Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3166773 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 26, 1965
Filing dateNov 2, 1962
Priority dateNov 2, 1962
Publication numberUS 3166773 A, US 3166773A, US-A-3166773, US3166773 A, US3166773A
InventorsFloyd A Wyczalek
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sonic surface cleaner
US 3166773 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 26, 1965 F. A. WYCZALEK 3,166,773

SONIC SURFACE CLEANER Filed Nov. 2, 1962 AIR SOURCE/:7?

f CLEANING UID URCE I I "IIIIIIIIIIIIIII/////////// 7 //IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII7I7IIIII//{K?(Q ///////iii// M A INVENTOR.

ATTpRNEY United States Patent 3,166,773 SQNIC SURFACE CLEANER Floyd A. Wyczalek, Birnfingham, Mich, assignor to General Motors Corporation, Detroit, Mich, a corporation of Delaware Fiied Nov. 2, 1962, Ser. No. 234,939 5 Claims. (CI. 97)

This invention concerns a surface cleaner that utilizes vibratory energy for loosening and removing dirt, grease or any other foreign matter from a surface.

In a co-pending patent application of Wyczalek and Drayer, Serial Number 211,599, filed July 23, 1962, and assigned to the assignee of this invention, a surface cleaner device is shown having a plurality of elongated projections extending into a chamber which is adapted to be supplied with a liquid. A vibrator is connected to the device and provides a high-frequency rotating force vector that causes gyration of the projections so as to create liquid cavitation in an area proximate the surface being cleaned. The liquid cavitation results in a cleaning action that dis+ seminates and dislodges any foreign particles adhering to the surface.

This invention contemplates an improved surface cleaner of the above-described type which is simplified in construction and provides a more durable and efficient operating structure. More specifically, the apparatus made in accordance with this invention is'characterized in that it has a diaphragm mounted to a surface-engaging ring member in a manner such as to provide a cavity for receiving a cleaning liquid. A vibrator is coupled to the diaphragm and serves to drive the latter at a high frequency so as to cause liquid cavitation at the surface to be cleaned. For optimum results the vibrator is operated at a frequency at or above 100 cycles per second and at the resonant frequency of the apparatus.

A more complete understanding of the invention can be derived from the description taken in conjunction with the following drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a partially sectioned elevation view of a surface cleaner made in accordance with the invention, and

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the apparatus shown in FIG- URE 1.

Referring now to thedrawings, a surface cleaner constructed in accordance with the invention is shown comprising in general an annular base member or rim it) which is integrally formed with a diaphragm 12, which in turn supports an air-driven vibrator 14 at the center thereof. A handle 16 includes a pair of diverging arms which are fixed to the upper surface of the base member 10 and provides for manual movement of thelower surface along the surface to be cleaned during a cleaning operation. The entire surface cleaner is made from metal and in order to permit flexing action of the diaphragm an annular groove 18 is formed in the upper surface of the cleaner body directly above the inner'wall 19 of the rim; the groove serving to reduce the metal thickness at this point. The inner wall 19 and the lower surface 20, of the diaphragm define a cavity which, as shown in FIG. 2, is circular in form and is connected through a pasage 22 and-a conduit 24 to a source of cleaning liquid 26. A metering valve 28 is provided in the conduit 24 for controlling the rate of liquid supply to the cavity. In order to assure that the cavity is substantially filled with the liquid during the operation of the surface cleaner, a porous liquid-retainingpad 30 having a configuration conforming to that of the cavity can be provided in the latter. In this instance a sponge is used, however it should be understood that any other material having a liquid-retaining ability may be provided in the cavity. It has been found that the closer the lower surface of the diaphragm is positioned to the surface being cleaned, the less need there is 3,166,773 Patented Jan. 26, l95

poses, however, it will suffice to say that this vibrator includes a roller-type mass 32 freely housed within a working chamber 34 that has side walls defined by a pair of apertured discs 36 fixedly secured to the vibrator housing. Compressed air from a source 38 is metered to the vibrator through a control valve 40 and is directed into the working chamber 34 by a nozzle so positioned that the air stream emanating therefrom strikes the roller 32 at a tangential attitude so as to drive the latter in an orbiting manner about the working chamber. In this instance, the roller is driven in a plane perpendicular to the diaphragm 12 and accordingly provides a rotating force vector which also is perpendicular to the diaphragm.

It should be apparent that in operating the above-described surface cleaner, the lower surface 17 thereof is placed in contact with a flat surface to be cleaned. The valve 28 is then opened to direct cleaning liquid 26 to the pad 30 and thereafter valve dti is opened to supply pressurized air to the vibrator 14. For most efiicient operation the vibrator is operated at a frequency equal to the resonant frequency of the apparatus resulting in vibratory energy being transmitted to the liquid and creating a multiplicity of liquid cavitating bubbles at the surface being cleaned. Each of the cavitating bubbles contains a vacuum of such magnitude that when it collapses on a central nucleus, an enormous force is developed which acts on the surface and accounts for the dissemination and dislodging of any foreign particles adhering to the surface. As is well known, cavitation is produced when vibratory energy is supplied to a liquid medium and a liquid particle is moved away from an adjacent liquid paritcle so as to cause a vacuolar surface to exist between thetwo adjacent particles. This effect can be produced by motion of particles in two opposite directions, or by motion of particles in the same direction so long as one particle has a greater velocity thanthe other.

It has been found that for successful operation of a surface cleaner of the above-described type, the diaphragm should be made thin enough in order to resonate at the the cavity. To those skilled in the art this, of course,

should be apparent. Nevertheless, it should be noted that in operating this apparatus, for optimum results the vibrator should be operated above cycles per second and at the resonant frequency of the assembly.

Finally, it should be noted that as in the case of the aforementioned patent application, the diameter of the roller in the vibrator is more than one-half the diameter of the confining or working chamber. It is important to Various changes and modifications can be made in the above-described device without departing from the spirit of the invention. It should be understood that such changes and modifications are contemplated by the inventor and he does not intend to be limited except by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A portable sonic apparatus for cleaning the surface of an article, comprising a rim having a surface-engaging portion, a planar diaphragm supported by the rim and defining a cavity with the latter so that the normal distance between the inner surface of the diaphragm and the surface-engaging portion is less than one-half the Width of the diaphragm, means for supplying liquid at a controlled rate to the cavity,.and a vibrator coupled to the diaphragm in vibration-transmitting relationship, said vibrator comprising a freely movable mass, means constraining said mass for movement in an orbital path perpendicular to said diaphragm, means for driving said mass in said orbital path at a frequency which causes the diaphragm to resonate in a mode that produces a plurality of nodal circles on the diaphragm With resultant liquid cavitation in an area proximate the surface to be cleaned.

2. A portable sonic apparatus for cleaning the surface of an article, comprising an annular rim having a surfaceengaging portion, a planar diaphragm supported by the rim and defining a cavity with the latter so that the normal distance between the inner surface of the diaphragm and the surface-engaging portion is less than one-half the diameter of the diaphragm, means for supplying liquid at a controlled rate to the cavity, and a vibrator coupled to the diaphragm in vibration-transmitting relationship, said vibrator comprising a freely movable mass, means constraining said mass for movement in an orbital path perpendicular to said diaphragm, means for driving said mass in said orbital path at a frequency above 100 cycles per second and in a frequency range that causes the diaphragm to resonate so as to produce a plurality of nodal circles on the diaphragm with resultant liquid cavitation in an area proximate the surface to be cleaned.

3. A portable sonic apparatus for cleaning the surface of an article comprising an annular rim having a surfaceengaging portion, a planar diaphragm connected to the rim and defining a cylindrical cavity with the latter so that 1 the normal distance between the inner surface of the dialiquid with the passage, a source of pressurized air, an airdriven vibrator coupled to the diaphragm, said vibrator comprising a freely movable mass, means constraining said mass for movement in an orbital path perpendicular to said diaphragm, conduit means connecting the air source with the vibrator, said vibrator adapted when energized to flex the diaphragm in a resonant mode to produce a plurality of nodal circles on the diaphragm with resultant liquid cavitation in an area proximate the surface to be cleaned.

4. A portable sonic apparatus for cleaning the surface of an article comprising a planar flexible diaphragm, a rigid rim integrally formed with the diaphragm at the periphery thereof and having a surface-engaging portion depending therefrom for locating the diaphragm proximate the surface to be cleaned, a cylindrical cavity defined by the diaphragm and the rim, a source of liquid, a passage formed in the rim for connecting said liquid source with the cavity, a vibrator connected to the center of said diaphragm on the side opposite the cavity, said vibrator comprising a housing having a working chamber, a roller provided in said chamber for orbital movement in a path perpendicular to the diaphragm, a source of compressed air connected to said housing for driving said roller in said orbital path, valve means provided between said source and said housing for admitting air to the latter to drive said roller at a frequency which causes the diaphragm to resonate in a mode that produces a plurality of nodal circles on the diaphragm with resultant liquid cavitation in the area proximate the surface to be cleaned, and a handle connected at diametrically opposite points to the rim for manually positioning the apparatus.

5. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein said cavity is filled with a sponge-type material.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,590,913 Adams Apr. 1, 1952 2,657,668 Maier Nov. 3, 1953 2,793,009 Peterson May 21, 1957 2,917,290 Peterson Dec. 15, 1959 2,975,448 Glaser Man 21, 1961 2,980,123 Lemelson Apr. 18, 1961 2,987,906 Bourland June 13, 1961 3,066,686 ONeili Dec. 4, 1962 3,089,790 Balamuth et al May l4, i963

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2590913 *May 26, 1948Apr 1, 1952Adams David HWindow cleaning and the like device
US2657668 *Jun 4, 1948Nov 3, 1953Nat Lead CoApparatus for impregnating and coating porous bodies
US2793009 *Dec 2, 1954May 21, 1957Edwin F PetersonMachine vibrator
US2917290 *Apr 25, 1957Dec 15, 1959Edwin F PetersonVibrator
US2975448 *Oct 5, 1956Mar 21, 1961Hans GlaserDevice for removing stains from fabrics by beating with simultaneous treatment with cleaning fluid
US2980123 *Nov 14, 1955Apr 18, 1961Jerome H LemelsonUltrasonic apparatus
US2987906 *Aug 26, 1958Jun 13, 1961Bourland William NDevice for removing stains from fabric
US3066686 *May 10, 1960Dec 4, 1962Bendix CorpSonic treating apparatus
US3089790 *Jun 9, 1960May 14, 1963Cavitron Ultrasonics IncUltrasonic cleaning devices and method of cleaning
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3251087 *Feb 19, 1964May 17, 1966Platt Jr Arthur GApparatus for wall washing or the like
US3357033 *Aug 17, 1965Dec 12, 1967Beehler Vernon DSonic surface cleaner
US3376798 *Jul 14, 1965Apr 9, 1968Albert G. BodineSonic trowel
US3409925 *Jun 6, 1966Nov 12, 1968Albert G. Bodine Jr.Sonic scrubbing device
US3497898 *May 29, 1967Mar 3, 1970Beehler Vernon DFabric cleaning device
US3507695 *Apr 18, 1967Apr 21, 1970Beehler Vernon DUtilization of sound wave energy
US3618566 *Aug 27, 1969Nov 9, 1971Gen Motors CorpApparatus for metal wetting liners
US4595419 *Dec 27, 1982Jun 17, 1986Proto-Power CorporationUltrasonic decontamination robot
US5309593 *Mar 4, 1991May 10, 1994Tokyo Copal Chemical Co., Ltd.Surface finishing device
US7255116 *Jul 2, 2004Aug 14, 2007Crocker James PStripe removal system
US8357245Aug 8, 2007Jan 22, 2013Crocker James PStripe removal system
US8357292Jan 26, 2010Jan 22, 2013Crocker James PWater treatment system for surface cleaning apparatus
US9180496Feb 27, 2009Nov 10, 2015Waterblasting, LlcWater blasting head with through feeding hydraulic motor
US20050284190 *Aug 5, 2004Dec 29, 2005Tien-Chu FanPortable ultrasonic cleaning machine
US20060000491 *Jul 2, 2004Jan 5, 2006Crocker James PStripe removal system
US20080066781 *Aug 8, 2007Mar 20, 2008Crocker James PStripe removal system
US20090241999 *Feb 27, 2009Oct 1, 2009Crocker James PModular Stripe Removal System
US20090242003 *Feb 27, 2009Oct 1, 2009Crocker James PWater Blasting Head With Through Feeding Hydraulic Motor
US20100200514 *Aug 12, 2010Crocker James PWater Treatment System For Surface Cleaning Apparatus
DE1628800B1 *Dec 18, 1967Dec 2, 1971Harold T SawyerGerät zum behandeln von oberflächen mittels schwingungen
EP0287033A1 *Apr 12, 1988Oct 19, 1988Caroline Christ, abgasfreie Werkzeugreinigungsapparate für die KunststoffindustrieDevice for cleaning those parts of plastics-working machines to which plastic waste sticks
WO2001006905A1 *Jul 24, 2000Feb 1, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyRobotic system
WO2001036116A1 *Nov 15, 2000May 25, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyUltrasonic implement
WO2001036118A1 *Nov 15, 2000May 25, 2001The Procter & Gamble CompanyUltrasonic cleaning
WO2015161818A1 *Apr 23, 2015Oct 29, 2015海尔亚洲株式会社Stain removal apparatus and stain removal unit
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/97.1, 404/113, 401/204, 68/3.00R, 15/244.1, 134/6, 15/22.1, 134/1, 159/DIG.130, 366/126, 134/196
International ClassificationB08B3/12
Cooperative ClassificationB08B3/12, Y10S159/13
European ClassificationB08B3/12