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Publication numberUS3167090 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 26, 1965
Filing dateJul 5, 1962
Priority dateJul 5, 1962
Publication numberUS 3167090 A, US 3167090A, US-A-3167090, US3167090 A, US3167090A
InventorsJack J Booth, William C Branch
Original AssigneeJack J Booth, William C Branch
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispensing valve unit
US 3167090 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 26, 1965 J. J. BOOTH ETAL 3,

DISPENSING VALVE UNIT Filed July 5, 1962 FIG. I H I5 I3 23 I 5,\\ 7 27/" A 43 M I/ I 45 57 CO2 IDH O MIXED DRINK JACK J. BOOTH WILLIAM C. BRANCH INVENTORS BY Alma/J6 9770/2 may United States Patent 3,167,090 DiSPENSlrNfi VALVE UNIT Jack J. Booth andWilliam'C. Branch, both of R1). Box 16372, Dallas, Tex. Filed July 5, 1962, Ser; No. 207,500 6 (Jlaims. (13]. 137-664) This invention relates to liquid dispensing units and. in a more specific. aspect to valve and nozzle'arrangements for use in mixing beverages.

The preparation of soft-drink beverages-involves mixing a syrup of given flavor with a diluent in proportions to suit ones taste. The diluent maybe either plain or carbonated water. Usually, upon adding carbonated water. to a syrup a large amount of foam. isproduced. Such undesirable foaming depends primarily on the temperature of the water-syrup mixture, the velocityof the diluent as it mixes with the syrup, the ratio of syrup to water, as well as .theamount of gas dissolved in thediluent. It has been found that when the diluent and the syrup are mixed in the proper manner, however, the foaming. is significantly reduced. In the prior. art, there are many types ofv valve dispensing units whichare. used for mixing soft-drink beverages, but none is entirely. satisfactory because CO gas is removed from the water by agitation, thereby reducing carbonation in the drink. Incontrast to prior art units, the present invention significantly reduces the foaming action, maintains high. carbonation, and has other features and advantages not heretofore known.

The present-invention is an improvementover the valve dispensing unit described in Patent No. 2,921,605 and has for an objectthe provision of an improved valve dispensing unit.

Another object of the. invention is to provide regulation and control of the flow of syrup.

Another object of the invention is to provide a liquid dispensing nozzle having an independent syrup flow passage therein.

More particularly, in accordance with the. present invention, there is provided a valve block having a plurality of valves and fluid passagestherein communicating with a main flow channel. An adjustable pin i provided in the valve block to regulate and controlthe fiowof syrupin one of the fluid passages of each pair thereof. In a preferred embodiment there isprovided adispensing nozzle having a divergent flow passage that progressively increases in cross section along the direction of-flow. In the wall of the nozzle there is an independent syrup flow channel having its axis parallel to the longitudinal-axis of the nozzle. The syrup flow channel gradually merges in the nozzle with the divergent flow passage provided for a diluent fluid.

For a more complete understanding of the present invention and for further objects andadvantages thereof, reference. may be had .to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing in which:

FIGURE 1 is a longitudinal sectionalview of a dispensing valve unit constructed inaccordance with a preferred embodiment ofthe invention;

FIGURE 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of a dispensing nozzle in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention; and

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken along line 33of FIGURE 2.

Referring to FIGURE 1, a dispensing valve unit 11 includes a body or block 13 having substantially parallel front and rear faces 15 and 17, respectively. A plurality of horizontally extending bores 19, 21 are arranged vertically in pair groups in the block 13 and each bore 19, 21 extends lengthwise from the front face 15 to the rear face 17. The bores 19, 21 are arranged in substantially parallel rows which are spaced apart both laterally and vertically. The bores 1h, 21 extend generally parallel to the top and bottom faces 23, 25 of the block 13.

A plurality of vertical. channels 27 are provided in the front face 15 of the block 13 to connect a pair of vertically disposed bores 19, 21.

Within the block- 13, there is-provided a plurality of downwardly and angularly. inclined bores 29 by means of which each bore 19, 21 communicates intermediately its ends with the exterior of the block 13. The bores 29 extend through the bottom face 25 of the block 13.

The rear portion of each bore 19, 21 is enlargedto provide valve chambers 30, 32 that are generally cylindrical. The front faces of the valve chambers 3d, 32 are provided with a beveled surface to form valve seats 31 and 33 respectively. Resilient valve members 35 and 37 are disposed in each valve chamber 30, 32, each valve member being. conveniently connected to one end of valve stems 39, 41. The valve stems 39, 41 extend horizontally and forward. sufliciently in each bore 19, 21 to allow the free end thereof to project the same distance into the channel 27. At the rear. end. of each valve chamber 30, 32 there is provided an inlet fitting 43, 45 towhich are attached suitable fluid conduit means (not shown). Compression springs 47, 49 are disposed in the valve chambers 31), 32 between the inlet fittings 43, 4-5 and. the valve members 35, 37' to urge the valvemembers into intimate fluid-tight engagement with the valve seats 31, 33. i

A. plate 51 is secured to the front face 15 by a plurality of fasteners (notshown). In the rearward face of each channel 27 betweenthe vertically disposed bores 19, 21, there is provided a rod or guide pin 53 which threadedly engages a bore 55 provided for that purpose. The front end of each guide pin 53. projects outwardly and proximately to the rearward face of the plate 51;

A portion of one end of anelongated handle or lever 57 is received in the channel27 and extends downwardly therefrom. A transverse opening 59 large enough to loosely engage the guide pin 53 is provided in the end of the handle within the channel 27. The portion of the lever 57 immediately adjacent the opening 59 is substantially straight and is adapted to contact the outwardly projecting ends of. the valve stems 39, 41. The portion 61 of the lever 57 above the valve stem 39 is bent forwardly. at an obtuse angle to contact the inner surface of the plate 51 adjacent the top edge thereof. Similarly, the portion of the lever 57 below the. valve stem-41 is bent forwardly at anobtuse angle to contact the lower edge of the plate 51; A. button or knob 65 may be conveniently attached for manipulation purposes to the lower end of the lever 57 by asuitable fastener 67.

The structure thus fardescribedprovides for the control of flow of syrup by way of channel 45 and carbonated water by way of channel 43. In accordance with the present invention, the mixing of the fluids is controlled in a nozzle of unique construction. More particularly, the lower region of the downwardly inclined bore 29 isenlarged to receive one end of a dispensing nozzle 69. There is provided, in the block 13, a downwardly. inclined bore 71 which connects the bore 21 immediately forward of the. valve seat 33' and the enlarged end of the bore 291 There is provided, also, an inclined bore 73 which extends from the lower face 25 to the bore 71. The bore 73 is disposed substantially at right angles to the axis of the bore 71 and intersects the same intermediately the length thereof. The axes of the bores 19, 21, 2h, 71, and 73 lie substantially in a plane which is parallel to one sideof the block 13. The lower region of the bore 73 is enlarged and threadedly receives an adjustable screw pin 75 having a cylinder extension 7'7 which is slidably received in the smaller portion of the bore 73. The extension 77 is movable in the bore 73 and, when extended inwardly fully, effectively closes the passage 71 to fluid flow. A slot 79 may, if desired, be provided in the free end of the screw pin 75 to receive a blade or other tool for purposes of adjusting the pin.

FIGURES 2 and 3 illustrate a preferred embodiment of the dispenser nozzle 69 which includes a cylindrical body 81. The outer diameter of the cylindrical body 81 in the region 83 is slightly smaller than the diameter at the other end. An end portion 85 is formed of diameter appreciably smaller than that of region 83. The smaller end of a short frusto-conical section 8-7 has the same diameter as the free end 85. The frusto-conical section 87 is terminated in a short cylindrical section 89. The end of the section 89 is beveled at a slight angle to provide a sealtight engagement with the inward end of the enlarged bore 29.

An axial cylindrical bore 91 extends through sections 89 and 87. Thence, the axial bore is divergent, that is, the cross-sectional area increases progressively. Near the free end of the body 81, the divergency ceases and from the region 95 the bore is cylindrical and concentric With the cylindrical body 81. If desired, the free end of the body 81 may be cut obliquely, as shown in FIGURE 2, as at 101. The axial bore 91 constitutes a main flow passage in the nozzle 69.

There is also provided an auxiliary passage 103 in the wall of the nozzle 69 having a diameter significantly smaller than the diameter of the cylindrical bore 91. The axis of the bore 103 is disposed in parallel spaced relation to the axis of the main flow passage 91. One end of the auxiliary bore 103 commences at the juncture of the firusto-conical section 87 and the cylindrical section 85. The bore 103 extends therefrom in the direction of flow until it merges with the main fiow passage intermediately its length. By this structure the confluence of the channels 91 and 163 is of gradual and progressively in creasing area so that there will be a progressively increasing intermixture of fluids in the two passages, as will hereinafter be detailed.

The arrangement of the valves in the block 13 and the manner in which they are manipulated to control flow of ingredients are described in Patent No. 2,921,605, referred to hereinbefore, and a detailed description herein will not be necessary. The present invention contemplates a plurality of nozzles 69 in a block 13 to dispense a syrup and a diluent into a container or receptacle, either separately or simultaneously. There is interposed in the path of syrup flow within the block an adjustable pin to regulate and control the quantity of syrup flowing to the nozzle.

To understand the manner in which the nozzle 69 and control pin 77 are used, note that when the lever 57 is manipulated toward the rear, the valve member 37 opens and the syrup flows from storage past the valve and into the flow passage 71. Depending on the relative position of the control pin 77, a quantity of syrup flows into the auxiliary flow passage 193. In like manner, or simultaneously, the lever 57 may be manipulated to open the valve 35 so that diluentfiuid will flow from storage past the valve and into the passage 29. Thence it flows into the nozzle 69. If both syrup and diluent are flowing simultaneously, they are allowed to comrningle only in accordance with a predetermined pattern as controlled by the geometries of the two flow channels 91 and 1613. By so regulating the intermixture, foaming has been found to be significantly controlled. The ingredients emerging from the nozzle and entering the receptacle are partially mixed, completion of which is accomplished as the ingredients reach the receptacle into which they are placed. The foaming resulting therefrom, however, is controlled and reduced by the manner of delivery. The diluted syrup and diluent do not foam to any appreciable extent.

It is convenient to regulate the relative rate of flow of syrup by adjusting the control pin 77.

Thus, the invention is characterized by a dispensing nozzle having a flow passage extending along a direction of flow, an auxiliary flow passage in the wall of the nozzle having its axis spaced from the axis of the nozzle, with the two flow channels converging at a relatively small angle for progressively increasing the rate of intermixture of fluids flowing in the passages as the discharge end of the nozzle is approached. An adjustable control pin is provided in the flow channel leading to the auxiliary flow passage.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention the spout will have the form shown in FIGURE 2 wherein an outward extending annular rim is formed at the upper end 89. A second annular rim is formed immediately below the upper end of the channel 103. The spout 69 is fitted into a recess in block 13 under a press fit. In the preferred embodiment the block is provided with a re-entrant opening. The larger diameter portion of the opening is just slightly smaller than the diameter of the rib below the top of channel 103, FIGURE 2. The smaller diameter of the re-entrant opening is slightly smaller than the diameter of the rib at the upper end 89. By forcing the spent 69 into such a recess, the two annular ribs above described will seal the syrup flow channel and prevent leakage of the syrup on the valve block. Further, the main flow passage is divergent and the auxiliary passage is cylindrical with its axis spaced from and parallel to the axis of the main flow passage as to merge gradually and completely with the main passage within the length of the nozzle. Preferably, the block and the nozzle are made of plastic and the lever, valve stems, springs, inlet fittings, plate, guide pin and screw pin are made of metal, preferably stainless steel or the like. The valve members are made of a resilient rubber material.

It will be appreciated from the foregoing description that modifications may be made in the valve to fit or accommodate various environments in which it is to operate. For example, the handle 57 has been shown extending downwardly from the valve block 13. It has been found desirable in some instances to have the handle 57 reversed so that it extends upwardly, providing a knob or an actuating member above the block 13. The spout 69 is illustrated as extending downwardly at an angle. In some instances it is more desirable to have the spout extend perpendicular to the lower face of the block 13. These modifications and others can be made within the scope of the present invention. It is, of course, significant that there be provided a zone for intermixture of a syrup and a diluent as by means of the graded entry of the flow channel 103 into the divergent flow channel 91. It has been found necessary to provide a divergent flow channel for the diluent in order to accommodate carbonated Water which requires a gradually expanding flow channel to prevent the build-up of undue pressures and undesired high velocity streams. Furthermore, the provision of the syrup channel having an entry which extends over substantially the entire length of the nozzle provides for a gradual introduction of the syrup into the diluent in such a manner, as in the case of carbonated beverages, to minimize foaming. The same advantage is achieved even though the spout 69 is oriented perpendicular to the valve block. The introduction of the syrup by way of a flow channel whose axis is parallel to the axis of the diluent channel is beneficial. It has been found that substantial improvement over prior art devices in control of foaming can be achieved in accordance with the present invention by inserting a tube into channel 103 with the tube terminating midway of the length of the spout. The preferred embodiment of the invention has been illustrated, however, as a graded entry of the syrup channel into the diluent channel wherein the axes of both channels are parallel.

It will be noted that the valve elements 35 and 37 are urged into a closed channel position by the springs 47 and 49. However, it is not necessary that the springs provide the entire closure force since the pressure exerted through the carbonated water and syrup in the lines 43 and 45 will force the elements 35 and 37 into a fluidtight sealing relation to maintain the flow channels sealed except when opened under the control of the handle 57.

Having described the invention in connection with certain specific embodiments thereof, it is understood that further modifications may now suggest themselves to those skilled in the art and it is intended to cover such modifications as fall within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a dispensing system where a syrup is mixed with a diluent during travel from storage to a receptacle the combination which comprises a spout having a first flow channel therein of substantially large cross section and extending from an input point to the mouth thereof, said spout having a separate flow channel extending through the side wall of said first flow channel at an angle such that the confluence of said first flow channel and said separate flow channel extends substantially the length of said spout.

2. In a dispensing system where a syrup is mixed with a diluent during travel from storage to a receptacle the combination which comprises a spout having a first flow channel axially therein of progressively increasing cross section along the direction of flow from the input to the mouth thereof and having formed therein a separate flow channel in the wall of said spout parallel to the axis of said spout and intersecting said first flow channel with the area common to both flow channels progressively increasing with distance from said input.

3. In a dispensing system where a syrup is mixed with a diluent during travel from storage to a receptacle, the combination which comprises:

(a) an elongated spout having a relatively large flow channel therein leading to the mouth thereof,

(b) a relatively small flow channel in said spout having a separate input and gradually and progressively merging with said large flow channel along the direction of flow from the inputs for providing progressively increasing area common to both flow channels with distance from the input of said spout, and

(0) means for controlling flow of fluids in both channels.

4. In a dispensing system where a syrup is mixed with a diluent during travel from storage to a receptacle, the combination which comprises:

(a) a spout having a first enlarged flow channel and having formed in the wall of said spout a separate flow channel in spaced relation to the axis of said first flow channel, said separate flow channel merging with said first flow channel in a confluence zone extending substantially the length thereof,

(b) a diluent delivery channel connected axially to the input of said first flow channel for flow of diluent in said spout,

(c) a syrup delivery channel connected to said separate flow channel for flow of syrup therein,

(d) flow control means for simultaneously injecting said diluent into said diluent delivery channel and for injecting said syrup into said syrup delivery channel, and

(e) means for regulating the flow of syrup in said syrup delivery channel.

5. In a dispensing system where a syrup is mixed with a diluent during travel from storage to a receptacle, the combination which comprises:

(a) a spout having a divergent flow channel along the direction of flow and having formed in the wall of said spout a separate cylindrical flow channel in spaced parallel relation to the axis of said divergent flow channel with said cylindrical flow channel merging with said divergent flow channel over a substantial portion of the length thereof,

(b) a first flow channel connected axially to the input of said divergent flow channel for delivery of diluent to said spout,

(c) a second flow channel connected to said cylindrical flow channel for delivery of syrup to said cylindrical flow channel,

(d) flow control means for simultaneously injecting said diluent into said first flow channel and for injecting said syrup into said second flow channel, and

(e) means for regulating the flow of syrup in said second flow channel.

6. In a dispensing system where a syrup is mixed with a diluent during travel from storage to a. receptacle the combination which comprises:

(a) a spout having an input and a mouth,

(b) means for introducting said diluent axially at said input to said spout, and (c) means for injecting said syrup into the stream of diluent in said spout along a flow path parallel to the axis of said spout and extending from the region of said input into said spout.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 140,465 Burns July 1, 1873 2,491,610 Goddard Dec. 20, 1949 2,888,040 Terwilliger May 26, 1959 2,921,605 Booth Jan. 19, 1960 2,940,483 Mossberg June 14, 1960

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US140465 *Jul 1, 1873 Improvement in tar and petroleum burners
US2491610 *Feb 23, 1946Dec 20, 1949Daniel And Florence GuggenheimJet directive device
US2888040 *Jul 26, 1955May 26, 1959Cee And Tee Products IncSoda water dispenser
US2921605 *Jun 10, 1958Jan 19, 1960BoothDispensing valve unit
US2940483 *May 15, 1958Jun 14, 1960Modern American Products IncDispensing apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3310203 *Oct 20, 1964Mar 21, 1967Mccann S Engineering & Mfg CoDrink-dispensing device
US3443589 *Sep 16, 1966May 13, 1969Dole Valve CoGravity valve
US3448769 *Oct 20, 1965Jun 10, 1969Cornelius CoPost-mix valve having plural independent actuators
US3455332 *Oct 18, 1965Jul 15, 1969Cornelius CoPost-mix valve
US3839645 *Nov 23, 1973Oct 1, 1974D NickersonAutomatic liquid level control means
US3933179 *Feb 27, 1974Jan 20, 1976Hechler Iv ValentineWater and concentrate supply valves for proportioning mixer-dispenser
US3984053 *Nov 4, 1974Oct 5, 1976Hechler Iv ValentineTwo-stage jet pump proportioner
US4010768 *Dec 10, 1975Mar 8, 1977Hechler Iv ValentineTwo-stage jet pump proportioner
US4273288 *Jul 27, 1979Jun 16, 1981Societe Generale Pour L'emballageDispensing head for beverages
US4474214 *Sep 2, 1982Oct 2, 1984Iannelli Frank MBeverage mixing and dispensing valve
US4741355 *Dec 9, 1985May 3, 1988The Coca-Cola CompanyLow cost beverage dispenser valve assembly
US8079495 *Oct 8, 2010Dec 20, 2011Pepsico, Inc.Beverage dispensing system with a head capable of dispensing plural different beverages
US8113384Sep 22, 2008Feb 14, 2012Pepsico, Inc.Beverage dispensing system with a head capable of dispensing plural different beverages
US8123080Sep 22, 2008Feb 28, 2012Pepsico, Inc.Beverage dispensing system with a head capable of dispensing plural different beverages
US8127966Sep 22, 2008Mar 6, 2012Pepsico, Inc.Beverage dispensing system with a head capable of dispensing plural different beverages
US8356730Jan 25, 2012Jan 22, 2013Pepsico, Inc.Beverage dispensing system with a head capable of dispensing plural different beverages
US8590746Sep 14, 2012Nov 26, 2013Pepsico, Inc.Beverage dispensing system with a head capable of dispensing plural different beverages
US8616412Jan 21, 2013Dec 31, 2013Pepsico, Inc.Beverage dispensing system with a head capable of dispensing plural different beverages
EP0007877A1 *Jul 27, 1979Feb 6, 1980Societe Generale Pour L'emballageDraught-dispensing head for an apparatus distributing even beverage quantities
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/898, 137/12.5, 239/415, 239/433, 239/414, 137/607, 137/801
International ClassificationB67D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/0082, B67D1/005
European ClassificationB67D1/00H2B4H, B67D1/00H8B