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Publication numberUS3176474 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 6, 1965
Filing dateOct 24, 1963
Priority dateOct 24, 1963
Publication numberUS 3176474 A, US 3176474A, US-A-3176474, US3176474 A, US3176474A
InventorsAbbott Roy W
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air conditioning unit
US 3176474 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 6, 1965 R, w, ABBOTT 3,176,474

AIR CONDITIONING UNIT FIG.2 WW

:+15 ATTORNEY April 6, 1965 R. w. ABBOTT 3,176,474

AIR CONDITIONING UNIT Filed oct. 24, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. Roy w. ABBOTT United States Patent O 3,176,474 AIR CONDlTlGNiNG UNET Roy W. Abbott, Jedersontown, Ky., assignor to General Electric Company, a corporation of New Yorlt Filed Oct. Z4, 1963, Ser. No. 318,63o

' 4 Claims. (Cl. 62-280) The present invention relates to air conditioning units and is more particularly concerned `with a window unit comprising an indoor section and an outdoor section interconnected by means for supporting the unit on the window sill so that the indoor and outdoor sections are on opposite sides of the wall below the sill.

Conventionally room air conditioners adapted to be window mounted comprise a single housing or casing containing both the evaporator and condensing unit cornponents of the refrigeration system. Such units consume valuable window space and offer numerous mounting and closure problems. ln order to avoid these disadvantages, so-called saddle type units have been proposed comprising separate but interconnected indoor and outdoor sections adapted to be supported by the interconnecting means on the sill of a window with the respective sections positioned on opposite sides of the enclosure wall generally below the sill level. Such units have presented a number of construction problems one of which is the problem of disposal of the condensate which collects on the evaporator contained in the indoor section.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a saddle type air conditioning unit including new and ii.- proved means for disposing of the condensate from the indoor or evaporator section,

Another object of the invention is to provide a saddle type air conditioning unit including an indoor or evaporator section, an outdoor or condensing unit section and adjustable interconnecting means connecting these two sections and designed both to support the unit on a window sill and to contain the refrigerant lines connecting the evaporator and condensing unit components of the refrigeration system.

Another object of the invention is to provide an air conditioning unit of the aforementioned type in which the adjustable 'connecting means also serves to conduct condensate from the indoor section to the outdoor section.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent as the following description proceeds and the features of novelty which characterize the invention will be pointed out lwith particularity in the claims annexed to and forming part of this speciica tion.

In accordance with what is presently considered to be a preferred embodiment of the present invention, there is provided a saddle type air conditioning unit comprising an indoor or evaporator section, an outdoor or condensing unit section and a pair of telescoping tubular members interconnecting the top portions of the two sections in such a manner that when the unit is supported on a window sill by means of the tubular members, the indoor and outdoor sections are on opposite sides of the wall below the window sill. The two tubular members are designed to carry the necessary interconnecting ele"- trical wiring and refrigerant tubing as lwell as to provide a path for the llow of condensate from the indoor section to the outdoor section. Condensate lifting means in the indoor section for elevating condensate from the bottom of that section to a point in which it will flow by gravity through one of ithe tubular members preferably comprises a shroud having an internal channel-shaped annular groove therein, means for introducing condensate into the lower portion of the shroud and a ring ro` tatably mounted within the groove for elevating the condil #falce Y densate through the groove to the top of the shroud. A trough extending tangentially from the top of the shroud is provided for conveying the elevated condensate to the indoor end of one of the tubular members.

For a better understanding of the invention reference may be had to the accompanying drawing in which: Y

FIGURE l is a side elevational view, partly in section of an air conditioning unit of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a plan view partly in section of the unit shown in FlGURl-E l;

FIGURE 3 is a view of the condensate elevating means taken generally along line 3 3 of FGURE 1; and

FIGURE 4 is a side view of a preferred form of the condensate elevating means.

With reference to the drawing, there is shown in FIG- URES 1 and 2 thereof an air conditioning unit of the saddle type comprising an indoor or evaporator section 1 and an outdoor or condensing unit section 2 interconnected by means of a pair of telescoping tubular members 3 and 4. The telescoping members 3 and 4 provide means for supporting the unit on the sill 5 of a window so that the two sections are disposed on opposite sides of the wall 6 below the window opening provided with the sash 7.

The air conditioning unit includes a refrigeration system comprising an evaporator S disposed within the housing or casing 9 forming part of the indoor section l and a condensing unit, including a condenser lil and a compressor il, disposed within the casing 14 forming part of the outdoor unit 2. The indoor section 1 also includes a -fan 1S .driven by a motor 16 for drawing room air in# wardly through a grille 17 provided in the rear Wall of the casing 9 and discharging conditioned air through a grille i8 provided Vin the front wall Vof the casing 9. Similarly, a `fan 2b driven by a motor 2l circulates outdoor air through the casing ld, the outdoor air entering the casing through a grille 23 provided in the rear wall of the casing i4 and being discharged through a grille 24 in the front wall of the casing.

Each of the tubular members 3 and 4 comprises a iirst tube 25 extending into and connected to upper portion of the casing 14 of the outdoor section and a second tube 26 extending into and connected to the top portion of the casing 9 of the indoor section 1. The `tubes 26 telescopica'lly slide in the tubes 2S so as to permit an adjustment of the distance lbetween the indoor and outdoor secv tions for accommodating walls or sills of different thicknesses. The tubes 26 may also be provided with brackets 28 adapted to engage the indoor edge of the sill 5 for positioning the unit vwhile the tubes 25 are provided with pads 29 adapted to support the unit on the outer edge of the sill 5. As the bracket 2S and the pad 29 are carried respectively on tubes 25 and 25, the distance between these elements 2d and 29 can be adjusted to accommoi `date different sill widths. When the uni-t is supported in a window, the sash 7 may be notched as indicated by numeral 30 to receive the members 3 and 4, or if desired, the sash 7 may merely be closed into contact with these members and the Vren'iaining space between the sash and sill closed by means of a ygasket or other sealing means.

In addition .to the evaporator 8, the condenser 16 and the compressor 11, the refrigeration system includes a suction line 31 for conducting low pressure refrigerant Ifrom the evaporator to the compressor 11 and a capillary 32 for feeding condensed refrigerant from the condenser l@ to the evaporator S. The compressor il, the condenser llt?, the capillary 32, evaporator 3, suction line 3l. are connected in the usual closed series liow relationship with the capillary 32 providing the pressure reduction between the condenser and evaporator.

In accordance with the present invention, the suction line 3l and the capillary 32 pass through the tubular member 3.y In addition, the portion of the suction line 31 indicated by the numeral 33 within the outdoor section 2 is folded orlooped in such a manner as to provide a substantial freedom of movement between the portion of the suction line contained within the tubular member 3 and the end connected to compressor 11 as the tubular member 3 is adjusted to various window widths. Preferably, this portion 33 is looped about the scroll 35 surrounding the fan 20 so that as the portion of the suction line 31 contained within the tubular member 3 moves relative to the compressor during adjustment of the tubular member, the loop 33 prevents the suction line from kinking or being unduly bent within the outdoor section 2. The capillary tube 32 is preferably also formed in one or more loops within the outdoor section 2 for the same purpose.

During operation of the air conditioning unit, moisture contained within the indoor air stream circulated through the evaporatorS condenses on the relatively cold evaporator surfaces and drains from the evaporator into a sump 37 provided in the bottom wall of the casing 9. In order to remove this water, there is provided means for elevating the water to a point adjacent the top of the casing 9 where it can be introduced into the indoor end 3S of the tubular member 3 through which it iiows into the outdoor section 2. More specifically, there is provided a condensate disposal means comprising, as is illustrated in FIGURE 3 of the drawing, annular shroud 40 having on the interior thereof an annular channel-shaped groove 41. The shroud 40 rests in the sump 37 and has an opening 42 communieating with the sump through which condensate flows from the sump 37 into the groove 41. An annular ring 43 which may be mounted on the tips of the vanes 44 of fan for rotation with the fan extends into the groove 41 and into the sump 37. Counterclockwise rotation ofthe ring 43 in the groove 41 as viewed in FIGURE 3 causes the condensate entering the groove 41 through the opening 42 to be swept upwardly through the groove. A portion of this elevated condensate is continuously discharged from the upper portion of the groove 41 into a trough 46 extending tangentially from the top of the shroud 40. From the trough 46 the Water Hows through a connector 4'7 into the tubular member 3, the indoor section end of which is closed by'means of a plug 48. The condensate then flows through the tubular member 3 and into the outdoor section 2 where it collects in a sump 49. A slinger ring 50 provided on the outdoor fan 26 serves to elevate this water into the path of the air stream owing through the outdoor section 2 so that it is thrown onto the condenser 1G and is evaporated for discharge as a vapor with the outdoor air stream.

Preferably, as is shown in FIGURE 4 of the drawing, the peripheral surface of the ring 43 is composed of a flexible foam material 51 such as a iiexible polyurethane foam. This material has been found to provide a water pumping means having a much lower noise level than a metal ring. In addition, the foam material pumps substantial quantities of air along the groove 41 and this circulating ystream of air within the groove 41 induces the water to flow upwardly around the groove and into'the trough 46 without substantial physical contact between the water and the ring.

The conditioner also includes Various electrical circuitry for controlling the operation of the compressor and the fan motors 16 and 21. A thermostat control for controlling the operation of these electrical components and the various switch means are contained within a control box 52 mounted on the top of the indoor section 1 while the wiring 53 connecting the control box to the compressor and outdoor fan motor 2t) pass through the tubular member 4.

By the above construction, it will be seen that the air conditioner unit of the present invention is characterized particularly by adjustable support members in the form of the tubular members 3 and 4 which not only serve to connect and support the two sections of the air conditioning unit on a window sill but also provide the necessary passages for the refrigerant conduits, the condensate and the electrical wiring between the two sections.

While there has been shown and described a particular embodiment of the present invention it will be understood that the invention is not limited thereto and it is intended by the appended claims to cover all such changes and modications as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A condensate elevating means for an air conditioner including fan means comprising:

an annular ring rotatable with said fan means, a stationary annular member having channel-shaped groove enclosing said ring and including an inlet for condensate at the bottom thereof,

a trough extending ltangentially from the 'top of said annular member,

whereby rotation of said ring in said groove causes condensate to be swept upwardly into said trough,

said ring including a peripheral portion composed of soft foam plastic foam material extending into said groove.

2. An air conditioning unit adapted to be supported on a window sill comprising:

an indoor section including a casing containing an evaporator, and fan means for circulating indoor air over said evaporator,

an outdoor `section including a casing containing refrigerant condensing means,

a pair of telescoping tubular members connecting the top portions of said sections and adapted to be supported on said window sill, Y

refrigerant conduits connecting said evaporator and condensing means,

said conduits passing through one of said members and including ree coiled portions in one of said sections Vto permit telescopic adjustment ofsaid members to various sill widths,

a condensate elevating means comprising an annular ring rotatable with said fan means, a shroud having channel-shaped groove enclosingjsaid ring and including an inlet for condensate at the bottom thereof,

a trough extending tangentially from the top of said shroud and connected to said one of tubular members,

whereby rotation of said ring in said groove causes condensate to be swept upwardly into said trough for discharge into said outdoor section,

said ring including a peripheral portion composed of soft foamed plastic material extending into said groove.

3, In an air conditioning unit, condensate removal means comprising:

an annular shroud having an internal channel-shaped annular groove therein,

means for introducing condensate into the lower portion of said shroud,

a trough extending tangentially from -the top of said shroud,

a ring rotatably mounted in said groove,

said ring having a peripheral edge composed of a soft Y foamed plastic material dipping into the condensate in the lower portion of said shroud for elevating said condensate upwardly through said groove for discharge into said trough during rotation of said ring.

4. An air conditioning unit comprising:

an outdoor section comprising a casing containing a condenser, a compressor and fan means for circulat-V ing outdoor air in heat exchange with `said condenser, an indoor section comprising a casing, an evaporator contained within said casing and fan means for circulating room air through said casing and in heat exchange with said evaporator,

first and second telescoping tubular members each connecting the upper portions of said casings in spaced relation for supporting said casings on opposite sides of a wall below a window sill,

said indoor section including means for collecting condensate from said evaporator and means for introducing said condensate into said first tubular member for passage through said first tubular member into said outdoor section,

means in said outdoor section for directing said condensate into the outdoor `air iowing through said condenser,

refrigerant conduits connecting said condenser and compressor with said evaporator,

said conduits including rst portions passing through said first tubular member and second portions in the form of a coil extending about said fan means,

electrical controls for controlling said fan means and said compressor including switch means associated with said indoor section and leads extending through said second tubular member connecting said switch means with said compressor and outdoor section fan means.

References Cited bythe Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,320,436 6/43 Hull 62-262 2,326,698 11/44 Hull 62-262 2,500,852 3/ 50 Money 62-279 2,638,756 5/53 Borgerd 62-280 2,712,737 7/55 Palmer 62-428 2,723,540 11/55 Den 62-262 2,737,787 3/56 Kritzer 62-428 2,760,354 8/56 Brady Y 62-262 FORETGN PATENTS 844,876 8/60 Great Britain.

ROBERT A. OLEARY, Primary Examiner.

`vVHJLJIAli/i I. WYE, Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US2320436 *May 28, 1941Jun 1, 1943Gen Motors CorpRefrigerating apparatus
US2326698 *Dec 26, 1940Aug 10, 1943American Cyanamid CoCoating composition containing polyvinyl acetate methylal
US2500852 *Jan 22, 1949Mar 14, 1950Artkraft Mfg CorpRoom cooler
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US2712737 *Jun 1, 1954Jul 12, 1955Palmer John EBuilding wall adaptor for air conditioning apparatus
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3296820 *Oct 23, 1965Jan 10, 1967Bauman Robert RWindow mounted air conditioning unit
US3309889 *Mar 11, 1966Mar 21, 1967Gen Motors CorpAir conditioner for sliding windows
US3321931 *May 3, 1965May 30, 1967Whirlpool CoFan structure
US3404539 *Apr 10, 1967Oct 8, 1968Laing Vortex IncAir conditioning apparatus
US3438219 *Aug 14, 1967Apr 15, 1969Chrysler CorpRoom air conditioner
US5167131 *Oct 21, 1991Dec 1, 1992Karkhanis Rajiv KAir conditioning unit
US5313806 *Jan 4, 1993May 24, 1994Chun FengIntegral air conditioner of which an indoor unit and an outdoor unit are connected with vibration dampers
US5582025 *Jun 21, 1995Dec 10, 1996Slant/Fin CorporationLow obstruction window air conditioner
US5697555 *Jul 18, 1995Dec 16, 1997Robinson; ArthurApparatus for dispersing liquid in droplets
US6336338 *Nov 13, 2000Jan 8, 2002Uri KorenRoom air conditioner
US7121105Oct 27, 2005Oct 17, 2006Elliot RaisWindow-mounted split air conditioning apparatus and method of installation
US7992404 *Oct 9, 2007Aug 9, 2011Kuo Jui SuWindow air conditioner with easy installation method
US20080083240 *Oct 9, 2007Apr 10, 2008Kuo Jui SuWindow air conditioner with easy installation method
US20140020421 *Mar 14, 2013Jan 23, 2014Christopher J. GalloAir conditioning unit and method of installing the same
DE3226804A1 *Jul 17, 1982Jan 19, 1984Bosch Gmbh RobertDevice for heating individual rooms
DE3226806A1 *Jul 17, 1982Jan 19, 1984Bosch Gmbh RobertDevice for heating individual rooms
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/280, 62/262, 62/428, 417/65, 239/214
International ClassificationF24F1/02
Cooperative ClassificationF24F1/02
European ClassificationF24F1/02