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Publication numberUS3167221 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 26, 1965
Filing dateApr 10, 1961
Priority dateApr 10, 1961
Publication numberUS 3167221 A, US 3167221A, US-A-3167221, US3167221 A, US3167221A
InventorsBen Feinstein, Leonard Wirth
Original AssigneeBen Feinstein, Leonard Wirth
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reversible and vented spout unit and can
US 3167221 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 26, 1965 B. FEINSTEIN ETAL REVERSIBLE AND VENTED SPOUT UNIT AND CAN Filed April 10, 1961 w 0.7;) T T W M 6 5 7 N ze 20 d) United States Patent 3,167,221 REVERSIBLE AND VENT El) SPGUT UNIT AND CAN Ben Feinstein, 4427 Don Felipe Drive, Los Angeles, Calif., and LeonardWirth, 4854 Dempsey St, Eueino,

Calif.

Filed Apr. 10, 1961, Ser. No. 101,725

Claims. (Cl. 222--481) This invention relates to cans for storing liquid, particularly volatile liquid, and is particularly concerned with a vented spout useful to dispense liquid from the can, it being a general object of this invention to provide a combined spout and closure for a liquid storage conltainer, or can, and which usefully serves as a dispenser and alternately as a closure.

Liquid storage containers, or commonly referred to as cans, are widely employed to hold volatile liquids such a s'cleaning solvents and gasoline, etc. The volume of these cans varies widely, in the country, from a single pint to, say for example, five gallons. Although the size of the can is not important a usual and widely used size is the one gallon size, this being the unit of measurement most widely employed in the sale of volatile fluids, such as gasoline.

The container or can of the class under consideration varies widely in geometric configuration and is usually made of sheet metal, with side walls, a top and bottom, and closed by a single screw cap. The cap covers an opening, usually at one side and corner of the top, so that the liquid can be poured from the can by tipping the same. However, pouring cannot be accomplished satisfactorily from a full can, especially without the pro vision of a pouring spout, and even with a tubular spout in place of the said cap satisfactory pouring cannot be obtained. Dissatisfaction arises from the lack of a vent to admit air to displace the liquid that is poured. Consequently, without a vent there is a periodic surging of liquid, causing it to gush forth uncontrollably at intervals. This periodic and indeterminable gushing action is present with or without a spout, when pouring from a can without a vent, and this invariably results in substantial spillage and slow dispensing.

An object of this invention is to provide a spout that can be stored within the container or can and which can be withdrawn and mounted for convenient pouring of liquid from the said can.

Another object of this invention is to provide a vented pouring spout for a container or can and which prevents surging of liquid as it is dispensed. Further, the said vent means that we provide is incorporated in the spout structure and does not encumber the said can in any way.

It is still another object of this inventionv to provide a vent construction to be applied to the already standardized container or can construction, wherein the spout enters through the usual pouring opening for housing it within the said can, and wherein the said spout mounts on and projects from the said usual pouring opening.

The various objects and features of this invention will be fully understood from the following detailed description of the typical preferred form and application thereof, throughout which description reference is made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGS. 1 and 2 are perspective views showing a typical can of the class under consideration and the two useful installations of the vented can spout of the present invention.

FIGS. 3 and 4 are enlarged detailed sectional views, FIG. 3 showing the position of the can spout shown in FIG. 1, and FIG. 4 showing the position of the can spout as shown in FIG. 2.

3,l7,22l. Patented Jan. 26, 1965 FIG. 5 is a plan view of one of the parts and taken as indicated by line 5-5 on FIG. 3.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged detailed section of a portion of the structure and taken as indicated by line 6-6 on FIG. 5.

in the drawings we have shown a typical container or can C of the type under consideration. Combined with the said can C is the closure and pouring spout unit S of the present invention. In FIG. 1 of the drawings the spout and vent unit S is shown with a spout A inserted into the can C and with the closure B in use and exposed. In FIG. 2 of the drawings, the spout and vent unit S is shown mounted for pouring liquid from the can C and with the closure B removed and not used. both of the two conditions shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, respectively, the tubular pouring opening of the can C is employed to receive and to position the spout and vent unit S.

The can C that we have shown is a typical rectangular one-gallon can with flat side walls 10, a fiat bottom, and a flat top 11. The pouring opening 12 is a tubular part offset to one corner of the top 11 and it projects normally therefrom. The particular opening 12 that we employ is a standardized one and three-quarter inch opening, the part 12 forming the same being threaded to receive a cap that is not employed, but which is modified as a coupler D, to be described.

The coupler D that we employ in lieu of the usual cap is essentially the same as a cap in that it has a depending skirt 13 that is threaded to screw onto the opening part 12. However, the top 14 of the cap is modified and provided with an opening 15 therethrough and of substantial size. In practice, only a small marginal portion of the top 34 remains and such as to overlie the top rim of the part 12. It is to be understood that other types of caps may be employed, for example snap-on type caps can be used thus avoiding use of screw threads.

The spout and vent unit S involves an elongate tubular spout A carried by a mounting plate 20 and adapted to have two assembled positions relative to the can C. Further, the unit S involves a vent means V also carried by the mounting plate 20. As shown, the said mounting plate 21 is a flat disc-shaped element, smaller in diameter than the inside diameter of the threads of the coupler D. A plurality of small radial projections 21 extend from the periphery of the plate 29 in order to engage with the threads in the coupler D and so that the parts remain assembled and do not easily separate.

The tubular spout A projects from one side of the plate 243 and opens at the other side of the plate 20, said spout A being spaced inward from the periphery of the plate so as to extend by or through the opening 15 in the liquid flows therethrough from (the can C. The valve of the vent means V is a poppet type check valve with a seat 25 that is engaged by a valve disc 26. A stem 27 extends from the disc 26 to guide the same and projections 28 extend inwardly in the flow passage 29 to retain the disc 26 in Working position relative to theseat 25.

In accordance with the invention, the vent means V is in the form of a tubular element that projects well into the can chamber in order to admit displacement air to said chamber at a point removed inwardly from the plane of the plate 20 where liquid enters the spout A. Thus, air

. entering the. chamber doe the can,saidspout beingihidden from view.

erei anus again allowing spout Ais extndedinto thecan C to be. housed, thenlthe closure B is utilized to closethe otherwise open spout A t and the vent means V that is operable to open Thesaidj closure'B is afcapj-shaped element with a rim 30 to seal with the top 14 of the cou'pler'D andwith a dome 31" tooverlie thewent means V that projects from the plate With. the unit S installed in the can C,1as shown in FIG.

1,'th ereTisLsealed engagement of the-closure B with the opening part,12,the plate 20being clampedtherebetween, andliQuids are safely contained within the chamber. in

From theioregoing. it .will be apparent that we have 'provideda. very" simple and readilyuseful combination of elements that can be quickly assembled in the two manners. shown. 'In order. to use'the vented'canspout of thepresent invention it is simply necessary to unscrew the couplerD andito reverse the position of the spout A. Theclosure-B, isremoved from the assembly and the coupler Liquidwill readily flow from the. spout A without surging 7 thereof, this action being aiforded by the provision of the vent means V which operates to jet displacement air into the chambergof the can while allowing full flow of liquid; from the said chamber. v t j j Having described only a typical preferred form and, application of our invention, we do not wishto be limited or restricted to thespecific details herein set forth, but wish to reserve-to ourselves any modifications-0r variations that may appear to those skilled in the art and fall 1 within the scope of the following claims. I

, Having described our invention, we claim:

a a 'r .4 z therein and with: a single openi reversible spout unit comprising a pouring tube permanently fixed to and extending from one side of a mounting plate and a valve controlled vent opening displaced later-allyof the pouring tubeand through and open at said mounting plate and permitting fluid to flowin a'direction opposite from the extension of the pouring'tube, said plate being co-extensivewith the jsaid opening and with .an opening thereth rough passingtthe tube and exposing the vent opening; thespout unit havinga' first mounted position with the pouringtube projecting through the single opening and into the chamber and a second mounted position with the pouring tube." projecting from the, opening at the exterior of the chamber, acoupler'engaging the plate tofsecure it to the can, and a closure to overlie and seal the first mentioned opening when thespout unit is in I said first position.

;,4. In combination with a c a pouring tube permanently'fixed to and extending from he? pouring tu aid lp tekbeig co x en ith t said part and with an opening" therethrough passing the tube and exposing the ventopening, the spout unit having, a first'mounted position with the pouring tube projected v through the part and into the chamber and a second mounted position with the pouring tube projected from the p t at e exterihr'ofe cham a hr 'd d p r screwed'onto the plate and securing it, to the part onthe can, and a closure to overlie and seal the-s aid p wh n w 5 In combination with acan having. a closed chamber therein and with a thread d, part forming a single opening othe d ber; a er l po un t o p ng 1. In combination with a can having a closed chamber I therein and with a single opening to the said chamber; a reversible spout unitcomprising a pouring tube perma nently fixed to and extending from one side, of a mounting plate and-a vent opening displaced laterally of the,

pouring tube and; through and, open at said mounting plate, said plate being co-extensive with the said-single opening and with-an opening therethrough passing the tube and exposing the vent opening, the spout unit having a first mounted position with the pouring tube projected through the opening and into the chamberand a second mounted position with the pouring tube projected from the opening at the exterior of the chamber, a coupler engaging the plate to secureit tothe can, and'a closure to overlie and sealthe first mentioned opening when the.

spoutEunit is in said first position. g

2 In combination with a can having a closed chamber therein and with ,althreaded part forming a single opening to the said chamber; a reversible spout unit comprising a pouringtube permanently fixed to and extending from onefsideof ai mounting plate and a vent opening displaced, laterallyof the pouring tube and through andopen at said mounting plate, said, plate beingco=extensive with' the, saidf part and with an opening therethrough passing the tube and. exposingthe vent opening,: the.spout unit. having a 'first. mounte'dfposition with the pouring tube projected through the part and into the chamber; and a second mounted position with the pouringtube projected froni'thepar t at theexteriorof the chamber, a threaded coup1ei'."s'crewed onto the plate and securing it to the part on the;can, and aclosure to overlie andsealthe said part when the spout} unit is in said first, position.

3. combination with a can having a closed chamber apouring'tu be permanently fixed; to and extending from' one side of a mounting platejand a valve controlled tube vent opening. displaced laterallyjof the pouringtube and through'and: open at said mounting plate, and projecting ub an a ly romt c. plate i a d re io pp t o the extensionjof-the; pouring tube and permitting. fluid to p u n t be nd xpos n h hhejvent op n g, the spoutunit having afirst'lmounted position with the pourn hepmiec ed hmh h epa an i t e a r and a second mountedv position with the pouring tube projected from the, part at the exterior of the chamber, a threaded coupler screwed onto, the plate? and securing it to 'thejparton the can, and a closure, to overlie and seal.

the said'part when thespout unitis insaid first position.

' Befierencesc ited by the Examiner UNITEDiSTATES: PATENTS- RAPHAEL M..LUPO', Primary Examiner. SAMUELF. QQLEMAN, Louis J. DEMBO,

" Examiners.

ng to the said chamber; a

I an having a closed chamber thcrein and with aythreaded part forming a single opening to the said chamber; 'a reversible spoutunit comprising flow in-a direction, oppositefrom'the direction of said. 'po r nglube extension said l tehein ex nsive .With. the'said part and with an opening'therethrough passing-

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US290824 *Dec 25, 1883 Automatic vent for water-pipes
US386418 *Aug 11, 1867Jul 17, 1888By Direct And Mesnf AssignmentsMeasuring bottle or flask
US1297458 *Mar 12, 1917Mar 18, 1919Edward GarveyPredetermined-bulk liquid-dispenser.
US2210676 *May 25, 1939Aug 6, 1940Min A Max CompanyPouring attachment for cans
US2649227 *Mar 23, 1951Aug 18, 1953Ohio Corrugating CompanyContainer for liquids and semiliquids
IT462108B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3360169 *Apr 7, 1966Dec 26, 1967Lion Fat Oil Co LtdContainer with an improved dispensing closure
US4643825 *Dec 6, 1984Feb 17, 1987General Chemical CorporationBulk container system for high purity liquids
US4832232 *Apr 8, 1988May 23, 1989Broccoli Anthony BSpray gun vent
US5275313 *Feb 7, 1992Jan 4, 1994Ashland Oil, Inc.Chemical dispenser having an exterial connecting apparatus with a quick disconnect assembly
US5277343 *Aug 21, 1992Jan 11, 1994Parsonage Harvey JContainer with pouring spout
US20120312813 *Feb 25, 2011Dec 13, 2012Monsanto Technology LlcContainer assemblies for storing, shipping, and/or dispensing fluids, and related methods
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/481, 222/568, 222/545, 222/539
International ClassificationB65D47/06
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/061
European ClassificationB65D47/06A