Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3176063 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 30, 1965
Filing dateOct 2, 1961
Priority dateJun 30, 1960
Publication numberUS 3176063 A, US 3176063A, US-A-3176063, US3176063 A, US3176063A
InventorsIvar Jepson, Wolter Gilbert R
Original AssigneeSunbeam Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Can opener supporting device
US 3176063 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 30, 1965 JEPSON ETAL 3,176,063

CAN OPENER SUPPORTING DEVICE Original Filed June 30, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 March 30, 1965 l. JEPSON ETAL CAN OPENER SUPPORTING DEVICE Original Filed June 30, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Ems.- Jaw/z 4 Km United States Patent ()fiice 3,l76,%3 Patented Mar. 30, 1965 3,176,963 (IAN @hENER SWPQRTENG DEVHIE Ivar Jepson, flair Park, and Gilbert K. Welter, lllmhurst, Ilh, assignors to Sunbeam Corporation, Chicago, Ill, a corporation of Illinois @riginal application June 30, 196i), Ser. No. 39,838, new Patent No. 3,682,274, dated (let. 3, 1961. Divided and this application Get. 2, M61, Ser. No. 142,281

13 (Ilalms. (Cl. 174-52) This invention relates generally to power-operated can openers and more particularly, to improvements in mounting and supporting can openers. This invention is a division of copending application Serial No. 39,888, filed June 30, 1960, which matured into Patent No. 3,002,274, issued on October 3, 1961, and assigned to the same assignee as the instant application.

One of the problems encountered in powering a can opener is that of providing a cord connection between the electric motor used therein and the wall receptacle. While there have been some examples of wall mounted can openers, most of the prior art power can openers have included stand-type mounts which would merely rest on a table or kitchen counter top. These can openers are provided with an electric cord long enough to span the gap between the electric wall outlet and a location where the user finds convenient. Quite often a counter top is used. In some instances, the convenient location is adjacent to the wall outlet and thereby confronts the user with the problem of a power cord occupying the counter top work space. Experience teaches that the most frequent user of the can opener is the housewife and she invariably needs all the counter top work space avaiable in order to perform the various household chores. The housewife not only finds the unneeded length of power cord unsightly, but space consuming and troublesome.

in the same light, many users prefer mounting the power-operated can opener on the kitchen wall adjacent to a convenient electrical outlet in order to conserve counter top space. The mounting, however, must enhance the beauty of the room. A power cord that is visible between the can opener and the wall outlet certainly detracts from the decorum or" the room and is, therefore, objectionable. We have invented two types of mounting which economically overcome the heretofore discussed situations, one being adaptable to certain types of wall mounting and the other being an improved type of stand mounting.

It is therefore an object of the invention to provide an improved can opener stand which is simple in construction and which has a low manufacturing cost.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a wall mounting means for an electric can opener whereby the can opener may be mounted on the wall directly over a plug receptacle.

It is an additional object of the invention to provide a stand mounting for an elec' ie can opener wherein cord storage means are provided.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent as the following description proceeds and the features of novelty which characterize the invention will he pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of the specifica tion.

For a better understanding of the present invention, reference may be had to the accompanying drawings in whic PEG. 1 is a front perspective View of the can opener utilizing the stand type mounting and having a can in operatin g position therein;

FIG. 2 is a rear elevational view of the stand mounted can opener shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a partial side elevational view of the top of the can opener stand shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the can opener in FIG. 1 showing in exploded relation the mounting plates for wall mounting the can opener;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged front view of the can opener of FIG. 3 with the lid retaining means removed;

FIG. 6 is a modified sectional view taken substantially along line 6-6 of PEG. 5 showing the can opener mounted to the terminal box;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken along line 77 of FIG. 6 including the lid holding means.

Referring to the drawings in which like numerals designate like parts throughout the several views, the can opener, which is shown with various types of mounting or support throughout the figures, is designated generally by the reference numeral 11. In FIG. 1 the can opener H is shown with a stand support 12 which is designed to support the can opener on a table or kitchen counter top. A can 13 is shown in FIG. 1 in operative position in the can opener lit. The support 12 is substantially L-shaped when viewed from the side including a horizontally disposed base portion 14 and a vertically positioned upright portion 16 which extends from the rear portion of the base. For the purpose of mounting the can opener 11 on the stand support 12 there is provided a rearwardly displaced mounting plate 18 at the top of the upright 16. The upright 16 terminates in a flat supporting shelf 16a which supports the can opener in its position secured to the mounting plate 18.

To mount the can opener 11 on the plate 13, a plurality of mounting screws 20 are utilized which extend through the plate 18 into engagement with the can opener ill. An opening 22 has been formed in the mounting plate l to permit a can opener power cord 24 to extend therethrough. The opening 22 has been made sulficiently large so that a plug 26 secured to the end of the power cord 24 may be passed therethrough on assembling the can opener to the stand 12. The entire stand support 12 including the base 14, the upright 16 and the mounting plate 18 is a single piece of molded plastic.

Since the can opener is normally used in the kitchen where there are many conveniently located outlets a powr cord of about four feet in length is normally provided with the can opener. Since in many instances the electrical outlet will be no more than a foot or so from the location in which the can opener is to be used, it is desirable to have a means available for varying the available length of the power cord. In the instant design, this is accomplished by forming the upright 16 with a recess or cavity 161') witlu'n which the unused section of the power cord may be stored. To permit the power cord 24 to enter the recess 16]) the opening 22 is slotted downwardly at 5%.

To retain a portion of the power cord within the recess ldb, a metallic plate cover Ed is utilized as a closure member. The plate 3?) is the same size as the opening of the recess ldb and is supported in the opening on four bosses 16c which are formed integrally with the plastic support 12. A plurality of self-tapping screws 32 may be used to secure the closure plate 3d in position. One of the outer walls of upright 16 is slotted at access to permit the power cord 24 to exit from the recess. The access or outlet opening ldd is formed of such a depth that the plate 30 clamps the cord 24 therebetween. It should be understood therefore that the lower left-hand screw 32 as viewed in FIG. 2 must be loosened to adjust the length of power cord extending from the recess 1611. Once the selected amount of cord is extending therefrom, the same lower left screw 32 may be tightened down forming a strain relief which prevents more cord from being withdrawn from the recess.

The mechanism of the can opener is enclosed within a cup-shaped housing member 34 which has an opening facing toward the rear. Cooperating with the housing 34 to complete the chamber within which the mechanism is mounted, there is a support plate member 36. The plate 36 has a number of holes 36:: formed therein which receive screws 38 to assemble the plate 36 to the housing 34. In addition to the openings 36a, the plate 36 is provided with four threaded openings 36b, three of which are visible in FIG. 4, to receive the mounting screws 2% which extend through the mounting plate 18 of the stand support 12.

In the event the can opener is to be mounted on the wall, it is necessary that means be available to mount the can opener thereon without the use of screws extending inwardly from the rear. To accomplish this end, a separate wall plate is utilized, as is best shown in FIGS. 4, 6 and 7. The wall plate 4% includes four offset lugs itla which project inwardly from the plane of the plate. The plate member 36 has four openings 360 which are positioned to correspond to the location of the lugs 49a. Thus, upon moving the wall plate 4d against the plate member 36 the lugs 46a may be positioned to extend through the openings 36:. Each vertically aligned pair of openings 36c are interconnected by an elongated slot 3nd which extends upwardly past the uppermost openings 360. After the lugs itla have been inserted into the openings 36:, the plate 36 may be moved downwardly so that the lugs 40a move vertically in the slots 36d into locked engagem nt with the plate 36.

It can be readily appreciated that the wall plate 46 may be mounted on any convenient wall by means of screws extending through openings 40b provided thereon. An enlarged opening 490 positioned in the center of the wall plate 4t) permits the power cord to extend therethrough. In instances where there is a convenient terminal box located in the kitchen, it may be desirable to mount the can opener directly over the terminal box so that there will be no problem of extending the power cord from the can opener to the terminal box. In such instances, the wall plate 46 may take the form of a substantially cupshaped member having outwardly extending walls Md. The walls 40d are designed to engage the plaster wall ll as is best shown in FIG. 6. The purpose of the cupshaped design is to allow room for a wall receptacle which normally includes a flange extending from the wall opening for the terminal box across the surface of the plaster wall.

In FIG. 6 there is shown a conventional electrical terminal box 42 which is secured in the plaster wall 41 by any suitable means such as, for instance, by screwing or nailing the box 42 to the studding of the wall. Electrical power is brought into the terminal box by means of a suitable cable which is joined to the terminal box by a connector 44 A pair of wires 46 are shown extending inwardly to connect to a plug receptacle 48 mounted within the terminal box.

While it is conventional to employ plug receptacles which are substantially flush with the wall surface, it would be impossible to mount the can opener flush with the wall if means were not provided to accommodate the power cord 2d and the plug 2 5. To provide room for these parts the plug receptacle 4% has been provided with an inwardly extending recess 50 within which the plug 26 and the coiled cord 24 are received. The receptacle 48 has an integrally formed flange 4842 which extends outwardly from the top of the recess B. The flange 48a is molded with suitable openings to receive mounting screws 52 which extend therethrough into threaded engagement with assembly tabs 42a provided on the terminal box 42. Upon inspection of FIG. 6 and the location of the flanges 48a overlaying the face of plaster wall ll, it becomes obvious that the inwardly dis rected walls 49d on the wall plate dfi are necessary to assure flush mounting of the can opener while at the same time not interfering with the outwardly extending portions of the receptacle 4%.

The can opener 11 and the operation thereof is dis closed and claimed in our patent application Serial No. 39,888, which matured into Patent No. 3,002,274, issued on Gctober 3, 1961.

While there has been illustrated and described several particular embodiments of can opener mounting means of the present invention, it will be understood that various changes and modifications may occur to those skilled in the art. t is intended in the appended claims to cover all those changes and modifications which fall within the true spirit and scope of the present invention.

What is claimed as new and desires to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. In a motor operated can opener comprising a cupshaped housing having the opening thereof facing rearwardly, a plate member secured to said housing to form a closure for said opening, a one-piece L-shaped support for said can opener having a base and a vertical upright portion, said upright portion having a rearwardly displaced mounting plate formed integrally therewith and projecting vertically from the top thereof, said plate member being secured to said mounting plate, said upright portion being hollow and having a reaiwardly facing opening, a base plate covering said opening in said upright forming a cord chamber, a power cord extending from said housing through said plate member, an opening in the top of said upright in front of said mounting plate through which the cord extends into said cord chamber, and a slot in said upright on the edge of said rearwardly facing opening for said cord to extend from said cord chamber to a power connection.

2. The can opener of claim 1 wherein the depth of said slot is such that said power cord is clamped between said slot and said base plate when said base plate is tightly assembled to said upright portion.

3. A motor operated can opener comprising a cupshaped housing having tie opening thereof facing rearwardly, a plate member secured to said housing to form a closure for said opening, a one-piece L-shaped can opener support having a base and a vertical upright portion, said upright portion having a rearwardly displaced mounting plate formed integrally therewith and projecting vertically from the top thereof, said upright terminating in a flat supporting shelf which supports the bottom of said cup-shaped housing, means securing said plate member and said mounting plate together, said upright portion being hollow and having a rearwardly facing opening, a base plate covering said opening in said upright to form a cord chamber, a power cord extending from said housing through said plate member, an opening in said flat supporting shelf in front of said mounting plate through which the cord extends into said cord chamber, a slot in said upright on the edge of said rearwardly facing opening for said cord to extend from said cord chamber to a power connection, said slot being of such depth that said base plate cover clamps the cord therebetween.

4. In a can opener comprising a housing, a stand supporting said can opener having a base and a vertical upright portion, said upright portion having a mounting plate formed integrally therewith and projecting vertically from the top thereof, said housing being secured to said mounting plate, said upright portion being hollow and having one open side, a base plate covering the opening in said upright forming a cord storage chamber, a power cord extending from said housing through an opening in said upright into said cord storage chamber, and an opening in the side of said cord storage chamber near the said base and said cord emerging therefrom for connection with an electrical outlet.

5. In a can opener comprising a housing, a support plate attached thereto, an L-shaped support for said can opener having a base and a vertical upright member, said upright member having a shelf portion at the top thereof to support the bottom of said housing, a vertical extending mounting plate formed integrally with said upright and a means for securing said support plate thereto, said upright member being hollow and having an opening in one side, a closure member covering said opening in said upright to form a cord storage chamber, means securing said closure member and said upright together, a power cord extending from said housing into said cord storage chamber through an opening near the top thereof, and an outlet opening in said cord storage chamber to allow the plug end of said cord t6 extend therefrom. I

6. Iii a motor operated can opener comprising a housing, a support plate attached thereto, a support stand having a base and a vertical upright portion, said upright portion having a rearwardly displaced mounting plate formed integrally therewith and projecting vertically from the top thereof, said housing being secured to said mounting plate, said upright portion being hollow and having an opening in one side, a closure member being secured to said upright portion to cover the opening in said upright portion to form a cord storage chamber, a power cord extending from said housing into said cord storage charnher through an inlet opening near the top thereof, a means to secure said closure member to the upright, an outlet opening located on the parting line between said upright portion and said closure member near the bottom of said cord storage chamber for the cord to emerge, the size of said outlet opening being such that said cord is clamped between said closure member and said upright portion when said closure member is tightly secured to said up right.

7" In an electrically operated can opener comprising a housing enclosing said can opener, an electrical power cord for energizing said can opener, one end of said cord being connected to said can opener, a stand having a base portion with an upright portion extending upwardly therefrom, said housing being secured to said upright portion in elevated relationship with respect to said base portion, said upright portion being hollow and having a rearwardly facing opening, a cord retaining plate secured to said upright portion to at least partially cover the opening in said upright portion to form a cord storage chamber, the other end of said power cord having an electrical plug, said chamber and said opening receiving a coiled portion of said cord adjacent said can opener with only sufficient length of cord extending from said chamber to connect said plug with a spaced electrical outlet.

8. In an electrically operated can opener, a stand, said can opener being mounted on said stand, an electric power cord for energizing said can opener, a cord storage chamber formed in said stand, one end of said cord being connected to said can opener, essentially the remainder of said cord being positioned in said chamber for storage therein, the other end of said cord having an electrical plug, an access to said chamber for withdrawing said cord to engage said plug with an electrical outlet which is positioned in spaced relationship with respect to said stand mounted can opener, and said cord being restorable in said chamber through said access.

9. In an electrically operated can opener, a stand, said can opener being mounted on said stand, an electric power cord for energizing said can opener, a cord storage chamber formed in said stand, one end of said cord being connected to said can opener, essentially the remainder of said cord being positioned in said chamber for storage therein, the other end of said cord having an electrical plug, an access to said chamber for withdrawing said cord to engage said plug with an electrical outlet which is positioned in spaced relationship with respect to said stand mounted can opener, said cord being restorable in said chamber through said access, said stand comprises a base member having an upright support member formed thereon, a housing enclosing said can opener, said housing being mounted on said upright support member in elevated relationship with respect to said base member, said upright support member being hollow to define said cord storage chamber, and said cord storage chamber enclosing said cord therein for essentially obscuring said cord from view when stored therein.

10. In a can opener as in claim 9, wherein a mounting member is formed at the upper end of said upright support member, said housing being positioned at said upper end and mounted on said mounting member, said upper end having an opening formed therein for passage of said cord from said can opener into said cord storage chamber, said access comprising an outlet opening formed in said cord storage chamber adjacent said base member, said plug end of said cord extending through said opening.

11. In a can dpener as in claim 10, wherein said base, upright support and mounting members comprise molded plastic parts which are integral with each other, said upright support member having a rearwardly facing opening, said outlet opening comprising a slot formed in an edge of said rearwardly facing opening, and said rearwardly facing opening being closed by a removable closure plate.

12. An electrically operated can opener comprising a stand including a horizontally disposed base member and a vertically extending upright member, a horizontally disposed substantially flat shelf section integrally formed at the top of said upright member and a mounting section extending upwardly adjacent said shelf section, said can opener positioned in a cup-shaped housing having a opening facing rearwardly and a fiat bottom wall adapted to engage said shelf section in supporting relationship, an electric power cord having one end connected to said can opener and the other end attached to a plug, a support plate secured to said housing to form a closure for said housing opening and defining an opening for said plug end of the cord to pass therethrough, fastening means attaching said support plate to said mounting section, said up right member being hollow and defining a rearwardly facing opening, a base plate covering at least a portion of the opening in said upright to form a cord chamber, the excess of said cord being storable in said chamber, an access to said chamber for withdrawing said cord to engage said plug with an electrical outlet which is positioned in spaced relationship with respect to said stand mounted can opener, said cord being restorable in said chamber through said access.

13. In a can opener as in claim 12, wherein said sections provide an access for said cord to extend from the opening in said support plate to said chamber.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,050,132 Spiegel Aug. 4, 1936 2,446,907 Cavanagh Aug. 10, 1948 2,644,853 Berninger et al July 7, 1953 2,825,963 Sykes et a1. Mar. 11, 1958 2,962,542 Witt NOV. 29, 1960 2,979,300 Howell et al Apr. 11, 1961 3,025,392 Worth Mar. 13, 1962 3,049,688 Sinopoli Aug. 14, 1962

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2050132 *Feb 25, 1935Aug 4, 1936Spiegel Charles JElectrical receptacle wall box and supporting device
US2446907 *Oct 10, 1946Aug 10, 1948Nelson G BurkeElectrical appliance cord
US2644853 *May 21, 1949Jul 7, 1953Gen Time CorpCasing for an electrical clock movement having a cord storage compartment
US2825963 *Nov 16, 1956Mar 11, 1958Sykes Charles JCan opener
US2962542 *Apr 8, 1958Nov 29, 1960Pacific Automation Products InMulticonductor cable junction device
US2979300 *Aug 28, 1959Apr 11, 1961Gen ElectricCan opener mounting structure
US3025392 *Oct 14, 1958Mar 13, 1962Joseph WorthElectric lamp
US3049688 *Aug 31, 1959Aug 14, 1962Frank SinopoliPortable electrical receptacle box
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5313708 *Dec 4, 1992May 24, 1994The Rival CompanyCan opener
US5992026 *Jan 9, 1998Nov 30, 1999The Rival CompanyKitchen appliance with pivotal mounting
US6189221Dec 31, 1998Feb 20, 2001The Rival CompanyCan opener appliance having a side-cutting mechanism
US6351889Jan 13, 2000Mar 5, 2002The Holmes Group, Inc.Adjustable-height can opening appliance
US6510613Jul 20, 2000Jan 28, 2003The Holmes Group, Inc.Ergonomic can opener
USD454286Mar 21, 2001Mar 12, 2002Conair CorporationCan opener
Classifications
U.S. Classification30/401, 248/223.21, 30/424, 174/58, 174/54
International ClassificationB67B7/00, B67B7/70
Cooperative ClassificationB67B7/38
European ClassificationB67B7/38