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Publication numberUS3167805 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 2, 1965
Filing dateDec 21, 1962
Priority dateDec 22, 1961
Also published asCA735864A, DE1467731A1, DE1869482U
Publication numberUS 3167805 A, US 3167805A, US-A-3167805, US3167805 A, US3167805A
InventorsPaul Zuppinger, Wernhard Huber
Original AssigneePaul Zuppinger, Wernhard Huber
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Net enclosed soap article
US 3167805 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 2, 1965 P. zuPPlNGl-:R ETAL 3,167,805

NET ENCLOSED SOAP ARTICLE Filed Deo. 21, 1962 1. Paul Zupplnger,

Wernho rd Hu been;s

INVENT AT1-ORNE@ United States Patent O 3,167,805 NET ENCLOSED SOAP ARTICLE` Paul Zuppinger, Bodenweg 12, Arlesheim, and Wernhard Huber, Pelikanweg 9, Basel, Switzerland Filed Dec. 21, 1962, Ser. No. 246,423 Claims priority, application Switzerland, Dec. 22, 1961, 14950/ 61; February 20, 1962, 2128/62 12 Claims. (Cl. 15-568) It has already been proposed many times to enclose a soap bar in a conventional net, in order to cause increased lathering, to prevent the soap from slipping and enable the soap to be hung up and to be completely used. It has also been suggested to enclose soap in a sack-shaped network of loosely woven material such as cotton, paper or nylon, the threads of which are coated with natural or synthetic rubber (cf. French Letters Patent 734,094, Swiss Letters Patent 217,729 and U.S. Letters Patent 2,607,940). Contrary to these recommendations, one notes when using such nets, in particular net or knitwear made of cellulose-containing materials or of rubber that the asserted increase in lathering does not occur. Namely, when a bar of soap is enclosed in a knotted net of cotton threads or in a permeable loosely woven textile material and is then wetted well with water, it is noted that the net or the material sicks to the surface of the soap, producing a greasy consistency and that no increase in lathering is effected. Furthermore, there is the disadvantage that netted products made of cellulose materials or of rubber become dirty and rot, giving the soap an unattractive appearance. Because of the hygroscopic nature ofthe cellulose ber and soap combination, the

soap is practically always in a moist state. The knots become hard, so that they rub the skin uncomfortably when using the soap. `The foregoing comments all explain why a combination of bars of soap with nets has not yet provided a useful measure'for increasing the usefulness of bars of soap and why this combination has not led to a new art in connection with bars of soap.

It has now surprisingly been discovered that an astonishing increase in lathering is, in fact, obtained with the aid of nets having selected properties. Moreover, the drawbacks of conventional nets are thereby overcome. The nets which may be utilized according to the invention possess resilient, i.e. rebounding or springy properties, and consist of hard-elastic, thermoplastic, hydrophobic material. The resilient propertiesv arise from the combined effect of the flexibility and rigidity of the net. They must be such that, when the Vsoap is used, those parts of the net which project beyond the surface'of the soap, or stand away from it, immediately spring back into shape after being bent. v

The lathering is primarily caused in that, by the reciprocal movement of the soap solution and the resilient net of hydrophobic material in the presence of air, soap lamellae form in the meshing of the net, which turn into lather. The net must be flexible and yet sutliciently rigid in order that the soap solution forming upon use of the soap may be able to form soap lamellae with the net.r This surprising effect of the net may be determined, for example, on the rone hand by immersing the net partially in the soap solution and moving the soap solution by shaking, and on the other hand by moving the net up and down by the action of bending forces in the still soap solution. The lathering is unexpected and surprisingly great in both cases. However, if the same tests are made with nets or fabrics of cotton and with nets of soft synthetic material, for example of softened polyvinyl chloride, that is to say with nets which do not have the described resilient properties, one notes that no additional lathering takes place in the first case and that no lather forms at all in the second case.

ice

In this connection it should be mentioned that there has been no lack of attempts to increase the lathering of bars of soap with other means than netlike articles, namely with such which are based on the known lather-producing effect of sponges. Instead of natural sponges, it has been proposed to enclose the soap in sacks of soft sponge material, in particular of polyurethane sponge material. It has further been suggested, instead of using such sponge materials, to insert the bar of soap in a sack-like product of several superimposed layers of a thermoplatic material in knitted form. The sponge-like products have a threedimensional form and the lather-production is based on modification of volume of the hollow areas present, in which there must be soap solution as well as air. The modification of volume of the hollow areas is caused by pressure forces acting from the exterior. Covers of semirigid, plastic or tlexible material, or of rubber, have also been proposed, which comprise either sharp-edged, perforated rims with projections in the form of knobs, outwardly conically broadened holes or cellular recesses in the form of ribs crossing at right-angles. The rims and the knobs are intended -for massage, and the holes or recesses act as suction cups which produce lather with the application of pressure. In the case of the present invention, on the other hand, the lather is not formed by the deformation of hollow areas, but by the pressureless cooperation of air, soap solution and a thin, resilient net. The application of pressure forces is even preventative of lather in the case of the product of the invention. The lighter lthe movements, the more plentiful and easier is the lathering. Lather surprisingly forms when one merely slides 'the product of the invention over flat, smooth surfaces without pressure, for instance over glass plates -or textile fabrics spread out on a at base. This lathering can only be produced with heavy pressure movements when the soap is enclosed in sponge-like articles. Moreover, the sponge-like products have the disadvantage that the surface, in particular sensitive skin, is roughened by the necessary application of pressure, dirt and lime` soap easily deposit in the interior, it is difficult to keep the soap product dry and considerable quantities of water are required for the lathering as well as for rinsing after use. vThere is Afurther the drawback that no immediate Soaping effect is present. Contrary to these disadvantages, in the case of the invention only a small part of the'surface of the soap is covered by the threads of the net such that the soap is immediately ready for use. The surface of the soap is always in contact with the surface to be treated, so that one touches the soap as well as the net when picking up the bar of soap.

The object of the invention is a soap article consisting of soap and a net and being immediately ready for use, and which is characterized by that it contains at least one bar of soap permanently enclosed in a net made of a hydrophobic, thermoplastic highpolymer having a substantially smooth exterior on all sides, said net further possessing resilient properties upon use of the soap and advantageously being produced by extrusion, and having slip-fast meshes of an average Width of l to 20 millimeters.

The production of nets with the required properties is known [cf. Kunststoffe, volume 51 (1961), p. 801]. 'Ihey may be produced from a suitable polyvinylchloride plastisol over a turning engraved roller with perpetual solidilication of the paste. The nets may also be produced by sealing extruded and drawn monotls. Woven nets are also suitable provided they have the required resilient properties in use and provided the meshes are slip-fast. Such nets are preferably used which may be produced by direct extrusion of a monoiil made from a thermoplastic high polymer in net form. By means of contrarotating apparatus, .a direct sealing of the monotil is obtained and tubular nets or at nets are produced in or multi-'edged cross-section.

Vare especially suitable.

. 4.3; a single operation. The meshes may be rhomboid, circular, or of any other shape [see Verpackungsrundschau, volume (1959), p. 78; yModern Plastics,

view, whereas the C16-C18 fatty acidsV generally present volume 37, September 1960, p. 156, and British Letters Patent 836,555 and 836,556]. Tubular nets are particularly advantageous, which are produced entirely by extrusion of a thermoplastic synthetic substance. In the case of these nets, the knots are formed simultaneously with the threads by an extrusion step by means of imly constituted, hard-elastic, highmolecular products, preft erably fully synthetic high polymers such as polyvinyl chloride,.polyvinylidene chloride, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinyl formal, polycarbonates, polyamides, polyesters, and in particular polyolefins such as .polyethylene Vand. polypropylene.

The average diameter, or the average greatest cross-sectionaldimension, respectively, of the thread is, generally 0.1 to 2, andV preferably 0.25 to 1.2 millimeters. millimeter is employed, the resilient properties necessary for the production oflather are lost, whereas with a larger diameter than 2 millimeters the force necessary to flex the net is too great. The mesh width of the net must be such with a given thread thickness that the described resilient properties are on hand when Ithe .soap enclosed therein is used. In consideration of this condition, the net possesses an average mesh Width of 1 to ,20, preferably 4 to 15 millimeters; It is advantageous to'use tubular-nets obtained by extrusion which preferably Vhave a rhomboid mesh form with a mesh Width of 4 to l5 millimeters, a thread thickness of 0.3 to 1 millimeter, and inv slack state an average -tube diameter of 2 to 10 centimeters. Nets with rhomboid meshes have a smaller surface in slack state than'in extended state. When such a net isextended, it contracts as a result ofthe tensile stress'` perpendicular to# the longitudinal, direction. The 'surfaces of the nets'used in accordancefwith the invention are smooth, that is tosay no projecting parts are present,V

and thestructure of the meshes and crossings is not such that the surfaces to be cleansed are roughenedor chafed 'or that the net catches thereon. Knotless nets are therefore appropriately used. For the purpose of 'advantageous massage effect, the nets may comprise smallirounded thickenings at the crossings of the-threads, which' generally do not exceedthe double or triple of the thread rcoss-section, The thermoplastic mass may furthercontain dyestuifs in order to give the net a coloured appearance.

As soaps there come in question in particular those bars of soap which are used in the`household and which are employed for toilet use and to` clean textiles. Examplesy of such soaps are curd soap, Castile soap, ne soaps,

olive oil soap, palm oil soaps and milled toilet soaps, Which accordin'gto the type of oil or fat used, and accord- The thread of the net may have a round, oval Y steps therefor. If a thread diameter of less than 0.1

ing to the purpose for which theyV are to be employed,l

contain -95% total fatty acids i.e. the alkali 'salts thereof. The soaps may contain `the usual additives, such as glycerine, super-fatting agents, scents, dyestuifs or sodium poly phosphates. Synthetic soaps, so-called syndets, which are composed offatty alcohol sulphate or fatty acid condensation products, also come in consideration A particularly valuable improvement yin the fieldv of soap industry by means of the invention consists, in particular in the field of compositions for skin care, in that hard soaps Lather surprisingly forms much more readily with-'hard soaps than with soft soaps, that is tosayY thel reverse of the effect obtained when using soap Without a net. The lathering ability of bars of soap is based, as is known on the presence of C10-14 fatty acids.` Asl a result of their irritating effect, however, theseflatter.- are not harmless from a physiological point of in soap, which have poorlathering power and give rise to hard properties, are physiologically harmless. It is now possible, by means of the invention, to'V employ bars of soap for body care which, consist to a much greater extent than previously Vof the physiologically harmless C16C18or Cl-.Czrfatty acids. In the case of the bars of soap designatedas hard in connection with the invention, no or vonly aslight sticking of the net to the surface of the soap voccurs in use and afterthedrying'of the soap system, so `that thefnet orl the soap',respectively, is-again capable of free movement at the occasion of the subsequent use thereof. The use of soaps whereby the net sticks to the surface of the soap when dry and when in use, or whichy can only be freed'fromrthe said surface with difficulty, is not advisable since theincreased lathering is only caused by movement of the parts of the net standing away from the surface and no longerof the entire surface of the net.

The closing of the net is permanent, that is to say such `that it can no' longer be opened fwitho'ut taking special For instance, thepermanent closing. is effected by mechanical means, suchas by binding with threads or ties, with clips, with strong tensile force by means `of springsor rubber cbands, or-With metal clips. The net is advantageously closed byV hot-sealing. 'When using mechanicaly closing means, one must namely take care that they fulfil the Vrequirement'of maintaining an over-allsmooth exterior surface,.that is tosay that they cause no .undesired rubbing and no catching. In the case of the; sealing, the points of fusion should be as rounded as possible.y It is advantageous to enclose the soap in an endless tubular net, whereby a continuous hotsealing possible by means ofmechanical devices, if desired leaving anintermediate vportion therebetween. f Flat ortubular nets having kconnected net-likeperforated and non-perforated sections are also suitable' because a welded seam cam easily be performed. If sack-shaped nets are used,` Which are obtained by sealingV the one end of a tubular net, `in order that thev sealing is on the inside the sack may be ,turned inside out,'the soap inserted, and the other net endtagain appropriately closedV by sealing. The advantage consists in that only onerclosure is on the outside of the net.` Instead ofa tubular rnet, a band-like net may. also beused, Vwhereby'the sealing may then also be .effected .alongthe longitudinal axis. VIf desired, an

impressionV of a sign or a name may be performed together f with the sealing; moreover, a foil, a ring, a hook or a ilexible projection in the form of a thread, a cord or a chain, may be connected with vthey netv by sealing. The projection may serve tohang up the soap enclosed in the net or to attach .the Asame to'the'faucet or the rear-wall of a Wash basin. In'.both' cases the removal of the soap is therebyy hindered. The exibleprojection may also be connected with the net merely .by knotting;l After use the soap enclosed Yinthe net is appropriatelyvhung on a hookV over the wash basin, the.' bath tub, the Wash trough or the soap dish,ipreferably yby a mesh inthe-net. The Water can thereby drip off and the greasiness usually arising when keeping the soap in a dish orithe like does not occur. The soap is always at hand, immediately ready vfor use,and is in a dry, hygienic and thus attractive state. T ovmeet the requirementfor immediate soaping effect, it usuallysuffices, in .particular with hard soaps, to enclose the same in a single net. In the' case-of soft soaps the net` can penetrate into the soap,.as mentioned, and stick to the same,- whereby ithe 'said effect-of the net is partially hindered from cominginto effect. In such casesV it is; appropriate to enclose the .soap in two nets. The outer net then assumes the said functions and the inner net prevents the penetration ofythe outer one.

Thel preparatiorrof the. soap yproduct according to the invention is effected such that the: soap per se is enclosed free for'movement from the start and that this condition is not only attained with the progressive reduction in size of the bar or bars arising from use of the soap. By the term free movement, it is meant that the soap or the net may easily be moved or adjusted into another position. The soap is advantageously enclosed in the net such that a wedge-shaped or arcuate gusset with a length of 1 to 5 centimeters is formed. The presence of projecting net parts with resilient properties, or such which stand away from the soap, as well as the free movement of the net and the soap may be considerai to be the principal causes for the increased lathering when using the soap.

Not only single bars of soap but also severay such bars may be enclosed in a net. For instance, several balls, cubes or rods of soap, which may have different colors to please the eye, may be enclosed in a net of the kind described. The intermediate spaces and the possibility of movement of the content of such nets promote lather- In FIGURES la, 1b, 1c, 3, 4, 5 and 6, nets are shown such as are obtained by extrusion of a thermoplastic according to German Letters Patent 1,109,131. FIG. 1a shows such a net in slack condition, FIG. 1b the same net extended to twice the size shown in FIG. la and FIG. 1c the said net extended to three times the size shown in FIG. la. The bar of soap is preferably enclosed in the net such that the latter assumes the shape according to FIG. lb. When the soap is being used, the net may alternately assume the shape illustrated in FIGS. 1a, 1b or 1c, whereby the lathering is equally promoted. FIGURE 2 shows a net such as is obtained by extruding and sealing monols, in accordance with British Letters Patent No. 836,555 and 836,556. Slight thickenings are present where the threads join. In FIGURE 3 the soap product of the invention is shown hung up and attached. In said FIGURE 3, 1 is a device for hanging up the soap, attached to the faucet by a loop means and having a hook 2, on which one mesh of the net is hung. The soap enclosed in the net is designated by 3, the arcuate gusset by 4 and the sealing joint by 5. The net is exibly attached for movement by a securing means 6 to the wall at 7. The securing means is sealed with the net ends at 8. In FIGURE 4 a soap enclosed in the net is illustrated, a ring 9 being attached to the net by sealing. The net is closed by .a welded seam 10. FIGURE 5 shows three soap balls 11, permanently enclosed in a sack, the one closure 12 of which is inside the net. FIGURE 6 shows an oval bar of soap 3 secured to an irremovable holder 13 in the manner usual in restaurant wash-rooms, the said holder being mounted on the wall or to any appropriate appliance present. The net slipped over the bar of soap 3 is drawn together and bound fast at the upper end 14 and sealed at the lower end 15 of the bar of soap, but is sufficiently loose and movable around the fixed piece of soap that an increased lathering is obtained in accordance with the method ofthe invention.

The following examples, which are illustrative bu-t not restrictive of the invention, demonstrate the surprising results of nets with the properties described and lead to the recognition that the following effects enter into consideration with respect to the lathering:

(l) On the basis of the rigidity and simultaneous exibility of the net, that is to say on the basis of the rebound properties, lather forms with the repeated llexing of the ends of the net or with the repeated pressure against the bar of soap of the parts of the net standing away from the soap.

(2) By the reciprocal movement of the soap on the hydrophobic, flat and smooth net, or in other words by the reciprocal movement of the net on the surface being cleaned, lather immediately forms.

(3) The air which is present between the surface to be cleaned and between the side of the soap facing the said surface, and in particular inside the meshes of the net, causes the formation of lather on smooth surfaces when vthe soap and net are moved back and forth thereon.

It is obvious that the soap articles of the invention, i.e. the soaps enclosed in the net, may be packed in a suitable manner in paper or carboard; if desired, the packing may consist of a water-soluble foil.

Example 1 A rectangular toilet soap weighting about g. is enclosed in a knotless tubular net which is obtained by direct extrusion of polyethylene. (cf. FIGURE lb). Both ends of the tube are closed by hot-sealing. The average cross-section of the thread is 0.3 mm. and the average mesh size of the rhomboid meshes 5 rnm. The diameter of the tube in slack state is about 3 cm. and the weight of 1 meter of tube is 7.5 g. The net contracts perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the tube and perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the rhomboid such that the soap is. surrounded in its longitudinal axis by the net, substantially without any intermediate space. The net is somewhat longer than the soap, however, so that there is a space, i.e. a gusset of about 2 cm. at each end.

Dirty hands are washed with a bar of soap covered in this manner. In a short time, considerable lathering occurs and the dirt is thoroughly and rapidly removed, in addition by the mechanical cleansing effect of the net.

When taking a shower, about half the time is required to soap the entire body with the net-soap than when using conventional soap i.e. soap which is not surrounded by a net-sack. The sure grip of the soap and the massage effect of the net on the skin are simultaneously found to be agreeable.

The use of a rectangular bath-soap is advantageous, which is enclosed in a net of the described kind having a tape-like or ribbon-like extension of about 1 meter secured or hung on each end. The soap is held fast with both hands at the ends of the extension, whereby all parts of the body can be soaped and cleansed with heavy la-thering and massage effect by moving the soap back and forth.

Example 2 To determine the lathering, 3 bases are used, each having a surface dimension of 400 cm.2:

(a) a wooden board covered four-fold with a silk fabric,

(b) a laminated plate pressed from an aminoplast, and

(c) a glass plate.

A 72% olive oil soap is used having the following dimensions: 6 X 3 x 1.5 cm. This is enclosed in a tubular net in accordance'with Example 1, the net having a length of 7-8 cm. The above said bases are wetted with water, whereupon the soap enclosed in the net is moved back and forth thereon. In all cases a layer of lather immediately forms, surprisingly also on smooth surfaces, which said layer of lather covers the base.

The tests show that the product of the invention may also be used in the cleaning of textiles with particular advantage in that it makes the use of a scrubbing board superfluous.

If a hard Castile soap is used, the net enclosing the soap for free movement therein, lather can be produced by light reciprocal movement on rounded members such as pipes or tubs, and even on edges. If a knife is moved over a spot where the net stands away from the surface ,of the soap, lather forms in a short time.

Example 3 A Castile soap weighing about 400 g. is used, which iS enclosed in a tubular net produced by hot-sealing a monotil of polyethylene and having small thickenings at the crossings of the threads (cf. FIGURE 2). The average mesh size of the net is l0 mm., the average cross-section of the thread is 0.2 mm. and the diameter of the tube is about l0 cm. The net encloses the bar of soap loosely and its openings are mechanically permanently closed. A mans shirt of a cotton fabric is wetted with water and spread out on a flat, smooth Surface. The textile material is treated, in particular the cuffs and the collar, by passing the soap enclosed in the net back and forth over the same. Lather immediately forms and vin a short time the treated surface iscovered Withflather.

Example 4 A Castile soap weighing about 250 g. and having a total fatty acid content of 82% is enclosed in a tubular net obtained by direct extrusion of polypropylene` having an average mesh size of 12 mm., an average thread cross- ,section of-0.5 mm. and a tube diameter .of about8 cm.,

closed by means of sealing.V The net loosely surrounds the soap such that it can glide over the surface of the soap when using this latter. A dirty linen kitchen cloth is wetted with water and spread out on the flat bottom of a wash trough. The soap is now pased back and forth thereover, whereby lather immediately forms.- If the same soap is used without the netno lather whatesoever occurs on the linen fabric.

Example 5 The advantageous effect of enclosing bars of soap in a net is particularly evident when using hard soap and soap which does not lather readily. A net. is used suchas that described in Example 1. On the one handV a Castile soap which Ihas been stored for a long time and having a fatty acid content of 72% is used and on the other hand a transparent glycerine containing soap. In'the absence of a net, only a slowly occuring lathering is noted when Soaping textile fabrics or ones hands. If :the soap is enclosed in a net, this latter readily glides over the hard surfacev of the soap and immediately causes, contrary to all expectations, substantial amounts of lather. In the case of the glycerine soap, the grip-fast property whichY may simultaneously be attained is very agreeable. Finally, the same advantageous results are obtained Vbar of soap which is permanently enclosed in a sealed net possessing resilient properties upon use of said soap and consistingof an extruded hydrophobic, thermoplastic Vhigh polymer, said net having further a substantially. smooth exterior on all sides and slip-fast meshes of an average Width of 1 to 20 millimeters.

3. An article of manufacture comprising soap and net immediately ready for use and consisting of at least one bar of soap which is permanently enclosed in a sealed tubular, knotless net possessing resilient properties upon use of said soapfand consisting of an extrudedl hydrophobie, thermoplastic lngh polymer, said net having further a substantially smooth exterior on all sides and slip-fast meshes of an average Width of 1 to 20 millimeters.

4. An article of manufacture comprising soap and net immediately ready for household and toilet use and consisting of at least one bar of soap which is free-movably and permanently enclosed ina sealed tubular, knotless net possessing` resilient properties upon use of said soap and consisting of an extruded hydrophobic, thermoplastic,`

high polymer, said net havingfurther a substantially smooth exterior on all sides and slip-fast meshes of an average width of l to 2O millimeters.

5. An article of manufacture comprising soap and net immediately ready forV household and toilet use and consisting vof at least one lbar of soap which is free-movably and permanently enclosed in a sealed tubular, knotless net having in the slack state an average tube diameter of 2 to 10j-centimeters, a substantially smooth exterior on allV sides, slip-fast meshes of an average width'of 1 to 2() millimeters Iand a thread thickness of VG l to 2 millimeters, said net possessing resilient properties upon'use of said soap and consisting of an extruded hydrophobic, thermoplastichighA polymer.

6. An article of manufacture comprising soap and net immediately ready for'household and toilet use: and consisting of at least-one bar ofy soapwhich is free movably and permanently enclosed in a sealed tubular, Vknotless net having in the slack state an average tubezdiameter of 2 to l() centimeters, a substantiallysmooth exterior on all sides, slip-fast meshes of an average width of 1 to20 millimeters and a thread thickness of 0.1 to 2 millimeters, said net possessing resilient properties upon'use of Ysaid soap and consisting of an extruded hydrophobic, thermoplastic high Ypolymer selectedffrom the group consisting Y of polyethylene and polypropylene.

V7. An article'of manufacture comprising soap and net immediately ready fork household and -toilet use and consisting of several bars of-soap which are free-movably and permanently enclosedfin a sealed tubular, knotless net i having in the slack state an average tube diameter of 2 to l0 centimeters,V a substantially smooth exterior on all sides, slip-fast meshes of an average Width of 1 to 20 millimeters and a 4thread thickness of 0.1V to 2 millimeters,

Vsaid niet. possessing resilient propertiesV upon use o-f said soapy andco-nsisting ofan extruded hydrophobic, thermoplastic high polymer. v

Y 8. An article of manufacture comprising soap and net immediately ready for'householdsand,toiletiuse and consisting of several bars of soap which are free-movably and permanently enclosed in a sealed tubular, knotless net havingfin the slack state an average V-tube diameter of 2 to .1G centimeters, a substantially smooth exteriorron all sides, slip-fastmeshes of anfaverage-width of l to 20 millimeters and athread thickness of 0.1 to 2 millimeters, said net possessingresilient propertiesV upon use of'said soap and consisting of an extruded hydrophobic, thermoplastic hghpolymer selected fromA the group .consisting of polyethylene and polypropylene. Y

9. In anarticle of manufacture .comprising .a bar of soap enclosed in a net, the improvement which comprises a net lpossessing resilient properties upon use of said soap and consisting ofv an extruded hydrophobic,` thermoplastic high polymer, said soap further being free-movably and permanently YenclosedY and said net further Yhaving a substantitlly smooth exterior on all ksides .and slip-fast meshes ofv an average Width of 1 to 2O millimeters.

l0. An article of manufacture as claimed in claim 1 wherein the net is connectedwith a flexible projection. i

11. An article of manufacture comprising a combination of soap' and fa net irnmedately ready for use and which consist.k of at least one bar of soap which is permanently enclosed in two nets',the inner. net preventing the penetration of the `outer net into the'V soap, the outer Vnet possessing resilient properties upon use of said soap and bothnetsy consistingr of Ya hydrophobic, Ithermoplastic high polymer, said nets having further asubstantially smooth Vexterior Aon all sides and vslip-fast meshes of an average width of l to 20 millimeters.

l2. An article of manufacture comprising a combination of soap and a net immediately readyl for household and toiletuse and consisting of at least one'bar kof soap which ispermanently enclosed in two tubular, Yknotless and sealed nets having in slack state an average tube diameterl of 2 to l() centimeters, a substantially smooth exterior on all sides, slip-fast meshes of an average Width of 1 to 20 millimeters and a thread thickness of 0.1 to 2 millimeters, the inner net preventing theV penetration of the outer net into the soap and said outer `net possessing resilient properties uponiuse of said soap,*both nets c011- 9 l@ sisting of an extruded hydrophobic, hermoplastic high 2,611,144 9/52 Lambert 15-605 polymer. 2,958,885 11/ 60 Donuey 15-568 References Cited bythe Examiner FOREIGN PATENTS UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 7341094 7/32 France- 780,014 7/57 Great Britain. 2,319,847 5/43, Clanton 15-605 X 2,607,940 8/52 Miller 15-509 CHARLES A. WILLMUTH, Primary Examiner.

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US20100107328 *Oct 23, 2009May 6, 2010Jennifer Katherine BrooksFull Bathtub Overflow Stopper and Bubble Bath Diffuser
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WO2004058026A1Dec 1, 2003Jul 15, 2004Lever Hindustan LtdCustomized personal cleansing system
WO2004058027A1Nov 28, 2003Jul 15, 2004Lever Hindustan LtdCustomized personal cleansing article
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/201
International ClassificationC11D17/04, A47K5/00, A47K5/04
Cooperative ClassificationC11D17/041, A47K5/04
European ClassificationA47K5/04, C11D17/04B