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Publication numberUS3172118 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 9, 1965
Filing dateJul 2, 1962
Priority dateDec 31, 1956
Also published asUS3172120
Publication numberUS 3172118 A, US 3172118A, US-A-3172118, US3172118 A, US3172118A
InventorsDe Caro Charles J, Henning Robert W
Original AssigneeOlin Mathieson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cocking means for the firing pin of an explosively actuated tool
US 3172118 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Mam]! 9, 1965 c. J. DE CARO ETAL 3,172,118

cocxmc wsms FOR ms FIRING PIN OF AN EXPLOSIVELY ACTUATED TOOL Original Filed Dec. 31, 1956 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS' CHARLES J DE CARO ROBERT W HE NN/NG March 1965 c. J. DE CARO ETAL 3,172,118

COCKING MEANS FOR THE FIRING PIN OF AN EXPLOSIVELY ACTUATED TOOL Original Filed Dec. 31, 1956 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VENTORS CHARLES J. DEC/1R0 ROBE R 7' W. HE NN/NG March 9, 1965 c. J. DE CARO ETAL 3,172,118

COCKING MEANS FOR THE FIRING PIN OF AN EXPLOS IVELY ACTUATED TOOL Original Filed Dec. 31, 1956 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 4 4' W 5 i a 83 8811 82 1 7/1 ll 61 i7; \Y K 1 g 4 1oz Z0 v/ ;-$8 on g 40 6! g l 63' I4 \E? FIG 9 FIG -I@ INVENTORSI CHARLESJ DECARO ROBERT W. HE/VN/NG March 1965 c. J. DE CARO ETAL 3,172,113

COCKING MEANS FOR THE FIRING PIN OF AN EXPLOSIVELY ACTUATED TOOL Original Filed Dec. 31, 1956 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 w FIG "l3 7 CHARLES I\L/9%EE%ROS'.

ROBE/PT l4. HENN/NG United States Patent 3,172,118 COCKING MEAN FUR THE FIRENG PIN OF AN EXPLGSIVELY ACTUATED TOOL Charles 3. De Caro, Cleveland, and Robert W. I llenning, Rocky River, @hio, assignors, by mesne assignments, to Olin Mathieson Chemical Eorporation, a corporation of Virginia Original application Dec. 31, 1956, Ser. No. 631,881, now Patent No. 3,960,436, dated Get. 30, 1962. Divided and this application .Iuly 2, 1962, Ser. No. 215,756

(Claims. (El. 1-445) This application is a division of copending Serial No. 631,881, filed December 31, 1956, now U.S. Patent No. 3,060,436, granted October 30, 1962.

This invention relates to fluid powered devices and more particularly to fluid powered fastener driving tools.

The present tool is of the type wherein an explosive cartridge provides the power for driving a fastener or similar driven element and more particularly wherein the explosive force is directed against a piston of substantially greater mass than the fastener, with the piston driving the fastener. In tools of this type difficulty may be encountered in dissipating the explosive force after the fastener has been driven. The explosive gases are discharged through a relatively large opening in the side of the barrel at a point relatively close to the barrel breech. The release of the gases results in a very loud report and a flame and glowing particles which are annoying and which could cause injury to the operator of the tool or to material close to the discharge opening. Difficulty may also be encountered in stopping the forward travel of the piston after detonation of the cartridge. Such forward travel is usually stopped in one of two ways, either by the resistance of the fastener or other driven element, particularly a headed portion of such an element engaging a surface into which it is being driven, or alternately by a portion of the piston engaging an abutment in the muzzle end of the barrel. The first mode of stopping the travel of the piston is objectionable because the driven element may be driven too far into the workpiece and in the case of a fastener the head may be driven through the surface of the workpiece. In stopping the travel of the piston by engagement with an abutment in the muzzle of the barrel a great deal of shock results and possible damage to the tool or premature fatigue of the parts of the tool is likely, as well as discomfort to the operator.

A very serviceable and effective firing mechanism for tools in which a fastener is driven through a bore in the tool by an explosive force directed against the fastener itself utilizes a cocking rod secured to the barrel. In piston type tools this has not been found to be satisfactory because upon detonation of the cartridge the barrel is driven rearwardly against the breech block, and upon abruptly stopping the piston the barrel is driven forwardly. The resultant shock to which the barrel is subjected has resulted in a cocking rod attached to the barrel of a piston type tool becoming loose in its mounting and it has been found that under these circumstances the rod should be mounted in a portion of the tool which is not subjected to such severe shock.

The present invention is directed to overcoming these difiiculties and providing an improved tool. The shock resulting in stopping the forward travel of the piston under the force of the explosive charge is reduced by providing a plurality of hard washers between an abutment in the muzzle end of the barrel bore and a cooperating abutment portion on the piston. The impulse forces between the washers, or in other words, the rattling effect between the washers, absorbs this shock. The burning explosive gases which drive the piston are dissipated through an opening in the side of the barrel and then 3,172,118 Patented Mar. 9, 1965 through a blast chamber which reduces the report of the explosion and confines any flames or glowing particles of the explosive matter in the chamber. The firing mechanism has been improved by mounting the entire mechanism in the tool housing with no parts on the barrel or other portions of the tool which are subjected to excessive shock.

It is an object of this invention to provide an improved tool for driving fasteners or similar driven elements.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved means for dissipating shock in piston type driving tools.

Another object of this invention is to provide a quieter and safer tool.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved firing mechanism.

Additional objects and advantages will be apparent from the following description and drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side view of an embodiment of the tool in the inoperative or safe position;

FIGURE 2 is a top View of the tool shown in FIG- URE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a rear or breech end view of the tool shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a front or muzzle end view of the tool shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional schematic view of the tool taken on the line 55 in FIGURE 2;

FIGURES 6, 7, and 8 are sectional views taken respectively on the lines 66, 7-7, and 8-8 in FIGURE 5;

FIGURE 9 is a sectional schematic view similar to FIGURE 5, but showing the tool in the operative or ready-to-fire position;

FIGURE 10 is a sectional schematic view similar to FIGURES 5 or 9, but showing the tool immediately after firing;

FIGURE 11 is a sectional schematic view of the muzzle end of the tool and illustrates another embodiment of a portion of the tool;

FIGURE 12 is a sectional schematic view of the breech end of the tool and illustrates still another embodiment of a portion of the tool; and

FIGURE 13 is a sectional schematic view of the embodiment of FIGURE 12, but showing the tool immediately after firing.

Referring to FIGURES 1-10 in the drawings, and particularly FIGURE 5, the tool includes a barrel 14 and housing 1 including a forward portion 2 and a hand grip and trigger guard portion 3. The forward housing portion 2 has a tubular bore 4, a large elongated opening 5, a breech block closure portion 6, a fluid discharge opening 7, and screw threaded aperture 8. A trigger 11 is pivotably mounted in the forward housing portion 2 by a pivot pin 12. A barrel 14 having bore 9 is slidably mounted in the forward housing bore 4 and is normally inoperatively positioned outwardly with respect to the housing 2 by a spring 15 surrounding the barrel and engaging a flange 16 on the muzzle end of the barrel and a shoulder 17 on the muzzle end of the forward housing portion 2. The breech end 18 of the barrel 14 has a chamber 19 for receiving an explosive cartridge 20. The outer surface of the barrel has a longitudinal slot 22. A portion of this slot is cut through the barrel wall to provide an opening 23 which is aligned with the opening 7 in the housing when the tool is in the operative position, as shown in FIGURE 9. The longitudinal bore 9 opens through the muzzle end of the barrel and has a closed breech end except for the opening provided by the cartridge chamber 19. The muzzle end of the barrel bore is provided with screw threads 24.

A piston 28 is slidably received in the barrel bore 9 with a sealing fit at its extremities 29. The midportion of the piston is reduced and does not engage the bore 9. A detent 31 is received in a socket 32 in the piston. An outwardly protruding end of the detent is received in the portion 23 of slot 22 in the barrel 14 and is resiliently urged outwardly by a resilient plug 33 such as neoprene rubber. In one embodiment of the invention shown in FIGURE 5, the muzzle end of the piston 28 is provided with a stepped socket 35. The innermost portion of the socket is threaded at 36 and is smaller than the outer portion 37. A piston rod 39 has a forward shank portion 38, an enlarged shoulder i0, and a threaded rear portion 41. The shoulder 40 tightly engages the forward piston socket portion 37 and is screwed into the socket by cooperating threads 36 and 41.

The piston 23 is retained in the barrel bore 9 by a threaded metal plug 42. The metal plug is screwed into the threads 24 in the muzzle end of the barrel bore 9. The plug is formed of a soft, tough steel. A bore 43 is formed through the center of the plug to slidably receive the piston shank 39 with a close sliding fit to prevent bending the piston rod while driving a fastener or other driven element. The extremities of the bore 43 may be beveled as indicated in the drawing. A ball 45 is received in a bore 46 drilled through the plug 42 from the outside inwardly leaving a shoulder at the inner end in the bore 43 to retain the ball in the bore. The ball is resiliently urged outwardly by a rubber plug 48. Between the metal plug 42 and piston 28 are two hard metal impact washers 4-9 of tool steel or the like such as a special alloy, water-hardening steel known as Solar and sold under that trade name by Carpenter Steel Company of Reading, Pennsylvania. These Washers closely engage the barrel bore 5 and are provided with central bores 59 aligned with the metal plug bore 43 to receive the piston rod shank 39.

A blast chamber 52 is secured to the housing 2 in any appropriate manner as by welds 53 and ha an opening 54 aligned with the opening '7 in the housing. The blast chamber comprises a cylindrical member 55 which includes the opening 54. The cylinder 55 is closed at its rear end by a plug 56 welded therein. Received in the forward or breech end of the cylinder is a blast chamber bushing 57 to which is secured a chamber tube 58. The bushing 57 has an opening 59 and a hollow socket-like portion 69. The chamber tube 58 is secured in the socket 60 in any appropriate manner as by a sweat fit or welding. A plurality of holes 61 are formed in the chamber tube 58 and the rear end of the tube is sealed as by a crimp 62. A bolt 63 passes through aligned pairs of apertures in the cylindrical member 55, and the bushing 57, and is threaded only into the threaded opening 8. A reduced nose 64 on the inner end of the bolt 63 projects into the slot 22 in the barrel 14 and is adapted to engage the detent 31 for a purpose to be described hereinafter. Although tube 58 is preferred, chamber 52 may contain a porous packing such as metallic wool or the like.

The forward portion 2 of the housing ha mounted therein an extractor 67 of any appropriate type for withdrawing the expended cartridge 2%) from the chamber 19 in the barrel. The rear end of the forward portion of the housing 2 includes a cut-out portion 70 as best illustrated in FIGURE 6. The breech block 6 of the forward housing portion 2 includes a frusto-conical bore 71 opening into the cylindrical part of the cut-out '70. A firing pin 75 is slidably received in a cylindrical portion 7s (see FIGURE 6) of the cut-out 70. An L-shaped rod 77 is slidably received in a bifurcated portion 78 of the cutout 70.

The hand grip and trigger portion 3 of the housing 1 is secured to the rear of forward portion 2 of the housing by a pair of bolts 65 passing through the grip 3 and threaded into the forward part 2. The hand grip portion 3 of the housing includes sockets 8t) and 81.

The firing pin 75 comprises a frusto-conical nose portion 82, a first cylindrical body portion 83 and a second cylindrical body portion 84 of smaller diameter than the portion 33 as shown enlarged in FIGURES l2 and 13. A socket 85 is formed in the larger cylindrical body portion 83 and receives a detent 86 which is resiliently urged outwardly by a spring 87 (see FIGURE 5). In the in operative position shown in FIGURE 5, a reduced portion 88 of the detent 56 engages a hole 39 in the cocking rod 77. The firing pin is constantly urged forwardly and toward the muzzle by a spring 90 engaging a shoulder '91 provided by the juncture of the large cylindrical portion 83 and the smaller cylindrical portion 3a, and a shoulder 92 in the breech end of the socket St). The L-shaped cocking rod 77 is similarly constantly urged forwardly or toward the muzzle of the tool by a spring 93 engaging an arm 94 (see FTGURE 5) on the cocking rod and the base of the socket S1. The rear end of the firing pin 75 has a thin cylindrical extension 96 which is clearly visible in a bore 97 in the rear housing member 3 to indicate when the tool is properly cocked and to aid in maintaining the firing pin in proper alignment. The trigger it is normally maintained in the position shown in FTGURE 5 by a leaf spring )3 which may be secured to the housing member in any appropriate manner and is here shown as being received in a slot in the bifurcated portion 73 of the forward housing member cut out portion 70. The hand grip 3 may be provided with a resilient insert ltll) to relieve the shock which would otherwise be transmitted to the operators hand. The hand grip 3 is also provided with a relieved area 101 to reduce the weight of the tool and a trigger guard 192.

Referring to the embodiment shown in FIGURE ll, 21 floating piston rod ha a cyindrical portion 116 on its posterior end and a smaller second cylindrical portion 117 on its front end. A socket 119 is provided in the front portion 29 of a piston that otherwise corresponds to the piston 28. The base 118 of the socket 119 is of substantially the same diameter as the cylindrical portion 116 of the piston rod. The forward or open end portion 120 of the socket 11$ is flared outwardly to facilitate receiving the rear end of the floating piston rod and similarly the rear edges of the piston rod are beveled. Washers 121 may be provided to absorb any shock as previously described, although, they would not normally be required because the driven member stops the rod 115. The length of the cylindrical portion 117 is such that when the piston with its portion 29 is in its rear most position the floating piston rod 115, remains aligned with the center opening of the Washers 121 following the muzzle plug 42. The rod 115 is maintained in proper alignment through engagement of its forward end with the bores 122 and bore 4-3 in the washer and the muzzle plug, respectively. In using different size fasteners or other driven elements it is a simple matter to change the muzzle plug 42 and piston rod 115 by merely unscrewing the plug.

In the firing mechanism embodiment shown in FIG- URES 12 and 13 a rod 193 has a circumferential enlargement 107 and is slidably mounted in a socket 164 in the forward housing portion 2. A spring 196 is received on the rod and is maintained in engagement with the enlargement 107 by a plug 109 threaded into the housing. Upon rearward movement of the barrel the cocking rod M3 is moved rearwardly and through engagement with the detent 88, moves the firing pin 75 rearwardly and into the ready-to-fire position and upon depressing the trigger 11 the firing pin detent 88 is released and the firing pin moves to the position shown in FIGURE 12.

The operation of the tool and functioning of its various components is as follows: With the tool in the inoperative position shown in FIGURE 5 a cartridge 20 is inserted through the opening 5 in the housing 1 and into the chamber 19 in the barrel breech end 18. A fastener or other driven element F is inserted into the bore 43 in the muzzle plug 42. The fastener may-be provided with a washer W (FIGURES 5, 9 and 10) secured on its shank with a very tight sliding fit so that when the fastener is driven into a work surface S the washer will be forced against the head of the fastener. The washer is so positioned that it engages the ball 45 maintaining the fastener properly positioned in the muzzle plug. The tool is then grasped by the operator and the muzzle 42 is properly positioned on the work surface S. The operator then presses on the housing grip portion 3 causing the forward housing portion 2 to telescope over the barrel 14 until the barrel breech end 18 engages the breech block 6 in the housing 1 as shown in FIGURE 9. Shortly before the barrel breech end 18 engages the breech block 6, the barrel breech end engages the forward end of the cocking rod 77 forcing the cocking rod from further movement with the housing thereby compressing the spring 93. The firing pin 75 simultaneously is stopped from further approaching the barrel breech end and thereby compresses the spring 90 because the nose 88 of the firing pin detent 86 is in the cocking rod hole 89.

With the tool in the position shown in FIGURE 9, the operator merely pulls trigger 11, as shown in FIGURE 10, causing the trigger to engage the firing detent nose 88 and disengage it from the cocking rod hole 89, whereupon the force of the firing pin spring 90 drives the firing pin 75 forward until the firing pin nose 82 strikes the cartridge 20 detonating the explosive charge contained therein.

The force of the explosive charge drives the piston 28 through the barrel bore 9 and toward the muzzle plug 42. The muzzle end of the piston rod 38 strikes the head of the fastener F, or other driven member, to drive the fastener into the work surface S. The travel of the piston 28 is stopped by engagement of the piston with a series of washers backed up by the muzzle plug after initial engagement with Washers 49. The impact, or rattling effect, between the hard washers 49 substantially reduces the shock which would otherwise occur if the piston 28 engaged the muzzle plug 42. This resultant shock is also reduced by the soft, tough muzzle plug through the peening effect of the muzzle end washer 49 against the plug. It has been found that when only one washer 49 was used, although the shock was somewhat retarded, a single washer would expand and increase its diameter to the extent that it jammed in the barrel bore 9 and became ineffective in reducing the shock. When two Washers are used, neither washer increases its diameter to the extent that it jammed in the barrel bore. The more Washers that are used the greater is the reduction in the shock occuring in stopping the forward travel of the piston 28. It is therefore desirable to use as great a number of thin washers as is possible. However, the washers must have sufficient thickness to remain perpendicular to the barrel bore. If they are too thin they are likely to turn askew in the bore 9 and on the piston rod 38.

Upon detonation of the cartridge 20, the explosive force is applied in its entirety against the piston only a short portion of its entire travel through the barrel bore. As the piston 28 moves toward the muzzle of the bore the breech end of the piston passes the breech end of the opening 23 through the barrel side wall permitting the explosive gases to escape through the openings 7 and 54 in the forward housing portion 2 and in the blast chamber cylinder 55 respectively. As the gases pass into the blast chamber they pass through the holes 61 in the chamber tube 58 and into the central portion of the chamber tube, then through the socket 64 in the bushing 57, and out through the hole 59 in the bushing. The blast is thereby deflected away from the operator and the noise of the blast is substantially reduced. The blast chamber further prevents any glowing particles of explosive matter or flame resultant from the explosion from escaping from the tool 6 thereby eliminating any possibility of injury to nearby personnel or material.

After firing the tool the operator releases the trigger 11 which is returned to the position shown in FIGURE 9 by the spring 98. He then withdraws the tool from the work surface whereupon the spring 15 about the barrel 14 forces the barrel forward with respect to the housing 1 and permits the extractor 67 to withdraw the expended cartridge 20 from the chamber 19 in the barrel. Upon detonation of the cartridge 2%, the firing pin is in its inoperative or forward position as shown in FIGURE 10 and upon forward movement of the barrel 14, the cocking rod spring 93 drives the cooking rod forward in the housing 1 until the cocking rod arm 94 engages an abutment in the housing. With the cocking rod in its forwardmost position, the firing pin detent 88 again engages in the hole 89 in the cocking rod.

After firing the tool the piston 28 is in engagement with the rearmost washer 49, that is, it is positioned forward in the barrel bore 9. Upon forward movement of the barrel 14 with respect to the housing 1 the piston detent 31 engages the nose of the bolt 63 which protrudes into the slot 22, preventing the piston 28 from moving with the barrel 14 so that when the barrel is in its full inoperative position the piston 28 will again be adjacent the breech end of the barrel as shown in FIGURE 5. The tool is now ready to be reloaded for driving another fastener or other driven element.

The functioning of the firing pin mechanism shown in FIGURES 12 and 13 is substantially the same as that shown in the previous described embodiment. As the housing 1 moves forwardly with respect to the barrel 14, the breech end of the barrel engages the forward end of the cocking rod 193 causing the rod to stop and move only relatively with respect to the socket 104, against the resistance of the spring I166, compressing it in socket 104, to engage the firing pin detent S8 and thereby stop the firing pin with respect to the forwardly telescoping housing and until the parts are placed into the ready-to-fire position as shown in FIGURE 9. The operator then depresses the trigger lll releasing the firing pin to permit the spring 90 to drive the firing pin forward in the housing 1 and into engagement With the cartridge 20.

In the piston rod embodiment shown in FIGURE 11 the rod 115 floats free in the muzzle plug 42. As the piston 28 moves forward in the barrel bore 9, the cylindrical portion 116 of the piston rod is seated in the cylindrical socket 119 in the piston and the rod is driven forward against the fastener. As explained previously, in driving different size fasteners, it is necessary to use different size muzzle plugs and a piston rod of substantially the same diameter as the muzzle plug bore 43 and the washer bores 122. If the rod is of substantially less diameter it may bend while driving the fastener or other driven element into the surface S.

To disassemble the tool the bolt 63 is backed out of the threaded housing bore 8 to permit the barrel to pass over the bolt whereupon the detent is moved to a position aligned with an enlargement in the opening 23. The barrel is then removed from the housing bore 4 and the detent permitted to drop out of the socket 32 through the enlargement in the opening 23. ,IUpon removal of the muzzle plug 42, the piston may be removed. In order to remove the firing pin and cocking rod, the bolts 65 are removed and the housing grip portion 3 is removed from the forward housing portion 2. The springs and 93 may then be removed from their respective socket in the grip housing portion 3 and the firing pin 75 and cocking rod 77 may be removed from the forward housing portion 2. In the cooking rod embodiment shown in FIGURES 12 and 13 it is necessary to remove the plug 109 before removing either the spring 106 or the cocking rod 103. V

It is notable that opening 54 in blast chamber member 55 is axially elongated like barrel opening 7 to. offer 1,. 3,.s 12,1.ro

the driver piston during the last part of its inovemen an ever increasing discharge vent into the chamber 52 which is even more elongated to obtain a large volume without too much lateral bulk. The increasing vent assures complete dissipation of residual pressure. The chamber 52 acting between the muzzle and breech end thus cooperates with the muzzle arrangement to minimize the likelihood of damaging shock between the piston and the muzzle abutment.

Although this invention has been described with particular reference to certain embodiments, materials, and details various changes will be apparent to one skilled in the art and the invention is therefore not to be limited to such embodiments, materials, and details except as set forth in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A driving tool of the explosive actuated type comprising a housing having a front part and a rear part, a barrel slidably mounted in said front part and having a muzzle end projecting from said front part for abutment with a workpiece surface and having a breech end, a firing pin slidably mounted for longitudinal movement in said rear part together with biasing means urging said pin from a cocked position to a firing position, said breech end having means for receiving an explosive cartridge and being engageable with a breech biock fixed in said rear part, a piston slidably mounted in said barrel for movement between said muzzle end and breech end to be driven by discharge of said cartridge toward said muzzle end and to be returned to said breech end, said housing being longitudinally movable from a first inoperative position to a second operative ready-to-fire position at which said muzzle end is put into said surface abutment and said breech end engages said block, a detent slidably mounted in said firing pin and projecting laterally and resiliently urged outwardly therefrom, a longitudinally movable rigid member slidably mounted in said rear part with lateral displacement from said cartridge and adapted in said second housing position to engage said breech end and detent for moving said pin from its firing position to its cocked position, said member being separate from said housing, barrel, and pin and having an end for engaging with said detent, said detent extending into engagement with said end when said pin is moved toward and into its cocked position, and trigger means having a sear positioned to engage said detent at said cocked position and release engagement of said detent from said end to permit said pin to move to said firing position with said detent disposed on a side of said member opposite the trigger means.

2. A driving tool of the explosive actuated type comprising a housing having a front part and a rear part, a barrel slidably mounted in said front part and having a muzzle end projecting from said front part for abutment with a workpiece surface and having a breech end, a firing pin slidably mounted for longitudinal movement in said rear part together with biasing means urging said pin from a cocked position to a firing position, said breech end having means for receiving an explosive cartridge and being engageable with a breech block carried in said rear part, a piston slidably mounted in said barrel for movement between said muzzle end and breech end to be driven by discharge of said cartridge toward said muzzle end and to be returned to said breech end, said housing being longitudinally movable from a first inoperative position to a second operative ready-to-fire position at which said muzzle end is put into said surface abutment and said breech end engages said block, a detent slidably mounted in said firing pin and projecting laterally and resiliently urged outwardly therefrom, a longitudinally movable rigid rod slidably mounted in said housing with lateral displacement from said cartridge and adapted in said second housing position to engage said breech end and detent for moving said pin from its firing position to its cocked position, said rod being separate from said housing, barrel, and pin and having a perforation intermediate its ends for engaging with said detent, said detent engaging said rod and being extendably in said perforation when said pin is moved toward and into its cocked position, and trigger means having a scar positioned to engage said detent at said cocked position and release engagement of said detent from said rod at said perforation to permit said pin to move to said firing position with said detent disposed on a side of said rod opposite the trigger means.

3. A tool of the explosive actuated type comprising a housing having a front part and a rear part, a firing pin siidably mounted in the rear part of said housing, a barrel slidably mounted at the front part of said housing and having a breech end, biasing means acting on said pin thereby urged from a cocked position to a firing position, a detent slidably mounted in said firing pin and projecting through an opening in the Wall of said firing pin and urged outwardly with respect to said Wall, means mounted in said housing for moving said firing pin from its firing position to its cocked position, said means comprising a rigid rod slidably mounted in said housing, said rod having an end portion projecting from said rear part into said front part for abutment with said breech end, said rod engaging said detent to move said firing pin to and in its cocked position, means to release said engagement of said detent from said rod to permit said firing pin to move from its cocked position against said biasing means to its firing position when said barrel breech end engages said rod, said detent being disposed on the side of the rod opposite the release means and engaging the rod intermediate its ends at a perforation through said rod, said perforation adapting said detent and release means for engagement.

4. The tool of claim 3 wherein the rod has a laterally extending shoulder for engagement with biasing means in said housing urging said rod toward said breech end.

5. A tool of the explosive actuated type comprising a housing having a front part and a rear part, a firing pin slidably mounted in the rear part of said housing, a barrel slidably mounted at the front part of said housing and having a breech end, biasing means acting on said pin thereby urged from a cocked position to a firing position, a detent slidably mounted in said firing pin and projecting through an opening in the wall of said firing pin and urged outwardly with respect to said wall, means mounted in said housing for moving said firing pin from its firing position to its cocked position, said means comprising a rigid rod slidably mounted in said rear part, said rod having a first end portion projecting into said front part for abutment with said breech end and a second end portion projecting rearwardly and engageable with said detent, said second end portion of said rod engaging said detent and operable to move said firing pin to its cocked position when said rod is moved rearwardly relative to said housing by the engagement of said breech end with said first end portion of said rod, and scans to release said engagement of said detent from said rod to permit said firing pin to move from its cocked position to its firing position.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,448,382 8/48 Mason 89-14 2,449,571 9/48 Walker S9-l4 2,685,143 8/54 Bray et al. 42-69 2,7(l'1,93l 2/55 Polny 4 2-69 2,931,039 4/60 Henning et al. 4210 X 2,945,236 7/60 Kopf et a1. 42-1 X 2,968,811 1/61 Henning et al 42-1 X FOREIGN PATENTS 6,491 1914 Great Britain.

BENJAMIN A. BORCHELT, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2448382 *Oct 26, 1944Aug 31, 1948Bell Telephone Labor IncSilencer
US2449571 *Jan 31, 1945Sep 21, 1948Brooks WalkerSilencer for firearms
US2685143 *May 16, 1950Aug 3, 1954Bray Jr Theodore MFiring mechanism for firearms
US2701931 *Sep 5, 1952Feb 15, 1955John PolnyFiring mechanism for guns
US2931039 *Aug 29, 1955Apr 5, 1960Olin MathiesonCartridge firing apparatus
US2945236 *May 14, 1953Jul 19, 1960Olin MathiesonExplosively actuated tools
US2968811 *Jan 21, 1955Jan 24, 1961Olin MathiesonFastener device
GB191406491A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3972229 *Nov 11, 1974Aug 3, 1976Rowland J. KopfHardness testing probe assembly
US9328985 *Aug 7, 2015May 3, 2016Altor CorporationSingle shot firearm
US20160040950 *Aug 7, 2015Feb 11, 2016Altor CorporationSingle Shot Firearm
DE2221374A1 *May 2, 1972Nov 22, 1973Hilti AgPulverkraftbetriebenes setzgeraet mit schalldaempfeinrichtung
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/10, 42/69.1, 42/106, 42/10
International ClassificationB25C1/00, B25C1/18, B25C1/14
Cooperative ClassificationB25C1/18, B25C1/143
European ClassificationB25C1/14B, B25C1/18