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Publication numberUS3170594 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 23, 1965
Filing dateSep 4, 1963
Priority dateSep 4, 1963
Publication numberUS 3170594 A, US 3170594A, US-A-3170594, US3170594 A, US3170594A
InventorsNascher Fred M
Original AssigneeShell Oil Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stackable and nestable container
US 3170594 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. M. NASCHER STACKABLE AND NESTABLE CONTAINER Feb. 23, 1965 Filed Sept. 4, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. mfi

fie. 4.

Feb. 23, 1965 F. M. NASCHER STACKABLE AND NESTABLE CONTAINER Filed Sept. 4, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 F250 4% /VA2S6A/EQ INVENTOR. M Me /7.

Feb. 23, 1965 F. M. NASCHER STACKABLE AND NESTABLE CONTAINER Filed Sept. 4, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 A7950 M /V4$6A/EQ INVENTOR. BY M p mm;

prrae/vB s Feb. 23, 1965 F. M. NASCHER STACKABLE AND NESTABLE CONTAINER 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Sept. 4, 1963 F950 44. A/Qsa/EQ INVENTOR.

BYM W flrroe/va s United States Patent 3,170,594 STACKABLE AND NESTABLE CUNTAINER Fred M. Nascher, Los Angeles, Calif, assignor, by mesne assignments, to Shell Oil Company, New York, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Filed Sept. 4, 1963, Ser. No. 306,567 2 Claims. (Cl. 220-97) The present invention relates to a stackable and nestable container, and more particularly to such a container having two flat end Walls.

In the art of manufacturing integrally formed containers it is the general practice to design such containers so that both the side walls and the end walls thereof diverge upwardly and outwardly. One reason for this principle of construction is that it permits superimposed identical containers to be conveniently nested together. Another reason for this principle of construction is that the diverging wall configuration permits the fully formed container to be conveniently pulled from its mold during the forming operation. Numerous configurations of containers have been known and utilized which fall within the general category just referred to.

The advantage of having fiat end walls for the container is pointed out, for example, in US. Patent No. 2,995,271, although the containers disclosed in that patent have only a single end wall which is flat. One of the objects of the presentinvention, therefore, is to provide a container of this general type having two flat end walls.

The significant basis of the present invention, however, is an economic problem that is not readily apparent. The number and configuration of the convolutions or stacking posts which are incorporated into a container of the general type under consideration, for the purpose of providing stacking support for a loaded superimposed container, has an important effect upon the manufacturing cost, and specifically, upon the cost of the tooling for forming the container. As a general proposition the simpler the configuration of the container the less expensive the tooling will be, and the faster the operation of forming containers from a given set of tooling.

But the effective support of a fully loaded superimposed container, or more importantly, of a high stack of such fully loaded superimposed containers, usually requires a considerable number of stacking convolutions or posts. At least, such has been the teaching of the prior art. And when the containers are made of a long and narrow configuration, and the walls thereof are made very thin so as to conserve the expensive material that is used, the mechanical problem of providing effective vertical stacking support becomes critical indeed.

Thus, the primary object and purpose of the present invention is to provide a stacka ble and nestable container of such configuration as to have more effective vertical stacking support, relative to the total cost of the container including the cost of the material, the tooling, and the manufacturing process, than has been achieved in prior containers of this general type.

The general concept of the invention is summarized as follows. Both end walls of the container are made flat, although the end walls of course diverge outwardly and upwardly in accordance with the basic principle of construction of this type of container. walls is, near its upper extremity, provided with an outwardly offset portion which provides a single end wall shelf. The two side walls also diverge outwardly and upwardly. The end portions of the side walls which are adjacent the other end wall (that is, on the opposite end of the container from where the end wall shelf is located), are offset inwardly relative to the remaining portions of the respective side walls, these inwardly offset One of the end "ice side wall portions being in turn outwardly offset near their upper extremities so as to provide a pair of side wall shelves. The container also includes wall means rising up from each of the shelves to limit both the effective length and width thereof.

When a superimposed container is rotated end for end in order to assume its stacking position, one of the consequences of this relationship is that the upper container is shifted a small amount longitudinally relative to the lower container. This shift of longitudinal position of the upper container is measurable with reference to the end walls of both the upper and lower containers. However, in the presently preferred form of the invention a conventional circumferential head is utilized at the upper portion of the container, and this head is in turn offset longitudinally relative to the longitudinal center of the container, as measured between the end walls thereof. More specifically the circumferential head is provided with a first pair of widened portions which limit the length of the end wall shelf, and with a second pair of widened portions which limit both the width and the length of the side wall shelves.

Where containers of considerable length relative to their width are being utilized it is deemed preferable to incorporate side wall shelves which extend half the length of the container, or nearly so.

The objects and advantages of the invention will be more fully understood with reference to the following description considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of one presently preferred embodiment of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary perspective View showing a detail not visible in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a longitudinal sectional view of the con-' tainer of FIGURE 1 taken on the line 33 thereof;

FIGURE 4 is a transverse sectional view of the container taken on the line 4-4 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a longitudinal elevational view, partly in section, showing a pair of the containers of FIGURE 1 when superimposed in nested relationship;

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken on the line 66 of FIGURE 5;

FIGURE 7 is an elevational view, partially in section, showing a pair of the containers of FIGURE 1 in their stacking relationship;

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken on the line 88 of FIGURE 7; and

FIGURES 9 to 16, inclusive, are corresponding views of a second embodiment of the invention, which differs in some details from the first embodiment thereof.

Referring now to FIGURES 1 to 4, inclusive, the container there illustrated will be seen to include a bottom wall 20 from which end walls 21 and 22 extend upwardly and outwardly. The end wall 21 is of a flat configuration throughout, and at its upper extremity is joined to the circumferential head or flange 40. End wall 22 near its upper extremity is outwardly offset so as to provide an end wall shelf 23 therein.

Side walls 31 and 32 likewise extend upwardly and outwardly from the bottom wall 20. At two of the corners of the container the side walls 31 and 32 are joined throughout their vertical height to the end wall 22. The portions of the side walls 31 and 32 which are adjacent the other end wall 21 are identified as 33 and 34, respectively; and it will be seen that these end portions of the side walls are inwardly'oifset relative to the remaining portions thereof. Thus at the other two corners of the' container the side wall portions 33 and 34 are joined to the end wall 21 throughout their height. It will be'observed that a result of this arrangement is that the length of end wall 21 is less than the length of end wall 22.

The inwardly offset side wall portions 33 and 34 are separated from the main wall portions by shoulders 33a and 34a, respectively; and it will be seen that these shoulders 33a and 34a, from bottomto top, incline toward the end wall 21. Alternatively stated, the inwardly offset side WFllI'POIlIiOIlS 33 and 34 have their greatest length, measured longitudinally of the container, at their lowermost extremities. This relationship is necessary in order to permit a superimposed identical Container to nest within the lower container.

The inwardly offset side wall portions 33 and 34 are, near. their upper extremities, outwardly offset so as to provide a pair of side wall shelves 35 and 36, respectively.

These side wall shelves are formed at the same vertical elevation as the end wall shelf 23.

In conjunction with the end wall 22 the circumferential head or flange 40 has a first pair of widened portions 41 and 44 which limit the length of the end wall shelf 23 so that it is substantially equal to the length of the lower extremity of the opposite end wall 21 atv the point where it joins the bottom wall 20. In conjunction with the outwardly offset upper portions of inwardly offset side wall portions 33 and 34 the circumferential bead or flange 40 has a second pair of'wide ned portions 42, 43, which limit both the width and the length of the side wall shelves 35, 36.v Thedetails of this relationship and the reasons for it will be more fully understood when the stacking relationship of the containers is discussed, subsequently.

As best seen in FIGURE 3 the circumferential bead or flange 40, which is of a rectangular configuration, is offset a short distance longitudinally relative to the longitudinal center of the container, as measured-between its end walls 21 and 22. But if the length of the container is considered as including the end'wall'shelf 23, then in that event the longitudinal center thereof coincides with the longitudinal center of the circumferential head or flange One of the features of the present container is the in corporation of .anti-wedging posts 24, 25, 37, 38. The anti-wedging posts 24 and 25 are incorporated in the end wall shelf 23, while the anti-wedging posts 37 and 33 are incorporated in the side wall shelves 35 and 3d, respec-' tively. Each anti-wedging post is characterized by walls which generally diverge outwardly of the container as they extend downwardly. However, the location of such anti-wedging posts or lugs, as illustrated herein, is' a significant aspect of the present invention.

Reference is now made to FIGURES 5 and 6 illustrating the nesting relationship of two of the containers of FIGURES l to 4-; and it will be seen that the'anti-wedging action of the posts or lugs 24, 25, 37, and 33 is clearl illustrated therein.

FIGURES 7 and 8 illustrate the stacking relationship of the containersof FIGURES l to 4. End wall shelf 23 receives the shortened opposite end wall 2-1, at the lower extremity thereof where it joins bottom wall 2h. Side Wall shelf 36 receives the lower extremity of side wall 31 where it joins end wall 22 and bottom wall and in similar manner side wall shelf 35 (not specifically shown) receives-the lower extremity of side wall 32 in the area where it joins end wall 22 and bottom wall 20.

Thus, it will be seen that the horizontal spacing-measured transversely of the container, between the second pair of widened portions 42, 43 of the circumferential head or flange 40, is such as toaccommodate therebetween in a fairly precise fashion the lower extremity .of end wall 22,'alongf its juncture with bottom wall 20. The

upwardly rising wall portions 42a and 43a (which could be considered as parts either of the side wall portions 33 and 34, respectively, or of the bead portions 42 and 43,

the side wall shelves 35 and 36, in such manner as to rather precisely accommodate the full length of the bottom Wall 20 of the superimposed container between such end wall segments and the end wall segment 23a which extends above theend wal-l shelf 23.

Referring now to FIGURES 9'through 16 0f the draw ings it willbe seen thatthe container therein illustrated.

is essentially identical to the container of FIGURES l to v8, except for the followingspecific differences: the container is of lesser width, and therefore has. a greater length to width ratio; the side wall shelves 135 and I36 are of much greater length, being approximately half the full length of the container; and notches 1543, 151 separate the side wall shelves 135, 136," respectively, from their of this second embodiment of the invention is therefore unnecessary.

The invention has been described in considerable detail in order to comply with the patent laws by providing a full public disclosure of at least one of its forms. However, such detailed description is not intendedin any way to limit the broad features orprinciplesof the invention, or the scope of patent monopoly tobe granted.

What I claim is:

1. An integrally formed stackable and nestable container of sheet material of uniformcross-section throughout'comprising integral oppositelyrdisposed side and end walls and a bottom wall interconnecting the side and end walls, said side and end walls diverging upwardly and outwardly frorn said bottom wall and terminating in a flange connecting the marginal edges of said side and end walls, one container end wall having an outwardly offset shelf forming recess therein, said recess including bottom, side and end walls, the bottom wall-being disposed below the marginal flange and merging into the side wall thereof,said recess side wall being disposed outwardly of the container end wall and merginginto said marginal flange, the end walls thereof terminating inwardly of the container side walls, said container side walls each including adjacent the other container end wall an'inwardly offset portion extending the entire height of the side walls and defined by angularly disposed shoulders extending from adjacent; the bottom wall to said marginal flange, said offset portion being of greatest length adjacent the juncture with the bottom wall and of less length at the juncturewith the said flange to permit nesting of superimposed identical containers, each of'said offset portions of the side walls including an outwardly extending shelf forming recess, each recess including bottom, side and end walls, said recess bottom wall being disposed below the marginal flange and merginginto said side wall thereof, said recess side wall being disposed outwardly of the container side walls, one .of the said recess .end walls terminating short of the container end wall, the other'of said recess end walls merging into the inclined shoulder, each of said side and end wallshelf forming recessesv having a length several times their width and eachrecess including a downwardly extending anti-wedging post of less width than said shelf recess and of a height at least twice the distance from the bottom wall'of the shelf formingrecess to the said marginal flange, the exterior walls .of the post diverging outwardly and downwardly in non-parallel relationship both with the container walls and a true vertical plane and terminating in a postbot- .tom wall, said bottom wall beingparallelwith therecess bottom wallsand the marginal flange ofthe container and extending inwardly and merging with the container walls.

2. An integrally formed stackable and nestable container of sheet material of uniform cross-section throughout comprising integral oppositely disposed side and end walls and a bottom wall interconnecting the side'and end walls, said side and end walls diverging upwardly and outwardly from said bottom wall and terminating in a flange connecting the marginal edges of said side and end walls, one container end wall having an outwardly offset shelf forming recess therein, said recess including bottom, side and end Walls, the bottom Wall being disposed below the marginal flange and merging into the side Wall thereof, said recess side wall being disposed outwardly of the container end wall and merging into said marginal flange, the end walls thereof terminating inwardly of the container side walls, said container side wall each including adjacent the other container end wall an inwardly oifset portion extending the entire height of the side walls and defined by angularly disposed shoulders extending from adjacent the bottom wall to said marginal flange, said otfset portion being of greatest length adjacent the juncture with the bottom wall and of less length at the juncture with the said flange to permit nesting of superimposed identical containers, each of said offset portions of the side walls including an outwardly extending shelf forming recess, each recess including bottom, side and end walls, said recess bottom wall being disposed below the marginal flange and merging into said side wall thereof, said recess side wall being disposed outwardly of the container side walls, one of the said recess end walls terminating short of the container end wall, the other of said recess end walls merging into the inclined shoulder, each of said side and end wall shelf forming recesses having a length several times their width, and said side Wall shelf forming recesses having a length equal to substantially half the length of the container whereby a superimposed container is supported in the middle portion thereof as well as on both ends.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,823,829 2/58 Frater 22097 2,995,271 8/61 Frater 22097 THERON E. CONDON, Primary Examiner. GEORGE o. RALSTON, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2823829 *Feb 1, 1956Feb 18, 1958Frater Milton ANesting and stacking container
US2995271 *Aug 10, 1960Aug 8, 1961Lewis Co G BStackable and nestable container
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3326410 *Jun 7, 1965Jun 20, 1967Shell Oil CoStackable, nestable, interlocking container
US3447715 *Mar 4, 1968Jun 3, 1969Beney Richard William OliverContainers
US3892452 *Mar 28, 1973Jul 1, 1975Duraform IncModular cabinet assembly
US3981401 *Mar 14, 1975Sep 21, 1976American Can CompanyCover for plates and stacking devices therefor
US4473155 *Sep 29, 1982Sep 25, 1984Frem CorporationStacking and nesting bin
US4826013 *Jul 20, 1987May 2, 1989Multitek, Inc.Collection apparatus
US5071008 *Dec 6, 1990Dec 10, 1991Rubbermaid IncorporatedNestable and stackable containers
US5377860 *Sep 14, 1993Jan 3, 1995James River Corporation Of VirginiaDouble seal food container
US6039205 *Oct 16, 1997Mar 21, 2000Flink; Christopher M.Ergonomic hand-held shopping basket
US7866769Sep 6, 2007Jan 11, 2011Target Brands, Inc.Storage and organization system and components thereof
US8079588Feb 20, 2009Dec 20, 2011Lockheed Martin CorporationMailpiece container for stacking mixed mail and method for stacking mail therein
US8113600Sep 4, 2009Feb 14, 2012Target Brands, Inc.Storage and organization system with stackable shells
US8186776Sep 4, 2009May 29, 2012Target Brands, Inc.Storage and organization system and connectivity of the components therein
US8231002Feb 20, 2009Jul 31, 2012Lockheed Martin CorporationMailpiece container for stacking mixed mail and method for stacking mail therein
US8261515Feb 20, 2009Sep 11, 2012Lockheed Martin CorporationMailpiece container for stacking mixed mail and method for stacking mail therein
US8414092Feb 13, 2012Apr 9, 2013Target Brands, Inc.Storage and organization system with stackable shells
US8418874Dec 3, 2010Apr 16, 2013Target Brands, Inc.Storage bin and associated system
US8573716May 25, 2012Nov 5, 2013Target Brands, Inc.Storage and organization system and connectivity of the components therein
US8708433Apr 15, 2013Apr 29, 2014Target Brands, Inc.Storage and organization system and components thereof
EP0612666A1 *Feb 19, 1994Aug 31, 1994BEROLINA KUNSTSTOFF GESELLSCHAFT m.b.H. & Co. VERPACKUNGSSYSTEME KGContainer stockable after rotation
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/507, 206/519, D03/304
International ClassificationB65D21/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D21/045
European ClassificationB65D21/04D2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 7, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: VANGUARD INDUSTRIES, INC.
Free format text: ASSIGNOR WISH TO CORRECT SPELLING OF FIRST WORD OF ASSIGNEES NAME IN ASSIGNMENT DATED DEC. 4, 1972FROM VANGUARD, INDUSTRIES, INC., TO VANGUARD INDUSTRIES, INC.;ASSIGNOR:SHELL OIL COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004048/0013
Effective date: 19800410
Owner name: VANGUARD INDUSTRIES, INC., VIRGINIA
Free format text: ASSIGNOR WISH TO CORRECT SPELLING OF FIRST WORD OF ASSIGNEES NAME IN ASSIGNMENT DATED DEC. 4, 1972FROM VANGUARD, INDUSTRIES, INC., TO VANGUARD INDUSTRIES, INC;ASSIGNOR:SHELL OIL COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004048/0013
Oct 30, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: MIDLAND-ROSS CORPORATION, 20600 CHAGRIN BLVD. CLEV
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NESTIER CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:003921/0847
Effective date: 19811030
Owner name: NESTIER CORPORATION
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:MIDLAND-ROSS CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:003921/0855
Effective date: 19811029