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Publication numberUS3174863 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 23, 1965
Filing dateFeb 13, 1961
Priority dateFeb 13, 1961
Publication numberUS 3174863 A, US 3174863A, US-A-3174863, US3174863 A, US3174863A
InventorsShoup Allen A
Original AssigneeIrene Schneider Trust
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Smokeless broiler
US 3174863 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. A. SHOUP SMOKELESS BROILER March 23, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 13, 1961 WW s\ 'lll.

III Ill-Ill mp ,.F. :fi

INVENTOR. ALLEN A, SHOUP BY WWZM ATTY

March 23, 1965 A. A. SHOUP SMOKELESS BROILER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 13, 1961 Him 4; We n INVENTOR. ALLEN ASHOUP BY ATTY.

United States Patent 3,174,863 SMOKELESS BROILER Allen A. Shoup, Janesville, Wis., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Irene Schneider Trust Filed Feb. 13, 1961, Ser. No. 88,868 6 Claims. (Cl. 99-1) This invention relates in general to improved broiling means and in particular to a smokeless and flameless broiler.

The invention provides, in an electric broiler wherein a heating element is disposed directly beneath the food to minimize heat losses, means for preventing or minimizing both smoking and flaming even though fat drips down on the heating element of, and on other components of, the broiler.

Applicant has discovered that fats from foods, e.g., from meats, will not blaze or smoke upon contact with components if such components are maintained at temperatures outside of a certain range, said range hereinafter referred to as the smoke and flame temperature range. That is, if a component is cold enough, no smoke or flame will occur when fat drips thereon; and if a component is hot enough, no smoke or flame will occur when tat drips thereon. Applicant has discovered that the smoke and flame temperature range is the range of approximately 408 degrees Fahrenheit to approximately 1400 degrees Fahrenheit.

To further explain, applicant has discovered that when fat drips upon a component at a temperature of about:

Less than 408, neither smoke nor flame occurs;

Over 408 and up to 850, smoke occurs without flame, the smoking increasing with increases in temperature;

Over 850 and up to 1250, both flaming and smoking occur;

Over 1250 and up to 1400, flaming occurs without smoke;

and

Over 1400, neither smoke nor flame occurs.

In prior art broilers, the components, upon which fat drips, are maintained at temperatures Within the smoke and flame temperature range, and thus smoking and flaming occurs when fats drip upon such components.

Applicant has provided a new and improved broiler wherein the heating element is hot (i.e., is above 1400 degrees Fahrenheit, the upper end of the smoke and flame temperature range), and wherein the other components are either col (i.e., below 408 degrees Fahrenheit, the lower end of the smoke and flame temperature range), or are intermediate (i.e., within the smoke and flame temperature range) but are shielded against contact with dripping fats by a shield, deflector or baffle which is either cold or hot and thus smoke-free and flame-free. Applicants broiler is thus smokeless and flameless.

More particularly, the broiler of the invention includes a support means operating below the smoke and flame temperature range adapted to be mounted on a supporting surface and having a food supporting grill-thereon and a heating element arranged below the grill. Intermediate supporting means is provided for supporting the heating element on the support means. The intermediate supporting means constitutes any or whatever means that may be provided between the support means and the heating element. The heating element is provided with surfaces exposed to the path of fats falling from food "ice supported on the grill, wherein the surfaces are spaced apart to define spaces through which fats fall even if they strike the heating element. The surfaces are operated at a temperature above the smoke and flame temperature range, wherein fats impinging thereon will fall off and through the spaces without smoking and/ or flaming. The grill is spaced a sufiicient distance above the heating ele ment so that the temperature of the grill as heated by the heating element is below the smoke and flame temperature range. Moreover, the heating element is spaced a Sufficient distance above a surface or pan on to which the fats fall so that the surface or pan as heated by the heating element operates below the smoke and flame temerature range. And the area below the grill through which the fats fall in which the intermediate supporting means is located is such a small portion of the entire area below the grill through which the fats fall that even though any part of the intermediate supporting means may operate within the smoke and flame temperature range, any smoke or flame produced by fats impinging thereon is negligible.

Among the objects and advantages of the invention is the provision of an electric broiler which: is smokeless, is flameless; is low in cost; cooks rapidly; cooks the fat out of the food; retains the juices and vitamins in the food; is extremely easy to clean; is of simple construction so as to minimize need of repair, yet easy to repair or service should the need arise; has a great margin of safety from both severe burns and electrical shock; is economical in the use of electricity and in minimizing shrinkage of food; cooks steaks properly searing the juices in one side without losing them out the other side; and cooks foods extremely deliciously.

These and other objects and advantages will appear from the following description, when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the broiler of this invention, with a fragment removed, to more fully disclose the details of the broiler;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the removable cooking unit of the broiler, with fragments removed therefrom for a clearer disclosure;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary perspective view of the electric heating element of the removable cooking unit, and of the means supporting the electric heating element;

FIG. 4 is a front elevational view of the broiler;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary side elevational View, partly in section of a second embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 6 is a front elevational view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 5.

Referring to the drawings, there is shown a broiler having a tubular housing 1 which has four vertical or upright walls but has neither a top nor a bottom. On one side of the housing is mounted a vertical rod or post 2 which cooperates to provide vertical setting adjustability for a food supporting grill 3, by means of a grill handle 4 having an opening 5 therein only slightly larger than post 2. Thus, when held in a plane perpendicular to the post, the grill and grill handle may be moved up or down thereon to the desired position; and may be secured in the desired position by slightly cocking the grill and grill handle to lock the grill handle against the post. The grill handle 4 has a first portion extending vertically upwardly from the grill and a second portion extending horizontally away from the grill, forming a bent goose neck housing. Perfect broiling of steaks is accomplished by ad justing the grill to about /2 inch from element 15 for searing, to about 1%. inches from element 15 for cooking, and to about 3 inches from element 15 for keeping them warm prior to serving.

A removable cooking unit 6, which rests in housing 1 on a support 26, comprises a frame 12, preferably of about 12 x 16 inches, which supports all the components of unit 6. The frame 12, as shown, is of channeled configuration and has a pair of electrical insulating strips 13 disposed in the channel thereof. The frame 12. itself may, if desired, be made of an electrical insulation material. Mounted in the frame, and insulated therefrom by the insulating strips, is a pair of electric terminal pins 9 adapted to receive, through an opening 27 in the housing, a conventional electrical connector plug and cord accessory to connect the terminal pins to a conventional source of electrical energy of about 110 volts, 6O cycle, alternating current. The terminal pins 9 are connected to conductors Ztl mounted in the insulating strip 13 so as to be insulated from frame 12, the conductors 29 connecting the terminal pins 9 with terrnnial posts 19 which are mounted in frame 112 and insulated therefrom by insulating strip 13. Connected to terminal posts 119 are the ends 21 of an electrical heating element 15, which preferably is a No. 21 Nichrome wire No. 24-5. Element 15 is arranged in a zig-zag fashion as shown, being supported at its points of reversal of direction by means including short fine wire links 16. The short links 16 are preferably about inch long and are of smaller diameter stock than element 15 and preferably are of No. 23 Nichrome wire No. 245. The short links 16 are supported by L-shaped bent wire of larger diameter than either the element 15 Wire or the link 16 wire, and which act as springs tensioning element 15 so as to prevent undue slack which otherwise would occur upon expansion due to heating up of element 15 upon electrical energization. End links 14 are preferably about one inch long and are mounted in the insulation in frame 12 so as to be electrically isolated. Heating element 15 preferably is arranged to have 12 or 14 crossings. With 12 crossings, the heating element 15 preferably has a total length of about 8 /2 feet.

Disposed in spaced relationship above element 15 is an upper protective grid 1'7 mounted in insulating strip 13 on frame 12 and insulated from the frame and the electriccircuit. And disposed in spaced relationship below element 15 is a lower protective grid 18 mounted in insulating strip 13 on frame 12 and insulated from the frame and the electric circuit. These protective grids, in the event of breakage of element 15, confine the broken ends of the element Within the grids to prevent or minimize possibility of the element touching the user, the food, the housing l, the Water tray It?) or the water 11% therein, and the grids being electrically isolated, will insulate a broken electric element from'all parts of the broiler other than the isolated rods of the protective grids. I

The grids 1'7 and 18 consist of a plurality of separate rods, each mounted rotatably in the frame. This feature provides easy cleaning of the rods when washing unit 6, in that when rubbed with a cloth, sponge, or other cleaning device, the rods rotate and all sides thereof are thus easily cleaned. Each rod is electrically isolated from every other rod and from all other structure of the broiler. V

The electrical circuit for heating element 15 is thus seen to be, from the source of electrical energy, to one of the terminal pins 9, thence to one of terminal posts 1? via one of the conductors in, thence through element 15 to the other of the terminal posts 19, thence via the other of the conductors 26 to the other of terminal pins 9, and back to the source of electrical energy. It is also thus seen that the electric circuit is insulated from all other parts of the broiler, and even in the event of breakage of element 15 is still insulated from the frame and housing.

In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-4, inclusive, all portions of the entire broiler are at temperatures outside of the smoke and flame temperature range.

Heating element 15 operates hot, i.e., above the range, for example at over 2200 degrees F. and preferably about up to 2300 degrees F.

Each short link 16 of the fine high resistance wire, at its end in contact with element 15, becomes hot (i.e., above the range), and at its other end is cold (i.e., below the range). Only a negligible tiny spot or portion intermediate its ends is at a temperature within the range, but is so small that any fat striking it sputters off Without smoking or flaming.

Terminal posts 19 may also have a small portion, at the spot where element 15 contacts the posts, that may come within the range, but it is also negligible when compared to the entire area, and is disposed at the ends where fat drippings are less likely. For complete assurance, a deflector shield or baffle, such as bafile 24, which is maintained at temperatures outside the range, may be placed above posts 19 to insure no smoking or flaming, as is illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6.

All of the other components of the broiler are spaced sufiiciently from element 15 so as to be cold (i.e., below the range).

Upper protective grid 17 is about inch from element 15. Lower protective grid 18 is about inch from element 15. Short links 16 are about inch in length thus spacing end links 14, that distance from element 15. The remaining components are even further from element 15 than those just mentioned and thus are cold, i.e., below the range, and thus smokeless and flameless.

Mounted near the lower end of housing 1 is a removable fat drippings-and-water tray 10 slidably removable therefrom easily by a pullfixture Illa. The water tray may contain water in the bottom thereof as is indicated by reference numeral 1012. Fat dripping from the food drops into the Water in tray 10 so that, after cooking, the fat may be easily poured out'and the tray easily cleaned. For cooking very fatty foods, the presence'of water is highly desirable. The tray is disposed close to the heating element 15 for efficiency and economics of space, but not so close as to cause fats in the tray to smoke or ignite. The correct distance has been found to be approximately 4 /2 inches from heating element 15 'to the bottom of tray 10.

Housing 1 is provided with a plurality of openings 11, vertically in alignment, to provide vertical adjustability for mounting a support for a rotissiere or rotating spit, to adjustably dispose the rotating shaft of the rotissiere above the unit 6. In this arrangement, one may conveniently cook birds, or other food to be rotated, over unit 6, and may vary the size of thebird or other food, and still keep the surface of the food at the desired disstance from the heating element .15.

The frame 12 is of such size, and construction so that the removable unit 6 fits easily Within water tray 1%). This provides the convenient utility, when done cooking, of being able to wash unit 6 in water tray 10, by submersing unit 6 in water in tray. 11%.

Grill 3 is also of such size and construction so that it also fits easily within water tray 10 for such convenient washing. The upwardly bent goose-neck grill handle 4 of the grill permits the grill to be placed in the water tray, just as it permits the grill to be placed in the housing 1.

FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate another embodiment of the invention wherein a'heating element 22 is hot (i.e., is at a temperature above the smoke and flame temperature range), but wherein the support 23 for element 22, and perhaps a small portion of the end of element 22, is intermediate (i.e., within the smoke and flame temperature range). Thus, if fats were to drip on the support 23, smoking and/or flaming would result. To eliminate smoking and flaming, there is provided a deflector shield or baflle 24 which is either hot or cold (i.e., is outside of the smoke and flame temperature range). Fats will thus hit baflle 24 and not smoke or flame, and the fats are deflected from support 23. The baflie 24 may be a cold member (i.e., below the range), or may be a hot member (i.e., an element heated so as to be above the range). Element 22 may be, for example, a Globar heating element, which operates at temperatures above the range, e.g., at about 2300 degrees F., but which is usually mounted in such a way so that the end support member and a small portion of the end of the element is within the range. Element 22 could alternatively be No. 21 Nichrome wire No. 245 such as hereinbefore described for element 15, but mounted in such a way that the mounting and perhaps a small portion of the element are within the range.

Applicant has thus provided a novel broiling means and method for broiling smoke-free and flame-free, by providing, in the first embodiment, a hot heating element, and all other components cold. In the second embodiment applicant provides a hot heating element, cold components, and intermediate components, wherein the intermediate components are shielded from fats by either a hot or a cold bafl'le means.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent, is:

1. A broiler comprising, support means operating below the smoke and flame temperature range adapted to be supported on a supporting surface, a food supporting grill on said support means, a heating element arranged below said supporting grill, intermediate means for supporting said heating element on said support means, said heating element having surfaces exposed to the path of fats falling from food supported on said grill operating above the smoke and flame temperature range and spaces between said surfaces through which fats fall, means for supporting said grill a distance above said heating element so that the temperature of the grill as heated by the heating element is below the smoke and flame temperature range, said heating element being spaced a sufiicient distance above a surface on to which the fats fall so that said surface as heated by the heating element operates below the smoke and flame temperature range, the area of said intermediate supporting means upon which fats may fall being such a small portion of the entire area below the grill through which the fats fall that any smoke or flame produced by fats falling on the intermediate supporting means is negligible.

2. A method of broiling foods comprising, the steps of, placing food on a grill positioned above a heating element having surfaces exposed to the path of fats falling from said food and spaces therebetween through which fats fall, operating said surfaces above the smoke and flame temperature range, providing support means operating below the smoke and flame temperature range for said grill, providing intermediate means for supporting the heating element on said support means, spacing said grill a suflicient distance above the heating element to maintain the temperature of the grill as heated by the heating element below the smoke and flame temperature range, spacing said heating element a suflicient distance above a lower surface on to which said fats fall so that said lower surface as heated by the heating element operates below the smoke and flame temperature range, and confining said intermediate supporting means in such a small portion of the entire area below the grill through which fats fall that any smoke or flame produced by fats impinging on the intermediate supporting means is negligible.

3. A broiler comprising, support means operating below the smoke and flame temperature range adapted to be supported on a supporting surface, a food supporting grill on said support means, a heating element arranged below said supporting grill, intermediate means for supporting said heating element on said support means, said heating element having surfaces exposed to the path of fats falling from food supported on said grill operating above the smoke and flame temperature range and spaces between said surfaces through which fats fall, means for supporting said grill a distance above said heating element so that the temperature of the grill as heated by the heating element is below the smoke and flame temperature range, a fat collecting pan spaced a suflicient distance below said heating element so that said pan into which fats fall as heated by said heating element operates below the smoke and flame temperature range, said pan having water therein for facilitating the removal of fats therefrom, the area of said intermediate supporting means upon which fats may fall being such a small portion of the entire area below the grill through which the fats fall that any smoke or flame produced by fats falling on the intermediate supporting means is negligible.

4. A broiler comprising, support means operating below the smoke and flame temperature range adapted to be supported on a supporting surface, a food supporting grill on said support means, an electrically operated heating element arranged below said supporting grill, intermediate means for supporting said heating element on said support means, said heating element having surfaces exposed to the path of fats falling from food supported on said grill operating above the smoke and flame temperature range and spaces between said surfaces through which fats fall, means for supporting said grill a distance above said heating element so that the temperature of the grill as heated by the heating element is below the smoke and flame temperature range, said heating element being spaced a suflicient distance above a surface on to which the fats fall so that said surface as heated by the heating element operates below the smoke and flame temperature range, the area of said intermediate supporting means upon which fats may fall being such a small portion of the entire area below the grill through which the fats fall that any smoke or flame produced by fats falling on the intermediate supporting means is negligible.

5. A broiler comprising, support means operating below the smoke and flame temperature range adapted to be supported on a supporting surface, a food supporting grill on said support means, a heating element arranged below said supporting grill, intermediate means for supporting said heating element on said support means, said heating element having surfaces exposed to the path of fats falling from food supported on said grill operating above the smoke and flame temperature range and spaces between said surfaces through which fats fall, means for supporting said grill a distance above said heating element so that the temperature of the grill as heated by the heating element is below the smoke and flame temperature range, said heating element being spaced sufficient distance above a surface on to which the fats fall so that said surface as heated by the heating element operates below the smoke and flame temperature range, and means operating outside of the smoke and flame temperature range for shielding said intermediate supporting means against falling fats.

6. A broiler comprising, support means operating below the smoke and flame temperature range adapted to be supported on a supporting surface, a food supporting grill on said support means, a heating element arranged below said supporting grill, intermediate means for supporting said heating element on said support means, said intermediate supporting means being located a sufficient distance from the area in which fats normally fall so that any smoke or flame produced by fats falling thereon is negligible, said heating element having surfaces exposed to the path of fats falling from food supported on said grill operating above the smoke and flame tempera- 27 g ture range and spaces between said surfaces through 1,734,138 11/29 Lehmann 99-446 X which lets fall, and means for supporting said grill 2,097,793 11/37 -Howell 99-446 a distance above said heating element so. that the tempera- 2,230,268 2/41 Russell et a1. ture of the grill asheated by the heating element is below 2,752,475 6/56 Norris 219532 X the smoke and flame temperature range, saidheating ele- 5 2,827,846 3/58 Karling 99450 X -ment being spaced at sulficient'distance above a surface 7 2,874,631 2/ 59 Cooksley.

on to which the-fats fall so thatvsaid surface as heated 2,903,549 9/59 Joseph 99-446 X by the heating-elementoperates below the smoke and 2,905,077 9/59 Francia 99-446 flame temperature range. FOREIGN PATENTS 10 References Cited by the Examiner 140, 12/03 Germany.

7 UNITED STATES PATENTS ROBERT E. PULFREY, Primary Examiner.

$3223 1 5; GEORGE A. NINAS, JR., A. H. WILKELSTEIN, A.

1,291,423 1/19 Crary 15 LEWIS MONACELL, JEROME SCHNAJL, I

1,294,269 2/19 Hopkins 219.451

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3240147 *Jun 17, 1963Mar 15, 1966S W Farber IncBroiler and rotisserie combination
US3248518 *Sep 23, 1964Apr 26, 1966Mc Graw Edison CoBroiler-rotisserie
US3254591 *Nov 27, 1964Jun 7, 1966Riviera Appliance CorpElectric broiler and rotisserie
US3490359 *Sep 20, 1967Jan 20, 1970Seitz Charles EElectric charbroiler
US3522415 *Aug 7, 1967Aug 4, 1970Paul EislerElectric heating devices
US4206241 *Feb 13, 1978Jun 3, 1980Bibhuti Atma RMethod of preparing fowl
US5727451 *Mar 13, 1997Mar 17, 1998The Pillsbury CompanyBroiler apparatus
EP0091145A1 *Mar 16, 1983Oct 12, 1983Werkhuizen Rubbens naamloze vennootschapGrill
Classifications
U.S. Classification426/243, 219/532, 426/523, 99/400, 219/542, 338/316, 338/318, 99/446, 99/385
International ClassificationH05B3/16, A47J37/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47J37/0676, H05B3/16
European ClassificationH05B3/16, A47J37/06D2