Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3165883 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1965
Filing dateJun 14, 1962
Priority dateJun 14, 1962
Publication numberUS 3165883 A, US 3165883A, US-A-3165883, US3165883 A, US3165883A
InventorsLa Bossiere Edgar L, Nash Harold W, Torok Albert M
Original AssigneeLnt Entpr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fast draw timer
US 3165883 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 19, 1965 H. w. NASH ETAL 3,165,883

FAST DRAW TIMER Filed June 14. 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 l r m I- 1 rl 3 r i E: W i I a l I 4 r E 361 40 ff I I 4 1 Q I I L... I ,i 36 -30 INVENTORS.

JQLBEET M. Toeaz "yawn/7% 27 I rrakwsys.

3,165,883 FAST DRAW TIMER Harold W. Nash, Los Angeles, Edgar L. La Bossiere,

Gardena, and Albert M. Torok. Torrance, Calif., as-

signors-to LNT Enterprises, .Gardena, Calif., is copartnership l Filed June 14, 1962, Ser. No. 205,162

13 Claims. (Cl. 58-22.9)

This invention relates to a device for measuring elapsed time, and particularly to a timer device for use in connection with the measurement of elapsed time in practice gun draws.

So-called fast draw clubs have become increasingly popular. Various devices have been proposed for the measurement of elapsed time in gun draws. In some circumstances, electronics equipment of some substantial complexity is utilized for this purpose. The primary object of this invention is to provide a device for this purpose which is purely mechanical and which can be directly attached to the users wrist as is a wristwatch.

Another object of this invention is to provide a device of this character that is extremely simple in operation, and actuated or controlled by the movement of the arm away from and back to a starting horizontal position. For this purpose, use is made of a unique control device.

Another object of this invention is to provide a timer device of this character that is exceptionally rugged and durable and foolproof in operation.

This application is a continuation-in-part of our prior application Serial No. 65,978, filed October 31, 1960, now abandoned, and entiled Fast Draw Timer.

This invention possesses many other advantages, and has other objects which may be made more clearly apparent from a consideration of one embodiment of the invention. For this purpose, there is shown a form in the drawings accompanying and forming a part of the present specification, and which drawings, unless as otherwise indicated, are true scale. This form will now be described in detail, illustrating the general principles of the invention; but it is to be understood that this detailed description is not to be taken in a limiting sense, since the scope of this invention is best defined by the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

FIGURE l is a pictorial view of a device incorporating the present invention and placed upon the wrist of a user, the users arm being in a starting horizontal position;

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1, but illustrating the orientation of the device when the users arm is at or adjacent his gun holster;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged sectional View illustrating the component parts of the apparatus;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view on a slightly reduced scale and illustrating the parts in stopped position, corresponding to FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 4, but illustrating the apparatus in running position, corresponding to FIG. 2;

FIGS. 6, 7 and 8 are pictorial views illustrating respectively a weight, a cup and the dial forming a part of the present apparatus; and

FIGS. 9 and 10 are sectional views taken along planes corresponding to lines 99 and 1010 of FIG. 3.

Placed upon the wrist of a user is a case 10 of generally circular for-m having ears or lugs 11 at which the strap mounting pins 12 may be detachably secured in a conventional manner. The case may be made of metal, plastic or other suitable material. Closing a generally circular shallow recess 13 is a dial, face plate member or rotor 14. A central knob or hub portion 15 at the center of the annular dial may be angularly moved "ice by the user for purposes hereinafter described. Peripherally of the dial are scale markings 16 corresponding to, time intervals. The scale markings 16 denote elapse of time by cooperation with a pointer 17 imprinted, in

this instance, at the twelve-oclock position on the case.

The dial 14 is mounted for angular movement about its axis 18 and the axis of the recess 13 by the aid of a shaft 19. The inner end of the shaft is pivoted in a recess 20 extending inwardly from the bottom of the case or recess 13. The outer end of this shaft 19 projects through a through aperture 21 at the center of the dial 14. The coupling between the dial 14 and the shaft 19 is established by a yielding frictional grip. For this purpose, the outer end of the shaft 19 has a split formed by an axial cut 22. The normal diameter of the shaft 19 at its outer end is greater than the diameter of the dial recess 21. The shaft 19 furthermore is made of resilient, slightly flexible material. The coupling is thus established.

' In a manner presently to be described, the dial 14 is capable of movement through approximately one revolution at a limited rate, and the movement of the users arm from and to the position of FIG. 1 starts and stops the angular movement of the dial.

A coiled or convoluted spring 23 for providing the power to run the dial is accommodated in the case recess 13 immediately beneath the dial 14. Its inner end is anchored at the bottom of the axial cut 22 of the shaft 19, as shown most clearly in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5. The outer end of the spring 23 is anchored at an axial cut 24 in an anchor pin 25 formed integrally within the case 10. The pin 25 projects outwardly from the bottom of the case recess 13 at a place located between the axis 18 and the outer boundary of the recess 13. The end of the pin 25 clears the inner surface of the dial 14.

By manually rotating the dial 14 in one direction, that is, in a clockwise direction as viewed in FIGS. 1, 2, 4 and 5, the spring 23 is more tightly coiled and energy is therein stored. Accordingly, the spring 23 is capable of driving the dial in a counterclockwise direction.

In order to limit the rate of angular movement of the dial 14, damping means are provided. Yielding friction means in the form of slidably engaging parts could be provided. But since fluid friction is more predictable, a fluid coupling is provided instead.

A damping chamber is formed by a cup 26 which fits a recess 27 formed about the shaft 19 adjacent its piv-' oted end. The recess 27 is in the form of a step between the main case recess 13 and the shaft pivoting recess 20. The cup 26 fits the recess, and a chamber for fiuid F is formed about the shaft 19. The shaft 19 passes with minimum clearance through an aperture 28 in the bottom of the cup to prevent escape of fluid.

The shaft 19 has a circular flange 29, the flat righthand or outer side of which, as viewed in FIG. 3, is positioned adjacent the cup bottom. On the opposite side of the flange (see also FIG. 10) there are formed.

vanes 29 exposed in the chamber. Companion vanes 30 integrally formed on the case extend upwardly or outwardly of the bottom of the recess 27, as illustrated in FIG. 9. Fluid, such as silicone material or the like, establishes an hydraulic coupling between the case 10 and the shaft 19 by the aid of vanes 29' and 39. Relative rotation is thus resisted and the rate of angular movement of the dial 14 is limited.

To ensure appropriate operation, the cup 26 is prevented from moving angularly. For this purpose, the cup has a flange 31 extending radially outwardly from the base of the cup. This flange has a notch 32 (FIG. 8) that embraces the case pin 25. The flange 31 defines with the inner surface of the dial 14 a shallow space in which the spring 23 is accommodated.

In order to control the stop and start movement of '3 13 the dial 14 whereby an elapse of time can be measured, a weight 33 (see also FIG. 6) is provided. The weight 33 is generally of disk form and occupies the space between the cup flange 31 and the bottom of the cup recess 13. It'has a diameter less than that of the cup recess 13.

The weight 33 is mounted for pivotal movement whereby it may sense movement of the users arm from the horizontal position illustrated in FIG. 1. Thus, the weight 33 has an aperture 34 mounted upon an integrally formed projection or axle 35. The axle 35 projects upwardly or outwardly from the case recess 13. In this instance, the axle 35 is located between the pin 25 and the outer wall of the recess 13, as illustrated in FIG. 4., The weight is capable of oscillatory motion about the axis of the axle 35. Engagement of the rim of the disk 33 with the side walls of the recess 13 determines opposite limits to the movement of the weight 33.

The weight has a central aperture 36 to provide clearance about the cup 26 and an aperture 3'7 that provides clearance with respect to the pin 25 for all positions of the weight 33. Of course, the pin 25 or the cup 26 might be used to limit movement of the weight instead of the case periphery.

'The axle 35 is located at a place near, but angularly spaced from, the top of the case when the arm of the user is horizontal, as in FIG. 1. Thus, the axle 35 is located substantially at a one-oclock position. This weight tends to move to the right but is stopped by the righthand side of the case recess. The eccentric relationship of weight and case is illustrated in FIG. 4. With reference to the case 10, the weight 33 is at a counterclockwise- 'most position about the axle 35.

When the arm of the user is moved from the horizontal position of FIG. 1 downwardly toward the position of FIG. 2, the weight 33 relative to thes case 10 shifts, as indicated in FIG. 5, and the Weight moves to the opposite limited position illustrated. When a draw is made and completed, the arm of the user will move from the horizontal position of FIG. 1 downwardly and back to the position of FIG. 1. Correspondingly, the weight 33 Willmove from the relative position of FIG. 4 to the relative position of FIG. 5 and finally back to the relative position of FIG. 4. This movement thus controlsthe angular motion of the dial 14.

i For this purpose, the weight 33 has integrally formed thereon a detent or dog 38. The detent is formed by bending up a triangular portion at one side of an oblique slot cut at the periphery of the weight 33. The detent 38 extends upwardly from the plane of the weight and toward the case dial 14.

The dial 14 on its inner surface has a series of teeth 39 that are circularly arrayed about the axis 18 and capable of cooperation with the detent 38 to stop or release the dial. The teeth 39are formed in a slotted circular flange that peripherally encompasses the spring 23 and flange of the cup 26, as illustrated in FIG. 3. The teeth 39 are, however, located substantially inwardly of the peripheral wall of the case recess 13. When the weight 33 is in the position of FIG. 5, the projection or detent 38 peripherally clears all of the teeth 39. However, in the position of FIG. 4, the detent 38 is positioned in the path of movement of the teeth. When the detent clears, the dial 14 is released, and when the detent is moved into the path of the teeth, the dial is stopped.

The leading surfaces 39a of all of the teeth save the first tooth 40, that is, the surfaces facing in thedirection toward which the spring 23 moves the dial 14, are slightly reentrant in order that the force exerted by the spring 23 imposes a reaction on the detent 38, having a substantial inward component. Thus, the action of the spring 23 is positively to lock the detent in place until the force exerted by the spring is deliberately released by retraction of the dial 14. Accordingly, the reading at the pointer 17 may be taken without any hazard of losing the measurement thus obtained.

v gins virtually instantaneously.

At the starting position, however, the detent 38 is only very delicately engaged and. the spring 23 does not preclude movement of the weight away from locking position. Thus, the first tooth 40 has its leading surface sloped in the opposite direction, as at 40a, so that upon the slightest movement of the weight from the position of FIG. 4, the dial is freed. Measurement of elapsed time thus be- In operation, after a reading is completed, the dial 14 is returned to the starting position illustrated in FIG. 4 for engagement of the detent 38 with the leading surface 43a of the tooth 40. At this position, adequate energy is stored in the spring 23 to cause the dial to move through one revolution. In order to facilitate the placement of the detent 38 at the leading surface of the first tooth 40, a stop in the nature of a radial bar 41 is formed in the cover just beyond the tooth 40. As the force is applied upon the dial 14 against the action of the spring 23 and in the direction of the arrow 42 in FIG. 4, the detent 38 by cam action rides upwardly, outwardly and over the teeth 39 and finally over the tooth 40. Ultimately the stop bar 41 engages the detent 38. The dial 14 is then carefully released when the arm of the user is horizontally held, as viewed in FIG. 1, so that the leading face 40a of the tooth 40 then engages the detent. When the draw starts, the detent 38 moves and the dial rotates. When the draw is completed, the detent 38 enters imme diately between the teeth then adjacent the detent. The pointer 17 indicates elapsed time.

The angular motion of the dial 14 can be made faster or slower by controlling the tension of the'spring 23. This may be accomplished by coiling or uncoiling the spring while the dial 14 is held stationary. To achieve this, a narrow blade screwdriver or the like may be inserted in the end of the axial cut 22 of the shaft, the dial 14 restrained, and the shaft together with the anchored end of the coil spring 23 rotated until the desired'tension is achieved. For the use of the apparatus by personsof lesser skill, the rate of angular motion of the dial may purposely be small by virtue of such adjustment. The parts are so designed that for one setting of the spring, the dial 14 rotates at the very slow rate of one revolution in two or three seconds, and for another setting of the spring, rotates at the faster rate of, say, one revolution in somewhat less than a second. The markings 16 in any case display time increments of the order of fractions of a second.

The inventors claim:

'1. In a fast draw timer: a case member; means for attaching the case member to the arm of a user; a movable member mounted by the case member for movement in a path fixed with respect to the case; power means interposed between the case member and the movable memher for urging the movable member in one direction in its path; movable means sensitive to the orientation of the case member with respect to the horizontal for releasing and stopping the movable member; means controlling the speed of the movable member so that the movable member assumes a number of discernible positions during the running time of the order of a second; and pointer means carried by one of the members for indicating time increments of the order of fractions of a second and corresponding to successive positions of the movable member.

2. In a fast draw timer: a case having provisions for attachment to the wrist of a user; said case having a recess; a generally circular dial plate; means mounting said dial plate on the case for angular movement about an axis transverse to said dial plate; said dial plate forming a cover for said recess; a spring in the recess and connected to the case and the dial plate for urging the dial plate in one direction; yielding means reacting between the dial plate and a wall of the recess for limiting the rate of angular movement of the dial plate; said dial plate having a series of teeth exposed in the recess; and

a weight pivoted on the case and having a part movable into and out of the path of movement of the teeth in accordance with the orientation of the case for stopping and releasing the dial plate.

3. The combination as set forth in claim 2 together with stop means for determining a limit to the angular movement of said rotor in the other direction, said stop means when operable positioning one of said teeth for engagement with said weight part, all of the other teeth having leading surfaces oriented so that the spring normally urges the weight part, once engaged, more firmly into engaged position.

4. The combination as set forth in claim 3 in which said reacting means comprises viscous fluid, and means for confining the viscous fluid in the recess.

5. In a fast draw timer: a case having provisions for attachment to the wrist of the user, and having a circular recess; a circular dial fitting the recess and having a central aperture; said dial having an inner side exposed in the recess; a shaft having one end pivoted at the bottom of said recess and its other end frictionally engaged in said central aperture; a cup forming with the bottom of the case recess, a fluid chamber; the shaft extending through said chamber; vane means carried by the shaft and the case and exposed in the cup in opposed relationship to each other; fluid in the cup forming a hydraulic coupling between the vane means; a disk pivoted on the case for limited swinging movement in the recess in accordance with the orientation of the case with respect to the horizontal; and a drive spring in the recess and urging the dial in one angular direction; said dial having a series of teeth at its inner side arrayed circularly about the shaft for movement in a circular path; said disk having a projection movable into and out of the path of the teeth for stopping and releasing the dial.

6. In a fast draw timer: a case having provisions for attachment to the wrist of the user, and having a circular recess; a circular dial fitting the recess and having a central aperture; said dial having an inner side exposed in the recess; a shaft having one end pivoted .at the bottom of said recess and its other end frictionally engaged in said central aperture; a disk pivoted on the case for limited swinging movement in the recess in accordance with the orientation of the case with respect to the horizontal; and a drive spring in the recess and urging the dial in one angular direction; said dial having a series of teeth at its inner side arrayed circularly about the shaft for movement in a circular path; said disk having a projection movable into and out of the path of said teeth for stopping and releasing the dial.

7. In a fast draw timer: a case having provisions for attachment to the wrist of the user, and having a circular recess; a circular dial fitting the recess, and having a central aperture; a shaft having one end pivoted at the bottom of the recess; the other end of said shaft having an axial cut, and frictionally engaged in said aperture of said dial plate; and a coiled spring having its inner end anchored at the bottom of said shaft cut, and its outer end attached to the case and providing motive power for said dial; the end of said cut being accessible exteriorly for insertion of a narrow tool whereby the spring force exerted on the dial at a given position of the dial is adjusted.

8. In a fast draw timer: a case having provisions for attachment to the wrist of the user, and having a circular recess; a circular dial fitting the recess, and having a central aperture; a shaft having one end pivoted at the bottom of the recess; the other end of said shaft having an axial cut, and frictionally engaged in said aperture of said dial plate; a coiled spring having its inner end anchored at the bottom of said shaft cut, and its outer end attached to the case and providing motive power for said dial; the end of said out being accessible exteriorly for insertion of a narrow tool whereby the spring force exerted on the dial at a given position of the dial is adjusted; and yielding means retarding the angular movement of said dial.

9. In a fast draw timer: a case having provisions for attachment to the wrist ofthe user, and having a circular recess; a circular dial fitting the recess, and having a central aperture; a shaft having one end pivoted at the bottom of the recess; the other end of said shaft having an axial cut, and frictionally engaged in said aperture of said dial plate; a coiled spring having its inner end anchored at the bottom of said shaft cut, and its outer end attached to the case and providing motive power for said dial; the end of said out being accessible exteriorly for insertion of a narrow tool whereby the spring force exerted on the dial at a given position of the dial is adjusted; yielding means retarding the angular movement of said dial; and means responsive to the orientation of the case for releasing and stopping the dial.

it). In a fast draw timer: a case having provisions for attachment to the wrist of the user; a dial; means mounting the dial on the case for angular movement; a weight mounted on the case for limited movement in a path and urged by gravity toward one limited position when the users arm is horizontal, and toward another limited position when the users arm is away from horizontal; said dial having a series of teeth arrayed in a circle intersecting said path whereby the motion of the dial is locked or released in accordance with the position of the weight; and means for driving the dial in one direction.

1 1. The combination as set forth in claim 10 together with a stop carried by the dial for determining a starting position of said dial in which said weight is positioned for cooperation with one of said teeth, and in which only the other teeth have leading surfaces producing by reaction upon said weight, a force thereon maintaining it in locked position under the force of said driving means.

12. The combination as set forth in claim 10 together with a stop carried by the dial for determining a starting position of said dial in which said weight is positioned for cooperation with one of said teeth, and in which only the other teeth have leading surfaces producing by reaction upon said weight, a force thereon maintaining it in locked position under the force of said driving means, the teeth having trailing surfaces producing by reaction upon said weight, a force thereon urging it toward released position as the dial is retracted against the force of said driving means.

13. In a fast draw timer: a case member; means for attaching the case member to the arm of a user; a movable member mounted by the case member for movement in a path fixed with respect to the case; power means interposed between thecase member and the movable memher for urging the movable member in one direction in its path; movable means sensitive to the orientation of the case member with respect to the horizontal for releasing and stopping the movable member; means controlling the speed of the movable member so that the movable member assumes a number of discernible positions during the running time of the order of a second; pointer means carried by one of the members for indicating time increments of the order of fractions of a second and corresponding to successive positions of the movable member; and means for adjusting the rate of angular movement of the movable member.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1712013 *Sep 22, 1925May 7, 1929Robert WatsonAutomobile clock
US2427961 *Jul 1, 1946Sep 23, 1947Julius SchonholtzWatch dial construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3541781 *Sep 9, 1968Nov 24, 1970Bloom Walter LApparatus for measuring time spent standing or walking
US4187671 *Nov 14, 1977Feb 12, 1980Ebauches Electroniques S.A.Electronic watch with reaction timer
Classifications
U.S. Classification368/97, 968/833
International ClassificationG04F7/04, G04F7/00, G04F7/06
Cooperative ClassificationG04F7/06
European ClassificationG04F7/06