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Publication numberUS3166132 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1965
Filing dateJun 22, 1961
Priority dateJun 22, 1961
Publication numberUS 3166132 A, US 3166132A, US-A-3166132, US3166132 A, US3166132A
InventorsJack Bradley Billie, Lenahan Thomas P, Limbaugh Allen H
Original AssigneeHalliburton Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Grouting tool
US 3166132 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan- 19 1965 T. P. LENAHAN r-:TAL

GRou'rING Toor.

Filed June 22, 1961 HG2 H64 M A TTORNE Ys United States Patent O 3,166,132 GRQU'HNG TOOL v Thomas P. Lenahan, Billie .lack Bradley, and Allen H. Limbaugh, Duncan, Okia., assignors. to Halliburton Company, Duncan, Okla., a corporation of Delaware Filed June 22, 1961, Ser. No. 118,850 7 Claims. (Cl. 17E-235) This invention relates to a method and apparatus for grouting unconsolidated formations and, more particularly, to a method and apparatus for drilling a hole and injecting grouting material to consolidate the soil around the drill hole. y

One method for improving the load bearing characteristics of subsoil containing substantial quantities of sand, clay or gravel is to permeate the subsoil with groutto form a large, solid mass which is capable of withstanding heavy loads. The large mass of consolidated soil also prevents lateral slippage, for example, on hillsides.

The usual method of grouting is to drive a pipe into the soil by pumping water down through the pipe and out through a nozzle mounted on the end of the pipe. The stream of Water issuing from the nozzle washes away the earth and the pipe falls downward into the resulting cavity. When the bottom of the pipe has reached the desired depth, the ow of Water is stopped and grouting material is then pumped through the pipe and out atthe bottom, permeating the surrounding soil. When it has hardened, the consolidated earth forms a foundation which has increased bearing strength and is resistant to lateral slippage.

V.The grouting tools heretofore proposed have several limitations. Since al1 of the grouting material must be forced through the jet at the bottom of the pipe, it takes a considerable amount of time to inject the grouting material into the bore hole. The penetration and distribution of the grouting material, also, is extremely limited since it isinjected at a single point. i

'Attempts have been made to improve the distribution of grout in the drill hole by using compound pipe. The inner pipe conducts water for drilling and the outer pipe, which is provided with holes along its length, distributes grouting material. This method is not practical, however, since compound pipe is heavy and expensive.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a method and apparatus for uniformly distributing grout in a bore hole. y v

It is a further object of this invention to provide a grouting tool which permits the rapid injection of grout in a bore hole.

Another object of this invention is to provide a grouting tool which is adapted to be mounted on standard drill pipe.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of this invention, the grouting tool has a easing which is secured to a length of pipe. A nozzle is secured to the bottom ice pumped into the pipe it flows outward through the screen vand longitudinal slots. This permits a higher rate of flow of thegrouting material than is possible through the jet and results in a larger distribution of the grouting material along the length of the bore hole.

This preferred embodiment ofthe invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1V is an elevational view of a grouting tool suspended in a bore hole. A

FIGURE 2 is a cross sectional view of the grcuting tool. A

FIGURE 3 is a cross sectional view of the lower'portion of the grouting tool showing the tool during a drilling operation.

FIGURE 4 is a cross sectional view of the upper portion of the grouting tool showing a sinker bar and snap ring in engagement with the tube. V

FIGURE 5 is a cross section-al View of the grouting tool showing the tool during grouting.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, referring to FIGURES 1 and 2, a casing 1 is threadably secured to a well pipeZ by means of a connector 3. The casing 1 is provided with a plurality of longitudinal slots 4 spaced around the circumference of the pipe. A tubular screenV 5 is secured to the interior of the casing and extends along the length of the slots 4L The screen 5 is a composite, water-well type screen'with a layer of heavy mesh screen adjacent the slots and -a layer of iine mesh screen adjacent the interior of the casing 1. The mesh of theV screen is suiiiciently line to prevent sand or soil from the well bore from entering the casing 1 but not fine enough to prevent the liowA of grout outward through the screen 5. v

A valve body 6 is threadably secured to the lower end of the casing 1. The valve body 6 is provided with a central bore 7 which communicates with the interior of the casing 1. An enlarged portion of the bore 7 forms a seat 8 for a tube 9 which is telescoped within the casingnl and connector 3. The tube 9 has substantially the same outer diameter as the inner diameter of the connector 3. O-rings 10 and 11 mounted on the tube 9 cooperate with the connector 34 and valve body 6, respectively, to form a seal to'prevent the ow of uid into the space between the interior of the casing 1 and the outside of tlie tubeV 9;

A nozzle 12 is threadably secured to the lower end of the valve body 6. The interior of the nozzle 12 and the g lower portion of the valve body 6 form a cage for a ball 1 base 14 by the legs of the base which extend through the of the casing and longitudinal slots are provided around i the circumference of the casing above the nozzle. A screen is mounted on the inside of the pipe'adjacent to the slots. A removable tube is mounted within the casing to block the ow of Huid through the slots inthe casing. The tool is held in a vertical position and water is pumped through the nozzle to drill a hole forthe pipe. When the desired depth is reached, the ow of water is stopped and asinker bar with a snap ring on its nose is run down the pipe to retrieve the tube. The upper end of the tube is provided with an interior iiange which is engaged by the snap ring to facilitate removal of the tube. A ball is then dropped into the pipe to rest on a seat above the nozzle to prevent grouting material from flowing out through the nozzle. When the grouting material is slots 17 in the tube. vA ball 18 is secured to the opposite end of the tube 16 and a spring 19, which is confined within the tube 16, exerts a force on the base 14 to' urge the ball against a seat 20 in the valve body 6. The spring closes the` valve 13 to prevent fluid from ilowing back into the casing 1 through the nozzle 12 when there is no drill iiuidflowing through the bore 7. The lower end of the nozzle 12 is provided withV an'orice 21`to permit fluid to ow out through the end of the pipe.

The interior of the tube 9 is provided With a cylindrical recess Vportion 22 of an Venlarged diameter. The top of the cylindrical recess portion 22 forms an internal ange 23. The interior of the tube 9 is sufficiently large ito permit a sinker bar 24 to be inserted into the tube, as shown in FIGUREA. The sinker Vbar 24 isk provided with a snap ring 25. The ysnap ring is compressed by. a tapered portion 26 at the top of the tube 9 and Vthe snap ring 25 expands when it enters the cylindrical recess portion 2v2.

l As the sinker bar 24 is raised, the snap ring 25 engages Patented Jan. 19, 1965 is necessary to block the bore 7. "This is accomplished,

as shown in FIGURE 5, by'dropping a ball 27 down Vthrough the pipe 2. The ball is large enough to become lodged on the seat 8 of the valve body 6,thereby .acting as a valve to prevent grout from owing out: through the bore 7.` Y

In, operation, the tool is assembled as shown in FIG- URE 2 and a hose 28 is attached to the top of the pipe 2. Water, or other drill huid, is pumped through 'a hose 28, into the pipe2 and through the casing-1. The -pres' sure of the water on the ball 18 causes the check valve 13 to open, permitting the water to ow through the nozzle 12 and outvof the bottom of the pipe through the ori- The stream of water issuing from the nozzle 12 washes away the soil at the bottom of Vthe hole, forces it up along the sidesl of the casing 1 and out at the top of the hole, as shown in FlGURE 1. The screens 5 prevent sand from entering the casing and from becoming packed around the tube 9. An accumulation of sand or debris between the casing 1 and the tube 9 is undesirable, since it might form an obstructionto the removal of the tube 9. At this time there is no ow of WaterV through the slots 4 since O-rings 10y and 11 on the tube 9 seal the slots 4 from the interior of the casing 1. Y

When the desired depthk hasbeen reached, the water is shut off and due to the drop in water pressure the check valve 13 closes. A isinker bar 24 with a snapvring on itsnose is run down the pipe 2 .to retrieve the tube 9. After the tube is removed from the pipe, a ball 27 is dropped down the pipe. The ball lodges on the seat 8 of the valve body 6 to prevent 'the flow of grouting material through the bore 7 of the valve body. The grouting material is then injected into the pipe and owsfoutw-ard through the screens 5 and the rslots 4 in the ,side

of the casing 1. The valve 13 prevents the Vreturn ow of thegrouting material into the casing through the nozzle 12.

After the grout has been injected in the well bore, the pipe can be removed from the Well and reused, or it can remain in the well supported by Ithe consolidated subsoil. Since the exterior surface Yof the grouting tool Vdoes not have any projections which would resist the removal K of the tool, it can be easily raised .from the well bore immediately after the grout has been applied.

There are kseveral advantages in pumping the grouting material through the slots in thesidefof the pipe 1 rather than through the nozzle 12. One important advantage is that the flow area through the Vscreen is much greater than through the nozzle and the' grouting material can be pressure streamof uid for drilling and injecting groutl over la large area, sequentially.`

While the invention has beenillustrated and described in one embodiment, it is recognized that variations and changes may be made therein without departing from the invention as setforth inthe claims.

We claim:

1. Apparatus for drilling wells and forinjectng grout ing materials into unconsolidated subsoil formations comprising a casing, means for securing the casing to the end of aconduih said casing having apertures in the wall thereof, a nozzle secured tothe end of the casing for directing a stream of uid downwardly toerode theV soil beneath -the pipe, valve means in the nozzle, a tube telescoped within the casing in iuid sealing relation across said apertures, means for removing the tube, and means for shutting otf outward fiow of fluid through the nozzle when the tube is removed.

V2. Apparatus for drilling wells and for injecting grouting `materials into unconsolidated subsoil formations comprising a casing, means for secung the casing to the end of a conduit, said casing having longitudinal,

slots extending through the wall thereof, a screen secured to the inside of the casing over the slots, a nozzle secured to the end of the casing for directing a stream of tluid downwardly to erode the soil beneath the pipe, a sleeve valve mounted in the casing for preventing ow of fluid through the' slots, a check valve in the nozzle for.pre venting reverse ilow of uidfrom the nozzle to the casing and means for'opening the sleevevalve.

f 3. Apparatus for drilling wells and for injecting grout- .Y ing materials into unconsolidated subsoil formations ,j to the end of the casing for directing a stream of iluid downwardly to erode the soil beneath the pipe, a sleeve valve mounted in the casing for preventing flow of fluid through the slots, said casing having a valve seat therein forV engagement by the sleeve valve, a check valve inv the nozzle for preventing reverse flow of iluid from the nozzle to the casing and means for opening Athe sleeve valve.

4. Apparatus for drilling wells and for injecting grouting materials into unconsolidated subsoil formations comprising a'casing, means for securing said casing to the end of a conduit, said casing having longitudinal slots extending through the wall thereof, a screen secured to the inside of the casing over'the slots, a nozzle secured to the end of the casing for directing a stream ofV uid downwardly to erode the soil beneath the pipe,.a sleeve valve mounted in the casing Kfor preventing ow of fluid through the slots, a check valve in the nozzle for preventing reverse ow of lluid from the nozzle to the casing, means for opening the sleeve valve and'means for selectively blocking llow` of fluid from the casing through the nozzle whereby after the sleeve is opened, fluid is directed from the casing through the slots.

Y 5. lApparatus for drilling wells and for injecting grout ing materials into unconsolidated subsoil formations comprising a casing, means for :securing said casing to the end of a conduit, said casing having longitudinal slots extending through the wall thereof, a screen secured to the inside of the casing over the slots, a nozzle secured to theend of the casing for directing a stream ofuid downwardly to erode the soil beneath the pipe, said casing having a valve seat therein, a tube telescoped in the casing and extending along the slots, sealing means between the tube and the casing for preventing fluid flow from the casing through the slots, said tube engaging the valve seat, aV check valve in the nozzle for. preventing reverse flow of fluid from the nozzle to the casing and means for removing the tube from the casing.

n 6. Apparatus for drilling wells and for injecting groutlng materials into unconsolidated subsoil formations comprlslng a casing, means for securing said casing to the end of a conduit, said casing having longitudinal slots extending through the wall thereof, a screen secured to the inside of the casing over the slots, a nozzle secured to the end of the casing for directing a stream of iiuid downwardly to erode the soil beneath the'pipe, said casing having a valve seat therein, a tube telescoped in the casing and extending along the slots, sealing means between the tube and the casing for preventing fluid flow from the casing through the slots, said tube engaging the valve seat, a check valve in the nozzle `for preventing reverse ow of fluid from the nozzle to the casing, means for removing the tube from the casing and a plug cooperating with the valve seat to block the ow of uid from the casing through the nozzle after the tube is removed.

7. Apparatus for drilling Wells and for injecting grouting materials into unconsolidated subsoil formations comprising'a casing, means for securing the casing to the end of a conduit, said casing having apertures in the Wall thereof, a nozzle secured to the end of the easing for directing a stream of Huid downwardly to erode the soil beneath the pipe, one-Way Valve means for allowing fluid iioW out of the nozzle, but preventing liuid flow into the casing through the nozzle, means extending across the apertures in fluid sealing relation with the casing,

means for selectively removing the sealing means to per: mit fluid ilow through the apertures, and meansV for 15 2,924,948

shutting olf outward oW of i'luid through the nozzle after the sealing means is removed. Y

References Cited in the le of this patent UNTED STATES PATENTSw 277,695 Edson Mayk 15, 1883 1,279,783 Stirling Sept. 24, 1918 1,449,672 Hallvarson Mar. 27, 1923 2,185,522 Rollins Jan. 2, 1940 2,321,318 Reist'le ,Iune 8, 1943 2,387,602 Bannister Oct. 16, 1945 2,774,569 Jacobsen .De'c. 18, '1956 2,785,875 Hayes Mar. 19, 1957 2,890,169 Prokop June 9, ,1959

Mueller Feb. 16, 1960v

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US277695 *Feb 7, 1883May 15, 1883 Jakvis b
US1279783 *Mar 5, 1918Sep 24, 1918Robert StirlingMethod and apparatus for controlling and pumping oil-wells.
US1449672 *May 17, 1922Mar 27, 1923William Hallvarson PeterTool for making and repairing casings for wells, boreholes, or the like
US2185522 *Oct 28, 1937Jan 2, 1940Rollins Leon FWell flow controlling device
US2321318 *Sep 27, 1939Jun 8, 1943Standard Oil Dev CoWashdown device for inserting pipe into granular material
US2387002 *Jun 24, 1942Oct 16, 1945Bannister Clyde EApparatus for cementing the wall of an earth boring
US2774569 *Apr 5, 1954Dec 18, 1956Jacobsen Karl Oscar FEarth moving hydraulic suction nozzles
US2785875 *Dec 20, 1954Mar 19, 1957Hayes Charles MJet reamer
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3630036 *Dec 19, 1969Dec 28, 1971Tot Aanneming Van Werken VoorhElongated element to be driven into the ground together with a shoe
US6145603 *Jun 11, 1998Nov 14, 2000Sandvik AbExtension drilling system
US6966375 *Jun 8, 2004Nov 22, 2005Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Downhole surge pressure reduction and filtering apparatus
US7270181 *Oct 7, 2005Sep 18, 2007Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Downhole surge pressure reduction and filtering apparatus
US7487831Jul 16, 2007Feb 10, 2009Weatherford/Lamb, Inc.Downhole surge pressure reduction and filtering apparatus
DE3838534A1 *Nov 14, 1988May 17, 1990Willich F Berg BautechnikMethod and installation for renewing areas covered with large concrete slabs
DE102007045979A1 *Sep 25, 2007Apr 9, 2009Tracto-Technik Gmbh & Co. KgDrilling device for inserting sensor into ground, has valve body for allowing withdrawal of drilling fluid from outlet opening in position and allowing withdrawal of drilling fluid from another outlet opening in another position
DE102007045979B4 *Sep 25, 2007Sep 16, 2010Tracto-Technik Gmbh & Co. KgBohrvorrichtung und Verfahren zum Einbringen einer Bohrung in das Erdreich
Classifications
U.S. Classification175/235, 166/290, 175/315, 175/237, 175/314
International ClassificationE21B33/138, E21B7/18
Cooperative ClassificationE21B33/138, E21B7/18
European ClassificationE21B7/18, E21B33/138