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Publication numberUS3169581 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 16, 1965
Filing dateJul 27, 1962
Priority dateJul 27, 1962
Publication numberUS 3169581 A, US 3169581A, US-A-3169581, US3169581 A, US3169581A
InventorsPhil F Cummins
Original AssigneeGen Dynamics Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fire fighting and rescue apparatus
US 3169581 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 16, 1965 P. F. CUMMINS FIRE FIGHTING AND RESCUE APPARATUS 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 27, 1962 INVENTOR PH/L 1 CUMM/NJ arl (Q. 613% ATTOEAJE'V Feb. 16, 1965 P. F. CUMMINS FIRE FIGHTING AND RESCUE APPARATUS 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 27, 1962 AT OEMEY mud i ATTOQA/FY mm MM WW m C F N H P Ccw/ (E. B

Feb. 16, 1965 P. F. CUMMINS 3 FIRE FIGHTING AND RESCUE APPARATUS Filed July 27, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR PHIL F. CUMMIMJ Feb. 16, 1965 P. F. CUMMINS 3,169,581

FIRE FIGHTING AND RESCUE APPARATUS Filed July 27, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 V w v 149 ENG/NE INVENTOR. PHIL F. CUMM/MS AT TOPUEY E-6mm ATTOIZHE'Y 3,169,533 Patented Feb. 16, 1965 United States Patent Office=- The present invention relates generally to fire fighting and rescue equipment and, more specifically, to an apparatus which is particularly adapted for extinguishing aircraft fires and for effecting the rescue of personnel therefrom.

Although high performance turbojet aircraft have been in operation for several years at commercial as well as military airports, the fire, crash and rescue equipment at such installations is basically the same as that used when all aircraft were powered by conventional piston engines. Such equipment has proven to be inadequate for present day hazards encountered at many airports. This situation results from the use of a kerosene-base fuel for turbojet engines, which burns with a much hotter fiame than does the high octane fuel used in piston engines, and from the difference in construction between the two classes of aircraft. The higher temperature makes it more difficult to approach the fire to a position from which the extinguishing agent can be applied clfectively; and the stronger construction of jet aircraft enhances the problem of gaining access to the passenger and crew cornpartrnents.

At the present time the fire, or crash truck, most commonly used at airports is a very large and heavy vehicle which is adapted to discharge mechanical foam. Water and a protein, or detergent, solution are stored in Separate tanks and are pumped together under high pressure through aerating nozzles, which serve to expand the mixture into foam, and onto the fire. There are several disadvantages inherent in the design of such a truck, many of which result directly from the use of mechanical foam. With foam of this type it is necessary to employ a very large pump, which in turn, must be driven 'by a very large engine, in order to obtain an acceptable discharge range. Thus the truck chassis must be quite large in order to accommodate the pump, engine and tanks. Because of the excessive weight of the truck, it cannot effectively traverse soft surfaces, such as wet ground, etc. Another disadvantage of a truck of this type is that there is no provision for rescue of personnel who may be traped in a burning aircraft. The mechanical foam itself has certain inherent disadvantages. All foam materials function as fire extinguishing agents primarily by cutting off the supply of oxygen from the'fire. In aerating'the mixture to form the mechanical foam, bubbles are formed which are filled with air and hence contain oxygen. At a certain temperature, which is not uncommonly encountered in petro-chemical fires, these bubbles burst, thereby releasing oxygen in the immediate vicinity of the fire and-in many instances causing re-ignition, of'fiashback, thereof.

The fire fighting and crash apparatus of the present invention consists of a composite train of vehicles including a prime mover, one or more remotely-controlled, selfpropelled vehicles transportable by the prime mover, and one or more trailers pulled by the prime mover. The prime mover and trailers are provided with tanker tires in which the fire extinguishing agent is carried. In the preferred embodiment the agent employed is chemical foam (usually the reaction product of an aqueous mixture of sodium bicarbonate plus a stabilizer and aluminum sulfate). In additon one of the trailers is provided with a tank and accessory equipment for carrying and discharging a second fire extinguishing agent, which is preferably a dry chemical powder, such as sodium bicarbonate or potassium bicarbonate. The remotely controlled vehicles are provided with nozzles through which the agents may be'discharged. There is also provided a rescue boom by means of which personnel may be rescued from a fire without substantial danger to fire fighting personnel.

The design of the subject invention offers numerous advantages over prior fire trucks. By using tanker tires to store the fire extinguishing agent, the size and weight of the truck may be materially reduced. Since a large portion of the combined weight of the truck and fire extinguishing agent is carried in the tires, the center of gravity thereof is lowered considerably, thereby increasing the stability of the truck. The inflation pressure of the tanker tires is much lower than that of conventional tires; hence it is unnecessary to employ springs and shock absorbers on the vehicles. Another distinct advantage lies in the mobility of the present invention. As a result of the weight reduction, in combination with the greatly increased tread contact area of the tanker tires, the present fire fighting apparatus may be driven or towed across extremely soft terrain.

The use of a trailer with tanker tires greatly increases the quantity of fire extinguishing agent which may be transported to and discharged upon a fire. The inclusion of an appropriate second fire extinguishing agent makes the present fire fighting apparatus effective against all types of fires. Another important advantage is that through the use of the remotely controlled vehicles, it is possible to approach the fire more closely, thereby permitting more elfective dispersion of the fire extinguishing agent or agents, and the number of personnel'requi'red to operate the equipment is reduced by approximately fifty percent as compared with that of conventional design. a

The use of chemical, rather than mechanical foam, results in further advantages. When the two components of chemical foam are brought together, a chemical reaction occurs and carbon dioxide gas is released. The formation of such gas generates sufiicient pressureto discharge the foam through the nozzles and disperse it over a range greater than that of the prior mechanical foam equipment. Thus the need for large pumps and engines iseliminated. Moreover, the chemical foam is composed of bubbles which are filled with-carbon dioxide, an inert gas,

rather than air. Thus if the bubbles of the chemical foam are broken by the heat ofthe fire, carbon dioxide is released, thereby serving to inert the atmosphere surrounding the fire. The expansion ratio of chemical foam is approximately ten-to-one, as compared with eight-to-one for mechanical foam; thus a greater volume of foam is generated per gallon of liquid carried by the truck. Chemical foam is also more adhesive than mechanical foam, and will therefore better adhere to and remain on vertical and overhead surfaces for a longer period of time.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide an improved apparatus for fighting fires.

Another object is the provision of a fire fighting apparatus which will permit a closer approach to a fire and thereby more effective application of the fire extinguishing agent. V I

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved apparatus for fighting fires which is effective against all classes of fires.

Another object resides in the provision of an improved fire fighting apparatus having an increased capacity for carrying 'afire extinguishing agent.

Another object is to provide a more mobile fire fighting apparatus.

Another object is the provision of an improved fire fighting apparatus which is equipped with an effective means for rescuing personnel from a fire.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will be more apparent upon consideration of the following description of the appended drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective View of the invention showing the manner in which the remotely controlled vehicles may be employed in extinguishing an aircraft fire and the use of the rescue boom in removing personnel therefrom;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional elevational view through one of the tanker tires;

FIGURE 4 is a diagrammatic representation of the fire extinguishing agent system carried by the prime mover;

FIGURE 5 is a diagrammatic representation of the construction of the remotely controlled vehicles;

FIGURE 6 is a diagrammatic representation of the fire extinguishing agent system carried by a first trailer configuration;

FIGURE 7 is a diagrammatic representation of the fire extinguishing agent system carried by a second trailer configuration.

Referring now to FIGURE 1 of the drawings, the preferred embodiment of the present fire fighting and rescue apparatus includes a prime mover 10, a pair of remotely controlled vehicles 11, a first trailer 12 and a second trailer 13. The prime mover may be of any suitable construction and consists of the conventional chassis, body, engine, drive shaft, differential, axles, etc., all of which are supported upon tanker tires 19. Such tanker tires are preferably provided with a cleat-type tread for increased traction on soft terrain. As mentioned above the chemical foam ingredients are carried in the tanker tires 19 and are drawn therefrom through flexible conduits 20 connected to the outer ends of the axles, as will be more fully explained below. At the forward end of the prime mover 10 there is provided a cab 21 in which the driver and an assistant ride. Such cab 21 is preferably made in two spaced portions 21a and 21b in order that a heavily thermally insulated rescue enclosure 22 may be disposed therebetween when not in use. A rescue enclosure 22 is attached to one end of an extensible boom 23, the opposite end of which is anchored to the prime mover 10, as indicated at 24. The boom 23 may be of any suitable construction but is here shown as comprising upper and lower arms 27, 28 respectively, upper arm 27 being controlled by hydraulic actuator 25and lowerarm 28 by hydraulic actuator 26. The boom is controlled by an operator who rides in the rescue enclosure 22. Such rescue enclosure 22 is also provided with a foam nozzle 29 and a dry powder nozzle 30 through which the 'respective agents may be discharged. In the bottom of the rescue enclosure 22 is a trap door (not shown) through which personnel may enter during rescue operations.

The remotely controlled vehicles. 11 are carried on a rack or lift 31, at the front of the prime mover 10, which may be lowered and raised by means'of hydraulic actuators 32. Each of such vehicles 11 is provided with a foam discharge nozzle 34 and a dry powder discharge nozzle 35 which are connected with the respective fire extinguishing agent systems of the prime mover 10 by means of flexible conduits 36, 37, respectively. Such nozzles 34, 35 are fixedly interconnected in an over-and-under configuration and their mutual azimuthal and elevational directions are controlled by means of electric, motors in a manner to be explained below. The remotely controlled vehicles are supported upon and propelled by endless belt-type tracks 39 which are driven by electric motors. Both the nozzle motors and the track motors of each vehicle 11 are connected to a control panel located in each portion of the cab 21.

The first trailer 12 is connected to the prime mover by means of a conventional trailer hitch (not shown) aflixed on the end of a tongue 41 which is rigidly connected to the front axle 42 of the trailer. As in the case of the prime mover 10 the first trailer is supported upon tanker tires 43 wherein is carried an additional supply of the chemical foam ingredients which is withdrawn therefrom through flexible conduits 45. This supply of foam ingredients is connected with the foam system of the prime mover 10 by means of flexible conduits 46. Trailer 12 also carries a chemical dry powder dispensing system which includes a spherical tank, the upper portion of which is shown at 47, wherein a quantity of the substance is stored. Such tank 47 is connected with the prime mover dry powder system through a flexible conduit 49. It is desirable that the dry powder tank 47 also be connected with hand lines 50 which are normally wound upon reels 51 carried by trailer 12.

The second trailer 13 is towed behind the first trailer 12 and is of the same general construction, with the exception that the second trailer 13 does not include a dry powder system. As before, the foam ingredients are carried in tanker tires 51 and are withdrawn therefrom through flexible conduits 52. The foam system of the second trailer 13 is connected to the foam system of the first trailer 12 by means of flexible conduits 53. The second trailer 13 is also provided with hand lines 55 which are wound upon reels 56.

In the event of an aircraft crash, the prime mover 10 is driven to the crash scene by the most direct route, which may be across unpaved, muddy ground, with the remotely controlled vehicles 11 carried upon the lift 26 in the raised position, and the trailers 12 and 13 in tow. When the prime mover 10 reaches the vicinity of the fire, it is stopped and the lift 26 lowered to allow the vehicles 11 to be driven off the lift 26 and onto the ground or runway. The vehicles 11 then move, under their own power, toward the fire. The operation of the foam and chemical dry powder systems of the vehicles 11 and rescue enclosure 22 may be initiated at any time so long as the fire is within range. The rescue enclosure 22 is then raised and moved toward the fire through activation of boom 23. In order to eflect'the rescue of personnel as rapidly as possible, the foam and dry powder are firstdirected upon those areas of the aircraft in which such personnel are trapped. The rescue enclosure is then maneuvered into position to pick them up, as is shown in FIGURE 2. The remotely controlled vehicles 11 are moved to positions from which they can best support rescue operations. Since the escape hatches and doors are frequently jammed closed in a crash, it is desirable that the rescue enclosure 22 be provided with a circular saw 57, mounted adjacent its forward lower edge, whereby an opening may be cut in the aircraft to allow the personnel to exit therefrom. The saw 57 is preferably pivoted so that it may cut such an opening in the top of the aircraft, as shown, or in the side thereof. In order to protect the personnel while they are entering the enclosure'22, a fire curtain 59 of heat resistant material, such as asbestos, is attached about the lower edge thereof. When not in use the curtain may be rolled up and retained against the lower surface of enclosure 22 by means of a suitable release mechanism (not shown). Various other accessory equipment may be utilized in conjunction with the enclosure 22 and boom 23 to facilitate rescue. For example, a ladder (not shown) is provided by means of which persons may climb into the enclosure 22. It is also desirable to provide a power winch for hoisting injured persons into such enclosure.

As shown in FIGURE 3 the tanker mover 10 (as well as tanker tires 12 and 13, respectively) are mounted on a stationary, hollow axle 61. The beads of the tire 19 are sealed between outcr and inner plates 62 and 63, respectively, by means of a plurality of outstanding studs 65, suitably rigidly aflixed to the inner plates 63, and an equivalent number of nuts 66 threadably engaging such studs 65. Roller bearings 67, disposed within inwardly extending portions 69 of outer plates 62, provide for relatively friction-free rotation of the 19 with respect to axle 61.

tires 19 on prime 43 and 51 on trailers extension hose 71 which extends to within approximately two inches of the interior surface of the tire 19. Such hose 71 is made of rubber or other resilient material so that should the tire be deformed sufficiently to strike same, as might occur on rocky terrain, the hose will merely bend and no damage will occur. At its outer end the axle 61 is connected with the upwardly extending flexible conduit 20, by means of a right angle coupling '72, thence to the rest of the prime niovers foam system, as will be described below. In order to prevent the tire 19 from becoming deflated as the liquid is withdrawn therefrom, the interior thereof is connected to a source of gas pressurethrough a horizontal tube 73 within the hollow of the axle 61, the inner end of which is connected with an upright portion 75 which extends through the wall of the axle into the tire interior. At its outer end the horizontal tube 73 extends through the right angle coupling 72 and communicates with another upright portion 76 which, as will be seen, is connected to the gas pressure source. Although only the construction of the tanker tires 19 on prime mover it? and the associated conduits have been described and shown, it is to be understood that tanker tires 43 and 51 on trailers 12 and 13, respectively, are of a similar construction and are provided with similar conduit connections, etc.

The foam generating system and the dry powder conduits carried by the prime mover are shown schematically in FIGURE 4. In the preferred form of the invention the two ingredients of the chemical foam are carried in tanker tires on opposite sides of the prime mover. The conduits 20, which are connected with the hollow axle 61 of the tanker tires 19, are connected to manifolds 89 which, in turn, are connected to pumps 81 through conduits 82. Such pumps are preferably driven off the prime mover engine (not shown); however, a separate engine may be provided for this purpose, if desired. From the pumps 31 the foam ingredients pass through conduits 83 into a spherical expansion chamber 85 in which such ingredients are mixed and interact chemically to form foam. Since the volume of the foam after expansion is approximately ten times that of the liquid ingredients, there is thus generated a high pressure within the expansion chamber 85 which forces the foam out through foam conduit 86. In order to prevent backflow of the foam and foam ingredients as a result of such pressure, check valves 87 are placed in conduits 83. At its forward end the foam conduit 85 bifurcates and the resulting branches 8% are connected with flexible conduits as which are wound upon reels 9%) and carry the foam to the remotely controlled vehicles 11, as explained above. Valves 91 are positioned in branches 89 to control the flow of foam therethrough. The ends of conduits 36 are fitted with coupling devices 92 by means of which they may be connected with the vehicles 11. At some convenient location on foam line 86 a conduit 93 is connected thereto and serves to carry foam to discharge nozzle 29 mounted on rescue enclosure 22. A valve 94, operated from such enclosure, is disposed in conduit 93 whereby the flow of foam therethrough may be controlled. The foam system of the prime mover is connected to the trailer 12 by means of conduits 46 which are provided with coupling devices 95 and communicate with conduits 82 which carry the foam ingredients to the pumps 81. The conduits 4a and 82 are provided with shut-off valves 96 and 97, respectively, for controlling the flow of the foam ingredients therethroughr It will be noted that the conduits 46 join conduits 82 between the valves 97 and the pumps 81. Thus it may be seen that the pumps withdraw foam ingredients from either the tanker tires 19 of the prime mover, or those of trailer 12, or from both sets of tires simultaneously.

During the operation of thefoam system of the prime mover ll inflation of the tanker tires'19 is maintained by means of a suitable source of gas pressure, such as cylinders 192 of compressed nitrogen. Such cylinders 102 are connected with tanker tires 19 through conduits 103, manifolds 194 and conduits 76. A constant pressure outlet valve 1% is positioned in each of the conduits 193 and serves to. reduce the pressure from each of the cylinders to that required to maintain proper'tanker tire inflation.

The prime mover it is supplied with dry chemical powder from trailer'12 and is connected thereto by means of conduit 4? which is provided with a suitable coupling device 93 at its aft end. Such conduit 49 bifurcates at its forward end, the resulting branches 99 being connected to the dry powder conduits 37 which are provided with coupling devices res for connection with remotely controlled vehicles 11. The conduits 37 are wound upon the same reels 99 as are the foam lines 36. Valves H31 are placed in branches 99 for controlling the flow of dry powder therethrough. A conduit 77, havinga flow control valve 73 therein, joins the conduit '49 to nozzle 3% on rescue enclosure 22.

The construction of the remotely controlled vehicles 11 is shown in diagrammatic form in FIGURE 5. The foam and dry powder nozzles 34.- and 35 are provided with coupling devices 166 and 197, respectively, which mate with coupling devices 92 and 1% on the ends of foam and dry powder conduits 36 and 37, respectively, of prime mover 10. The nozzles 34, 35 are mounted upon a horizontally disposed shaft 108 pivotally supported between a pair of upright members 169 attached to a circular platform 11%). Adjacent one of the upright members a first spur gear 111 is rigidly afiixed to the shaft 1&8. Such gear 111 is engaged by a smaller, second spur gear 112 connected to the shaft of a reversible electric motor 113 mounted upon the circular plate 116. Such electric motor is driven off a bank of batteries 114 and serves to control the elevational direction of the nozzles. The circular platform is pivoted at its center and provided with teeth 115 about its outer edge which are engageable by a worm gear 116 afiixed upon the shaft of another reversible electric motor 118 mounted upon the chassis 117 of the vehicle 11. 118 is likewise driven off batteries 114 and serves to control the azimuthal direction of the nozzles 34, 35. The tracks 39 of the vehicle are powered by reversible, variable speed, electric motors 120 which'are also driven off batteries 114. The electric motors 113, 113 and 12%! are individually connected to the batteries 114 by suitable electric conduits (not shown) and to the prime mover by means of a coaxial cable 121, containing such conduits, which is wound upon a reel 122 mounted at the rear of vehicle 11. Onto the end of coaxial cable 121 is afiixed a suitable plug 123 adapted to engage a receptacle 125 (FTGURE 4) which is attached to a control panel 126 located in one section of the prime mover cab by means of which the movement of one of the vehicles 11 and the direction of its nozzles 34, 35 may be controlled. A similar panel is located in the other cab section and controls the other vehicle 11.

The primary function of the trailer 12 is to provide a source of dry chemical powder. In addition it serves as a means of carryinga second supply of foam ingredients. The dry powder is carried in a relatively large spherical tank 47 (FIGURE 6). The pressure for discharging such powder is preferably provided by a plurality of compressed nitrogen cylinders 127, each of which is connected to a manifold 129 which, in turn, is connected to the tank 47 through conduit 139. A constant pressure outlet valve 131 isplaced in conduit 136 and-serves to reduce the pressure from cylinders 127 to the desired operating pressure of the dry powder system. The output from tank 47 fiows forward through a main conduit 132 to the end of which is affixed a coupling device 133 adapted to mate The electric motor O with coupling device 98 (FIGURE 4) on conduit 49 carried by prime mover 10. The hand lines 51 are connected to the main conduit 132 by branch conduits 135. Valves 136 and 137 are disposed in main conduit 132 and branch conduits 135, respectively, and provide a means of controlling the flow therethrough. The tanker tires .3 on trailer 12 are similar to those on prime mover described above and are provided with the same conduit components for withdrawing the liquid foam ingredients therefrom. The conduits 138, which are connected to manifolds 139, extend forward, terminating in coupling devices 140 adapted to mate with coupling devices 95 on conduits 46 of prime mover 10, thereby connecting the tanker tires 43 of trailer 12 with the foam system of the prime mover. Between the coupling devices 140' and control valves 141 in conduits 138, such conduits are joined by conduits 53 which communicate with the foam system of trailer 13. T o the ends of such conduits 53 are affixed coupling devices 142 for connecting same to trailer 13. The flow through conduits 53 is controlled by valves 143. Inflation of tanker tires 43 of trailer 12 is maintained in the same manner as described above.

The foam system carried by the trailer 13, as shown in FIGURE 7, is basically the same as that of the prime mover. The foam ingredients are withdrawn from tanker tires 51 by pumps 145 driven by an engine 146, through a power divider or differential 147 mounted upon the chassis of the trailer 13. From the pumps 145 the foam ingredients may be directed either through conduits 148, 149 and into an expansion chamber 150 or conduits 148 through bypass conduits 151, which serve to shunt the foam ingredients around the expansion chamber 150. Such bypass conduits 151 terminate in couplings 152 which mate with couplings142 on the aft ends of conduits 53 (FIGURE 6), thereby connecting the foam system of trailer 13 with those of trailer 12 and prime mover" 10. The path followed by the foam is controlled by valves 153 and 154 placed in conduits 149 and 151, respectively. The expansion chamber is connected to hand lines 55 through a main foam conduit 155 and branch conduits 156. It is also desirable that provision be made whereby an additional supply of foam ingredients may be utilized. This is easily accomplished by connecting conduits 157 to the foam system of the trailer 13 on the intake side of the pumps 145. Such conduits are provided with terminal couplings 159 and control valves 16%.

From the foregoing description it will be apparent that the vehicles (prime mover 10, trailers 12 and 13) employed in the present fire fighting apparatus may be operated in various combinations. Moreover, each of such vehicles may be utilized independently of'the other two, inasmuch as each carries the necessary equipment to discharge one type of fire extinguishing agent. Such an arrangement offers a flexibility heretofore unknown in fire fighting equipment. For example, if a small fire should occur in an area in which it would be difiicult to maneuver the complete fire fighting apparatus, one or both the trailers 12 and 13 may be towed to the scene of the fire by a tractor, jeep, pickup, or even an ordinary passenger vehicle, and the hand lines of the trailers employed in extinguishing the fire. However, particularly when considered in combination, the present invention offers numerous advantages over prior fire fighting apparatus in the quantity of fire extinguishing agent which may be transported to and discharged upon a fire, in its ability to approach the fire more closely and to extinguish all types of fires.

Although only the preferred embodiment of the present invention has been shown and described herein, it is not to be construed that the invention is limited thereto as numerous modifications will be apparent to those skilled in the art; and the invention is to be given the broadest possible interpretation within the scope of the following claims.

What I claim is:

1. Fire fighting apparatus comprising, in combination:

a prime mover provided with tanker tires for carrying a supply of a fire extinguishing agent;

at least one trailer provided with tanker tires for carrying an additional supply of said fire extinguishing agent;

at least one self-propelled, remotely controlled vehicle transportable to the scene of a fire by means integral with said prime mover, said vehicle having a remotely controlled nozzle directably mounted thereon; V

conduit means connecting said tanker tires to said nozzle; and 7 pump means disposed in said conduit means whereby said fire extinguishing agent may be discharged through said nozzle and onto said fire.

2. Fire fighting apparatus comprising, in combination:

a prime mover carrying a first supply of a first fire extinguishing agent;

a trailer operatively connected to said prime mover and carrying a second supply of said first fire extinguishing agent;

said trailer carrying in addition a supply of a second fire extinguishing agent;

a self-propelled, remotely controlled vehicle, transportable on said prime mover, on which are directably mounted first and second nozzles;

first conduit means connecting said first and second supplies of said first fire extinguishing agent with said first nozzle;

pump means disposed in said first conduit means for discharging said first fire extinguishing agent through said first nozzle;

second conduit means connecting said supply of said second fire extinguishing agent with said second nozzle; and

pressure means for effecting discharge of said second fire extinguishing agent through said second nozzle.

3. Fire fighting apparatus comprising in combination:

a prime mover carrying a supply of a first fire extinguishing agent;

first and second trailers carrying additional supplies of said first fire extinguishing agent;

one of said trailers also carrying a supply of a second fire extinguishing agent;

a self-propelled, remotely controlled vehicle on which are directably mounted first and second nozzles; first conduit means connecting said supplies of said first fire extinguishing agent with said first nozzle;

pump means disposed in said first conduit means for discharging said first fire extinguishing agent through said first nozzle;

second conduit means connecting said supply of said second fire extinguishing agent with said second nozzle; and

pressure means connected to said supply of said second fire extinguishing agent for effecting discharge of same through said second nozzle.

4. Fire fighting and rescue apparatus comprising in .60 combination:

a prime mover provided with tanker tires for carrying a supply of a first fire extinguishing agent;

first and second trailers also provided with tanker tires for carrying an additional supply of said first fire extinguishing agent; a self-propelled, remotely controlled vehicle heaving directably mounted thereon first and second nozzles;

means for pumping said first fire extinguishing agent from said tanker tires of said prime moved and said trailers and discharging same through said first nozzle directably mounted on said self-propelled, remotely controlled vehicle;

said first trailer also being provided with a container for carrying a supply of a second fire extinguishing agent; a

means for effecting discharge of said second fire extinguishing agent through said second nozzle directably mounted upon said remotely controlled vehicle; and

an extensible boom mounted upon said prime mover and having an enclosure attached to the end thereof, whereby rescue operations may be carried out.

5. Fire fighting and rescue apparatus comprising in combination:

a prime mover carrying a first supply of a first fire extinguishing agent;

a trailer carrying a second supply of said first fire extinguishing agent;

said trailer also carrying a supply of a second fire ex tinguishing agent;

aself-propelled, remotely controlled vehicle on which are directably mounted first and second nozzles;

first conduit means connecting said first and second supplies of said first fire extinguishing agent with said first nozzle;

pump means disposed in said first conduit means for discharging said first fire extinguishing agent through said first nozzle;

second conduit means connecting said supply of said second fire extinguishing agent and said second nozzle; 7

pressure means for efiecting discharge of said second fire extinguishing agent through said second nozzle; and

an extensible boom mounted upon said prime mover and having an enclosure attached to the end thereof, said boom operative to eifect rescue operations.

6. Fire fighting and rescue apparatus comprising in combination a prime mover provided with tanker tires for carrying the ingredients of a chemical foam fire extinguishing agent; said prime mover having a vertically moveable lift platform on one end thereof;

a trailer also provided with tanker tires for carrying an additional supply of said chemical foam ingredicuts;

a pair of self-propelled, remotely controlled vehicles transportable on said lift of said prime mover, each of said vehicles having a nozzle directably mounted w thereon;

conduit means connecting said tanker tires of said prime mover and said trailer with a chamber wherein said ingredients are mixed and expand to form foam;

V 0 n r means for pumping said ingredients from said tanker tires to said chamber;

conduit means connecting said chamber to said nozzl operative to discharge said chemical foam therethrough; and

an extensible boom mounted upon said prime mover and having an enclosure attached thereto Where by rescue operations may be carried out. 7. Fire fighting andrescue apparatus comprising in combination:

transportable on said lift at the front of said prime 7 mover, each of said vehicles having a nozzle directably mounted thereon;

conduit means connecting said tanker tires of said prime mover and said trailer with a chamber wherein said ingredients are mixed and expand to form chemical foam;

means for pumping said ingredients from said tanker tires to said chamber;

pressurizing means connected to said tanker tires for maintaining the required inflation pressure therein; conduit means connecting said chamber to said nozzles whereby said chemical foam may be discharged the'rethrough; and an extensible boom mounted on said prime mover and having an enclosure attached to the end thereof to carry out rescue operations. 8. Fire fighting apparatus comprising, in combination: (A) a first self-propelled vehicle constituting a prime mover and comprising:

(1) a chassis,

(2) a first extinguisher system having cooperatively associated integrated agent storage means, agent feeding means, and agent discharge means,

(3) a second extinguisher system having cooperatively integrated agent feeding means and agent discharge means,

(4) a vertically moveable lift platform on said first vehicle chassis operative to effect transportation of an associated remotely controlled selfpowered vehicle;

(3) a first trailer means comprising:

(1) a chassis, (2) a first extinguisher system having (a) agent storage means, (b) an agent feeding means, and (0) means for transferring the agent to said first vehicle first extinguisher system agent feeding means;

(3) a second extinguisher system having (a) agent storage means,

([2) agent feeding means,

(c) a selectively operable agent discharge means, and

(d) means for selectively transferring the agent to said first vehicle second extinguisher system agent feeding means;

(C) a second trailer means comprising:

(1) a chassis, (2) a first extinguisher system having (a) agent storage means,

([2) agent feeding means,

(c) pressurizing means,

(d) selectively operable means, and

(e) means for selectively conducting the agent to said first trailer first extinguisher system agent feeding means, (D) a remote controlled tracked vehicle transportable on said first vehicle lift platform comprising:

(1) fire extinguisher agent discharge means operatively: connected to said first vehicle first and second extinguisher systems,

(2) integral motive means for effecting said tracked vehicle mobility and agent discharge means operation. 9. Fire fighting apparatus comprising, in combination: '(A) a first self-propelled vehicle constituting a prime mover and comprising:

(1) a chassis,

(2) a first extinguisher system having cooperatively associated agent storage, feeding and discharge means,

(3) a second extinguisher system having cooperatively associated agent storage, feeding and discharge means,

(4) a universally moveable rescue boom having agent system discharge means thereon selectively operatively connected to said first vehicle first and second extinguisher systems,

(5) a vertically moveable lift integrally operatively associated with said first vehicle for transportation and storage of a remote control vehicle;

agent dischar e (B) a first trailer means comprising:

(1) a chassis,

(2) a first extinguisher system having cooperatively associated agent storage, feeding and transferring means, said last named means operative to transfer the agent to said first vehicle first extinguisher system agent feeding means,

(3) a second extinguisher system having cooperatively integrated agent storage and feeding means and selectably operable agent discharge means, and means for selectively transferring the agent to said first vehicle second extinguisher system agent feeding means;

(C) a second trailer means comprising:

(1) a chassis,

(2) a first extinguisher system having agent storage, feeding, pressurizing and discharge means, and means for selectively transferring the agent to said first trailer first extinguisher system feeding means; and

(D) a remotely controlled vehicle transportable on said first vehicle lift,

(1) said vehicle including first and second extinguisher transfer and feeding means for cooperation selectively With said first vehicle, and first and second extinguisher agent discharge means,

(2) said vehicle having self-contained motive means for etfecting vehicle mobility and control of said agent discharge means.

10. Fire fighting aparatus comprising, in combination: (A) a first self-propelled vehicle constituting a prime mover and comprising:

(1) a chassis,

(2) a first extinguisher system having cooperatively associated agent storage, feeding and discharge means,

(3) a second extinguisher system having cooperatively associated agent storage, feeding and discharge means;

(B) a first trailer means comprising:

( 1) a chassis,

(2) a first extinguisher system having cooperatively assoicated agent storage, feeding and transfer means, said last named means operative to transfer the agent to said first vehicle first extinguisher system agent feeding means,

(3) a second extinguisher system having cooperative integrated agent storage and feeding means, selectably operable agent discharge means, and means-for selectively transferring the agent to said first vehicle second extinguisher system agent feeding means;

(C) a second trailer means comprising:

(1)'a chassis,

(2) a first extinguisher system having agent storage, feeding, pressurizing and discharge means, and means for selectively transferring the agent to said first trailer first extinguisher system feeding means;

(D) each said first extinguisher agent storage means comprising:

(1) tanker tires having an integral storage capac- 12 ity defined by tire walls surrounding a stationary hollow axle, said walls sealed on said axle at the open side thereof by inner and outer plates extended outwardly therefrom,

5 (2) a hollow flexible tube extended through the wall of said axle and positioned with an open end in communication with the interior of said tire for withdrawing the extinguisher agent, the other end of said tube communicating with the interior of said axle,

(3) said axle communicating with said agent feeding means and forming a part thereof; (E) each said second extinguisher system including (1) a selectively pressurizable chemical dry powder storage cylinder as said storage means,

(2) a conduit as said agent feeding means, and

(3) said agent discharge meansin communication with saidconduit.

11. Fire fighting apparatus comprising in combination:

a prime mover provided with tanker tires for carrying a supply of a fire extinguishing agent; a self-propelled, remotely controlled vehicle having an agent discharging nozzle thereon;

means operatively associated with said prime mover for transporting said self-propelled, remotely controlled vehicle to the scene of a fire;

said vehicle being provided with a pair of endless belt tracks driven by electric motors for propelling said vehicle;

a pair of electric motors for controlling the azimuthal and elevational directions of said nozzle;

conduit means connecting said tanker tires with said nozzle; and

1 pump means disposed in said conduit means for efiecting discharge of a fire extinguishing agent through said nozzle and onto said fire.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 636,122 10/99 Eades et al.

1,023,141 4/12 Eisenbise 169 -24 1,421,496 7/22 Klewanech 16924 2,246,616 6/41 Cherry 16924 2,319,486 5/43 Austin 18077 X 2,325,355 7/43 Yost 16924 2,352,379 6/44 Geertz 16924 2,505,055 4/50 McNair 16924 50, 2,548,190 4/51 Arpin 239-447 X 2,598,390 5/52 Johnson 18077 2,729,295 1/56 Edwards 16925 2,799,352 7/57 Boerner et al. 169--14 2,936,835 5/60 Sheppard 169--14 3,010,533 11/61 Ross 169-25X FOREIGN PATENTS 254,195 7/26 Great Britain. 775,307 5/57 GreatBritain.

EVERETT W. KIRBY, Primary Examiner.

EUGENE F. BLANCHARD, LOUIS I. DEMBO,

Examiners.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification169/24, 280/1, 280/408, 152/9, 280/836, 280/DIG.700, 180/324, 280/4, 239/147, 152/DIG.500, 152/450
International ClassificationA62C27/00, A62C3/02, A62C3/08, A62C99/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62C3/0292, A62C3/08, Y10S280/07, A62C99/009, A62C27/00, Y10S152/05
European ClassificationA62C3/02R, A62C27/00, A62C3/08, A62C99/00F