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Publication numberUS3166323 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1965
Filing dateFeb 9, 1962
Priority dateFeb 9, 1962
Publication numberUS 3166323 A, US 3166323A, US-A-3166323, US3166323 A, US3166323A
InventorsAnderson Amy W
Original AssigneeAlvan J Schmedlin Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pocketed ball game with projecting means
US 3166323 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 19, 1965 T. A. ANDERSON Filed Feb. 9, 1962 POCKETED BALL. GAME WITH PROJECTING MEANS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG.|

||' Nil II lll/APilA/IHH" 7 3 I l9 l2 ll" x\ FIG.2

INVENTOR.

THOR A. ANDERSON 3W ATTORNEY.

Jan. 19, 1965 T. A. ANDERSON POCKE'I'IED BALL. GAME WITH PROJECTING MEANS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 9, 1962 7 m w EA w FIG.4

FIG

INVENTOR, FIG 5 THOR A ANDERSON ATTORNEY.

United States Patent ()1 3,166,323 POCKETED BALL GAME WITH PRQJECTING MEANS Thor A. Anderson, 500 Brookside Drive, Fairfield, Conn.; Amy W. Anderson, executrix of said Thor A. Anderson, deceased, assignor of one-half to Aivan .I. Schmedlin, In, Trumbull, Conn.

Filed Feb. 9, 1962, Ser. No. 172,166 8 Ciaims. (Cl. 273119) The present invention relates to amusement devices, and particularly to a new and improved pocket-ball game of the surface projectile type.

The principal object of the invention is to provide a surface projectile type of game having the capacity to effect the pocketing of a plurality of balls in random fashion.

Another object of the invention is to provide such a game in which the number of pockets for receiving balls is less than the number of balls employed.

Still another object of the invention is to provide such a game in which a chart is used with it on which wagers may be placed and which chart discloses the betting odds for each individual ball.

Another object of the invention is to provide such a game in which the balls have imparted to them an orbital motion at one elevation and, while orbiting, are gravitated to a lower elevational track where pocket means are provided for receiving certain ofsaid balls as they move about their lower orbital path. i

In one aspect of the invention, a base may include a cylindrical chamber and a centrally disposed, rotatable post; The wall of the chamber may include an annular track intermediate to the ends of the side wall of said chamber. i

In another aspect ofthe invention, pocket means may be provided in communication with said track, and ball expelling means may beincluded with said pocket means for clearing the ballsfrom said pocketmeans. p

In still another. aspect'of the invention, a disk maybe mounted on said post for rotation relative to the post andin a manner to permit axial movement of the-disk relative to the post I 3,166,323 Patented Jan. 19, 1965 ice r 16 may be mounted centrally of the bottom 14 and it disk 18 when it is spun.

. In still another aspect of the invention, resilient means may be provided for normally holding said disk in an upper position where its peripheral edge blocks.,the balls from entering the annular: track. r V

In still another aspect of theinvention, the disk may iilcllld a toothed member adapted to impart to the balls an orbital motion 'as'the post and disk are spun.

The above, other objects and novel features of the invention will become apparent from the following specification and accompanying drawings which are merely exemplary.

Inthe drawings:

of theinvention have been applied;

. FIG. 1 is a plan view of a game to which the principles FIG. 2 is a sectionalv elevational viewtaken substan- V tially along line 22 ofFI G. 1;

FIG. 3 is'a plan view of a modified form of the inven tionj FIG. 4 is a broken-away portion of the device shown in FIG.3;and T j i I a FIG. Sis a form of chart used with the devices shown in FIGS. 1 m4. 1

Referring to the drawings, and particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2, the principles of the invention areQshown as applied toalsurface projectile type of game device. comprising a base 10 which may include a cylindrical recess 11 therein and an annular track 12 formed within the may journal a vertically disposed post 15.

A sleeve 17 may be journaled on post 15, and it may have fixed to it a disk 18 that may be weighted at 19 and dynamically balanced to provide smooth rotation of the The post 15' may include an elongated groove 20 therein, and a pin or screw 21 in sleeve 17 may ride within said groove. The post 15' may be provided with a bore 22 within which a compression spring 23 may be located.

A cap 24 may be fixed to, and close the top end of cylinder 17. A knob 25 may be mounted on cap 24 and journaled in an antifriction bearing 25'. A disk 26 having a stem 27 may abut against the underside of cap 24, forcing sleeve 17 and disk 18 upwardly until screw 21 abuts the top edge of groove 20 in post 15'. In this normally upper position, the peripheral edge 28 of the disk 18 blocks the admission of balls 29 to the annular track 12. However, by spinning the sleeve 17 and disk 18, the balls 29 are thrown outward and orbit about the post 15'. By momentarily depressing sleeve 17, disk 18 is moved downwardly, permitting the balls 29 to move into, and travel around the track 12.

A chamber 30 may be provided otf one side of the track 12. The chamber 30 may be divided into a plu rality of stalls, and in the embodiment shown, three stalls 31, 32 and 33 are disclosed. The stalls 31, 32 and 33 are in open communication with track 12, and each is largeenough to admit only one of the balls 29. When the device is employed as a horse or dog racing game, stall 31 may be designated win; stall 32 place; and stall 33 show. The top surface 34 of the disk 18 may be slightly dished so that when not revolving, the balls 29 normally collect about a toothed disk-like member 35, the teeth 36 of which kick the balls to ensure their orbiting as they move radially outward.

When used as a dog racing game, eight balls 29 may be employed, each having a different color. With all.

into, and travel about track 12. This action of depressing knob 25 does not reduce the speed of rotation of disk 18 I because of the antifriction bearing 25 betweenknob 25 and cap 24. As this occurs, each of the stalls 31, 32;and

33 willbefilled with a-ball 29 at random. Accordingly,

it will be apparent which coloredball (dog) iwon, which placed, and which showed.

In order to remove the b 29 from the stalls 31, 32"

and 33, a three-prongedplunger37 maybe provided.

. It may include prongs 38, 39 and 40 aligned'with stalls 31, 32 and '33, respectively. A stem 41 may be connected to the prongs .38, 39 and 40and it may extend to the exterior of the base 10, supporting a knob 42 thereon. A-spring 42' abutting againstwall 43 of'base 10 and a' collar .44 fixed to the stem 41' normally urges the prongs 38, 39 and 40 into thestalls 31, 32 and 33. By withdrawing knob 42 rightwardly and releasing thesame, and

and top wall 15 of the recess 11. 'An antifriction' bearing with knob 25 depressedso that disk 18 is at its lowermost position, balls 29 withinfstalls 31, 32 and 33 are forcibly ejected onto the top surface of disk 18 and all other balls 29 within track 12 also roll ontodisk 18.

Releasing knob 25 again conditions the device to repeat a spinning operation and the. random movement of three balls 29 into the stalls 31, 32 and 33.

Referring to FIG; 5, a chart is shown listing the odds for win, fplace and fshowf as well ascolored squares corresponding to the eight different colors of the balls 29.

- balls adapted-to roll at random on ball-receiving means in communication with said track Thus, the odds as shown are 6:1 for win. For a bet on place the odds are 2:1 for win and 3:1 for place. For a bet on show the odds are 1:1 for win, 1:1 for place and 2:1 for show. The game is played by placing chips, money or the like on selected squares on the chart of FIG. 5, and by operating the game device.

Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4, a modified form of the invention is shown. It may comprise parts similar to those described in connection with FIGS. 1 and 2, with the exception of the stall locations and the means for ejecting the balls 29 therefrom. In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, the base may include three stalls 45', 46 and 47, each opening off the annular track 12. Another annular groove-like track 48 may be concentrically arranged relative to track 12. Track 48 may be divided from track 12 by a series of closely spaced pins 49 that are omitted across the communicating passage between track 12 and recess 11. A spring-like element St) may be anchored ona pin 51 and it may extend about track 48, thence through a passage 52 and an eye 53 fixed to a plate 54 removably attached to and covering a recess 55 in base 10. From the eye 53 the element 50 may be connected to a pin 56 that is attached to a knob 57. The knob 5'7 is provided with flanges 58 that ride .in a track means 59. Spring means an anchored on eye 53 and fixed to pin 56 normally urges knob 57 to the position shown in FIG. 4 with pin 56 abut-ting a stop 61.

The spring element 50 within groove 48 may include a scalloped construction including points 62,, 63 and 64 between the scallops. As the knob 57 is movedcloc kwise (FIGS. 3 and 4) by grasping it by the pointer finger with the thumb on a stop 65, the points 62, 63 and s4,

respectively, pass across the stalls 45, 46 and 47.simultaneously ejecting the balls 29 therein radially inward onto the top of disk 18' if it-has been depressed as, previously explained.

Referring again to FIG. 2, transparent window means 66 and 67' may cover, respectively, the top of the recess 11 of base itl, and the chambers 34), 45, 4-6 and 47.

Althoughthe various features of the new and improved game device have been shown and described in detail to fully disclose two embodiments of the invention, it will be evident that changes may be made. in suchdetails and certain features may-be used without others without departing'fromthe principles of the invention.

" What is claimed is: n v

e 1. In a game, a base; a circular chamber having aside wall with an upper extremity located within said base; a

1 post mounted in, and concentric with, said' chamber and extending vertically thereabove; an annular track means of a diametergreater than that of said chamber located within the side wall of said chamber, beneath the upper extremity of said side wall and in communication with chamber; a rotatable disk mounted on said post and adapted to be moved axially of said post between upper and lower limits; means for resiliently urging said disk to its upper position where its peripheral edge cooperates with the upper extremity of said chamber side wall to block access from said chamber to said track means; means for spimiing said disk when it is in its upper pesition; means for moving said disk to its lower position without substantially reducing its speed of rotation; balls adapted to roll at random on the top of said disk; ballreceiving means in conmmunication with said track means, whereby upon spinning said disk, the balls thereon are given a radially outward and orbital motion, and movement of said disk to. its lower limit causes said balls to enter said track means and ultimately to enter said ball-receiving means; and manually operable means for ejecting the balls from said ball-receiving means to said disk when said disk is at its lower limit.

3. In a game, a base; a circular chamber having a side wall with an upper extremity located within said base; a post mounted in, and concentric with, said chamber and extending vertically thereabove; an annular track means said chamber; a rotatable disk mounted on said post and adapted to be movedaxially ofsaid post between upper with the upper extremity of said the top of said disk;

means, whereby upon spinning said disk, the balls thereon are given a radially outward and orbital motion, and

movement of said disk to'its lower limit causes said balls to enter said track means and ultimately to enter said ball-,-

- and lower limits; means for resiliently urging said' disk to its upper position" where its peripheral edge cooperates to said track means;

of a diameter greater than that'of said chamber located within the side wall of said chamber, beneath the upper extremity of said side wall and in communication with said chamber; a rotatable, slightly disheddisk mounted on said post and adapted to be moved axially of said post between upper and lower limits; toothed means on said disk near the center thereof; means for resiliently urging said disk to its upper position where its peripheral edge 7 cooperates with the upper extremity of said chamber side wall to. block access from said chamber to said track means; balls adapted" to roll at random on the top of said disk; ball-receiving means in communication with said track means, whereby upon spinning said disk, the

halls thereon are given a radially outward and orbital motion, and movement of said disk to its lower limit causes said balls toenter said track means andiultimately to enter said ball-receiving means; and manually operable means located adjacent said ball-receiving means for ejecting the balls from said ball-receiving means to said disk when said disk is at its lower limit.

4. In a game, a base; a circular chamber having a side wall with an upper extremity located within said base; a

post mounted in, andconcentric with, said chamber and extending-vertically thereabove; an annular track means 1 of a diameter geater than that'of said chamber located J'Wltlllil the side wall of said chamber, beneath the upper extremity of said side wall and in. communication with a said chamber; a rotatable disk mountedo'n-fsaid' post and adaptedto'be moved axially'of said post between upper and lower limits; means for resiliently urging said disk to its upper position where its peripheral edge cooperates with the upper extremity of said chamber side wall to block access from said'chamber to said track means; balls adapted to'roll at random on thetop of said disk; closely spaced ball-receiving chambers in communication with said track means, whereby when said disk is moved to its lower limit, said;balls enter said track means and tiltia mately' entersaid ball-receiving chambers; a retractable -."member having a prong for eachof said ball-receiving pronged member-into a chambers; and resilient means-{normally urgingsaid position where said prongs enter 1 each of said'ba'll-receiving chambers, whereby upon operreceiving means; and manually operable means for ejecting the balls from s'aid'ball-receiving means to said disk when said disk is at its lower limit? ation of said retractable member and resilient means when said disk is in its lower position, said balls will be caused I to return to thetop of said diskirorn saidball-receiving 2'. In a game, a base; a circular chamber having ag'side wall with an upper'extremitywithin said base; a post mounted in, and concentric withsaid chamberand extend: a ing vertically thereabove; an annular track means o-f a diameter greaterthan that of said chamber located within the side wall of said chamber, beneath the upper extremity of said side wall and in communication with said wall with chambers.

' 5. In a game, abase; -a circular chamberhaving a side an upper extremity located within said base;

a post mounted in, and concentric. with, said chamber and extendingyertically thereabove; an annular ,trackmeansof a diameter greater than that of said chamber located with:

in the side wall of'said chamberpbeneaththe upper ex-- tremity of said side wall and in communication withsaid chamber; a rotatable disk mounted on said post and adapted to be moved axially of said post between upper and lower limits; means for resiliently urging said disk to its upper position where its peripheral edge cooperates with the upper extremity of said chamber side wall to block access from said chamber to said track means; means for spinning said disk when it is in its upper position; balls adapted to roll at random on the top of said disk; closely spaced ball-receiving chambers in communication with said track means; means for moving said disk to its lower position without substantially reducing its speed of rotation, whereby said balls enter said track means and ultimately enter said ball-receiving chambers; a retractable member having a prong for each of 'said ball-receiving chambers; and resilient means normally urging said pronged member into a position where said prongs enter each of said ball-receiving chambers, whereby upon operation of said retractable member and resilient means when said disk is in its lower position, said balls will be caused to return to the top of said disk from said ball-receiving chambers.

6. In a game, a base; a circular chamber having a side wall with an upper extremity located within said base; a post mounted in, and concentric with, said chamber and extending vertically thereabove; an annular track means of a diameter greater than that of said chamber located within the side wall of said chamber, beneath the upper extremity of said side wall and in communication with said chamber; a rotatable, slightly dished disk mounted on said post and adapted to be moved axially of said postbetween upper and lower limits; toothed means on said disk near the center thereof; means for resiliently urging said disk to its upper position where its peripheral edge cooperates with the upper extremity of said chamber side wall to block access from said chamber to said track means; means for spinning said disk when it is in its upper position; balls adapted to roll at random on the top of said disk; closely spaced ball-receiving chambers in communication with said track means; means for moving said disk to its lower position without substantially reducing its speed of rotation, whereby said balls enter said track means and ultimately enter said ball-receiving chambers; a retractable member having a prong for each of said ball-receiving chambers; and resilient means normally urging saidpronged member into a position where said prongs enter each of said ball-receiving chambers, whereby upon operation of said retractable member and resilient means when said disk is in its lower position, said balls will be caused to return to the top of said disk from said ball-receiving chambers.

7. In a game, a base; a circular chamber having a side wall with an upper extremity located within said base; a post mounted in, and concentric with, said chamber and extending vertically thereabove; an annular track means of a diameter greater than that of said chamber located within the side wall of said chamber, beneath the upper extremity of said side Wall and in communication with said chamber; a rotatable disk mounted on said post and adapted to be moved axially of said post between upper and lower limits; means for resiliently urging said disk to its upper position where its peripheral edge cooperates with the upper extremity of said chamber side wall to block access from said chamber to said track means; means for spinning said disk when it is in its upper position; balls adapted to roll at random on the top of said disk; ball-receiving chambers spaced about said base and in communication with said track means; means for moving said disk to its lower position without substantially reducing its speed of rotation, whereby said balls enter said track means and ultimately enter said ball-receiving chambers; an annular groove concentric with, and adjacent to said track means; a spring within said annular groove having spaced means adjacent each of said ballreceiving chambers, the construction and arrangement being such that as said spring is moved along said groove,

said spaced means thereon eject the balls within said ball receiving chambers; and resilient means normally urging said spring to a position such that said ball-receiving chambers can receive balls, whereby upon operation of said spring and resilient means when said disk is in its lower position, said balls will be caused to return to the top of said disk from said ball-receiving chambers.

8. In a game, a base; a circular chamber having a side wall with an upper extremity located within said base; a post mounted in, and concentric with, said chamber, and extending vertically thereabove; an annular track means of a diameter greater than that of said chamber located within the side wall of said chamber, beneath the upper extremity of said side wall and in communication with said chamber; a rotatable, slightly dished disk mounted on said post and adapted to be moved axially of said post between upper and lower limits; toothed means on said disk near the center thereof; means for resiliently urging said disk to its upper position where its peripheral edge cooperates with the upper extremity of said chamber side wall to block access from said chamber to said track means; balls adapted to roll at random on the top of said disk; ball-receiving chambers spaced about said base and in communication with said track means, whereby when said disk is moved to its lower limit, said balls enter said track means and ultimately enter said ball-receiving chambers; an annular groove concentric with, and adjacent to said track means; a spring within said annular groove having spaced means adjacent each of said ballreceiving chambers, the construction and arrangement being such that as said spring is moved along said groove, said spaced means thereon eject the balls within said ballreceiving chambers; and resilient means normally urging said spring to a position such that said ball-receiving chambers can receive balls, whereby upon operation of said spring and resilient means when said disk is in its lower position, said balls will be caused to return to the topof said disk from said ball-receiving chambers.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,069,248 8/13 Graves 273-119 1,491,961 4/24 Miller 273-142 1,560,496 11/25 Bakketun 273-119 1,657,163 1/28 Howe 273- 2,487,363 11/49 Olson 273-119 X 2,668,716 2/54 Morsch 273-110 3,057,625 10/62 Livingston 273-122 X 3,090,623 5/63 Dugan 273-121 X FOREIGN PATENTS 345,988 v12/21 Germany. 562,138 10/32 Germany.

DELBERT B. LOWE, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US1069248 *Sep 23, 1912Aug 5, 1913Cornelius W GravesGame.
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US1560496 *Apr 12, 1923Nov 3, 1925Bakketun Torger AGame
US1657163 *Apr 27, 1927Jan 24, 1928Howe Fred MGame
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US3057625 *Oct 7, 1960Oct 9, 1962Livingston Mary RGame apparatus
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*DE345988C Title not available
DE562138C *Oct 22, 1932Erich RicklefsKugelspiel, bei welchem die Kugeln von einem in der Mitte des Spieles befindlichen Rotationsteller nach am aeusseren Umfange des Spieles liegenden Gewinnfaechern laufen
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3419452 *Nov 6, 1964Dec 31, 1968Du PontProcess for bonding rubber to polyester structures
US3623723 *Jul 16, 1969Nov 30, 1971Helbach Charles EFinger manipulation game
US3658341 *Aug 28, 1970Apr 25, 1972Curtner Larry C ABall mixing device
US4162073 *Jul 15, 1977Jul 24, 1979Norris Patrick HHollow pyramid containing indicia-bearing spheres
US4906004 *Jan 9, 1989Mar 6, 1990Anton WenzelRandom number selector
US5029862 *Aug 30, 1990Jul 9, 1991Azrak-Hamway International, Inc.Overhead spinner
US5553851 *May 17, 1995Sep 10, 1996Quick Silver Development Co., Inc.Revolving rings gaming apparatus
US6105962 *Dec 15, 1998Aug 22, 2000Sierra Design GroupRotating disks slot machine
US6106394 *Jun 24, 1999Aug 22, 2000Furlong; RobinRandom character selector device
US6164647 *Nov 25, 1998Dec 26, 2000Chee; Ah-Him Chong TocCasino wheel game system
US6550767 *Apr 6, 2001Apr 22, 2003Chester L. PittmanChildren's toy
US8105148 *Nov 28, 2007Jan 31, 2012Benchmark Entertainment, LCAmusement game using vertical rotating wheel
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/119.00R, 273/277, 273/274, 273/142.00R, 273/129.00R, 273/144.00B
International ClassificationA63F5/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2250/186, A63F5/0088, A63F5/02
European ClassificationA63F5/02, A63F5/00P