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Publication numberUS3174234 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 23, 1965
Filing dateSep 3, 1963
Priority dateSep 3, 1963
Publication numberUS 3174234 A, US 3174234A, US-A-3174234, US3174234 A, US3174234A
InventorsWeitzner Dorothea M
Original AssigneeWeitzner Dorothea M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe heel assembly
US 3174234 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 23, 1965 D. M. WEITZNER SHOE HEEL ASSEMBLY 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Sept. 3, 1963 m 7 mm M E Ew 0 w W [M A,

arch 23, 1965 D. M. WEITZNER 3,174,234

SHOE HEEL ASSEMBLY Filed Sept. 3, 1965 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

OROTHEA M.WEITZNER March 23, 1965 D. M. WEITZNER 3,174,234

SHOE HEEL ASSEMBLY Filed Sept. 5, 1965 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. DOROTHEA M. WEITZNER ATTOPAZ'VY United States Patent 3,174,234 SHOE HEEL ASSEMBLY Dorothea M. Weitzner, 8 E. 62nd St, New York 21, N.Y. Filed Sept. 3, 1963, Ser. No. 305,922 4 Claims. C1. 36-1) This invention concerns a shoe heel construction and more particularly involves a shoe heel having a compartment for storing an overshoe.

According to the invention the shoe heel has a movable door or wall which can be opened to expose a compartment in which a collapsed overshoe is stored. In one form of the invention, the overshoe has a sole engaged at one end in the compartment to hold the overshoe on the shoe when in operative position.

It is therefore the object of the invention to provide a shoe heel having a compartment in which an overshoe is stored.

Another object is to provide a shoe heel with a mechanism or means to facilitate inserting of a collapsible overshoe into a storage compartment in the heel.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various'novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view of a shoe having a heel with open storage compartment and a collapsed overshoe to be stored therein, the overshoe also being shown in expanded position by dotted lines.

FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view on an enlarged scale taken on line 22 of FIGJI.

FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of a shoe and par-ts of a heel assembly embodying a modification of the invention.

FIG. 4 is a vertical sectional view on an enlarged scale similar to FIG. 2, and taken on line 44 of FIG. 3, with the shoe heel assembled.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of another shoe heel and partof a shoe according to the invention.

FIG. 6 is a rear view of the heel'of FIG. 5, showing a step in the operation thereof.

FIG. 7 is a horizontal sectional view taken on line 77 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 8 is a vertical sectional view taken on line S-8 of FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a sectional view, partially in elevation, of a shoe with another heel according to the invention.

FIG. 10 is an exploded viewpartially in section and partially in elevation of the heel and shoe of FIG. 9.

PEG. 11 is a side elevational view of another shoe and heel with overshoe engaged thereon.

FIG. 12 .isa side view or the shoe and heel of FIG. 11 with overshoe disengaged.

FIG. 13 is a sectional view on an enlarged scale similar to FIG. 2, showing the interior of the heel of FIGS.

11 and 12.

FIG. 14 is a sectional view of the heel of FIG. 13 with overshoe collapsed and inserted into the heel.

Referringto the drawings, there is shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 'a heel assembly 29 including a tapered hollow shell attached at its upper end to sole 22 of -a shoe 24. The shell has a curved wall 25 forming the rear and sides of the heel. The shell has a front, generally rectangular opening 26 which is closed by a panel 23 pivotally mounted on a pintle 2? at its upper end in the opening 26. The panel 28 serves as a door for compartment C defined by the panel and wall 25. The compartment is rather elongated and will hold collapsible plastic overshoe 3t) the bottom wall 38 of the heel.

end engaged in a threaded hole 4'? in the shell.

'ceiving the head 49 of the bolt.

3,1?4234 Patented Mar. 23, 1%65 "ice when theovershoe is rolled up as shown in FIG. 1. The overshoe can be opened asv shown by dotted lines in FIG. 1 to cover shoeld. A. hole 31 is provided at the rear end of sole 32 of the overshoe through whichthe'heel assembly 29 will extend when the overshoe is mounted on the shoe.

Panel 28 has an indentation 33 at its lower end which engages on a retractable detent ball 34 of a catch assembly including aspring '35 engaged in recess 36 at When'the ball engages the lower end of the panel,'.the compartment is closed. The panel canbe opened'by engaging a fingernail in an indentation 39 formed in. the outer side of the panel near its lower end. A lift 40 is attached tothe bottom wall 38 of the heel. The heel serves as a support for the shoe in normal fashion when the overshoeis stored inside compartment C and when the overshoe is removed.

In FIGS. 3 and 4 is shown a shoe heel assembly 20 'in'cludingan inner tapered core 42. and an outer tapered shell 44. The core is secured to the underside of sole 22 of shoe 24 and extends downwardly into the shell which has an opentop and closed bottom. The shell is secured to the 'core' by a bolt 45 which has a threaded The shank .of the bolt passes through'a hole it formed in the core near itsbottom end. A recess '48 is provided in the front wall of the shell near its bottom end form- An overshoe 32 can be folded around the core and the core and overshoe can then be inserted into the shell which will then form a part of the heel of the shoe.

shell can be removed to expose the overshoe which can then he slipped off the core. The shell can then be replaced on the core and the shoe used in normal manner. If desired, the shell can be removed and the core 42'will then serve as the heel of the'shoe. The core is-provided with a lift at its bottom end to take up Wear when the core 42 is usedas a heel without the shell.

FIGS. 58 show another heel assembly 29 including a hollow tapered core 52 secured to the'sole 22 'of shoe 24 The core has -a circular bottom wall 53 to which is attached a lift 54. A shaft or spindle 55 extends axially through the core and its upperend is rotatably engaged in a recess -55 at the top of the core. A compartment C2 is defined in the heel assembly between core 52 and spindle 55. The spindle has a longitudinal slot '57 in which can be engaged one end of a'collapsible overshoe 32 The core 52 has a rear opening 59 through which the overshoe can be inserted. A tapered formfitting shell 60 is rotatably mounted on the core. This shell has an opening 62 which can be registered with opening 59 for insertion of the overshoe as shown in FIG. 6. The shell can be turned on the core to close opening 59. Opening 62 in'the shell willthen be located at the front of core assembly as shown in FIG. 5. The shell may be provided with a recess 63 in which can engage detentbal1'64 of a catch assembly including a spring '65 in recess 66 of the core as shown in FIG. 8. When the ball 64 is engaged in recess 63, the shell is held non-rotatablytonthe core. The shell can be grasped and forcibly turned around to align holes 62 and 59 at the rear of the heel assembly.

A cross pin '66 on the spindle bears on the bottom wall 53 of the core to hold the'spindle rotatably in the core. The spindle has a slot 67 exposed at lift 54. A coin 68 can be engaged in the slot67 for turning the spindle to wind the collapsible overshoe 32 on the spindle in compartment C2. To remove the overshoe, it can be grasped through aligned openings 59, 62 and pulled outwardly, thus unwinding it from the spindle.

In FIGS. 9 and 10, a rather flat shallow heel assembly 20 is provided with an inner plate 70 having upstanding side and rear walls 70 70 defining a compartment C3 for an overshoe. A tongue 72 is secured by a rivet 73 to the front end of the plate 70. This tongue has a hole '74 which receives a stud 75 extending downwardly from sole 22 of shoe 24. A cap nut 76 engages on the threaded stud. At the top of rear wall 70", secured by rivet 79, is 3. lug 77 which engages on a tongue 78 secured by rivet 80 to sole 22 of the shoe. By loosening the cap nut, the front end of the heel assembly can be detached from the stud 75 and then the assembly can be moved rearwardly to disengage the lug 77 from tongue 78. A lift 82 is attached to the underside of plate 70 to take up wear. The assembly 20 with its wide, shallow compartment is especially adapted for use with flat heel shoes worn by women and children. The heel assembly will serve as a heel in normal fashion with and without an overshoe in the compartment C3.

FIGS. 11-13 show a heelassembly 20 which includes a hollow shell having a curved wall 25. defining side and rear walls of the heel. A panel 28' is pivotally mounted by a pintle 29' in opening 26' at the front of the shell to provide a door therefor. The panel is pivoted at its lower end. Its upper end terminates slightly below sole 22 of shoe 24 to provide a passage through which can extend flexible heel 90 of a collapsible elastic overshoe 32. The rear end of the heel is secured by nailing or cementing inside compartment C4 at the underside of sole 22 The overshoe can be stretched so that its front end 92 will engage on the toe 94 of the shoe 24 while the rear end 90 of the heel 90 which is held inside of the compartment holds the overshoe on the shoe, as shown in FIGS. 11 and 13.

A flexible tab 95 extends outwardly of the upper end of the panel 28 for grasping to open and close the panel. FIG. 12 shows the overshoe 32 removed from the toe of the shoe and hanging loosely in collapsed form out side of the heel assembly. Panel 28 is open. FIG. 14 shows the overshoe rolled up inside of the compartment C4 of the heel assembly. The sides of the panel 28' are frictionally engaged in opening 26' so that the panel is held closed. In addition, finger- 96 which extends rearwardly of the panel at the bottom thereof inside the compartment, is engaged by the rolled up overshoe to assist in holding the panelclosed.

When the overshoe is extended outside of the heel assembly,'the upper end of the panel 28 engages the underside of heel 90 and is there held frictionally so that the panel cannot swing open unless tab 95 is pulled forwardly. A lift is secured to bottom wall 38 of the heel.

The assembly 20 insures that the overshoe cannot accidentally be lost and separated from the heel assembly and shoe. In addition, the engagement of the heel of the overshoe inside the heel assembly keeps the overshoe snugly on the shoe.

In all forms of the invention described above, it will be noted that provision is made for storing a collapsible overshoe, spats, shoe ornaments or any shoe elements in a storage compartment in a heel. The heel serves in normal manner to support the shoe when the overshoe is inside or out of the heel.

It is to be understood that the door 28 may be of the sliding type which may be actuated by the wearers finger nails.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise constructions herein disclosed and that various changes and modifications may be made within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims,

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is: v 1. A heel assembly for a shoe having a sole with a toe portion, comprising a hollow shell attached at one end to the sole, a lift attached to the other end of the shell, said shell having a front wall with an opening therein, a panel pivotally mounted in said opening defining a door for a compartment in said shell, a collapsible overshoe having a flexible sole with a toe end, with itsrear end secured in said compartment, said panel having an upper end terminating short of said one end of the shell to define a passage for extension of the flexible sole of the overshoe therethrough, the toe end of the overshoe being held engaged on the toe of the shoe, and whereby the overshoe can be collapsed and the flexible sole of the overshoe rolled up to store the entire overshoe in said compartment, said panel having a tab at said upper end to facilitate pivoting the panel for opening the same.

2. A heel assembly for a shoe having a sole with a toe portion, comprising a hollow shell attached at one end to thesole, a lift attached to the other end of the shell, said shell having a front wall with an opening therein, a panel pivotally mounted in said opening defining a door for a compartment in said shell, 3. collapsible overshoe having a flexible sole with a toe end, with its rear end secured in said compartment, said panel having an upper end terminating short of said one end of the shell to define a passage for extension of the flexible sole of the overshoe therethrough, thetoe end of the overshoe being held engaged on the toe of the shoe, and whereby the overshoe can be collapsed and the flexible sole of the overshoe rolled up to store the entire overshoe in said cornpartrnent, said panel having a tab at said upper end to facilitate pivoting the panel for opening the same, said panel having a rearwardly extending finger at the lower end thereof in said compartment to be engaged by the rolled up sole of the overshoe to hold the panel closed with the overshoe in the compartment.

3. A heel assembly for a shoe having a sole with a toe portion, comprising a hollow shell attached at one end to the sole, said shell having a front wall with an opening and a compartment therein, a panel for said opening, a collapsible overshoe having a flexible sole with a toe end, with its rear end secured in said compartment, said panel having an upper end terminating short of said one end of the shell to define a passage for extension of the flexible sole of the overshoe therethrough, the toe end of the overshoe being held engaged on the top of the shoe, and whereby the overshoe can be collapsed and the flexible sole of the overshoe rolled up to store the entire overshoe in said compartment.

4. A heel assembly for a shoe having a sole with a toe portion comprising a hollow shell attached to the heel end of the shoe and said shell having an opening and a compartment therein, and a collapsible overshoe having a flexible sole with a toe end with its heel end secured in said compartment, said overshoe when extended being adapted to be secured over the toe end of the shoe and held engaged on the top thereof and the overshoe can be collapsed and the flexible sole thereof can be rolled up to store the entire overshoe in said compartment.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,393,175 Sherard Oct. 11, 1921 1,571,112 Foster Jan. 26, 1926 2,507,991 Neal May 16, 1950 2,897,609 Bodkin Aug. 4, 1959 2,904,901 Goldstein Sept. 22, 1959 2,924,029 Rosen Feb. 9, 1960 FOREIGN PATENTS 484,172 Italy Aug. 29, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1393175 *Sep 27, 1920Oct 11, 1921Sherard Oliver EShoe-heel
US1571112 *May 20, 1922Jan 26, 1926Curtis Foster ClarenceHeel for boots and shoes
US2507991 *Jul 24, 1947May 16, 1950Thomas E NealWedgie type shoe
US2897609 *Mar 19, 1956Aug 4, 1959Lawrence E BodkinStorage shoe heel
US2904901 *Jan 14, 1959Sep 22, 1959Goldstein MurrayReceptacle heels for footwear
US2924029 *May 12, 1958Feb 9, 1960 Rosen
IT484172B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3325918 *Dec 29, 1964Jun 20, 1967Dorothea M WeitznerShoe heel and overshoe assembly
US3328900 *Feb 15, 1965Jul 4, 1967Dorothea M WeitznerShoe construction with storage compartment
US3398468 *Oct 13, 1966Aug 27, 1968Dorothea M. WeitznerBuilt-in stretchable elastic shoe sole cover
US5921008 *Feb 26, 1998Jul 13, 1999Ruff; Stephen M.Shoe
US6289612 *Jan 21, 2000Sep 18, 2001Dorene Jean KentFootwear having concealed storage cavity for personal items
US6457260 *May 24, 2001Oct 1, 2002Thomas E. RoelofsFootwear with attachable covering
US6457266 *Aug 20, 2001Oct 1, 2002Chuan-An HsiaoOvershoe structure
US6851203May 23, 2002Feb 8, 2005Thomas E. RoelofsFootwear with attachable covering
US7716856 *Aug 5, 2008May 18, 2010Stephanie SeipelChalk shoe
US8943713Mar 12, 2013Feb 3, 2015James EidsonShoe with concealed heel storage compartment
US20100095555 *Oct 16, 2009Apr 22, 2010Combs Jeffrey SFootware having integral compartment in sole for carrying items
US20110035965 *Aug 17, 2010Feb 17, 2011Marianne KayObject for adorning footwear
US20110203139 *Feb 22, 2010Aug 25, 2011Eidson James CShoe With Concealed, Heel Storage Compartment
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/1, 36/34.00R, 36/136, 36/7.10R
International ClassificationA43B3/00, A43B21/00, A43B21/42, A43B3/24
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/42, A43B3/24
European ClassificationA43B21/42, A43B3/24