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Publication numberUS3174488 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 23, 1965
Filing dateMay 22, 1961
Priority dateMay 22, 1961
Publication numberUS 3174488 A, US 3174488A, US-A-3174488, US3174488 A, US3174488A
InventorsRau Richard C
Original AssigneeElectronic Coin Proc Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin separating machine
US 3174488 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 23, 1965 R. c. RAU 3,174,488

com SEPARATING MACHINE Filed May 22. 1961 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 l l44d use I FIG.6

INVENTOR.

RICHARD C. RAU

WMWW

ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,174,488 COIN SEPARATING MACHINE Richard C. Rau, Mention, Mass., assiguor to Electronic Coin Processing Corporation, New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed May 22, 1961, Ser. No. 111,663 3 (Ilaims. (Cl. 133-3) This invention relates to coin handling machines and more particularly comprises a device for separating worn and mutilated coins from coins in good condition. While this invention has numerous applications, it is particularly well suited for use in combination with other equipment which tests the authenticity of coins of one or more denominations.

In recent years automatic coin handling equipment such as vending machines and change makers have come into wide use. Because worn and mutilated coins may jam or otherwise impair the operation of such coin equipment, considerable energy has been directed to the discovery of inexpensive, dependable, large capacity devices for separating the worn and/ or mutilated coins from coins in good condition. Such devices are used to advan tage as the first stage in a coin handling assembly to remove the worn and mutilated coins before the coins are directed to coin proovers in the equipment.

The primary object of my invention is to provide dependable high-capacity coin separators.

Another object of my invention is to provide a coin separator which may readily be combined with other forms of coin handling equipment as the first stage of an assembly, to prevent worn and mutilated coins from reaching machines disposed further along in the assembly.

My invention capable of achieving the several objects noted may be embodied in one of several forms. In each of the several forms of my invention, the coins being tested are directed through a slot of a height just in excess of maximum acceptable coin thickness. In this manner, overly thick coins are separated from those which do not exceed the maximum allowable thickness. In several embodiments of my invention, the coins being tested are directed to the inlet of slots of a height substantially equal to the minimum acceptable thickness of coins of the denomination under test. In this manner, coins that are too thin are separated from the batch. To further test the coins being handled, the slots may be of substantial length so that bowed or bent coins will wedge in one of the slots which is sized to pass unbowed and unbent coins.

These and other objects and features of my invention, along with its incident advantages, will be better understood and appreciated from the following detailed description of several embodiments thereof, selected for purposes of illustration and shown in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a view in perspective of one embodiment of a coin separator constructed in accordance with my invention;

FIG. 2 is an end view of the device shown in FIG. 1 with the motor omitted;

FIG. 3 is a view in perspective similar to FIG. 1 but with parts broken away to show the interior of the mechanism;

FIG. 4 is a side view partly in section of another embodiment of a coin separator constructed in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary view of a portion of the mechanism shown in FIG. 4; and

FIG. 6 is an elevation view partly in section of yet another embodiment of a coin separator constructed in accordance with my invention.

The embodiment of my invention shown in FIGS. 1-3

includes in its general organization a coin receiver 10, multi-stage coin tester 12 and an acceptable coin collector 14. The multi-stage coin tester 12 includes two pairs of closely spaced discs 16 and 18 carried by shafts 20 and 22, respectively. The shafts 20 and 22 are supported for rotation about horizontal axes by pillars 24 and 26. It will be noted in the figures that the axis of shaft 20 is disposed above the axis of shaft 22, and that the diameters of the pairs of discs are substantially equal.

The discs of pair 16 supported on shaft 20 are disposed immediately beneath the discharge end of coin receiver 18. The discs are spaced apart a distance substantially equal to the minimum acceptable thickness of coins of the denomination under test. The spaced inner faces 28 of the discs 16 thus define a slot 30 through which coins of less than acceptable thickness may slide. About the periphery of the discs 16 beyond the slot 30 is a seat or channel 32 adequate in thickness to receive virtually all coins deposited on the periphery by the coin receiver 10. The periphery of the discs are beveled as shown at 34 to assure that coins sit in the channel 32.

In FIG. 3 it will be noted that a pair of thin plates or shims 36 and 38 are disposed in the slot 30 between the discs 16 so as to define in cooperation with the surfaces 28 the margins of the slot. The plates 36 and 38 serve to direct coins which enter the slot 30 downwardly between the discs to a collector 40. Coins 42 disposed in the slot 30 are shown to be guided by the shims through the slot across the discs into the collector 40.

Coins deposited on the channel 32 on the periphery of the discs 16 and which do not fit into and therefore fall downwardly through the slot 30 will ride on the channel and be directed by means of the track 44 to the periphery of the second pair of discs 18. The track 44 cooperates with the upper edge of shim 38 to roll the coins from the periphery of discs 16 to the periphery of discs 18.

The discs 18 are substantially identical to the discs 16 but are spaced apart a distance substantially equal to the maximum acceptable thickness of coins of the denomination under test. Thus, the surfaces 46 of the discs 18 together define a slot 48 through which coins which do not exceed a maximum acceptable thickness may fall. The edge 50 of shim 38 and yet another shim 52 cooperate with the surfaces 46 to define the margins of the slot 48. In FIG. 3 coins 54 are shown falling through the slot 48 and into the chute 5610 a point of collection of coins which are not excessively worn or mutilated.

The discs 18 like the discs 16 are provided with a channel 58 and a beveled edge 60 at their periphery to receive the coins from the track 44. The channel 58 serves to carry those coins which are too thick to pass into the slot 48 beyond the top of shim 52 where they ultimately are guided by the trailing edge 62 of shim 52 into collector 64. Coins 66 are shown in FIG. 3 to be headed for the collector 64 of coins of excessive thickness.

The embodiment of my invention shown in FIGS. 1-3 function as follows: Coins ostensibly of the particular denomination under test are fed by the receiver 10 to the channel 32 of discs 16. The discs 16 which are rotated together with discs 18 by the belt and pulley system 68 in turn supplied with power from a motor 69 turn in a direction indicated by arrow 70 to direct coins onto the upper edge of shim 38 and into track 44. However, those coins which are thinner than the width of slot 30 fall between the discs 16 and are directed by shims 36 and 38 to the collector 48. Coins which escape the slot 30 are directed by the upper edge of shim 38 and track 44 to the channel 58 on discs 18. The discs 18 rotate in the direction of arrow 72 and the slot 48 will receive all coins which do not exceed the maximum acceptable mum acceptable thickness as defined by the slot.

3 thickness as defined by the space between the surfaces 46 of the discs. Those coins which drop into the slot 48 will be larger than the minimum acceptable thickness as they escape the slot 30, and will not exceed the maxi- Overly thick coins will be carried on the channel 58 of discs 18 to the collector 64. Thus, excessively worn coins will gather in collector 40, oversized and mutilated coins will collect in collector 64, and coins of the proper size will be directed to a point of collection through chute 56.

The embodiment of my invention shown in FIGS. 4 and includes a coin receiver 80, a single stage coin tester 82, a chute 84 for acceptable coins and a collector 86 of unacceptable coins.

The coin tester 82 is supported on a frame 88 which carries a horizontal shaft 90 that rotates the tester about a horizontal axis. A pulley 92 secured to the end of shaft 90 provides an input for the system. The shaft 90 supports a drum 94 for rotation about the horizontal axis of stationary hub 96. The drum 94 includes a flared wall 98 which provides the drum with a relatively narrow inlet end 100 and an enlarged discharge end 102. The portion of the wall 98 which defines the discharge end 102 of the drum 94 is vertically oriented to define a vertical wall segment 104 that is closely spaced to a plate 106 mounted for rotation with the drum and which partially closes its discharge end. The periphery of plate 106 defines with the vertical wall segment 104 a slot 108 of a width substantially equal to the maximum acceptable thickness of coins of the denomination under test.

Coins introduced into the inlet end 100 of the drum 94 slide on the wall 98, which defines an inclined plane, to the slot 108 and are further directed to the slot by guide 110 carried by hub 96. Those coins which do not exceed the maximum acceptable thickness of the denomination of coin under test will fall through the slot 108 into the chute 84 and be gathered as acceptable coins. Those coins which exceed the maximum acceptable thickness will wedge in the slot 108, because the wall 98 gradually converges toward the plate 106. The coins which wedge in the slot will be carried by the rotation of the drum 94 to the location of clearing mechanism 112 disposed immediately above the periphery of the plate 106 and vertical wall segment 104.

The clearing mechanism 112 includes a ring gear 114 carried by and that rotates with the drum 94. The ring gear 114 drives a gear 116 supported on the top of frame 88 and which in turn carries an eccentrically mounted wheel 118. The wheel 118 in turn is connected to a finger or rod 120 aligned with the slot 108 and moves the finger vertically in and out of the slot 108 in response to rotation of the gears 114 and 116. Thus, the finger 120 serves to dislodge those coins which wedge in the slot and are carried to the location of the clearing mechanism. Coins that are dislodged from the slot 108 by the finger 120 fall into a stationary chute 122 disposed within the drum 94 and are conveyed to the collector 86.

In operation, the embodiment of my invention shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 functions as follows: Coins to be separated are deposited in the receiver 80 mounted on frame 124 and are directed by the receiver into the inlet end 100 of the drum 94. A number of arms 126 are supported on the hub 96 and extend downwardly into the drum toward its wall 98 and serve to agitate the coins deposited in the drum and spread them out along the inner surface of the drum wall. The arms 126 may be made of magnetic material so that they may pick up iron slugs fed into the drum. A door 128 formed in the wall 98 affords access into the interior of the drum for periodic clearing of coins which neither pass through the slot 108 or discharge from the drum by clearing mechanism 112. As the drum 94 rotates, the coins slide down the inclined wall 98 and are directed by guide 110 to the slot 108. Those coins which do not exceed the maximum acceptable thickness enter the chute 84 while others which exceed the acceptable size lodge in the slot and are later directed to the collector 86 by means of clearing mechanism 112 and chute 122.

The embodiment of my invention shown in FIG. 6 includes a coin receiver 130, a multi-stage tester 132, and several collectors disposed adjacent the tester. The multi-stage tester 132 is oriented within a stationary drum 134 supported in a slightly inclined position by frame 136. Some five plates 138 separately numbered 138a to 1380 extend across the drum 134 and are generally normal to the drum axis. Each of the five plates 138 defines with the cylindrical wall of the drum a coin bin or container 142. Thus, five such bins 142a-142e are arranged one above the other in tiers within the drum. Each of the plates 138 is provided with a warped or bent portion 140 which serves as a chute between adjacent bins. Thus, coins entering the uppermost bin 142a will travel down through the bins 142b, 1420, 142d and 1420 via the respective warped portions 140 of the plates. In effect, the several plates with their warped or bent portions define a spiral passage through which the coins may move from the upper to the lower end of the drum.

Adjacent the lower edges of the five plates 138a-138e are slots 144 separately numbered 144a144e. As the slots 144 are disposed at the lower edge of the plates 138, coins disposed on the plates may slide toward the slots, and if the coins are of a thickness less than the slot height they may pass through the slots and out of the drum 134.

Extending axially through the drum 134 is a shaft 146 having its ends disposed in bearings 148-150. A pulley 152 is mounted on the lower end of the shaft to provide an input to rotate the shaft. The shaft 146 carries in each bin 142 immediately above the plate 138 a wiper arm 154 that extends outwardly to the inner surface of the drum 134. As shaft 146 rotates, the wipers 154 rotate with it and move the coins disposed in each of the bins over the surface of the plate 138. The wipers 154 push the coins in the bins by the mouth or inlet of the slots 144 at the lower edge of the inclined plates 138 and further carry those coins which do not pass into the slots 144 to the warped portions 140 of the plates so that they may slide into the next lower bin of the drum.

Preferably the height of the slots 144 are successively greater from stage to stage; that is, the height of slot 144b exceeds the height of slot 144a, the height of slot 144a exceeds that of slot 144k and continuing to slot 144a. The height of slot 144e is substantially equal to the maximum acceptable thickness of coins of the denomination under test. Slot 144d should be substantially equal to the minimum acceptable thickness of coins under test. Thus, all coins thinner than the minimum acceptable thickness should slide through one of slots 144a-144d, while coins which do not exceed the maximum acceptable thickness should pass through slot 144a.

The bottom wall 156 of drum 134 forms with the cylindrical wall of the drum yet another bin 158 and it too is provided with an exit slot 160. Slot 160 should be considerably larger than the maximum acceptable coin thickness so that all coins carried to bin 158 by warped portion 140 of wall 138a may exit from the coin tester.

Disposed adjacent to the drum 134 are several collectors 16251-162). Collector 162a is aligned with the slot 144a formed in the uppermost bin of the drum and collects the thinnest coins discharged from the drum. Coin collector 162b-162d receive slightly thicker coins than those in collector 162a but of less than minimum acceptable thickness. Colleetor 1622 disposed adjacent slots 144a receives those coins which are within the proper range of thickness while collector 162 receives all oversized coins. A chute 164 communicates with collector 162a to convey acceptable coins to a desirable location.

The embodiment of my invention shown in FIG. 6 operates as follows: all coins ostensibly of the denomination under test are fed to the multi-stage tester 132 through the receiver 130. The coins from the receiver are deposited in the uppermost bin 142a in the tester, as suggested by coins 166. All the coins will slide on the inclined plate 138a of the bin 142a towards the slot 144a. Those very thin coins which pass through the slot 144a will be gathered in collector 162a, and those coins which do not pass through slot 144a will be picked up by wiper 154 and be pushed in the bin 142a until they reach the warped portion 140 of the plate 138a. The warped portion 140 will carry the coins to the next lower bin 14% as suggested by coin 168. The coins in bin 14% will in turn be directed past slot 144 and if thinner than the height of the slot will discharge into collector 16%. The wiper 154 disposed on the plate 138]) will convey the coins in bin 14% which do not pass through the slot 14 1b to the Warped section 140 of that plate where they will be taken to the next lower bin 142c. This operation is continued until the coins filter down through the drum 134 and discharge into one of the collectors.

From the foregoing description those skilled in the art will appreciate the numerous modifications which may be made of any of the embodiments of my invention without departing from its spirit. Therefore, I do not intend to limit the breadth of this invention to specific embodiments illustrated and described, but rather it is my intention that the breadth of this invention be determined by the appended claims and their equivalents.

What is claimed is: i

1. A coin sorting machine for handling coins of one denomination comprising a first pair of discs mounted for rotation about a first common horizontal axis, a second pair of spaced discs mounted for rotatiton about a second common horizontal axis, said pairs of discs being oriented with the uppermost point on the periphery of the second pair of discs being disposed below the uppermost point on the periphery on the first pair of discs, means for rotating the pairs of discs about their axes, means spacing the first pair of discs apart a distance substantially equal to the minimum acceptable thickness of coins of said one denomination, means spacing the second pair of discs apart a distance substantially equal to the maximum acceptable thickness of coins of said denomination, means for depositing coins to be sorted on the periphery of the first pair of discs, and means carrying coins from the periphery of the first pair to the periphery of the second pair which fail to fall between the discs of the first pair.

2. A device as defined in claim 1 further characterized by the rotation of the first pair of discs carrying coins on the periphery of said first pair toward the second pair.

3. A coin sorting machine comprising a first pair of parallel discs oriented about a horizontal axis and spaced apart a distance capable of receiving all coins thinner than the minimum acceptable thickness of coins of the denomination being sorted, a channel formed about the periphery of the pair of discs and into which coins to be sorted are deposited, said channel aligning coins carried by it with the space between the discs, a second pair of parallel discs oriented about a horizontal axis and spaced apart a distance capable of receiving all coins which do not exceed the maximum acceptable thickness of coins of the denomination being sorted, a channel formed about the periphery of the second pair of discs for receiving coins and aligning them with the space between said second pair, means'for rotating the first recited pair of discs so that coins in their channel which fail to fall between them move toward the second pair of discs, a track for conveying coins from the channel of the first recited pair to the channel on the second pair of discs, means for rotating the second pair of discs so that coins in their channel move away from the first pair of discs, and means for collecting coins from the channel of the second pair which fail to fall between said second pair.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 574,528 Elder Jan. 5, 1897 937,517 Galligan Oct. 19, 1909 1,028,611 Sattley June 4, 1912 1,095,981 Farrell May 5, 1914 1,168,461 Batdorf Jan. 18, 1916 1,363,818 Scott Dec. 28, 1920 1,813,841 Fast July 7, 1931 1,894,190 Myers Ian. 10, 1933 2,289,002 Fleming et a1 July 7, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US574528 *Jan 5, 1897 Coin separator and distributer
US937517 *Jan 13, 1909Oct 19, 1909Thomas F GalliganCoin-sorter.
US1028611 *Apr 28, 1906Jun 4, 1912Clarence StanleyCoin sorter and counter.
US1095981 *Feb 18, 1913May 5, 1914Farrell CompanyMachine for assorting and counting coins.
US1168461 *Aug 18, 1909Jan 18, 1916Automatic Coinwrapping Machine CompanyAutomatic coin separating, adding, counting, and bagging machine.
US1363818 *Jun 12, 1919Dec 28, 1920Evan R ScottApple-grader
US1813841 *Nov 20, 1928Jul 7, 1931 Device for sorting coins
US1894190 *Dec 5, 1930Jan 10, 1933Myers Herbert BCoin assorting and counting machine
US2289002 *Jun 2, 1939Jul 7, 1942KronsonMachine for sorting and counting coins
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4376442 *May 14, 1980Mar 15, 1983General Railway Signal CompanyCoin Assorter
US6783452 *Sep 18, 2001Aug 31, 2004Glory Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaCoin assorter and coin inputting device
US6991530Jul 7, 2004Jan 31, 2006Glory Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaCoin sorting apparatus
US7004831Jul 7, 2004Feb 28, 2006Glory Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaCoin sorting apparatus
US7018284 *Jun 7, 2004Mar 28, 2006Royal Sovereign Inc.Apparatus for sorting and counting coins
US8202144Sep 30, 2005Jun 19, 2012Glory Ltd.Coin sorting system
US8535125 *Mar 9, 2012Sep 17, 2013Wincor Nixdorf International GmbhFeed unit for filling a coin module with coins
US20040238320 *Jul 7, 2004Dec 2, 2004Yushi HinoCoin sorting apparatus
US20040242142 *Jun 7, 2004Dec 2, 2004Seo Hwa IlApparatus for sorting and counting coins
US20120231721 *Sep 13, 2012Wincor Nixdorf International GmbhFeed unit for filling a coin module with coins
EP1956561A1 *Sep 30, 2005Aug 13, 2008Glory Ltd.Coin sorting system
Classifications
U.S. Classification453/3
International ClassificationG07D3/10, G07D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07D3/10
European ClassificationG07D3/10