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Publication numberUS3169344 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 16, 1965
Filing dateOct 3, 1962
Priority dateOct 3, 1962
Publication numberUS 3169344 A, US 3169344A, US-A-3169344, US3169344 A, US3169344A
InventorsGreene Norman A
Original AssigneeGreene Norman A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Action toy operated by pounding
US 3169344 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 16, 1965 N. A. GREENE 3,169,344

ACTION TOY OPERATED BY POUNDING Filed 001:. s, 1962 I: F/ 6. 2 F/ a. 3

INVENTOR WA. 6mm:

I Arramvzy;

United States Patent 3,16,344 AsCTIGN TSY OPERATED BY P'QUNDHNG Norman A. Greene, New Rochelle, N31. (181 W. 55th St., New York 19, N35.) Filed Oct. 3, 1962, Ser. No. 228,101 7 Claims. (til. 46l32) This invention relates to toys, especially for young children, and more particularly to an action toy operated by impact, preferably but not necessarily by means of a mallet.

The general object of the invention is to provide an improved toy for young children. A more particular object is to provide an action toy which is operated by impact, as by means of a mallet. Considered in difierent aspect, it is an object of the invention to provide a pounding toy for children in which the pounding results in an amusing action of the toy.

To accomplish the foregoing general objects, and other more specific objects which will hereinafter appear, my invention resides in the toy elements and their relation one to another as are hereinafter more particularly described in the following specification. The specification is accompanied by a drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a vertical section taken through a toy embodying features of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a transverse section taken approximately in the plane of the line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a view like FIG. 1, but showing a modification;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary view, like FIG. 1, but showing a different form of the toy; and

FIG. 5 is a similar view showing still another form.

Referring to the drawing, and more particularly to FIG. 1, the toy comprises a base 12, a driving element 14 so mounted on the base that it is adapted to be driven downward, and an elongated slide member 16 projecting for a substantial distance from the base and having its lower end slidably received in the base. A return spring 18 urges the slide member longitudinally downward. A figure 28, in this case resembling a frog, is movable along the slide member 16. There are means to inhibit downward movement while affording upward movement of the figure, and in the present case the slide has serrations 22 engaged by a part 24 of the figure acting as a tooth or spur.

The toy further includes a force-transmitting and direction-changing means 26 between the driving element 1 3 and the slide member 16. In the present case the means 26 consists of a series of balls or spheres confined in but readily movable along a curved path 28. The halls may be made of a hard material, or if desired may be made of a somewhat resilient material such as polyethylene. In any case it will be seen that downward blows on the driving element 14, as by means of ones hand, or more preferably, by means of a mallet 3%, will cause longitudinal reciprocations of the slide member 16, and consequent movement of figure 2! upwardly along the slide member. The head of the mallet may be made of rubber or a plastic material which will not readily mar furniture.

The upward and return movement of the slide member, for each blow, is so fast that it is almost imperceptible, which increases the amusement caused by the travel of the figure along the slide member.

It will be understood that the moving figure is propelled forward by transfer of force from the serrations to the matching tooth 24 on the figure. This sends it along in a series of leaps until it flies oil the slide member at the end. The forward arms of the figure loosely engage the sides of the slide member to maintain the figure in proper position, but they do not prevent the tail portion and spur 24 of the figure from rising slightly as it moves over the 3,159,344 Patented Feb. 16, 1965 serrations. To return the figure to the lower end of the slide member, it is merely necessary to hold the tail portion or spur above the serrations as the figure is slid freely down to the starting position.

Referring now to FIG. 3, the base 32, the driving element 34, the slide member 36, and return spring 38 all may correspond to the comparable parts shown in FIG. 1. However, the force-transmitting and direction-changing means 40 dififers, and in the present case consists of a helical spring confined in and readily movable along a curved path 42. This spring has immediately adjacent coils, that is, at the top or concave side of the spring the coils abut one another closely so that the spring acts as a force-transmitting means without excessive yielding when struck by the driving element 34.

Another form of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 4. In this case there again is a base 44 carrying a driving element 46, and also carrying an elongated slide 48 having its lower end slidably received in the base 44. The return spring 59 corresponds to that previously described. The force-transmitting and direction-changing means includes a pivoted lever 52 having one end generally beneath the driving element 45, and having its other end generally beneath the lower end of the slide member 48. The pivot 54 of the lever is located between its ends, so that a downward movement of the driving element 46 causes an upward movement of the slide member 43.

Still another form of the invention is shown in FIG. 5. Here again there is a base 56 carrying a driving element 58 and a slide member 60, the latter being urged downward by a return spring 62. A figure 64 straddles and is movable along the slide member 60.

The force-transmitting and direction-changing means in this case consists of a slidable element 66 urged upward by its own return spring 68, this being a compression spring. The element 66 has a camming portion 79 underlying the lower end of the slide member. A downward blow on the driving element 58 causes its sloping or wedge-shaped camming portion 70 to drive the slide member upwardly.

In FIG. 1 the upper end of the slide member 16 is devoid of the stop means. When the figure 20 has nearly reached the end of the slide, another blow sends the figure flying oil the slide. However, stop means may be provided, and in FIGURE 5 a pin 72 extends transversely of the slide at its end, and serves to arrest movement of the figure when it reaches the end of the slide.

Another difference in FIG. 5 is that the moving figure 64 simulates a monkey with its arms 74 around the slide member 60. It will be understood that any other simulation may be employed, including mechanical objects such as an auto or an airplane, instead of a live creature.

By appropriate design of the lower part of the figure, the serrations may be formed on the bottom instead of on the top of the slide member. Moreover, it is not altogether essential to provide serrations. In FIG. 5 the arms 74 may be continued beneath the slide member, and the weight distribution of the figure may be such that the hands bear upwardly against the bottom of the slide member, While the tail bears downwardly against the top of the slide member. The resulting frictional engagement may be made sufficient to prevent downward movement of the figure. With most of the mass of the vfigure disposed above the slide member, as shown, a

such as to inhibit" downward movement while affording upward movement of thefigure, even without using actual 1 serrations on the slide member, although it is simpler }to use serrations. I

The top maybe used as a pro-school amusement toytages and ispreferred. 7

I I It is believed that the construction and operation of my improved toy, as well as the advantages thereof, will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description. It will also be apparent that while I have shown and described the invention in several preferred forms, changes may be made without departing from the scope of the invention, as sought to be defined in the following claims. 7

I claim: a

l. A toy comprising a base, a driving means on said base for movement in an up and down direction and adapted to be pounded downwardly as by means of a mallet, an elongated slide "member projecting outwardly and upwardly for a substantial distance from said base and having its lower end only slidably' received in said base, the entire projecting portion being exposed on all sides, a return spring directly connecting said slide member to said base for urging said slide member longitudinally toward the base,.means simulating a figure slidably embracing and movable from one portion to a second portion of said slide member when said driving element is actuatedymeans to inhibit rearward while affording forward movement of said figure along said slide met her, and a force-transmitting and direction-changing means between said driving element and said slide member, such that downward blows on the driving element 2. A toy as defined in claim 1 in which the slide is provided with stop means at its outer end to prevent the figure from flying ofi'theslide-on reaching the upper end. I i

3; A toy as defined in claim 1 in which the forcetransmitting and direction-changing means comprises a series of contacting balls confined in but readily movable along a curved path, said series of balls extending between the lower end of the driving element and the inner end of the slide member.

4. A toy as defined in claim 1 in which the forcetransmitting and direction-changing means comprises a helical spring with closely adjacent coils confined in but readily movable along a curved path, said helical cause longitudinal reciprocations of the slide member and 3 consequent progressive movement of the figure along the slide member.

spring extending between the lower end ofthe driving element and the inner end of the slide member.

5. A toy as defined in claim 1 inwhich the forcetransmitting and direction-changing means includes av pivoted lever having one end generally beneath the driving element and having'its other end generally beneath the lower end of the slide member, the pivot of said lever being located between its ends.

6. A toy as defined in claim 1 in which the forcetransmitting and direction-changing means includes a slidable element with resilient means urging the same upwardly and having a camming portion underlying the lower end of the slide member,

1 7. A toy as defined in claim l in which the force-- transmitting and direction-changing means between the driving element and the slide member is housed and concealed in said base. 7

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 7 RICHARDC. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2554116 *Dec 10, 1946May 22, 1951Monner Gun CorpGas operated gun
US2618376 *Oct 3, 1950Nov 18, 1952Jr Arthur E MayMaterial conveying toy
US3003767 *Mar 4, 1957Oct 10, 1961Keuls Henry P CAmusement device with projectible object
DE373046C *Mar 3, 1922Apr 7, 1923Hans KotschenreutherKletterfigur
FR657431A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4777973 *Jul 28, 1987Oct 18, 1988Kotaro NakajimaAlternate walker having extensible/contractible front and rear legs
US5853174 *Jun 24, 1997Dec 29, 1998M DesignGame and two-way ratcheting mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/314, 446/1, 446/3
International ClassificationA63H11/00, A63H11/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63H11/04
European ClassificationA63H11/04