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Publication numberUS3171700 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 2, 1965
Filing dateJul 11, 1962
Priority dateJul 11, 1962
Publication numberUS 3171700 A, US 3171700A, US-A-3171700, US3171700 A, US3171700A
InventorsBrickman Harold, Kendrick T Parsell
Original AssigneeEver Wear Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bar cabinet
US 3171700 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 2, 1965 K T. PARsELL ETAL 3,171,700

BAR CABINET Filed July 11, 1962 FIG 2 2 Sheets-Sheet l :1" I kendrzkkZ'ParselZ I" 52 3 Harold Brickman INVENTORS March 2, 1965 K. T. PARSELL ETAL BAR CABINET 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 11, 1962 Kendrick 1 Parsell Harold Eric/(man mvsmons BY c.

azf ys United States Patent 0 3,171,760 EAR CAEENET Kendrick T. Parsell, Evanston, and Harold Ericlnnan, hicago, BL, assignors to Ever-Wear, lino, timcago, 1th, a corporation of Hliinois Filed Italy 11, N62, Ser. No. 2599,021 Z Clairns. (Cl. 312-488) This invention relates to a cabinet construction for use as a bar. More specifically, the construction of this invention provides a portable cabinet adapted to carry bar implements and bottles for preparing drinks.

There are various factors which enter into the manufacture of suitable bar cabinets of the type to which the present invention is directed. Thus, the cabinets should be as light in weight as possible to provide maximum portability. it is also necessary to provide strength and rigidity in the constructions in order to decrease as much as possible the danger of breaking the contents if the cabinet is dropped or otherwise mishandled.

The appearance of cabinets of this type is understandably also of importance. Thus, it is desirable to employ in the construction of the cabinet materials which provide a rich exterior and which are durable enough to withstand normal use without appreciable deterioration. It is also desirable to avoid as much as possible the presentation of fasteners and the like on the exposed surfaces of the cabinet, since these tend to present an unsightly appearance.

in bar cabinet constructions now in use, it has been found necessary to employ materials of substantial thickness in order to provide suitable strength and rigidity. The use of thick material adds to the weight of the cabinets and is, therefore, undesirable in this respect. Furthermore, there is added cost involved when relatively large amounts of material are employed. In addition, it is desirable to provide compartmented portions in the interior of the cabinets in order to provide for retaining of implements and bottles in position. However, where relatively thick materials are employed in the manufacture of the cabinets, it is extremely diii'icult to form compartmented portions without adding materially to the cost of the constructions.

Prior designs are also objectionable from the standpoint of expense for other reasons. Where heavy gauge materials are employed, forming and handling operations are more burdensome. Since relatively expensive materials, having a particularly presentable appearance, are preferred, these materials represent a large portion of the total cost of the cabinets. Accordingly, where thicker materials are necessary, the cost will be increased. in some cases, cheaper materials are employed, but it is then necessary to provide more presentable coverings for the exposed surfaces, and the carrying out of such an operation is costly.

it is an object of this invention to provide a portable cabinet which is particularly suitable for carrying bar implements and bottles for preparing drinks.

It is an additional obiect of this invention to provide a bar cabinet of the type described which is light in weight while providing suitable strength and rigidity and which is durable while presenting a rich appearance and is, nevertheless, manufactured in a highly economical fashion.

Billfihh Eatenterl Mar. 2, 1965 It is a further object of this invention to provide a bar cabinet of a unique construction which eliminates the need for the use of heavy material to provide strength and rigidity and which thereby enables the use of highly presentable materials without unduly increasing costs.

It is a more particular object of this invention to provide a bar cabinet which includes a unique inner and outer shell construction in combination with unique means for securing the shells together, the combination providing the advantageous features of this invention.

These and other objects of this invention will appear hereinafter and, for purposes of illustration, but not of limitation, specific embodiments of this invention are shown in the accompanying drawings in which- FIGURE 1 is an elevational view of a portable bar cabinet characterized by the features of this invention;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevation of the bar cabinet shown in FIGURE 1;

FiGURE 3 is a side elevation illustrating the opposite side of the bar cabinet of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is an elevational view illustrating the cabinet in the open position and showing the compartmented inner shells located Within the outer shells of the construction;

FIGURE 5 is a front elevation of the bar cabinet construction;

FlGURE 6 is a sectional view taken about the line 6-6 of FEGURE 1;

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged fragmentary view in section illustrating clamping means for the rims of the two sections of the cabinet;

FIGURE 8 is an enlarged fragmentary View in section illustrating the application of the hinge to the structure;

FIGURE 9 is an enlarged fragmentary view in section illustrating the clamping means of FIGURE 7 shown prior to engagement with the rims of the construction; and

FIGURE 10 is an enlarged fragmentary View in sec tion illustrating the clamping means after engagement with the rims and as they appear when the associated sections of the bar cabinet are in the closed position.

The present invention is generally directed to a bar cabinet construction of the type employing two pivotally connected sections forming an enclosure and having latch means for securing the sections in a closed position. In accordance with this invention, each of the cabinet sec tions comprises an outer shell and an inner shell interfitted therein. Means are positioned along the rims of the associated inner and outer she is for each section, and these means are adapted to hold the shells together.

In a preferred form of this invention, the means holding the rims of the shells together comprise channelshaped members with the side Walls thereof extending over the rims of the shells. The side walls are adapted to be clamped together so that a secure engagement of the channel-shaped members with the shells can be provided.

The channel-shaped members, which are adapted to hold the rims together, also function as aligning means for the sections of the cabinet when they are in closed position. This is accomplished by providing a groove in one of the channel-shaped members and a corresponding tongue extending outwardly from the base of the other channel-shaped member. When the cabinet sections are closed, the tongue and groove interfit thereby holding the cabinet sections in alignment all along their respective peripheries.

The accompanying drawings illustrate a bar cabinet characterized by the features of this invention. The cabinet is divided into two sections 12 and 14 which are pivotally connected by means of hinges 16. A latch 18 is provided for holding the sections in closed position. The handle 20, secured at the top of the section 14, provides portability in the construction.

As shown in FIGURE 4, the interior of the bar cabinet is cornpartmented whereby the cabinet can receive bar implements and bottles. The compartments comprise depressed portions in the interior walls of the cabinet and in the embodiment shown these include large portions 22 separated by walls 23 which are formed in the section 14. The compartments 2 2 are des gned for retaining bottles, and a strap 24 fastened to the interior walls at either end and provided with a snap 26 permits securing of the bottles in position.

In the bar cabinet section 12 compartments 28 are provided for retaining tumblers. Straps 30 are permanently secured over these compartments. Compartments 32 are designed for retaining shot glasses, a mixing spoon is adapted to fit into the compartment 34, an opener is adapted to fit into the compartment 36 md a corkscrew into the compartment 38. A strap 49 extends across each of these compartments and is adapted to hold articles placed therein in position. It will be appreciated that the nature and number of compmtments in each of the sections 12 and 14- can be varied as desired and the illustrated (lesi n is only provided as one possible combination.

FIGURE 6, which illustrates the cabinet in section, reveals the inner and outer wall structure which is primarily responsible for the improved characteristics of the bar cabinet. As shown, the section 14 consists of an outer shell 42 and an inner shell 44 The section 12 comprises an outer shell 4-6 and an inner shell 43.

Each of the inner and outer shells is manufactured from a relatively thin sheet of material. It has been found, however, that when the shells are assembled in accordance with this invention, the combined inner and outer shells provide a cabinet having strength and rigidity equal to cabinets employing a much thicker single sheet. Furthermore, the asesmbled shells have the added advantage of providing for concealment of the unsightly ends of all fasteners. This is the case since the ends of the fasteners, for example as shown at 5%, are concealed by the inner shell and fasteners on the inner shell have their ends concealed by the outer shell. This substantially improves the appearance and also the economy of manufacture of the cabinet, since there is no need to provide means for covering exposed fastener ends. The interior surfaces of the inner shells are preferably flocked in order to further enrich their appearance.

FIGURES 7 through 10 illustrate the means for holding the adjacent peripheral edges of the inner and outer shells together. These means include .a pair of channel members 52 and 54, one for the section 12 and the other for the section 14. Each of the channel members cornprises a base portion 56 with walls 58 depending therefrom i The interior walls 58 are provided with a sharp projecting edge 66 for engaging the inner shells. As shown in FIGURES 9 and 10, the walls 58 are adapted to be clamped together and the'edge 6% then digs into the inner shell and is, therefore, held tightly in place.

The channel member 52 is provided with a groove 62 in the base 56 on the side opposite the channel walls 58. A. corresponding tongue 64 is located on the base 56 of the channel member 54. As shown in FIGURE 10, this tongue and groove arrangement interfi-ts when the cabinet is closed. This provides for alignment along all sides of the cabinet construction and aids in presenting a neat appearance.

The bar cabinet of this invention provides many distinct advantages. Since the amount of material employed represents a relatively low weight, maximum portability is provided in the construction. This is accomplished without sacrificing strength and rigidity due to the provision of separate inner and outer shells. In the manufacture of the cabinets, it is desirable to employ stiff plastic materials of the type adapted to receive a leather-like finish. The use of lesser amounts of this type of material represents a considerable saving in the over-all costs of the cabinets. The channel members are preferably formed of metal, and the use of aluminum is desirable from a weight and appearance standpoint.

The provision of the inner shells, as noted, provides a convenient means for concealing unsightly fastener ends. Furthermore, the relatively thin rinner shells can be readily formed to provide the desired compartmented surfaces, and this forming can be accomplished without in any way disturbing the smooth exterior surfaces of the exterior shells.

The bar cabinet of this invention is also characterized by a simplified construction which adds to its economical nature, particularly in the manfacturing aspects. Thus, only three parts, the inner and outer shells and the channel member, make up each section of the cabinet construction, and these three parts can be easily assembled.

It will be understood that various modifications can be made in the above described bar cabinet construction which provides the characteristics of this invention without departing from the spirit thereof, particularly as defined in the following claims.

We claim:

1. A bar cabinet construction of the type having hinge means pivotally connecting two sections which form an enclosure and means for securing said sections in a closed position, each of said sections comprising a single outer shell member and a single inner shell member, means fastening said hingemeans and securing means to said outer shell, the transverse dimensions of said inner and outer shells being approximately coextensive and means positioned along the rims of said sections for holding said inner and outer shells together at their peripheral edges whereby said shell members cover the ends of fastening means attached in said construction, said means for holding said shells together comprising channel-shaped members with the side walls thereof extending from a base over said edges and having a sharp projecting edge thereof for digging into one of said shells to fasten said peripheral edges together, and including a groove provided inone of said channel-shaped members on the side of the base opposite said side walls and a tongue defined in the other channel-shaped member extending from its base and adapted to interfit with said groove when said sections are in the closed position, said inner shells being provided with compartmented' portions for receiving bar implements and bottles and including means fastened to said inner shells for retaining said implements and bottles within said compartmented portions, the space between the interior surface of said inner and outer shells being completely open to provide a light weight construction.

2. A bar cabinet construction of the type having hinge means pivotally connecting two sections which form an enclosure and means for securing said sections in a closed position, each of said sections comprising a single outer shell member and a single inner shell member, means fastening said hinge means and securing means to said outer shell, the transverse'dimensions of said inner and outer shells being approximately coextensive and means posi tioned along the rims of said sections for holding said inner and outer shells together at their peripheral edges whereby said shell members cover theends of fastening means attached in said construction, said means for hold- 5 a'ng said shells together comprising chann l-shaped members with the side Walls thereof extending from a base over said edges, means associated with said channelshaped members for fastening said peripheral edges to gether, said channel-shaped members defining opposed outer base surfaces adapted to be mated together for closing off the interior of said cabinet when said sections are in a closed position, said inner shells being provided with compartmcrited portions for receiving bar implements and bottles and including means fastened to said inner shells for retaining said implements and bottles within said compartmented portions, the space between the interior surface of said inner and outer shells being completely open to provide a light weight construction.

References Cited by the Exaer UNITED STATES PATENTS FRANK B. SHERRY, Primary Examiner.

CHANCELLOR E. HARRIS, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1914154 *Nov 4, 1932Jun 13, 1933Palumbo Anthony JDustproof trunk molding
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US2679244 *Nov 28, 1952May 25, 1954Salvatore FucciCombined bottle warmer and hot plate carrying case
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3339781 *Mar 22, 1965Sep 5, 1967Grace W R & CoHollow wall container
US3347354 *Oct 3, 1966Oct 17, 1967West Richard CBar caddy
US3348892 *Apr 13, 1966Oct 24, 1967Antares SpaCarrying case for a portable typewriter
US3596754 *Dec 11, 1968Aug 3, 1971Oscar Schmidt International InCombination shipping and carrying container
US3871519 *Dec 26, 1973Mar 18, 1975Groomes JacquelineBingo carrying case
US3926308 *Feb 11, 1974Dec 16, 1975Olean Case CorpTool carrying case
US4003468 *Mar 24, 1975Jan 18, 1977Berkman Joseph LCase and insert for differently sized magnetic tape enclosures
US4223787 *May 9, 1979Sep 23, 1980Data Packaging CorporationCassette carrying case
US4449629 *Mar 29, 1983May 22, 1984The Stanley WorksDisplay and storage container for multiple tool parts and the like
US5579914 *Oct 25, 1995Dec 3, 1996Thore; ScottCamper kitchen caddy
US6915797Feb 4, 2004Jul 12, 2005Dilton A. LightbournePortable kitchen for preparing and storing foods or the like
US20050166906 *Feb 4, 2004Aug 4, 2005Lightbourne Dilton A.Portable kitchen for preparing and storing foods or the like
US20070131221 *Feb 3, 2005Jun 14, 2007Lightbourne Dilton APortable kitchen for preparing and storing foods or the like
US20150047941 *Aug 14, 2013Feb 19, 2015Saul Barry WaxBottled Beverage Carrying Suitcase System
US20150150348 *Feb 13, 2015Jun 4, 2015Saul Barry WaxBottled Beverage Carrying Suitcase System
USD796204Jan 5, 2016Sep 5, 2017Saul Barry WaxSuitcase insert
Classifications
U.S. Classification312/200, 206/217, 190/28, 206/231, 206/483, 206/541, 312/400, 206/521
International ClassificationA47B69/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45C13/02, A45C11/00, A47B69/00
European ClassificationA45C13/02, A47B69/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 8, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: SHELL AGRAR GMBH & CO. KG, GERMANY
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:CELAMERCK GMBH & CO. KG, INGELHEIM AM RHEIN;REEL/FRAME:005237/0102
Effective date: 19881111