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Publication numberUS3174388 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 23, 1965
Filing dateDec 27, 1962
Priority dateDec 27, 1962
Publication numberUS 3174388 A, US 3174388A, US-A-3174388, US3174388 A, US3174388A
InventorsArthur W Gaubatz
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Filament winding of rocket cases
US 3174388 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 23, 1965 A. w. GAUBATz 3,174,388

FILAMENT WINDING OF' ROCKET CASES Filed DSO. 27, 1962 A Tron/ver United States Patent O of Delaware Filed Dec. 27, 1962, Ser. No. 247,673 6 Claims. (Cl. tEd- 1) This invention relates to winding machines for filament wound rocket cases and, more particularly, it relates to a winding machine with a stationary mandrel used to construct large rocket cases.

At the present time, glass filament wound rocket motor cases are being produced over numerous types of rotating mandrels. The axis of rotation of the mandrel has been either vertical or horizontal. With the state of the art of rocket case design progressing as it is, an increasing demand is being felt for larger rocket motor cases. From this demand arises the problem of developing a machine which can construct large rocket motor cases and in finding a mode of transportation to convey the case from the construction site to the launch site. lt is generally felt that if the contemplated size of a one-piece rocket case ex-ceeds 14 feet in diameter and 50 feet long, the only means of transport would be by water. This mode of transport provides difficult handling problems and may result in damage to the cases. Therefore, it is generally recognized that the presently visualized large cases y feet in diameter by 80 feet in length should be constructed on the launch site. Therefore, a winding machine to construct large cases on the launch site is needed.

in winding smaller cases the practice has been to have a mandrel rotate and the filament feeding apparatus remain stationary. In winding large cases, however, the mandrel needed will be so large that it is envisioned that it will be easier to rotate the filament feeding apparatus than to rotate the mandrel. This then establishes the need of a stationary mandrel winding machine that will efficiently and effectively produce large filament wound rocket motor cases.

ln general, the invention relates to a winding machine having a stationary vertical two-piece spindle on which is mounted a stationary mandrel. The winding apparatus comprises two vertical columns fixed to two swing arms which rot-ate about the stationary spindle. A filament feeding carriage member is mounted between the two column members and has pinion members to engage racks on the column members and to traverse the column members in the vertical direction. The filament feeding carriage also has a ram member which rotates about its own axis and which moves longitudinally toward and away from the mandrel. Thus, the correct combination of the movements specified provides the desired winding pattern.

Therefore, it is an object of this invention to provide a winding machine to construct large lament wound racket motor cases.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a winding machine for constructing large filament wound rocket motor cases which features the ease of handling afforded by a stationary mandrel.

It is still a further object of this invention to provide a winding machine with a stationary mandrel for constructing large rocket motor cases on the launch site.

Other objects, features and advantages of the invention will become apparent upon reference to the succeeding detailed description of the invention and to the drawings illustrating the preferred embodiment thereof; wherein,

FIGURE l is a schematic view of the winding machine structure showing a portion of the rack pattern; and

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged view of the filament feeding ii Patented Mar'. 23, 1965 lCe apparatus as taken in the direction of lines 2-2 of FIG- URE l.

More specifically, FIGURE l shows a winding machine structure with a cross beam i@ held by two side wall members l2. The winding machine structure is set on a foundation structure i4, which may be of any suitable anchoring material, such as concrete. Set in this foundation structure 14 is the lower spindle i6. The upper end spindle 18 is anchored to the cross beam 1t) of the structure and is a removable steady rest to facilitate the withdrawal of any apparatus attached to the spindle. Both of the spindle members i6 and i8 are stationary. Mounted on both ends of the stationary spindle is the stationary mandrel 2i). The structure and the materials used in the mandrel 20 will be taken up later in this discussion. Rotatably mounted on the stationary spindles i6 and i3 are the upper and lower swing arms 22 and 24. The inner ends of the arms 22 and 24 have suitable bearings 26 to allow rotation about the spindles 16 and 1S. Mounted between and fastened to the swing arms 22 and 2.4i are the two coulmns Z8 and 30, which have vertical racks 29 and 3i. The columns 28 and 30 are fixed to the swing arms 22 and 24 by slidable means .32. The slidable connecting means 32 can be adjusted such that the swing arm or radius of the column members 25 and Si) may be adjusted. This adjustment will enable the machine to make rocket cases of varying diameters. Located between the two column members 28 and 30 is the carriage device 34. The details of the carriage member 34 will be taken up when FIGURE 2 is discussed. The swing arms 22 and 24 are rotated by two 20 horsepower hydraulic rotary drive motors 36 and 38. These rotary drive motors 36 and 38 are synchronized so the upper and lower swing arms 22 and 24 move equally. The energy of the rotary drive motors 36 and 38 is transferred to the swing arms through pinions iti and 42 which eng-age the large drive gears 44 and 46, which are fixed to the swing arms 22 and 24.

As previously stated, the carriage device 34 (FIGURE 2) is mounted between the column members 28 and 30. Two 40 horsepower hydraulic vertical drive motors 48 and E@ are mounted on the carriage member to provideV the energy for vertical motion of the carriage member on the column members. These vertical drive members 48 and 5t) transfer their energy to pinions 52 and 54 which drive the carriage up and down the racks 29 and 31 of the columns 28 and 30. The relationship here is one of a simple rack and pinion device. The longitudinal bar or ram member 56 of the carriage 34 undergoes both rotation about its own axis and in and out oscillatory motion. The rotation about its own axis is provided by a hydraulic rotary drive motor 5S which transfers energy to a pinion 6i) driving a gear 62 fixed to a rotatable sleeve 63 which reciprocably mounts the ram 56. The longitudinal oscillatory motion of the ram 56 is provided by a longitudinal hydraulic ram motor 64 mounted on sleeve 63, which drives the ram through a pinion and rack mechanism 65. Filament holding spools 68 are mounted on the sleeve 63 by strut members '72. Two such spools are illustrated although more may be provided as desired. Two hydraulic tension motors 76 are provided here to regulate the constant roving tension of the filament winding material. The filament winding material, which is preferably in straps of one foot width is seen to pass around pulleys 80 before entering the ram structure 56. The iilament material then passes through the ram structure and is guided onto the winding by the rotating eye member S4. The

rotating eye member may be a pulley mounted on ram 56 by a strut 86. Attached to the ram member 56 by a flange 88 and adjacent to the roving eye 84 is a battery of heat lamps @il which are used to cure the resin binder on the filament winding as the filament is laid. The resin binder is an adhesive material which is applied to the filament winding to unitize the structure and the application of heat to this binder facilitates a rapid hardening of the rocket case as it is Wound. rThis resin binder may be applied to the winding as it passes through the carriage or it may be on the Winding when it leaves the spool.

Because of the several modes of rotation of the movement involved, a further clarirfication of the interrelationship or" the parts is deemed necessary. The spindle members 16 and 18 and the mandrel 26 are stationary. 'l' he swing arms 22 and 24 and the column members 2S and 3i) undergo a uniform rotation about the spindie members 18 and 2i). The carriage member 34 as a whole moves vertically up and down the racks 29 and 3ft on the column members 28 and 30. The spools eti and the ram structure 56 rotate uniformly about their own axis, and the ram structure 56 including the eye member S14 undergoes longitudinal osciliation toward and away from the winding structure. The purpose of this longitudinal motion is to facilitate the deisred polar wind pattern for winding the end of the rocket case where the diameter is smaller. The rotation of the ram and spool racks about their own axis is provided to prevent twisting, of the filament winding when the filament is applied to the ends of the rocket case. From the proceeding, it can be seen that the ram structure 56 and the eye member ad undergo four types of motion. They rotate with the swing arms and column members about the axis of the spindle, they travel in a vertical direction with the carriage up and down the column members, they rotate about their own axis, and they move longitudinally in and out from the winding itself. A complex control system will, of course, be needed to regulate the motions of the machine. A control system of the type disclosed in pending application, Serial No. 143,827, now Patent No. 3,133,236, entitled Filament Winding Machine Control, by Charles F. McCauley and assigned to the assignee or the present invention, would be appropriate.

When the rocket case winding has been completed, it can be seen that the upper swing arm 2.2 can easily be moved from the upper spindle i8. This then provides space for the removal of the mandrel 29. A suggested form of the mandrel would be that of block units which could be removed by passing them out through the hole in the top of the rocket case. The suggested blocks could be made of concrete, plaster, or could be sheets of metal or wood. The only requirement to their size being they would have to pass down through the opening at the top of the rocket case. This shows the distinct advantages of a stationary vertical mandrel over a rotating horizontal one. It can be seen that a block structure would not be sound if it were oriented horizontally. Therefore, the stationary vertical mandrel permits the construction of very large mandrels from removable block units. It is further suggested that the mandrel consist of the solid fuel propellant itself, thereby removing any problems involved With the dismantling of the mandrel. The major problem here, of course, would be the danger in handling the solid fuel before combustion is desired. In general, though, it can be seen that many forms of mandrel could be adopted to be used on the subject invention.

Additionally, a cutting tool could be substituted for the roving eye 84. Thus, the invention could be used as a machining tool to finish to precise measurement the rocket case structure. This suggestion is entirely feasible since the pattern of the winding machine will be a programmed entity; therefore, the machining tool could follow the same exact path that was followed by the eye mechanism. it is also suggested this same machine can be adapted to weld seams on a segmented steel case by substituting an arc welding head for the roving eye.

While the subject invention has been illustrated for use in winding filament would rocket motor cases, it can be seen that the invention is very wide in scope and may have many other applications and that many changes and modiications may be made thereto Without departing from the scope of the invention.

i claim:

1. A winding machine for constructing filament wound rocket cases comprising, in combination, a vertical stationary spindle, a vertical stationary mandrel mounted on and tixed to the spindle, two rigid arm members perpendicular to and rotatable about the spindle member, a pair of synchronized hydraulic rotary drive motors actuating these said arm members, column members fixed to and extending between the arm members so that they rotate about the spindle member with the arm members, each said column member having a rack portion, and a carriage member with a pair of pinions to traverse the racks on the column members including two hydraulic vertical drive motors to drive the pinion members, filament holding spools, a filament feeding tension control mechanism, a hydraulic longitudinal ram motor to drive the filament feeding tension control mechanism, a rotating eye member guiding the filament as it is wound around the mandrel, and a hydraulic rotary drive motor to rotate the eye member.

2. A winding machine for constructing filament Wound rocket cases comprising, in combination, a vertical stationary spindle, a vertical stationary mandrel mounted on and fixed to the spindle, said mandrel comprised of the soiid fuel reactant materials such that its removal will not be necessary upon completion of the case, two rigid arm members perpendicular to and rotatable about the spindle member, a pair of synchronized hydraulic rotary drive motors to actuate the arm members, column members fixed to and extending between the arm members so that they rotate about the spindle member with the arm members, each said column member having a rack portion, and a carriage member with a pair of pinions to traverse the racks on the column members including iilament holding spools, a lament feeding tension control mechanism, and a rotating eye member guiding the filament as it is Wound around the mandrel.

3. A winding machine for constructing filament wound rocket cases comprising, in combination, a vertical stationary spindle, a vertical stationary mandrel mounted on and xed to the spindle, two rigid arm members perpendicular to and rotatable about the spindle member, a pair of synchronized hydraulic rotary drive motors to actuate the arm members, column members fixed to and extending between the arm members so that they rotate about the spindle member with the arm members, each said column member having a rack portion, and a carriage member with a pair of pinions to traverse the racks on the column members including two hydraulic vertical drive motors to actuate the pinion members, a plurality of lament holding spools, a filament feeding tension control mechanism, a longitudinal ram drive motor to actuate the filament feedinfy tension control mechanism, and a rotating eye member guiding the filament as it is Wound around the mandrel, said rotating eye member through its rotation and longitudinal movement allowing the winding pattern to be enacted in the desired form.

4. A winding machine for constructing filament wound rocket cases comprising, in combination, a vertical stationary spindle, a vertical stationary mandrel mounted on and fixed to the spindle, two rigid arm members perpendicular to and rotatable about the spindle member, a pair of synchronized hydraulic rotary drive motors to actuate the arm members, column members fixed to and extending between the arm members so that they rotate about the spindle member with the arm members, each said column having a rack portion, and a carriage member with a pair of pinions to traverse the racks on the column members including a pair of hydraulic vertical drive motors to actuate the pinion members, a plurality of filament holding spools, a ilament feeding tension control mechanism, a ram which radially reciprocates with the mandrel, a hydraulic longitudinal ram drive motor to radially reciprocate the ram member, a rotating eye member guidmg the iilament as it is Wound around the mandrel, a rotary drive member to rotate the eye member, said rotating eye member through its rotation allowing the Winding pattern to be enacted in the desired form.

5. A Winding machine for constructing filament Wound rocket cases comprising, in combination, a stationary mandrel mounted on a vertical axis, a frame rotatable about the axis including column means parallel to the axis, a carriage member reciprocable on the column, a ram mounted on the carriage to reciprocate radially with respect to the mandrel and to rotate about an axis perpendicular to said irst axis, and means on said ram to feed the lilament Winding material to the mandrel.

6. A Winding machine for constructing ilament Wound rocket cases comprising, in combination, a stationary mandrel mounted on a vertical axis, a frame rotatable about the axis including column means parallel to the References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,404,512 l/ 22 Chapman 86-1 X 1,425,084 8/ 22 Fricdlander 5 7-62 2,009,850 7/35 Koshoshek 57-62 2,5 20,402 8/ 50 Hirsh 242-7 2,785,866 3/57 Vogt 242-7 BENJAMIN A. BORCHELT, Primary Examiner.

20 SAMUEL FEINBERG, Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3331722 *Apr 25, 1963Jul 18, 1967Koppers Co IncWinding machine for filament-wound structures
US3367586 *Nov 26, 1965Feb 6, 1968Navy UsaThird motion system for filament winding machine
US3380675 *Feb 5, 1965Apr 30, 1968Black Clawson CoFilament winding machine
US3510382 *Mar 10, 1967May 5, 1970Kimberly Clark CoApparatus for crosslaying flexible webs
US3555958 *May 5, 1965Jan 19, 1971Hercules IncMethod for the manufacture of a rocket motor
US3945578 *Jul 31, 1974Mar 23, 1976Igor Vasilievich KaminskyMachine for winding casings
US4340627 *Aug 28, 1980Jul 20, 1982Heraeus Quarzschmelze GmbhWound and sintered vitreous silica article and method of making
US5676330 *Nov 22, 1995Oct 14, 1997International Pressure Vessel, Inc.Winding apparatus and method for constructing steel ribbon wound layered pressure vessels
US7282107 *Aug 22, 2003Oct 16, 2007The Boeing CompanyMultiple head automated composite laminating machine for the fabrication of large barrel section components
US20050039843 *Aug 22, 2003Feb 24, 2005Johnson Brice A.Multiple head automated composite laminating machine for the fabrication of large barrel section components
US20080156436 *Oct 2, 2007Jul 3, 2008Johnson Brice AMultiple head automated composite laminating machine for the fabrication of large barrel section components
EP1211052A1 *Oct 26, 2000Jun 5, 2002Abb Research Ltd.Process and apparatus for bandaging bodies with fibre reinforced plastic bands
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/436, 86/1.1, 57/62, 156/169, 242/444
International ClassificationB65H54/64, B21F17/00, B29C53/56
Cooperative ClassificationB29C53/56, B21F17/00, B65H54/64
European ClassificationB29C53/56, B21F17/00, B65H54/64