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Publication numberUS3166799 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 26, 1965
Filing dateFeb 2, 1961
Priority dateFeb 2, 1961
Publication numberUS 3166799 A, US 3166799A, US-A-3166799, US3166799 A, US3166799A
InventorsBirnkrant Milton
Original AssigneeBirnkrant Milton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Inflatable furniture arrangements
US 3166799 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 26, 1965 M. BIRNKRANT 3,166,799

INFLATABLE FURNITURE ARRANGEMENTS Filed Feb. 2. 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. 2

FIG.6

f INVEN on I 36 H M4 ra/v i/elvm mvr I :2

JTXOE/VEYS Jan. 26, 1965 M. BIRNKRANT 3,166,799

INFLATABLE FURNITURE ARRANGEMENTS Filed Feb. 2, 1961 3 Sheets- Sheet 3 EXHA usr 6'34 United States Patent M INFLATABLE FURNITURE ARRANGEMENTS Milton Birnkrant, 711 West End Ave., New York, N.Y. Filed Feb. 2, 1961, Ser. No. 86,819 15 Claims. or. 2tl1.11)

This invention relates generally to inflatable articles and is particularly concerned with a new concept of convertible room arrangements utilizing inflatable furniture.

For the purpose of this application including the appended claims, the term furniture is used in its broadest sense and includes any kind of article or object suitable for equipping dwelling houses, apartments, plants, work shops, vehicles, laboratories and the like.

The term room as used in this application'including the appended claims, in turn is deemed to connote any wall-enclosed space, such as rooms proper, auditoriums, cabins of trailers, ships and aircraft, the interior of motor cars and the like.

In designing modern-day rooms and furniture, space is an important consideration. As is well known, modern lodgings are relatively cramped, since floor space is expensive, particularly in urban areas. In trailers, motor cars, aircraft and ships, the importance of space is shared with that of weight as'the performance characteristics of air, land and sea vehicles are very much dependent or size and weight.

As a natural consequence of these considerations, inflatable furniture has become increasingly popular during recent years, due to the fact that such furniture is light in weight and may be deflated when not in use, thus saving valuable space. However, available inflatable furniture has certain inherent drawbacks, because as inflating and deflating are ordinarily effected manually, these manual steps constitute cumbersome and time-consuming procedures. Further, the storage of the objects in deflated condition presents, oftentimes, serious problems.

vIt is, therefore, a primary object of this invention to overcome the drawbacks of known inflatable furniture by providing an arrangement wherein individual articles of furniture are normally hidden from view in deflated condition and are automatically inflated from acommon point of actuation when the need for the presence of such articles of furniture arises.

According to a further object of this invention, the inflated articles of furniture are again to be deflated in automatic manner and stored away when thefloor space is to be occupied by a different article of furniture or is to remain unoccupied.

A further object of this invention is to provide a convertible room arrangement wherein a plurality of inflatable articles of furniture normally stored away in deflated condition may be inflated at will so as to occupy a desired predetermined floor area.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a room arrangement with inflatable furniture which room selectively may assume different shapes so as to present pearance into a bedroom appearance, or vice versa.

Yet another object of this invention is the provision of an inflatable furniture room arrangement wherein the room may be cleared upon short notice from some or all of its articles of furniture so as to present a large empty floor area.

Considered from another aspect, the invention has as its object to provide inflatable articles of furniture which selectively may assume different shapes so as to present articles of furniture adapted for different use.

Generally, it is an object of this invention to improve on the art of inflatable furniture and on the utilization of such furniture in rooms.

It is also an object of this invention to provide a combined inflatable furniture-room arrangement wherein the 3,166,??9 Patented Jan. 26, 1965 articles of furniture may be automatically inflated and deflated in a simple and rapid manner without requiring complicated machinery.

A still further object of this invention is to provide combined inflatable furniture-room arrangements which are inexpensive to build and which have an attractive appearance.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will be more fully understood from the following detailed specification, particularly when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings forming part of this specification, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary perspective elevation of the wall of a room fitted with inflatable articles of furniture in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 2 is a section along line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 and FIG. 4 are views corresponding to FIG. 2, illustrating two stages during the inflating of the article of furniture stored within the wall;

FIG. 5 is a detail elevation of an element of the article of furniture of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a schematic representation illustrating the manner in which the articles of furniture of the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5 may be automatically inflated and deflated;

FIG. 7 is a schematic representation in plan view of an auditorium having a retractable seat arrangement in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 8 is a sectional view-along line 88 of FIG. 7,'

the seat arrangement being shown in retracted position;

FIG. 9 is a view corresponding to FIG. 8 showing the seat arrangement in elevated or operative position;

FIG. 10 is a side elevation of a'single seat of the arrangement shown in FIGS. 7, 8 and 9;

FIG. 11 is an elevation of a modification of a seat to be used in the arrangement of FIGS. 710; I

FIGS. 12, 13 and 14 are schematic representations in plan view of a few room arrangements which can be obtained in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 15 is a side elevation partly in section of a different embodiment of this invention, wherein two articles of furniture are stored in the same wall space, one above the other;

FIG. 16 is a view corresponding to FIG. 15 showing the upper one of the articles of furniture in inflated condition, while the lower article of furniture is stored in the wall space in deflated condition;

FIG. 17 is a schematic representation for operating the embodiments shown in FIGS. 15 and 16;

FIG. 18 shows a still further embodiment of an inventive article of furniture which can selectively be inflated to assume different shapes;

FIG. 19 is a schematic representation for operating the embodiment shown in FIG. 18; and

FIG. 20 shows a still further embodiment of an inventive wall-inflatable furniture construction.

Briefly, the invention provides for a convertible room arrangement wherein one or a plurality of inflatable articles of furniture are operatively associated with an opening or with openings or recesses of a wall, such as a side wall or floor of a room. The wall-has an interior space within which the articles of furniture are stored in deflated condition so as to be hidden from view.

For this purpose, the wall will advantageously include tion is to take place, the covers are removed and the pump is actuated whereby the article or articles of furniture will assume their inflated condition adjacent the wall portion with which they are associated.

According to a particularly advantageous embodiment of the invention, a common power source, such as a pump, is provided for inflating all the articles of furniture which are provided in the room. For this purpose, amanifold or the like tube may be passed" lengthwise through the wall and may connect with the individual articles of furniture, appropriate valve means being provided for eifecting'the'inflation of any or all of the articles in any desired sequence. Suitablemeans are provided for the purpose of facilitating deflation. Thus, for example, the suction end of a compressor type pump, which accomplishes the inflation of the articles, may be connected 'witha manifold which in turn is connected to outlets of the articles of furniture. whereby upon provisionof suitable valve means deflation of the articles may be effected at will.

According to one embodiment of this invention, an auditorium or lecture hall may be provided with a seat arrangement comprising a multitude of inflatable seats which in deflated condition areretracted to form a portion of the floor surface;

It is, of course, obvious that'th'e inventive furnitureroom combination may be constructed in many difierent ways. Thus, it is, for example, feasible to store a plurality of deflated articles of furniture in adjacent or juxtaposed position within the same general wall space so that selectively, any one of these deflated articles of furniture may be inflated so as to occupy a floor area of the room which is coextensive with the floor area tobe occupied by' an adjacent article.

Referring now to the drawings, and in particular to FIGS. 1-6, reference numeral generally indicates a portion of a side wall of a room, such as," for example, an ordinary living-room; The'wall llloomprises a front wall portion 12 and a rear wall'portion 14, the two wall portions being spaced from each other so as to define a space or clearance 16. A spacer element 18' may be interposed between the two wall portions. The front wall portion 12 has a number of openings of apertures 29, two of which are shown in FIG. 1. The openings 29 which communicate with the space 16 may be closed by covers or flaps 22. The bottom edges of the covers 22 are hinged to'thewall portion 12 by hinge members 24 and in closed position are retained against the Wall portion 12 by closure means 26. 26 may be of any known construct-ion or shape and may, for example, comprise a magnetic lock which holds the cover 22. flush'with the wall portion 12. The floor of the room has be'enindicated by reference numeral 28.

A compressor-like pump 30 with an electric motor 58 is provided at a suitable location as schematically indicated in FIG. 6. The pump 34) is connected to a pressure or inlet line32 and an exhaust or suction line 34:. Two articles of furniture, generally indicated by reference numerals 36 and 38, respectivel'y, are stored in deflated condition within the space 16 defined by the front and rear wall portions 12 and 14. The articles of furniture are of any suitable material commonly available on the market such as, for example; plastic or rubber, which lends itself to inflation and deflation. Each of the articles 36 and 38 has a flexible tubular inlet connection ill -and 40, respectively, and a flexible tubular outlet connection 42 and 42', respectively, which are respectively connected with the pressure line or manifold 32 and the outlet or suction line 34.

A plurality of valves 5t), 52, 54, 56 are provided in the lines, the purpose of which will become clear from the following description.

The operation of the arrangement will now be explained in detail:' FIG. 2 shows the deflated articles of furniture 36 and 33 as being stored or hidden within the space 16. The covers or flaps 2.2 have been folded upwardly about their hinges 24 so as to lie flush with the front wall portion 12. and to .close the openings 20. The

This closure means 4 covers 22. are being retained in this closed position by the lock members 26.

When article 36 is to be inflated, cover 22 is swung downwardly by about the hinges 24 until it has assumed the position shown in FIG. 3. As shown in FIG. 3, the cover 22 has a catch 44 which engages with a complementary surface as of the front wall portion 12. This catch may, for example, be a magnetic lock or any other suitable retaining means.

The deflated article 36 is now pulled out from the space to through the o ening 2%} and it will be noted that for this purpose, the tubular inlet and outlet portions 43 and 42, respectively, are flexible and are sufficiently long so as to permit withdrawal from the space. Of course, the tubes at} and 42 may have any desired length so as to enable the positioning of the article away from the wall 12. The valves 5t and 52 controlling the inflaticn of the second article of furniture 33 are now closed, while the inlet valve 54 provided in tube 46 of article 3% is opened and the outlet valve 56 is closed. The motor 58 which drives the pump is now started up and the compressor-like pump will thus pump air through line 32 and inlet tube 43 into: the deflated article 36 which thereby becomes inflated and assumes the shape of a chair as shown in FIG. 4. Valve 54 is now closed for maintaining the chair 36 in inflated condition. For the purpose of retaining the bottom edge of the chair against the front Wall portion 12, a magnetic foil strip 158 is arranged as seen in FIG. 5 which bears against a corresponding strip oil on the front wall 12 or the flap 22. The provision of strips 153, 60, however, is not necessary. The amount of air to be pumped into the article 36 may be predetermined by suitably adjusting the pump, whereupon the pump is automatically shut off.

If inflation of article 38 is desired, valve 52 arranged in inlet connection 46 is opened whereupon the pump 3% Will pump air through line 32 and pipe connection 4'8 into the chair 38 which thus will be likewise inflated. Of course, article 38 need not be a chair, but can be another type of article of furniture, such as a bed or table.

When deflation is desired, valve 56 is-opened so that air is sucked out from the chair 36 through the outlet connection &2 and into the suction line 34. Of course, deflation of article 33 can be accomplished in corresponding manner. The deflated article or articles are thereafter stuffed back into the space 15 whereupon the flap 22 is swung upwardly so as to lie flush again against the front wall portion 12 to hide the article or articles from view.

It will be realized that many variations may be effected in the embodiment just described. Thus, of course, it is possible to inflate and/or deflate the article in diflcrent manner, e.g., inflation may be accomplished by compressed ga-s stored in tanks or cylinders. Where space is of great importance such as, for example, on a space ship, inflation and deflation may be accomplished by chemical means such as by the reaction of gas-evolving chemicals.

While in the embodiment shown the deflated articles of furniture are stored within a space defined by two wall portions, it is, of course, feasible to provide a closet or the like which would serve the same purpose. Of course, many different ways of constructing or arranging the flap or cover 22 may be chosen.

It is also feasible that the system is operated from a control panel and that upon application of inflating pressure the article or articles press against the covers 22 whereby the latter will automatically swing downwardly to clear the openings 2%. The articles will thereafter emerge through the openings without requiring manual assistance.

Referring now to the embodiment of FIGS. 7, 8, 9 and 10, reference numeral ltltlgenerally indicates an auditorium such a a music hall, dance hall or the like. The auditorium comprises a multitude of seats. H32 which are arranged in rows as is common in halls of this kind. Each seat comprises a rigid top portion 104 which has beveled edges 106. The floor of the auditorium generally indicated by reference numeral 108 comprises a top floor 180 and a spaced bottom floor 182. The top floor 186 defines a plurality of openings 110 with beveled side portions 112, the 'beveling angle being complementary to that of the beveled edges 106 of the seats 104. Thus, in the retracted position as shown 'in'FIG. 8, the seats 104 fit tightly with their beveled edges 166-against the beveled edges 112 of the top floor openings 110. It will thus be realized that in closed or retracted position, the seats will form with the top floor 180 a continuous floor surface. In View of the conical seating area formed by edges 104, 106 only minute clearances or cracks remain in the top floor when the seats are in retracted position, so that for all practical purposes the floor surface will be continuous and smooth. An inflatable bag-like portion 120 is connected to each individual seat surface 104. The inflatable portions 120, at their bottom ends, have inlet connections 122 and outlet connections 124, respectively. The inlet connect-ions 122 which are situated within the space 190 between the floors 180, 182 are connected to a manifold 126 while a corresponding manifold 128 is provided for the outlet connections-124.

Each rigid seat portion 104 comprises lateral downwardly depending ears or lugs 1313. When the seat portions 104 are flush with the top floor surface 180, the ears 130 project into the space 190 and a rod 13-2 is passed through the ears 130, the ears of all the seats in one row being in'alignment. The purpose of the rod 132 is to urge the individual seat members 104 against the conical seating area formed with the floor surface 180.

The inventive arrangement dis-closed in FIGS. 710 operates as follows: When the hall i to be used without seats, for example, for dancing purposes or the like, the seats will assume the position shown in FIG. 8. In other words, the individual rigid seat portions 104 with their beveled edges 106 will be retraced so as to be flush with the floor surface 180.. In this position, the rods 132 are passed through the individual ears 130 in order to assure the retention of the seats in their downward position.

When the auditorium is to be used as a lecture hall or the like, and seats are thus required, the rods 132 which may be telescopically constructed are retracted, whereupon the inflatable members 120 are inflated in a manner similar to that explained in connection with the embodi merit of FIGS. l-6. Thus, the manifold 126 is connected to a compressor-like pump and air is thus injected into the members 120 through the inlet connections 122. Due to the inflation of the members 120, the rigid seat portions 104 are raised above'the level of the floor 108 and will thus present seats. Of course, inflation has to be continued to such an extent that the pressure within the member 120 is sufiic-ien-t so as to withstand the weight of a person sitting thereon. This, however, does not present any problem, as inflatable materials which are sufliciently rigid in inflated condition are well known in the art. Of course, any kind of reinforcements or the like may be provided with the members 120,

In order. to prevent lateral spreading :of the inflatable members 120 upon inflation, downwardly depending projections or brackets 134 are provided on the top floor surface 180 adjacent the openings 110. Thus, the inflatable members 120 will be forced to rise through the opening 110.

Deflation of the individualseats 104 is accomplished by withdrawing the air from the members 120 which is accomplished by connecting the manifold 128 to the suction end of the pump whereby the air will be withdrawn through the tubular connections 124. As previously mentioned, the inflation and deflation of the individual seats may be accomplished in a manner similar to that shown in FIG. 6.

Instead :of providing a common power source for all the seats, it is feasible to arrange several inflating sources, for example, one course for every row of seats. However, from a practical point of view, it will be preferred to have a single power source which operates the entire seat arrangement of the auditorium from a single point of actuation. This maybe easily accomplished by pro: viding valves at strategic positions.

It will thus be realized that by the arrangement as disclosed in FIGS. 7-10, a continuous smooth floor area of an auditorium may be converted within minutes :or even seconds so as to provide a large number of seats while,

in the reverse, the seats may be rapidly retracted so as again to present an unbroken floor area. The disadvantage of moving chairs and the like from and into the auditorium is'thus overcome by the invention.

a few of the multitude of room arrangements which may be obtained by the invention.

Thus, in FIG. 12, a room is shown wherein a table 302 and four chairs 304, 306, 368 and 310 are provided which in inflated condition will merge through the floor 320 while in deflated condition, they are stored within a space provided below the floor. 7

FIG. 13 shows a room wherein, for example, two beds 462 and 404 may be inflated. The beds, in deflated con dition,.may either be stored or hidden within a suitable wall space or, of course, they may be accommodated within cutouts or recesses within the floor which, thereafter, are covered by covers somewhat like the covers 22 in FIG. 1.

IG. 14 shows a living room arrangement with a couch 562, two chairs 504, 566, a table 508 and a desk 516. It will, of course, be realized that any number of arrangements may be obtained in the inventive manner. Thus, the interior of a motor car may, for example, selectively be converted from a seating arrangement into a luggage space.

Referring to the embodiment of FIGS. 15, 16 and 17,

it will be noted that this embodiment is somewhat similar to the one disclosed in FIGS. 1-6. However, two articles of furniture are stored within the same general wall space 616. As in FIGS. 1-6, there is provided a front wall portion 612, a rear wall portion 614, the two wall portions defining therebetween a space 616. A first article of furniture 636 is provided in the lower part of the space 616 while the upper part is occupied by a second article of furniture 638. Each of the articles 636, 638 is connected with the pressure and suction lines 632, 634, respectively, of a pump via inlet and outlet connections 646, 642. If the lower article 636 is inflated, it will assume the shape of a chair as indicated in dotted lines in FIG. 15. If, however, the upper article 638 is inflated while article 636 is stored within the wall or closet space 616, it will assume the shape of a work bench or the like. A particular advantage of the embodiment of FIGS. 16 and 15 is that the same floor space as indicated by the letter a will be occupied either by the chair 636- or the work bench 638. By adapting the size of the respective articles so that the work bench defines a larger vertical space than the chair 636, or by correspondingly dimensioning the length of the inlet and outlet tubes the desired result is obtained.

FIG. 17 schematically illustrates the operation of the arrangement of FIGS. 15 and 16. When the cock 650 is in position 1, and valve 654 is open, air from the pump will flow through line 632 into the article 636. If article 636 is to be deflated the exhaust valve 656 is opened and blocking means.

I jacent the level of the floor.

air will be withdrawn through the exhaust line 634. When article 633 is to beinflated, the cock 654 will be actuated so as to assume the position 2, whereupon air will enter article 638 through inlet line 632. When article 638 is to be deflated, the exhaust valve 659 will be opened and air will be withdrawn through exhaust line 634.

.PIGS. 18 and 19 illustrate a further embodiment and a modification of this invention. A chair 71d constituting a first section of an article of'furniture is provided which may be inflated and deflated in the same manner as the other articles of furniture previously disclosed. How- 'ever, the'chair 710 has a second section 712 which is connected with the main chair section Till), the com munication between'the two sections being accomplished by a pressure responsive valve 714 as indicated in FIG.

19. Chair 71d is inflated with a first predetermined pressure. At this pressure the valve 714 blocks the communic'ation to the second section 712. and thus acts as a However, when the pressure exceeds the predetermined value, the valve 714 will be opened to negate its blocking action whereby the section 712 will also be inflated as indicated in dotted lines in FIG. 18, thereby presenting an extenison. The system of operating the inflation and deflation of the article 7m, 712 is schemati'cally indicated in FIG. 19. The inletline is indicated by reference numeral 716 and when the valve 715 is opened, air will thus enter the section 71th for inflating purposes. The deflation of'sect-ion 714i is accomplished by opening exhaust valve 72% whereupon air is withdrawn through the discharge line 722. If the chair 710 is, for example, to be converted into a bed, the pressure is increased above a predetermined value whereupon the pressure responsive valve 714 will open so as to accomplish the inflation of section 712. The deflation of section 712 is accomplished through valve 730 and exhaust line 732. 'Of course, the inflation of the second section 712 may be accomplished in a different manner. Thus, section 712 may communicate with the main sec tion 710 through a pipe or the like provided on the top or bottom of section 7310. When section 712 is in col lapsed or deflated condition, the tubular connection with the main section is broken by angularly bending the tube so that no air can enter the auxiliary section 712 However, upon reaching a predetermined pressure or by unfastening straps as, for example, the straps 743 which are fastened to the main portion 71b and auxiliary portion 712, the connecting tube will be straightened thereby permitting the entry of air.

In the embodiments of FIGS. 1-6 and l9, the articles of furniture have been shown as being stored within a wall opening or recess which is above the floor level. This arrangement has been chosen for convenience sake as the flaps or covers will be more easily accessible in this manner. However, it is, of course, well within the scope of this invention to arrange the articles of furniture in deflated condition in a hideaway or recess which is ad- Such an arrangement has been shown in FIG. 20. It will be noted that the side Wall of the room Sill provides an inwardly stepped portion 812 which extends bet-ween the side wall portion tilt and the floor 814 so as to form a chamber. An inflatable article of furniture 820 formed like a web is provided, the edges of which are affixed to the walls of this step-like portion 812 in air tight manner. The inlet and outlet connections for the article are-indicated by reference numerals 824 and 842, respectively. A number of springs 826 are aflixed to the rear wall 832 and to the web-like article 820. The section shown in FIG. 20 is taken in'front of the connection of the springs see to the wall 832 so that the connection is not'visib'le. The springs are ofthe compression type and normally tend to urge the web towards the wall 832. Upon application of air pressure, the compression force of the springs will be overcome so that the web 826 is tautly stretched away from the wall to assume the desired shape. As soon as the air is exhausted through the outlet 842, the springs will tend to urge the web 820 towards the wall 832, thereby accomplishing automatic retraction. it will be realized that automatic retraction may be accomplished in many different ways known in the art.

While specific embodiments of the invention have been shown and described illustrating the application of the inventive principles, it will be understood that this invention may be embodied otherwise without departing from such principles.

What is claimed is:

l. A floor arrangement comprising a top floor having a plurality of spaced openings, a bottom floor spaced f om said top floor, said bottom floor and top floor defiring a space, an inflatable bag-like object adjacent each of said openings, pipe means located within said space and including extensions extending between said pipe means and each of said objects, a pump, said pipe means being connected to said pump, and valve means arranged on said pipe means, said objects being arranged for storage within said space when in deflated condition and assuming the shape of a seat-presenting article of furniture above the level of said top floor when in inflated condition, said objects having a rigid top portion adapted to close the respective opening when the objects are in deflated condition and to lie flush with the top floor, said rigid top portion forming a seat above said top floor when the objects are inflated.

2. A floor arrangement as claimed in claim 1, Wherein said rigid top portions have beveled edges, said top floor being complementarily beveled adjacent said openings, so as to present conical seats for the beveled edges of said top portions.

3. A floor arrangement comprising a top floor having a plurality of spaced openings, a bottom floor spaced from said top floor, said bottom floor and top floor delining a space, and inflatable object adjacent each of said openings, pipe means located within said space and including extensions extending between said pipe means and each of said objects, a pump, said pipe means being connected to said pump, valve means arranged on said pipe means, said objects being arranged for storage within said space when in deflated condition and assuming the shape of a scat-presenting article of furniture above the level of said top floor when in inflated condition, said objects having a rigid top portion adapted to close the respective opening when the objects are in deflated condition and to lie flush with the top floor, said rigid top portion forming a seat above said top floor when the objects are inflated, said rigid top portions having downwardly depending lug members, and retractable rod means arranged within said space and passing through said lug members for urging said rigid top portions into contact with said top floor.

4. A floor arrangement as claimed in claim 1, wherein said top floor has downwardly extending confining means adjacent said openings for preventing lateral spreading of said objects upon inflation.

5. A floor arrangement as claimed in claim 1, wherein said objects have back-rest forming portions, and means for retaining said back-rest forming portions in erect position.

6. In combination: a wall defining an interior cavity and having an exterior recess communicating with said cavity, an inflatable article of furniture arranged for storage within said interior cavity when in deflated condition, inflating means for inflating said article of furniture, pipe means connecting said inflating means with said article of furniture, said pipe means at least partly extending through and being mounted within said cavity and including a flexible portion adjacent said article of furniture and extensible through said recess, said article of furniture being manually pullable through said recess and assuming the shape of an inflated article of furniture adjacent said wall upon inflation by said inflating means. v

'7. The combination of claim 6, wherein said inflating means includes pump means. 8. The combination of claim 6, wherein said inflatable article of furniture comprises first and second inflatable portions communicating with each other and removable blocking means for blocking the communication between said first and second'portions, whereby selectively to inflate said first portion and said first and second portions.

9. The combination of claim 8, wherein said blocking means includes pressure responsive valve means.

10. In combination: a Wall defining an interior cavity and having an exterior recess communicating with said cavity, a movable cover attached to said wall and being movable between a first position in which the cover covers said recess and a second position in which said cover clears said recess, an inflatable article of furniture arranged for storage Within said interior cavity when in deflated condition, inflating means for inflating said article of furniture, pipe means connecting said inflating means with said article of furniture, said pipe means. at least partly extending through and being mounted within said cavity and including a flexible portion adjacent said article of furniture and extensible through said'recess, said article of furniture being manually pullable through said recess and assuming the shape of an inflated article of furniture adjacent said wall upon inflation by said inflating means.

11. A room comprising enclosing wall means having a front wall and a rear wall spaced from said front wall and defining an interior cavity with said front wall, saidfront wall having a plurality of spaced exterior recesses cles of furniture, said first flexible pipe connections perv mitting fluid flowinto the article of furniture while the communicating with'said cavity, a movable cover for each of said recesses andattached to-said front wall, each of said covers being movable between a recess-covering position and a recess-clearing positlon, a manifold pipe ex-.

means connected to said manifold pipe adjacent each of said recesses 'and being extensible therethrouglnan inflatable article of furniture connected to each of said flexi ble pipe connection means, a pump connected to said manifold pipe, and valve-means on said flexible pipe connectionmeans for controlling fluid flow therethrough,

said articles of furniture'being arranged for storage within said cavity when in deflated condition and being pullable through its adjacentrecess for inflation by said pump to assume the shape of an inflated article of furniture adjacent said front wall.

'12. A room: as claimed in claim, 11, wherein said flexi- V tending through said cavity, flexible. pipe connection for retaining said articles in inflated condition in a position adjacent said front Wall.

14. In a room as claimed in claim 11, wherein at least I two inflatable articles are arranged in juxtaposed position, the arrangement being such that said articles upon inflation tend to occupy the identical floor space.

15. In combination: a front wall panel-provided with a depression, said depression being defined by a bottom wall portion extending substantially parallel to the front wall panel and first and second spaced wall portions extending substantially perpendicular to the front wall panel and bottom wall portion, an inflatable article of furniture, said article of furniture comprising a web, said web being attached in air tight manner to the walls defining the depression and extending across said depression so that said web with the space defined by said depression forms an air tight chamber, spring means aflixed to said bottom wall portion and said web, said spring means having a tendency to urge said web into said depression and toward said bottom wall portion, pipe means traversing said bottom wall portion, and a pump connected to said pipe means outside said depression for inflating said web, the spring force of said spring means being weaker than the inflating pressure generated by said pump.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STAT ES PATENTS JACOB L. NACKENOFF, Fri-m Examiner. WILLIAM r. MUSHAKEExaminer.

Milton Bi rnkrant r by certified g correction and corrected beldw that err or appears that th in the abov e said Lett e numbered paters Patent should read as CQlumn 1 line 57, for "selectlvely may assume dlfferent gha'pes so as to resent" read selectively may be converted i m, 5a a living room apcolumn 6, line 29 or "merge" read emerge (SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD J. BRENNER: Corn

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/36.4, 5/10.1, 52/220.3, 312/242, 52/8, 297/14, 52/2.26, 297/15, 297/16.1, 5/706
International ClassificationA47C4/00, A47C4/54
Cooperative ClassificationA47C4/54, A47C9/06
European ClassificationA47C4/54, A47C9/06