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Publication numberUS3170184 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 23, 1965
Filing dateJun 30, 1960
Priority dateJun 30, 1960
Publication numberUS 3170184 A, US 3170184A, US-A-3170184, US3170184 A, US3170184A
InventorsJepson Ivar, Julius P Wied
Original AssigneeSunbeam Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vacuum cleaner
US 3170184 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 23, 1965 l. JEPSON ETAL 3,170,184

VACUUM CLEANER Filed June so, 1960 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 IN VEN TORS:

Feb. 23, 1965 l. JEPSON ETAL VACUUM CLEANER 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 50. 1960 B ird/ i INVENTORS.-

WFQM

Feb. v23, 1965 1. JEPSON ETAL.

VACUUM CLEANER 7 Sheets-Smeevt.v 3

Filed June 30, 1960 mmvroas;

I. JEPSON ETAL VACUUM CLEANER Feb. 23, 1965 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed June 30. 1960 M? wmY Feb. 23, 1965 l. JEPSON ETAL 3,170,134

VACUUM CLEANER Filed June 30, 1960 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTORS. I r4 0 Feb. 23, 1965 l. JEPSON' ETAL VACUUM CLEANER '7 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed June 30, 1960 INVENTORS:

I. JEPSON ETAL VACUUM CLEANER Feb. 23, 1965 '7 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed June 30, 1960 JNVENTORS:

a/a a @E w wl mwN United States Patent 3,179,184 VACUUM CLEANER Ivar .Iepson and Julius P. Wied, Oak Park, 11]., assignors to Sunbeam Corporation, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Filed June 30, 1960, Ser. No. 39,865 14 Claims. (Cl. 15-323) The present invention relates to suction or vacuum cleaners for removing dirt from floors, carpets, furniture and the like by virtue of the suction or vacuum produced by a motor driven fan.

So-called suction or vacuum cleaners particularly useful for use in the home have comprised two general types. One of these types commonly referred to as the upright cleaner comprises a housing having mounted therein a motor driven fan and also a rotatable brush driven by the motor. The housing terminates in a suction nozzle. Such a cleaner further includes a bag for receiving the dirt removed during the vacuum cleaning operation. The other type of cleaner commonly referred to as a tank or canister type cleaner gets its name from its construction. It commonly comprises a tank or similarly shaped unit containing a motor driven fan for producing a suction, and connected to this unit through a flexible hose are the various cleaning attachments. The present invention is directed to this latter type of cleaner, namely, the tank or canister type, which in recent years has gradually come to replace the so-called upright type cleaner.

The modern housewifes requirements for a vacuum cleaner are relatively stringent. First of all, she demands that such cleaner is capable of producing sufficient suction adequately to remove dirt lodged deeply in rugs or carpets. Furthermore, with the advent of the turbine driven brush, it must have adequate power to drive such brush without impairing the suction for removing the dirt. Another feature demanded by the modern housewife of a suction cleaner is that it be compact, light in weight, and

" easy to handle both during the cleaning operation and newbag be accomplished in a very simple and foolproof manner. Furthermore, such disposable bag should have a .very large surface area to produce increased cleaner efficiency and increased economy. Still another feature demanded in a suction cleaner by the modern housewife is ease of control. A suction cleaner is started and stopped many times during a cleaning operation, and this should be accomplished in a simple manner whether the cleaner is standing in a so-called storage position or whether it is in the position normally employed during a cleaning operation. Still another feature demanded by the housewife is a simple manner of storing the necessary power cord which all vacuum cleaners require. recognized so much by the'housewife as an important feature is the fact that a permanent filter should be provided to precludedirt from reaching the motor driven fan in the event that the disposable paper bag should be omitted, be improperly applied, or should develop a leak for some reason or another.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved tank or canister type cleaner Although not 3,170,184 Patented Feb. 23, 1965 construction and which provides increased cleaning efliciency with maximum economy.

Still another object of the present invention resides in an improved vacuum cleaner having a Wheeled housing wherein the wheels are recessed in the sides of the housing to the extent that the sealing gasket for closing the housing serves not only as a gasket but also as. a bumper.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an improved vacuum cleaner having a mechanical arrangement of elements therein to provide a flat panlike design with means to open the entire top of the flat panlike construction to afford access to the interior of the housing for ready replacement and removal of a cleaning bag disposed in the same plane as the vacuum cleaner motor.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an improved tank or canister type vacuum cleaner in which the housing is mounted on a pair of wheels ina substantially balanced manner so that the cleaner may readily be pivoted about the wheels.

Still another object of the present, invention is to provide a new and improved vacuum cleaner employing a single stage fan of such large diameter as'to provide much more suction than prior multistage fans. b

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an improved vacuum cleaner with improved motor means.

Still another object of the present invention resides in an improved switch arrangement disposed on the underside of the housing which, however, can be operated by foot pressure from the top of the housing and yet which will not be inadvertently actuated as the cleaner ismoved across the floor.

Another object of the present invention resides in an improved vacuum cleaner having a hinged air deflector or bafile' at the point of air discharge frornthevacuum cleaner housing.

Still another. object of the present invention resides in improved mounting means for the motor driven fan together with improved filter and diffuser means therefor.

Still another object of the present invention resides in an improved vacuum cleaner with carrying means for carrying the cleaner from place to placedesigned for maximum comfort, together withsimple means for supporting the vacuum cleaner in storage. and storing the cord in a simple and yet readily accessible manner Further objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent as the following description proceeds and the features of novelty which characterize the invention will be pointed .out with particularity in the claims an nexed to and forminga part of this specification.

For a better understanding of the, present invention,

FIG. 1 is .a perspective view of theva cuum cleanerof the present invention showing a portionof the hose and wand and: one of several cleaning attachments;

FIG. 2 isa side elevational view of the vacuum cleaner of the present invention'without the hose or attachments, illustrating how the cleaner motor may be'controll'e'd by foot operation;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the cleaner ofFIG. 2;;

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of the vacuum cleaner of the present invention with the hose :audattachme'nts reg moved, shown in the position which it assumes when stored, and further illustrating how the cord is supported for storage purposes} A I I FIG. 5 is an enlarged sectional view taken on line 5--5 of FIG. 3, showing the hose connected to the air inlet and with the cover shown in two positions thereof;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken on line 6-6 of FIG. 5,

" as the present application.

I o e a FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken on line 77 of FIG. 5, again assuming that FIG. shows the complete structure; FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken .O 1'1f line8 8- of FIG. 7, assuming that FIG. 7 shows the complete structure;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on'line'9 9 of FIG. 7, again assuming that FIG. 7 shows zsqm ete st u FIG. 10 is'an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken online were or FIG. 7;

FIG. 11 is enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on line 11 11 ofFIG. l0, assuming that FIG. 10 shows the complete structure;

FIG. 12 is. a greatly enlarged sectional view taken on line 12- 12 Of FIG. 1V1;

FIG. 13 is a view partly in section of the hose assembly including the suction control portion of the vacuum cleaner ofthepre sent invention; I

FIG. 1 4 i s an enlarged sectional view of the hose hanger employed with the Ivacuum cleaner of the present invention taken on line 14-14 of FIG. 13;

FIG. 15 ad'ev loped view of the hose hanger when. disassembled from the hose;

FIG. 16 is a fragmentary bottom view with certain portions brokenaway of the specific rug cleaning attachment shown in FIG. 11 of the drawings; and

FIG. 17 is a greatly enlarged sectional view taken on line 17-17 of FIG. 1.

Briefly, the present invention is concerned with a tank type vacuum cleaner comprising a low compact housing of the shape of a shallow pan with a top cover having a ciroumference of the maximum diameter of the pan and gasket me'ans'between the cover and the remainder of the com tainer which alsofdefines a peripheral bumper for the 'olean'er.j "l"he cleaner" is supported on suitable wheels 7 whichare recessed so as to be mounted inside the combined bumper and gasket. .A powerful motor driven fan is mounted c'entrally' of and within the pan-shaped housing so as to'defin'e' an' annular spaceforthe reception of a disposable dust collecting bag of large" surface area and volume. Animproved single stage fan and diffuser insures the provision of a' tremendous suction capable of sustaining/ 1- column of water seventy inches in height. Improved motor mounting means and diffuser and rnu'filer nieansfforv reducing air; noise and vibrations are provided.

improved motor controlling switch means is mounted e 'undersideofthe cleaner housing with means, how:

hilefelifi'iihating' inadvertent operation thereof.

Referring now to the drawings,'there is. illustrated a vacuu'ini or suction cleaner generally designed by the referenc'e numeral 30,.which'comprises a'suitable housing com-,.

.pris ngaalpan-shaped member '31 and acover 32 mounted I on suitable wheels 3s; The housing 531 is provided with means for'c'o'nnecting thereto a suitable tube coupling'35 s" to one endof afle xible suction hose 36. This If se 1 preferably formed from a nylon reinforced vinyl plastic,, thus providing a light-butlong wearing construc{ I "nomtaemse coupling 35 includes as'wivel 37 (FIG. 13) and a" curved tube 38"removably connected with one end 'rfrno're wand sections generally designated at 39;.

I ea; tube-38 is provided with an adjustable suction control member 40'describ'ed' in greater-detail hereinafter.

' To the other end of the wand section rnay be secured various"attachments.such as the rugcleaning attachment generally designated by the referencenumeral 41 in'FIG.

'1 of the drawings .or suitable other attachments (not I o operate'this' switch'rnea'ns from the top of the cleaner 30, it comprises a panlike open topmember of generally circular configuration having a rolled rim 31a surrounding the open top (FIGS; 5, 7, 8 and 9). On diametrically opposed positions of the circular side wall 311) of the pan 31 are provided an inlet opening 44 (FIG.'

of which will become apparent from the ensuing descrip-' tion. For strengthening the annular bottom 31c, a plurality of raised ribs 31c integrally formed with the bottom and radially disposed as best shown in FIG. 7 of the drawings are provided. For aesthetic purposes, arcuate depressions 50, 51 and 52 are provided in the annular bottom 310 at the junction with vertical wall 31-h, and the ribs 31:: all terminate in these depressions. The. end of the rib 312; where it terminates in depression 5t adjacent the inlet opening 44, provides a sort of stop, the purpose of which i will become apparent from the ensuingdescriptiori. Preferably, this stop is formed by a slight enlargement of the end of this rib. H

In accordancewith the present invention, the side Wall 3111 of base shell or pan 31 is inwardly recessed ondiametrically opposed sides as indicated at 53 and 54 to accommodate the wheels 33. The recesses 53 and 54 are identical and each effectively provides a flat wallsection ,7

31 (FIG. 7) to which is preferablywelded a bracket 56 having a laterally projecting stud 57 extending away from the wall section 31f. A suitablenylon sleeve 58 mounted on the stud 57 provides a relatively frictionless bearing for the wheels 33. Preferably, a vinyl or plastic member 59, as best shown in FIG. 7, effectively provides a tire for the wheels 33. The wheels may beheldon the stud 57 by any suitable member such as C-washer 6t}. receivable in an appropriate groovedefined inthe stud 57. To im- 7 prove the appearance,-aisuitable closure plate orcup 61 may be-provided for the center of eachwheel; therebyhim ing' the stud andC-washer. In an embodiment built 'in accordance with the present invention, the base'shell 31 was a metal stamping having a diameter of between four teen and fifteen inches and a depth of theorder of four inches. .Moreover, the wheels 33 were made of a moldedi plastic, and the cup-shaped members'ol were suitably decorated metal members with integral clips extending through openings (not shown) in the wheels 33. to hold the members in position. p

The'annular bottom31c of thebase shell or pan 31 is provided'with another opening 62- (FIGkS): which, is inend with an annular groove 65 toreceive therein a'por-- tion of circular side' wallSlbdefining. the opening 45, and similarly at the other end-v/ith'a groove 66 to receive 7 i therein a portion of the annular bottom 31c defining the;

terconnected with the opening 45 by an exhaust elbow generallydesignated at 64 and preferably formed ofa. rubberrnaterial. The exhaust elbow is provided at one opening 62." To insure against the leakage of anyl-airia t the openings- 45 and 62 where joined with theiexhaust elbow 64; there are provided a pair of springlike expan-: sion springs or rings 67 and 68 which are disposed in annular recesses 69 and 7t}',-respectively. .These springs or rings oland 68'are made of springlike material and mainshownfs'ch as anupholste'ry tool, a crevice tool, a dust brush, or; a tiirb'irie brush su'ch as is disclosed in and claimedin copending application of Jepson, E'rnstberger and Woltefnfierial No. 42,080, filed July 11; 1960, now 1 Patent No. 3,()71,799 and assigned to the same assignee Considering new the base shell or panlike member 31 whichffojrmsja major portion of the housing of vacuum train the circular I configuration of the exhaust elbow. i

whichis'made of relatively flexible 'materiale Y In order that the 'vacuumcleaner may be supported in the manner shown in FIG. 4 of the drawings wanna,

characterized as the storage position, there is provided a'base stand 74,-preferably formed ofa molded plastic; 1 which base stand also defines ahousing for a switch whichis described hereinafter. As illustrated. thebase' stand opening in outer switch button 80.

. U 74 includes an upper arcuate portion 74a generally conforming to the circular configuration of pan wall 31b, and including an opening 73 therein aligned with the opening 45 andthe exhaust end of elbow 64. This arcuate portion is provided with a plurality of pairs of projecting posts 74b and 74c'which extend against the exterior of wall 31b of the base shell 31 and are secured thereto by suitable fastening means 75, best-shown in FIG. of the drawings; The lower portion of the base stand 74 includes a rearwardly directed angular extension 74d 'hav ing a flat bottom wall 74e. The junction between the portions 74d and 74e defines a sort of toe 76 (FIGS. 2, 4, 5, 7 and 8) for'engaging a support such as is designated at 77in FIG. 4 of thedrawings. The space defined withthe drawings. Thisswitchbutton, however, has a lower central'opening for reciprocatingly supporting therein a molded inner switch button 81 having an annular lateral projection 81a resting onthe walls defining the lower A supporting U- shaped bracket 83 spanning the opening '79 is'secured to the wall 74s by fastening means 82. A relatively heavy coiled compression 'spring'84 is interposed between the bracket 83 and the outerfcup-shaped switch button 80,

with the lower end of spring 84 disposed in the cup portion of button 80 and, in fact, disposed in an annular recess 86 defined therein. 1 j i The bracket 83 also supports a conventional. switch generallydesignated at 88, preferably of the type comprising an insulated switch housing from which projects a threaded mounting support 89in the form of a hollow tube reciprocably mounting therein a switch actuating plunger 90. Preferably, the switch 88 isof the type that, upon successive actuations of the plunger 90, alternate opening andclosing of the switch contaotsoccurs. Suitg able spring means (not shown) normally bias the plunger switch housing 88, and the switch is then supported by clamping nuts 92 and 93, onedispose d on either side-of the U-shaped bracket83 and threadedly mounted on extension 89. The inner switch button 81 is suitably se- 'Clllfid to the plunger 90: Consequently, upon repeated actuations of the switch button 81, the switch 88 will be alternately opened or closed. The biasing spring for plunger 90'referred to above, which is conventionally a part of switch 88, is relativelyfweak,compared tothe spring 84. The switch 88' may also. be actuated by the outer button 80 by virtue of thefact that the inner switch button 81 is.provided ,withnn annular projection 81a thereto, there is provided an inlet unit generally designated' by the reference numeral 95 and comprising a die casting or the likeJThis die casting 95 comprises a .rectangular portion 95a which has a curved configurationjso as to conform with the outer periphery of thewall 31b of the base shell 31. Extending inwardly from the portion 95a is an integral'tubular member 95b which extends through the opening 44 and into the chamber defined within the base shell 31. As will be apparent from the ensuing description, this tubular portion 95b makes connection.

with the disposable dust bag to be described hereinafter.

The tubular portion 95b has a smooth circular passageway therein to make a relativelyclose fit with the tubecoupling 35, but includes in the portion thereof outside iof base shell 31 adjacent the outsideface of the casting 95 an annular recess 96 whereby locking connection with suitable mcans on a tube coupling 35 described hereinafter can be made, thereby to lock the tube coupling ina. releasable manner to the inlet unit 95. A plurality of fastening means 97 (FIG. 5) extend through the wall 31b of base shell 31 to secure the inlet unit 95 thereto. ,To'insurethat no air leakage occurs at the jopening44, a suit able gasket 99 (FIG. 9) is interposed between a'shoulder 100 defined on the unit 95 and the exterior surface of wall 311: of the base shell 31 surrounding the. opening 44.

. Another relatively large annular sealing gasket 101 sur-.

roundingtubular portion 95b within the base shell31 provides the desired air seal with the disposable bag to be described hereinafter. As illustratedin the drawings,

the unit 95'also includes'a cover guide finger 95c (FIGS. 7 and 9) which extends into the chamber defined by the base shell 31 through a suitable opening therein.- To prevent the escape of the air through this opening, a suitable sealing gasket 102 is provided, as' best shown in FIG.

by suitable sealing means. Thiseven applies to the openings for fastening means such as and .97, which preferably are provided with sealing washers to'insure an airtight casing or housing The'inlet unit is provided on the exterior surface thereof above the tubular portion 95b with a latching recess 103 (FIG. 9), the purpose of which will become apparent as the following description proceeds.-

Per the purpose of closing the open top of the: chamber defined within the base shell 31, there is provided the cover 32 previously described. This cover is a circular slightly dished member having a diameter of theorder of. that of the rolled rim 31a. A suitable hinge 106 having leaves 106a and 1061) joined by. a hinge pin105 secures the cover .32 to the base shell 31. The leaf 106a is fastened to a flattened portion 32a ofthe cover 32 by fastening means such as a rivet 107 (FIG=;8) and screw which limits the maximum downward movement thereof.

posed over. the exhaust opening 73 aligned withthe out .655

108 (FIG. 5),while the otherleaf 1065 is secured by fastening means 109. (FIG. ,8) to the wall 311; of the base shell 31 immediately abovethe opening. 45 therein. In accordancewith the present invention, thesame hinge pin 105 pivotally relating leaves106 a and 106b also pivotally supports a hingedair deflector or baffle 110 having spaced ears--110a. The hinged air deflector .110 is.dis-.

letor exhaust elbow 64. The'hingedair deflector is provided with a spring latch 1 11 which holds the deflector i a closediposition overlying opening 73 by engaging the inner wall of support 74, as clearlyfshowninFIG. 8 of s the drawings. In .this closedposition theexhaust air is ficient force to prevent such accidental actuation, and yet permits the operator to actuate the switch when desired m p ofythe cleaner.

So that theinlet opening 44 into be provided with means to connect the inlet tube coupling the base shell 31 may deflected downwardly therebyeliminating a concentrated rearward blast from the housing 31. However, when it is decided touse the vacuum cleaner 30 forfla blowing operation, the exhaust deflector 110 is tipped out of the way and the tube coupling 35 can then beconnected by insertion into the opening and latched to the inside wall e"r'30;; n v t Thecover 32jwhenin' the open position, alford's coma plete access to the interior of the base: shell 31. It is desirable, however, to provide means 'to preventthecover from being openedtoo far, and to this end there is pro videdfa flexible' strap 122 (FIG. which preferably is ai'plastic coated spring steel member having'one end I thereof ,securedby "the fastening means-75, which also"se I cures thebasestan'd 74 to the base shell 31, The other, end: of thepl'asticsheathed spring steel strap 122 is sedefining this opening In'o rder thatthe hinged deflector cover 110 may readily be released by a finger manipulation,therbase stand 74 is preferably .provided with a recess 113((FIGS. Sand 8): immediately below the lower end j-of the'hinged' deflector 110.

escape passageway for the deflected air and also permits This recess provides a an the finger of the operator to be inserted beneath the lower the base stand 74 by itself'will not be'a sufficient support to position .thevacuum cleaner'in the storageposition shown in"FIG 4 of the drawings. To this end there is provided on the cover 32'what might be referred to as a top, stand member 116 which preferably is a molded plas- ":1 tic-member having a pair of 'projecting legs 116a and 1161) lwliich together with the toe 76 provide a sort of tripod support. 'Thetop stand 116 performs an additional function in that it encloses the hinge 106and the means for securing' 'the same. to the cover 32. and, in a sense, then improves the appearance Preferably, the top stand member- 116 isjsecured to the cover32 by fastening rneans 117 and -118(F1GS.I5 and'S If desired, a suitable es'cuteh-v com-plate 119;rnay be providedover the top of, a portion of the topt standf'fl to improve the appearance. The

escutcheon plate'119, as is clearly shown intFlG, 3 of the ."drawinggha'sthe word fSwitch appendedtthereto, the v significance ofwhich "willbecome apparent from the en sning' d criptioh, a

1 i [From theabove description it will be understood that the switch 88Jand the control buttons and-81 therefor rare'mountedimore or less directly below the escutcheon' plate-119 having the word .Switch thereon. It will be appreciated that if the housewife places her foot on the escutcheon plate 119, as indicated in FIG. 2 of the draw- 'ings, and pressesdownwardly thereon, this will cause upward movement of the outer button tltl, as viewed in FIG. 8, against the compression of relatively heavy spr ng 8ft, with'the resultant actuation of the switch 88. With th s i arrangement the switch may'beEaCtuated in a very simple mannermerely by pushingdownwardly'with the foot on the escutcheon plate 119. However, when the cleaner is the drawings, and. under these conditions'theswitch they be actuated merely by depressingrthe, inner button 81 Inorder to prevent the escape of air at thezjunction of the drawings and includes'a portion which grips the tureor walls-that'mig i edge of the hingeddeflector for ready release of ante latch 111.- Y y 1! From the above description it will be apparent that cured to the interior of the cover by the fastening means 108 which holds the hinge 106 to the cover 32. Prefer ably, the'end'of strap 122secured to the cover 32" is disposed between ,two curved surfaces, one" defined on a block 124 'andthe other on ,a clamp 126-held by the sarne'jfastening means 108. 1 With this arrangement the strap isc'aused-to assume the loop shown in FI G.-5- of the drawings when the cover is closed. a

In order to carry thevacuum cleaner 30 about and to manipulatelthecover; 32, there is provided a handle as-' sembly generally designated at 123-wh1'ch :isillustrated in the drawings as a two-part assembly. comprising -a molded; plastic rectangular frame 'memberfl128a and a j 'U-shap ed metal casting 12811. The bight -portion of the U-shaped casting and'one endofthe rectangular' molded member 128a cooperate to define a hand grip portion 1 designated as 1129 whereby the,.user1 may readily grasp,

the vacuumcleaner 3t tocar'ry it about. Suitable fastenp g i ing means such as 130 (FIG. 9) secure theelements 128a and 128b into the unitaryyhandle assembly .123. j i k Moreover, this unitary handle assembly is secured as by fasteningmeans-131 (FIG.'5 of the drawings) to a flatj;

'whichwill be capable of stressing the resilient portion of the gasket 120 where, it contacts the rolled rinrlilzt. To I i this. end there is provided an L-shaped latching member 1-34jpivotally mounted as by a pivotpin 135 to the han dle assembly 128. One leg of the L-shaped latch 134,

specifically designated by the reference numeral 134a, has

a lateral projection 13411 receivable within the latching recess1 103 provided in the'inlet member 95. The other I arm 13 4c of the latching member .134 is eifectively' a' latch release arm which is biased by meanstof a torsion:

spring-generally designated as-14it), in a clockwise or. latching-direction as viewed in FIGS. 5 and 9 ofithe drawings .v This clockwise motionis limited'as best shown p in FIG. 9 ofthe drawings when the free end of latchjrea lease -arm'1 34c engages. the handle-assembly 128. -The I whichcan readily be manipulated by a single finger'manip; I

U -ulati0' .50

between the cover 32 and the base shell 31,. there is P117057 -vided-ta 'coverisealing-gasket 12% which is'both a sealing gask'et anda, protective resilient bumper. The cross 'section of this g-asket is clearly shown in FIGS. 5, 8fand 9 periphery of the cover3 2 was to remain secured thereto. f It also includes a compressible portion engaging the rolled upper edge 31:; of the baseshell-31 so; as toprovide a sat.- isfacto ry air seal In ac cor dance withthe present 'inven- 1 tion, the gasket 120'hasan outside dimension which extend' s'ib'eyondthe exterior of theiwheels 33 and associated" tires 59; and, hence, acts as ar buinper to preclude the wheels' orfotherparts ofLth'e cleaner trom'mar'ring furni- I l e engaged by the vacuum clean- 1 For thejpurpose of guiding the closingmov ement of cover 32, there is provided a guide member J-1 45 df somewhat L shape, having dn e arm' of the L securedytothe j inside cover 32 as by rivets jl tfi (FIG( 9 Guidemem ber 1'45 includes a depending frigid portio'n'terminatin'g 1 t suction. producingvmeans, and an important feature of spring is preferably a Ufshaped spring rnember, with. 5 1 the bight portion of the U engaging the 1340 offfl latchingmember134; The center portion of each leg of I, the :U-shaped spring member. 134 is Wrapped around the pivot pin :135 and thet ends o-i'lthe legs lthereof engagethe 1 top of the cover 32: beneath-the" handle assernbl'y 128. A 7 With this arrangement the: spring 14 0 normally biases i I the latching portion134b' of the-L-shaped lever 134 into latching engagement with recess 103 when the cover 32,, i V is d dr nd this positionsealing gasket 12d is fforced: intofscaling engagement with the rolled rim' 31a. of base 1 I shell 31.;- If desired, axsuitabledecorative"escutcheon plate,:such ,.as 143, may belsecured tothe arrn 1340 of} V latching level- 134 f This escutcheon plate preferably will q include information isuchas is shown' in ;FlG.* 3, which" 1 indicates that the .portior i f134cof theflatching' leveri13 4a" i i should bepushld or pressed to open the latch; I

iii bifurcations 14 5iiengageabl e guide; pin] 950 'to guide ,the; cover 32 during "the final fclosing' movement 7 a i V a s Gu de. member 'also' incl udes a depending 1 loop 145bfto define a" shoulder orhno'tch' for supporting;

thereof.

the disposable bag described hereinafter.

The heart of anyyacuumlfc'leaner is, of sour'sejthe f; i

the present invention is theprovision of afpowefful mo' ii tor driving a single-stage turbine'typ'e fa ries aslto; pro-'" f duce a suction capable of lifting" a column of water seventy inches in height, which is a substantially greater suction than is available in other vacuum cleaners now a on the market; The motor and fan portion of the cleaner and the mounting thereof are best shown in FIGS.5, 6, 7, 10, 11 and 12 of the drawings. Referring now to the drawings, themotor and fan assembly, gening an integral annular upperbearing support 152b. The

motor housing is effectively a bell-shaped member with the portion of the closed end of the bell cut away to define the ribs 152a supporting the annular bearing sup port 152i). The lower open end of the motor housing 152 is provided with a plurality of laterally extending lugs 152a (FIGS. 6 and 10) which merge into a laterally extending peripheral flange 152d. The peripheral flange 152d, as will become apparent from the ensuing description, is a clamping flange for clamping the motor and fan assembly 150 to the annular ledge 310?. v Secured to the lower end of the motor housing 152 is a bearing support 155 which'has a circular configuration conforming to the configuration of the housing 152 includingan axiallyextending flange 155a receivable in close fitting relationshipwithin a cooperating counterbore 156 definedwithin the lower end of the motor housing 152. The bearing support 155 further includes a latterally extending integral annular flange 15511 adapted to be in face-toface engagement with the flange 152d oi the motor housing 152, as is clearly apparent from FIG. 10 of the drawings. Additionally, the bearingi support 155 includes integral radially disposed arms 1550;.fr supporting an integral annular'lower bearing support 155d disposed in-aligned relationship with the upper bearing support 15212. The bearing support 155; further includes a plurality of. circumferentially spaced laterally extending lugs 155a substantially identical in shape and spacing with the lugs 152c of the housing 152'and adapted to be aligned therewith so that suitablefastening means such as158 extending upwardly through thelower lugs 155b,..and 'threadedly engaging tapped-openings in the upper lugsj152cmay secure'the bearing support 155and motor housing. 152 in assembled relationship as shown in FIG. of thedrawings. Mounted within the lower able roller bearing 164 An expansion ring-type bearing retainer 159 retains upper bearing 164 in upper bearing support 15212. Preferably, the top of the. annular upper bearing holder 15212 isclosed by a suitable plastic cap 163, best shown in FIG; 10 of the drawings.

1% the commutator 169 between the spiderlike arms 152a of the motor housing 152. Mounted Within each tubular portion 170b (FIG. 10), which is preferably formed of a molded phenolic resin, is a brush holder sleeve 17 6,

a brush 177, and a coiled spring 178 which biases the brush into contacting engagement with the commutator 169. The conventional electrical connections including lead 18h (FIG. 5) are made between the brushes and the motor windings. In an embodiment built in accordance with the present invention, the electric motor 150 was a one and one'half horsepower electric motor, thereb capable of producing a very powerful suction. I

' Secured to the lower end of the motor shaft 168 is a fanmerirbergenerally designated at 18 1, and, as best I shown in FIGS. 10, 11 and-'12 of the drawings, this fan member comprises a pair of circular metal plates or invention, the plates 182 and 183 had a diameter of the 'ordergof six inches and the height'at the narrowest portion of the curved blades 184 was of :theorder of one eighth of an inch-and thewidest portion thereof was of the'brder of three eighths of an inch. For securing the plates 182 and 183 and the blades 134 together to produce a unitary construction, the blades are provided along both edges at spaced points therealong with rivetlikeprojections 184a, which projections are adapted to extend through spaced openings 187 and 188 in the plates 182 and 183, respectively, as clearly shown in FIG. 12 of the drawings. The projections 184a, after being inserted inopenings 187 and 188, are mutilated as indicated at 189 by a suitable tool so as effectively to rivet the plates 152 and 183 to the curved blades 184, as clearly shown in FIG. 12 of the drawings. The upper plate 182 is provided with a relatively large centrally disposed axial air inlet opening 190. Air enters this axial inlet and is discharged at the periphery of the fan 181.

For'the purpose of securing the fan 181' to the motor shaft 168, the lower end of the shaft is threaded as indicated at 168a and the'disk 183 is provided with a 1 central opening 122 sufficiently largeto receive the shaft 168 therein. An upper spacing and clamping member Mounted within :the motor housing", 152 is a-suitable, V

field structure generally designated at 165', including a -field winding 16511, which field structure is .suitably clamped within the housing 152- by fastening-means designated ,as 166. An armaturej167, includingfan armature shaft 168 .and2a commutator 169', is journalled in aconventional mannerwithiri they bearings 16 0 and 164. Alpair. of diametrically opposed brush holders I 170,-preferably formed of a molded plastic material,

are secured to. .the; motor housing as byiastening'means 172 extendin'g through.integral ear portions 17th:. A

tubular portion 17% of each brush holderextends toward.

193 having a reduced portion 193a receivable within the annular lower bearing support d positions the fann181 relative to the motor shaft 168 and the fan upper clamping member to thewand 39, is substantially closed in that it is in engagement with rugs, upholstered furniture and the like, and it is important to develop a high static pressure.

This high static pressure is usually statedin terms of water lift; and; as has been pointed outiabove, a cleaner built in accordance with the present invention hada water lift of seyentyinChesQ T6 produce a high static pressure, the common practice has beento. increase the number of-fariwheelsto produce a multistageyfan. 'The air entering an axial. inlet near the center of the first stage is discharged peripherally and supplied to the axial inlet of the next adjacent stage. This arrangement increases the static pressure but reduces materially the volume of air. With the present invention a very high volume of air and alsoa highstatic pressure are produced.

In order to convert the kinetic energy of-motion of a large'volume of air to a desirable statidpressure',

there is provided a difiuse r generally designated at 196.

It will be apparent that the disk throughtheimufilerltli ill "which is essentially a disc molded of a phenolic resin or the like preferably secured to the underside of the bearing support 155 by the same fastening means 158 which holds'the motor housing 15b and the bearingsupvport 155 in assembled relationship. As illustrated, this diifuser 196 has 'a central or axial opening 197 aligned with'the axial inlet 19% in the fan 181. Preferably a suitable annular gasket 1% provides an airseal around I the'opening '119 7 by engaging with'the upper surface of a the diffuserwe and witha cooperating groovedannular ringflSSf defined on the lowerbearing support which ring has anannular' gasket confining recess 31% therein.

Wl1en the fastening means 1 .58am in the position shown i in FIG. -10, the gasket 1% is compressed as indicated so as to move into the recess 199 and an airseal is pro- "vided; All the .air drawn into the axial inlet 1% of the fanjlfil must'therefore pass through the motor housing through the openings between the curved spi'derlikc arms lfila, and, {of course; this air stream produces a cooling action onthe motor. windingswhich is desirable. Secured to, the bottom face of the ditfuser 196is a ditfuse'rco-ver 2% preferably formed as ametal stamping or the likewhich is suitably secured tothe diffuser as by'bolt s 291;" It will be apparent that the diffuser 1% and theidiifuser cover. 2% define therebetween a fancharnber 203 for the fan 181. integrally formed I with the 'diiiuser plate on'the underside thereof and disposed about an annular area immediately outside the i periphery ,of the fan 131 in the fanchamber are diffusing. members ISM which are angularly disposed vanes best shown in FIG. 11 of the drawings. Air

I discharged from the periphery of the fan 181' strikes of the drawingsif This permanent; filter screen212'prefera ably includes a cylinder formed of steel' screen Wire.

which has been rayon flocked both on the inside 'and the H outside. In a device built in accordance withrthe present invention arayon flocking of the order of .045- of an inch.

was employed on the inside of the filter screen 212 and a'similar flock of the order of .025; ofan in'ch was eniployedron the outside. Thisfjrayon flock was. defined as a live, denier flock. It is desirable'toinsure the neces- V saryporosity .butatthe same time,prevent dust particles from reaching the motor shouldanything occur to the disposable filter bagi The upper partfof the filter screen 212 is closed by a filter cover 213 Whichmay be stapled or" otherwise secured'to the cylindrical filter'screen 212.

Forthe purpose of maintaining the filter screen 212 and itsassociated cover 213 imposition, there preferably is' provided a Z-shaped bracket 215 (FIGS. Spand 7)-.,se'-

. cured as by a. screw 216 tofon'e 'of'thef'arms lma' 'andthe motorhousihg 152; The filterscreen 212 is thenhelch -in position by a fastening means 21'7 eXte nding through an openingin the cover 213and threa'dedly engaging'z I V theseiangularly disposed vanes thereby to convert the." V

.velocityor' kinetic energy of the discharged air to potential or pressure energy or What might be called static pressure. For the purpose of muttling the air escaping fromflthe periphery of the fan chamber 203 between the vanes 196a, there is provided a mufiier 2G5 (FIGS.

'5, l0.aud '11-) which is preferably formed from' -astrip ofiotmplastic such as apolyester-urethanefoam. This -'st rip is arranged in the form of an endless loop and is slipped around the'per'iphery of the chamber defined by the diffuser 1% and the dilfuser cover 209 so. that all i theaairfdischarged from, thetan chamber 203 must pass i 'In view fof the detailed 1 description with respect to the V motor fan'unit 150,- it-will readily be appreciated how f this unitfis supported within the cleaner housing defined bybasefshell 3-1 'and the cover 32. As best shown in I FIG. 10" or thedrawings, ,the motor fan unit 159 is in ser tedj intoopening 46'fromthe bottom .and the rectangular notch 49 permits this insertion even with the brush supports 170at tached'tothe motor. In order to reduce to a minimum the transmission of @any vibration from the motor fan unit 156 to. the housing'31, there are provided a of annular resilient gaskets 267 and 208, one disposedabove and one belowthe annular shelf These, members 207 and 203 are readily resilient mounting or j cushioning means and they are each provided with notched l gout portions for receiving :the lugs 152c on the motor .housing 152. The resilient mounting gasket 297 isfd s- 'posed above'fthe" flange l5ld and betweenthat-- flange;

1 52dvand: the--2innular motor. Supporting surface 31th The i o the r' mountin g ring ZtlSI is disposed above the an- [nularjs'upp ort 31d,v A suitabletwo-piece annular clamping ring 210;of' somewhat L shaped cross section, comprising"sections 210aand 21011 (FlGS.' 5,;7 a d o is.' lsecufred-as'by fastening means 211 engag1ngtapped openingls'fin the lugs 152c which openings'already receive the 1 fastening means 158,,from1-the .lovverend thereof jfhus the motor and fa'n'i-unit' 150' is secured within the opening 146" and resilientlyclamped to" the support 31d in a l manner'sojthat vibrations of themotor and fan un t lfifi I Willnot-be transmittedto the base 'Shell31 f I :Q Although; aswill ,become;appa1"entiromtheg ensuing shaped bracket 215 as clearly" shown in FIGSSbf th drawings.

In orderto supply electric powerto the vacuum ueaa er 30. of the present invention, there-is'providedj the conventional power cord 22tlwhich terminates in a plug connector 221. Preferably the plug connector 221- i's pro vided with. lateral projections 221d defining a cord -r eceivk ingjnotch or recesstherein'whereby when the cord is' i wrappedin ainanner described hereinafter and shown "in FIG. 4 of the drawings the-plug connectof ZZl may 'l a be' clampedto one of the cord turns tomaintainthe cord in this position. The end .of thepower cord 220 adjacent ,the vacuum cleaner30 preferably terminates in a molded enlargement 222 (FI G.'7 terminating in a pair of lateralfianges (notsh'own) integrally formed with the insulation of the power cord 22.0. A strainrelief member 223 is" then provided, having recesses lfor i' receiving the molded enlargement 222 and'fits lateral 1 ,flanges,.notshown which is clamped xto the-underside 5 of base" shell 31 by screws 224 (EIG..7).;'"

"For the purpose ofenclosingfthe fanfunit which'ex-l tends outside the base shell 31 and to direct thefair e'X-" hausted from "the;fan 'unit into'the exhaust :elbow' 64 where, it passes'through' the annular wall portion 31c 'of base shell '51, thereis provided a bottom pan Z26.- This bottom pan is secured by-suitablescrews 227 (FIGSLS' and 8) to flanged tubular members 228which are-welded at spaced points'to the botton iof base shell, 31, one of which is clearly shown in FIG. 8fof the drawings and;- 7 two of 'whichareshown in FIGXSofthegdrawings'f The bottomflpan 226 preferably is providedwithia peripheral g flange llca'best shown in FIGS. 15,-,8 and 9 for; engaging i .with the underside of" the annularpjsurfacefilc of base shell,,31i Preferablyfthe bottom pan 225'is1 provided I with suitable openingsthrough which the electrical con? doctors from-the power cord and the-electrical conductorsleading to. the switch 88 may extend.

Thai motor fan"unit;-is"preferably mountedwithin- V the vacuum 'cleanerfiillinan olf center positioni'so that "J 55thef axl i to the wheels -33 0r;-in otlierwordsg isslightly to the V V side of the center of the cleaner most .closelyadjaeentjto 'the switch as. Norm'allyfwhen the'vacuunrjcleanerdtl a in the position -shown iiiro. s ot thel-drawin'gs lit the center o ibgravity -is slightly' to the rear 1 V 13 is lightly restingon the outer switch button 80. T However, in order to provide a resting point should it tip in the other direction, the pan 226 is provided with a depending portion 226!) of somewhat conical shape at the apex of which is provided a plastic rivet 230; This rivet is inserted through an opening in the apex and secured by suitable fastening means 231 inside the pan as clearly shownin FIG. of the drawings. This plastic rivet 230 in effect defines a skid of a molded plastic '01? the same color as the cleaner housing, and it will be apparent-that this plastic skid will not mar or scratch as might ametal member, and furthermore no paint will wear off from it as would be the case if it were a metal member since the appropriate color is molded right into the plastic.

The vacuum cleaner 30 described above is capable of employing a disposable bag or wastecontainer and to this end there is provided a disposable paper bag 234 which when expanded is an elongated tubular member closed at both ends. At the center of the bag there is pro'videdfa rectangular cardboard stiffener member 235 having an opening therein of a size to receive the inlet extension 95b. There is of course also an opening in the disposable bag aligned with the opening in the cardboard member. In accordance with the present invention, the cardboard member secured to the center of the disposable b ag 234 is of such a size that the bottom edge thereof is receivable within the recess 50 in the base shell 31 and it abuts the shoulder defined by the end of the rib 31e at the front center of base shell 31 so as to force the cardboard member 235 against the sealing gasket 101 as. clearlyshown in FIGS. 5 and 9 of the drawings. The upper end of the cardboard member 235 is receivable within the notch defined in the member 145 by virtue of the loop 145]). With this arrangement, as the cover is closed and as clearly shown in FIGS. 5 and 9 of the drawings, the cardboard 235 is forced into sealing engagement with the gasket 101 so that no air leakage occurs between the inlet tube 95b and the entrance to the disposable bag 234. The elongated tubular disposable bag can then be disposed in the annular chamber defined between the walls 31b of the base shell 31 and the filter screen 212 as is clearly shown in FIG. of the drawings. P referably for storage: purposes the disposable bags 234 are pleated so that they can be folded into a very small unit. The filter bag 234 is made of a paper having for the housewife to slip'the cardboard off the end of.

inlet tube' 95b and remove the bag. The. steps need merely be reversed to insert a new disposable bag. By

virtue of the large diameter, low, flat housing a verylarge capacity disposable bag'can befemployed.

r 'Cord storage has alwaysvbcen a problem with'vacuum cleanersand the vacuum cleaner 30 is especially adapted to make this problem a simple one, As best shown in FIG. 4 of the drawings, the cover stand 116 and the handle assembly 128 project at diametrically opposed sides from the cover 32 and provide a simple Way in which the cord may be supported on the cover. \This as there illustrated merely (comprises wrapping the cord around: the projections of the cover stand 116 andxthe handle assembly 123. The cord clip 221:: then is clamped i to an adjacent cardturn to hold the cord in this position In order to simplify. the hose storage problem there is. provided in accordance with the present invention a hose hanger generally designated in FIGS. 1; 13 and 14 f cluding a .straplike portion 238qterminating' atone 14 end with a loop 233]) and at the other end with an opening 239 into which the loop 238]; may be inserted after the strap 238a has been ciamped around the hose36. Interlocking portions designated as 238s and 238d (FIG. 13) are preferably provided on the strap so that once it is looped around the hose it remains locked thereon in a predetermined position therealong and the operator can then take the loop 238!) and hook it on any suitable hanger or nail thus providing a very desirable support for the hose. Moreover, the hanger can be positioned at any desired posit-ion along thehose.

In view of the powerful suction which is produced by the cleaner of the present invention,.there are certain cleaning operations where this suction may be too great,

and in accordance with the present invention there has been provided a suction adjusting member 40 which is associated with'the curved tube 38 as best shown in FIGS. 1 and 13 of thedrawings. Asthere illustrated,

. the curved tube is provided with an opening 24-1 dis posed between a pair of rolled spaced ridges 38a and 38b defined in the curved tube 38. The suction control member or bleed ring 40 then comprises a split ring preferably molded of a suitable plastic, which fits into the space between the ridges 38a and 38b and may be rotated to adjust the effectiveness of the opening 241 which may be completely uncovered (as shown in FIG.

ably a nylon. reinforced flexible vinyl hos e which is" threaded onto a threaded end 37:: of the tube portion which with curved tube 38 defines the swiyel 37. The

other end of hose 36 is -threaded onto a threaded end 35a of the coupling 35. Preferably, the junction between the coupling 35 and the hose 36 is covered by a coupling collar 24.5 which may be cemented in position. collar 246 preferably also encloses the junction between the hose 36 and the swivel 37. This collar 246 is preferably also cemented to the hose 36. The collars 245 and 246 are preferably formed of a molded plastic of somesort.

In order to secure the coupling 35 ir'1to the opening defined by tubular extension b of inlet unit 95 or into theoutlet opening '73 and to secure the curved tube 3fi to the. wand sections 39 as well as to secure'the wand'" sections 39 to certain attachments such as the rug cleaning attachment 41, the coupling 35, the curved tube 3 8 and the wand sections 39 are each provided with identical locking means, the detailsrof which are best shown in FIG. 17 of the drawings, where a part ofthe wand portion 39is showninsection: It should be understood that identical arrangements are provided for all tube parts to be locked "or secured to another part and the same reference numerals. are used for corresponding parts.-

. Referring nowto the portion of tubular wand 39 shown in FIGS 17 of the drawings,zthere is provided in the.

walls. thereof adjacentthe enda pair of spaced openings i247 and 248. A locking member 249; is provided having a latch portion 249a and a finger manipulatingkno b 2 5% all formed as an integral unit. The locking memher .249 is associated withthe couplingelernent 35, the

curved tube element 38 or thewand element 39 by having the portions 24% and 24% extend. through' the spaced openings 247 and. 248jrespectively defined in. the associated elements 35,. 38 or 39;: A suitable leaf 'spring 256 secured to-the associated element 35,38 or.:3-9 by a rivet 25]."resiliently biases the 'locking. elements-249 to the positions shown in FIGS. 1, 13 and 117 of the drawings. .A housing member 252,;disposedwithin elements 135, 38 or '39, having one and the other end secured by the rivet 253, completely houses the locking-member 249 and the leaf spring 250 and provides a smooth passageway within the associated.

element, whether it be the' wand 39, the coupling 35 or the curved tube 38; In 'FlG. 17 of the drawings the wand 3 9-is indicated as being 'locked to a-tubular, ex-

" tension 2544 of a swivel 254 associated with attachment E at end securedby the rivet 251 ll, whichitubular, extension is provided with ,a latch 'opening; 255 for receivingf the latch portion 249L105 locking'rnember 249; To separate the wand 39 from the r attachment 41', it is merely necessary to depress knob 2491; against the force ofleaf spring 255?;until latch ,portion 249:: is free of the opening 255, whereuponzthe wand: 39 may be moved outvof telescopic engagement I with'the tubular portioni25 la. Inthe samemanner the curved tube 38'may be connected to the wand 39, which I is also provided with alatch opening corresponding'to.

{latch opening 255 receiving the latch portion 249a of lock member 249 of the curved tube 38 as shown in annular recess 96 of inlet unit 95 or engageable with/the inner edge' of the exhaust opening 73 defined in base stand Yd-thereby insuring that the coupling is locked to =the vacuum cleaner until removal therefrom is desired. 7 fReferringnow to'the rug attachment shown in FIGS.

1, 1-6 and '17 of the drawings, it comprises'a molded plastic-housing rnember' 26%), which is open on the bottom.' Rearwardly directed jintegral extensions of the housing 260 define a swivel socket portion 260;: for receiving may comprise a die casting, and thesocketportion 266d are pivotally-secured together by a'pair of pivot pins 263.;"Thehousing 26% and the'swivel 254. are provided A with alignedopenings 2614'and 265, respectively, where bysuction applied to the tubular extension 254a of swivel I 254 will be effective within housing 260.

wardly directed "opening in housing 260. The ends of this bumper member 266 are preferably wedged in recess es provided therefor toward the rear of housing 260 whereby ready replacement of such bumper member can mbelaccomplis'hedg I e tion, the litter rake .274 was, pressed into a recess provided 7 thereforin the nozzle shoe 267. ,The housingztl and the nozzle 267 are, held together as a unitary: structure bysuitable fastening means such as bolts 276 and 277." -To'support the rug attachmentAl onathe surface to be cleaned, a pair of rear wheels278 and a pair offront wheels or roller members 279 are provided. The front wheels 279 may be roller members for-med of nylon or 7 1 FIGS. land 13 of thedrawingsu Similarly, the latch V portion 249a of the coupling 35 is receivable in the the like disposed inevitable recesses 289, onJat either end of the nozzle shoe 267. Suitable pins23l driven into aligned openings 'definedgin' nozzle shoe'2l67 rotatably support the rollers or front wheels 279; The rea'rrollers V of wheels 278 are preferably pivotallymounted to'a pair of rearwardly directed integral extensions 267bj0fjthe i7 nozzle shoe 267, Theserearward extensions 26.71). are e disposed oneon either sideof the socket portion 260a", V t

of the housing 260 whereby the wheels' orr'olleirs 278 are disposed on either side of the socket 259a and the swivel. 254.

. In" order adjustably to'position a 'brush'within chamber26 9, the nozzle shoe 267 is provided with pair's V of spaced guide. members, two pairs designated bythe v thereinthe swivel 254. Preferably the'swivel 254 which l6 of'the drawings adjacent-oneend.

stood that identical pairs of such guide members will be providedon'the other portion of thenozzle shoe 267 not shown in FIG. 16. Also, at the center, 'asingle guide 'rnember267e is provided. These guide members 267e,

reference numerals 267s and 267d being 'shown in FIG. lt will be undere 267a and 267:: position and'vertically guide the move ment of a brush 284- which has'a rectangular support member284a from which a plurality of tufts or bristles 285 extend. The maximum downward movement of the brush 234is limited by the pins 281 supporting the rollers 27% as clearly shown in FIG. 16 of the drawings. A suit-- able leaf spring 287. disposed between the top of support I 284a and the top of the brush chamber 269, as viewediin FIG. 17 of thedrawings, cons'tantly biases the brush ztl i downwardly;

It will be-appre'ciatcdthat for best cleaning .acti onithe position of this brush will vary with the'types of surfaces cleaned, and to this end there 'is provideda pivotally V mountedibrush lock plate 289 preferabl-y secured" as by Mounted within theihousing260is a'nozzleflshoe 257 7 Which preferably comprises a die' casting of somewhat 9 simila'r configuration 'to the housing ltl'. The nozzle f shoefl'i' includes an integral longitudinally extending par- 1 tition member 267n whichdivides the nozzle shoe into an elongated. narrow nozzle chamber 268 forwardly of the partition"2 67a'. and a brhshchamberfl259 rearwardly Y of the partition 267a. Both'of these'chambers 268 and 269areop,en".atl the bottom, but the brush chamber 265?- is closed atlthe top,'whereaslthe nozzle chamber-268 is provided with a top'o'pe'ning 270 leading into thehousing 26;tland' connectedfto the swivel254: through the aligned openings@1264.and 265. ForIthe. purpose ofconnecting, the brush chamber 26 9[with thenozzle chamber, the j partition 26 7a is'provide'd-lalong-its lower edge at least for the-length of the opening. 270=with a plurality of 1 fspaced recesses 272 through which dirt'particlesreleased inthebrushchamber 269 may enter the nozzle chamber i 1268.] These. recesses. 2l2 define'between them teethlikej members273 which alsd act to some extent as a litter i rake." "Tog-ir'nprovethe .dirt"rernoval-, there is provided at, the front of the nozzle shoe-267 and extending along theientire length of thel' nozzle chamber 268 alitter rake .'2' 74.}prefera'bly formed'of a molded rubberlike material including apl'urality of angular extending resilient te'ethlike member's 274a. iAny'suitablemeans for secur f 5 ing the litter rake in position may beemployed. In an 75 will be re'adily understood. *It will be appreciatedithat afastening means 290 within the: brush chamber1269.

The brush lock plate 289. includes a. manipulating projece tion 239za and a; pair of icamlike' extensions 28% and 289m. The projection 2895 defines an inclinedjsu'rface" engageablewith the bottom of the brush support 284a asqclearlyshown in FIGS. 16 and-17 of: the'drawings,

so that, dependent upon the angular positionof the brush lock plate 289, the'relativevertical position of the-brush 2,84 maybe selectively controlled. Asbestyshown in a FIG. 16 of the drawings, the nozzle shoe 267is provided with indicia" such Qas prugs, carpets andffioors? 5 positioned atvarious'angular positions of thebrush lock i plate'289, and the extension 289ais in efiect als'oanindh cator 'tdindicate the particular setting As shown" EIGQ 16, the brush is adjusted for cleaning rugsgwhich meansthat the brush is inits mo'st'retracted position; The extension 289C forms-astop member engageable' with ,an integral projection -267f"to,- limit the maximum v clockwise rotation, as viewed in ,FIG. 16;,of'the' drawi Kings. 'This extension 2890, when the att'abhmentlis set 'f for cleaning, hard surfaced .floors', moves above 'the top 2 of brush support 284a,'and ineffect eliminates the action of spring 2t7jand provides arigidsupportcausingthe brushto engage'the flo'or'being cleaned. When the brush lock plate 289 'isin any other positionwherein'the. ex tension 28% is not above thetsupport 284a; then the v 7 spring 287 resiliently positionsthe brush, so that itlrnay move upwardly if the contacting force with the rug, or carpet is sufficiently great. '7 s In view of the detailed description included above, the I operation of the suctioncleaner of the present in fi nt mr when the motor and fan assembly 150 is energized, air

is drawn through the inlet opening and passes through the pores in the disposable bag 234 leaving dirt and dust particles inside the bag. The air then passes through the screen filter 212 surrounding the motor unit, which filters out any remaining dust particles which could damage the motor. The air is then drawn through the motor and exhausted at the rear of the, unit around the base. The suction can be adjusted by the bleed ring dii to any desired amount.

While there has been shown and described a particular embodiment of the present invention, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made without departing from the invention in its broader aspects, and it is, therefore, contemplated in the appended claims to cover all such change and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. In a suction cleaner the combination of a housing, spaced means for supporting said housing, switch means mounted on said housing comprising relatively movable contacts, a switch actuating member projecting from the bottom of said housing and operatively connected to actuate said contacts when moved toward the bottom of said housing, spring means normally biasing said switch actuating member away from the bottom of said housing, motor driven fan means supported by said housing, the center of gravity of said suction cleaner with respect to said spaced means being such as to cause said housing to pivot about the axis of said spaced means until said switch actuating member engages the surface supporting said cleaner, whereby said contacts are actuated by applying a force to the top of said housing directly above said switch actuating member of sufiicient magnitude momentarily to compress said spring. a

2. A suction cleaner comprising a housing, a pair of wheels supporting said housing from a surface to be cleaned, switch means mounted on said housing comprising relatively movable contacts, a first switch actuating member projecting from the bottom of said housing for actuating said contacts, a second switch actuating member disposed adjacent said first switch actuating member and arranged when moved toward the bottom of said housing to move said first switch actuating member to actuate said contacts, spring means normally biasing said second switch actuating member away from the bottom of said housing, and motor driven fan means supported by said housing, the center of gravity of said suction cleaner with respect to said wheels being such as to cause said housing to pivot about the axis of said wheels until said second switch actuating member engages said surface, said second switch actuating member preventing said first switch actuating member from engaging said surface, said contacts being actuated by applying a force to the top of said housing above said switch actuating members of sufficient magnitude to compress said spring.

3. The suction cleaner of claim 2 wherein said second switch actuating member is cup-shaped and said spring means'is a helical compression spring having one end received in said cup-shaped switch actuating member.

4. In a suction cleaner having a pan-shapedihousing and a pair of wheels connected to said housing at diametrically opposed portions thereof for supporting said housing from a surface to be cleaned, switch means mounted on said housing comprising relatively movable contacts, a first flanged switch actuating member projecting from the bottom of said housing for actuating said contacts, a second switch actuating member concentrically disposed relative to said first switch actuating member and arranged when moved toward the bottom of said housing to engage the flange on said first switch actuating member and move said first switch actuating member to actuate said contacts, spring means normally biasing said second switch actuating member away from the bottom of said housing, motor driven fan means supported somewhat centrally of said housing, said suction cleaner including said housing and motor driven fan means being so constructed and arranged that the center of gravity thereof is to one side of the pivotal axis of said wheels whereby said housing pivots about said axis until said second switch actuating member engages said surface, said second switch actuating member preventing said first switch actuating member from engaging said surface, and means for actuating said contacts by applying a force to the top of said housing above said switch actuating members of suflicient magnitude to compress said spring means.

5. The suction cleaner of claim 2 wherein said first switch actuating member is accessible through an opening in said second switch actuating member.

6. A suction cleaner comprising a pan-shaped open top housing having a diameter at least twice its depth, a cover hingedly connected to said housing to close the open top thereof, a pair of wheels at diametrically opposed positions on said housing for supporting the housing from a surface to be cleaned, switch means on said housing comprising relatively movable contacts, a first switch actuating member projecting from the bottom of said housing for actuating said contacts, a second switch actuating member concentrically disposed relative to said first switch actuating member and arranged when moved toward the bottom of said housing to move said first switch actuating member to actuate said contacts, spring means normally biasing said second switch actuating member away from the bottom of said housing, motor means disposed within said housing controlled by said switch means, said cleaner including said housing and motor means being so constructed and arranged that the center of gravity of said cleaner is such as to cause said housing to pivot about the axis of said wheels. until said second switch actuating member engages said surface, said second switch actuating member preventing said first switch actuating member from eI1-' gaging said surface, and means for actuating said contacts by applying a force to the top of said housing above said switch actuating means of'sulficient magnitude momentarily to compress said spring.

7. A suction cleaner comprising a panlike housing having a diameter several times the depth thereof, a cover hinged to the open top of said housing, a sealing gasket interposed between said cover and said housing, a pairfrom the periphery thereof, a supporting stand projecting.

from said housing at a point diametrically opposite said handle, said handle and at least a portion of said stand providing a cord support for said .power cord.

8. in a vacuum cleaner, the combination of a panshap'cd open top casing having an inlet and an exhaust opening therein, a suction creating fan and motor unit for producing a flow of air through said casing, a cover for said open top, a hinge including a hinge pin forsecuring said cover to said casing, a dust bag in said casing in the path ofsaid air how for separating entrained dirt from said. air, and an aindeflector pivotally connected to said casing by said hinge pin and movable over said exhaust opening to minimize the concentrated air last which occurs at said exhaust opening;-

9. The vacuum cleaner of claim 8 wherein said air deflector includes releasable latch'means to hold it over said exhaust opening. 7

10. A suction cleaner comprising a panlike housing, a

cover-hinged to the open top of said housing, a sealing by said housing with the motor of said unit comprising an electric motor disposed centrally of said housing and extending upwardly toward the top of said housing there by to define an annular chamber within said housing surrounding said motor, the fan of said unit comprising an axial inlet centrifugal single-stage blower disposed below said housing but drivingly connected to said motor, a fan chamber defined in part by the bottom of said housing and enclosing said fan, and stationary diffuser means in said fan chamber for converting the kinetic energy of motion of the air moved by said fan to static pressure, said air being discharged from said fan chamber through peripheral openings in said diffuser means, and an annular mufiier means closely embracing the periphery of said diffuser so that air discharged from said openings moves directly through said mufiier, the air discharged from said fan chamber passing through said mufiler regardless of whether said cleaner is used as a suction cleaner or as a blower.

11. The suction cleaner of claim 10 wherein said muffier comprises a foam plastic.

12. A suction cleaner comprising a housing, a pair of wheels supporting said housing from a surface to be cleaned, switch means mounted on said housing comprising relatively movable contacts, a first switch actuating member projecting from the bottom of said housing for actuating said contacts, a second switch actuating member concentrically disposed relative to said first switch actuating member and arranged when moved in a direction away from said surface to move said first switch actuating member to actuate said contacts, spring means normally biasing said second switch actuating member in a direction toward the surface being cleaned, motor driven fan means supported by said housing, the center of gravity of 'said suction cleaner with respect to said Wheels being such as to cause said housing to pivot about the axis of said wheels until said second switch actuating member engages said surface, said second switch actuating member preventing said first switch actuating member from engaging said surface, and means for actuating said contacts by applying a force to the top of said housing above said switch actuating members of sufficient magnitude to compress said spring.

' 13. Thesuction cleaner of claim 2 wherein the force to actuate said second switch actuating member is many times that required to actuate said first switch actuating member. i

* 14. In a suction cleaner having a pan-shaped housing and a pair of wheels connected to said housing at diametrically opposed portions thereof for supporting said housing from a surface to be cleaned, switch means mounted on said housing comprising relatively movable contacts, a first flanged switch actuating member projectcontacts, a second switch actuating member concentrically disposed relative to said first switch actuating member and arranged when moved toward the bottom of said housing to engage the flange on said first switch actuating member and move said first switch actuating member to actuate said contacts, means normally biasing said first switch actuating member away from the bottom of said housing, spring means normally biasing said second switch actuating member away from the bottom of said housing, said spring means having a force many times that of said means normally biasing said first switch actuating means, motor driven fan means supported somewhat centrally of said housing, said suction cleaner including said housing, and motor driven fan being so constructed and arranged that the center of gravity thereof is to one side of the pivotal axis of said wheels whereby said housing pivots about said axis until said second switch actuating member engages said surface, said second switch actuating member preventing said first switch actuating member from engaging said surface, said contacts being actuated by applying a force to the top of said housing above said switch actuating members of sufiicient magnitude to compress said spring means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 68,478 Allen Sept. 3, 1867 2,034,196 Martinet Mar. 17, 1936 2,155,669 Lofgren Apr. 25, 1939 2,176,139 Lofgren Oct. 17, 1939 2,418,130 Lofgren Apr. 1, 1947 2,486,619 Troxler Novnl, 1949 2,597,690 Wied May 20, 1952 2,616,114 Kroenlein Nov. 4, 1952 2,635,708 Lampe Apr. 21, 1953 2,653,342, -Bonin et al Sept. 29, 1953 2,731,194 Kent Jan. 17, 1956 2,778,447 Meyerhoefer Jan. 22, 1957 2,854,686 Hansen Oct. 7, 1958 2,871,503 Senne Feb. 3, 1959 2,876,479 Kaurman Mar. 10, 1959 2,888,192 Cole et al May 26, 1959 2,905,267 Thompson Sept. 22, 1959 2,913,755 Buccasio Nov. 24, 1959 2,918,693 Gasparini Dec. 29, 1959 2,948,014 Allen Aug. 9, 1960 2,967,013 Dallenbach et a1. Jan. 3, 1961 2,974,343 Seyfried Mar. 14, 1961 2,975,460 Sundberg Mar. 21, 1961 2,975,461 1961 Hansen Mar. 21,

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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/323, 15/326, 15/327.1, 15/371, 415/119, 15/325, 15/339, 15/412, 415/208.3
International ClassificationA47L9/28, A47L5/36, A47L5/22, A47L9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/2868, A47L9/00, A47L9/2889, A47L5/22, A47L9/2857, A47L9/2842, A47L5/362
European ClassificationA47L9/28S, A47L9/28F, A47L9/28P, A47L9/28D2, A47L5/22, A47L5/36A, A47L9/00