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Publication numberUS3176879 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 6, 1965
Filing dateApr 16, 1962
Priority dateApr 16, 1962
Publication numberUS 3176879 A, US 3176879A, US-A-3176879, US3176879 A, US3176879A
InventorsMojonnier Albert B
Original AssigneeMojonnier Inc Albert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container with spout, handle and a depression in its bottom wall for stacking
US 3176879 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 6, 1965 A. B. MOJONNIER 3,176,879 [CONTAINER WITH SPOUT, HANDLE AND A DEPRESSION Filed April 16. 1962 IN ITS BOTTOM WALL FOR STACKING 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 April 6, 1965 A. a. MOJONNIER 3,176,879

CONTAINER WIT SPOUT, HANDLE AND A DEPRESSION IN ITS BOTTOM WALL FOR STACKING 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 16, 1962 United States Patent Oflice dilhfll Patented Apr. 6, l iid 3,176,879 CGNTAiNER WITH SPGUT, HANDLE ANE A DEPRESSEG N EN HTS EGTTUM WALL FER STACG Albert E. Mcjonnier, Chicago, Ill., assignor to Albert Mojonnier, inc, Chicago, lit, a corporation of Hhnois Filed Apr. 16, 1962, Ser. No. 187,686 1i Elaims. (Cl. 222143) This invention relates to improvements in containers and particularly to plastic containers for liquids and the like.

While the container of the present invention is adapted to be made in widely different sizes for handling different quantifies of liquid, it has certain features which particularly are adapted for handling relatively large quantities of liquid, of the order of half gallon, gallon or more. In such quantifies, the Weight of the liquid itself is substantial and the handling of containers thus filled presents special problems, particularly during dispensing of liquid from the container.

It is a general object of this invention to provide a container adapted for holding relatively large quantities of liquid, and which container is itself light in weight to minimize the overall weight of the filled container, and which is yet sufficiently strong and rugged to withstand rough handling when filled.

Another object of this invention is to provide a container for liquids which can be easily carried and which enables manipulation of the container with one hand during dispensing of at least the major portion of the liquid from the container.

A more particular object of this invention is to provide a container for liquids having a pouring spout and integral handle so arranged that at least a major portion of the liquid in the container can be dispensed without lifting the container bodily from the support surface to thereby obviate the necessity of lifting and supporting the entire weight of the filled container during dispensing.

A further object of this invention is to provide a container which can be compactly stored in a confined space and in which the containers can be stacked one upon the other and in side-by-side relation to occupy a minimum of space.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide a container having a pouring spout extending laterally from one wall panel and a spout receiving depression in the opposite wall panel for receiving the pouring spout of a container therebelow when the containers are stacked, and in which the spout and depression are so arnanged to enable sliding of the containers into and out of stacked relation to minimize the overhead clearance as required for stacking the containers.

An additional object of this invention is to provide an improved disposable plastic container and integral handle construction so arranged that the stresses which occur during carrying of the container by its handle are distributed around the container.

These, together with other objects and advantages of this invention will be more readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective View of the container;

FIG. 2 is an end elevational view of the container;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the container;

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of the container;

FIG. 5 is a bottom view of the container;

FIG. 6 is a transverse sectional view taken on the broken section line 6-6 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 7 is a longitudinal sectional view through the upper container section taken on the plane 7-7 of FIG. 3 and illustrating the manner in which the container sections nest prior to assembly;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view through one of the ribs, taken on the plane 88 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on the plane 99 of FIG. 3 and illustrating the handle construction;

FIG. 10 is a perspective view illustrating dispensing of liquid from the container;

FIG. 11 is a perspective view illustrating stacking of the containers; and

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary side elevation-a1 view illus trating a modified form of spout.

The container of the present invention is formed with a generally rectangular configuration and is advantageously formed in two separate sections which are joined together to form an enclosure. The container sections are preferably in the form of two substantially equal cupshaped halves designated 21 and 22 having mating outturned flanges 23a and 235 which are joined together as by a heat seal along a line indicated at 2% in FIGS. 3 and 5'. The container may be formed of various different plastic materials such as polystyrene, polyethylene, acrylics, acetates, vinyls, polyvinylchloride, nylon, polyester base resin, etc. For uses such as food packaging of milk, and the like, impact polystyrene, a oopolymer, constitutes a presently preferred material. The halves or sections of the containers may be molded or shaped in any suitable manner, but are preferably formed of sheet material in a fluid pressure forming process wherein fluid pressure is used to press the sheet material into conformity with the shape of a. mold. Either vacuum or air at greater than atmospheric pressure may be used to press the sheet into engagement with the mold, and the mold may be of either the male or female type. In practice, it has been found preferable to use the so-called plug-assist type method in which the plastic sheet is heated; placed over a female mold; a plug pushed against the sheet to dnaw material from the sides into the bottom of the mold; and a vacuum thereafter applied to draw the sheet away from the plug and into conformity with the mold. This method enables control over the amount of thinning of the sheet at the bottom of the mold and, by proper design of the plug, the sheet can. be drawn to produce relatively thin side walls and relatively heavier face panels so proportioned as to produce substantially uniform strength in the carton.

The container half sections 21 and 22 have face panels respectively designated 25a and 25b which form the top and bottom or base of the container during storage of the same. The top and bottom panels are advantageously formed with a generally rectangular configuration to enable compact storage of the containers and, for reasons set forth hereinafter, one corner of each the top and bottom panels is truncated as indicated at 26a and 26b. The upper container half also includes side panels 27a and 28a, end panels 31a and 32a, and a diagonally extending panel 33a which extends across the truncated corner 26a between the side panel 28a and the end panel 32a. The lower container half similarly includes side panels 27b and 28b, and end panels 31b and 32b, and a diagonally extending panel 33b extending across the truncated corner 26]; of the lower panel.

It is essential to the economic manufacture of the containers that the container half-sections be formed from the minimum thickness sheet stock, and that the thickness of the various wall panels and parts thereof be controlled during the forming and shaping of the half sections to achieve the proper wall thickness necessary to give substantially uniform strength throughout the carton. In practice, it has been found that the thickness of the sides and end wall panels can be made substantially less than the face panels without causing failure of the side and end panels during handling. The peripheral mating flanges 23a and 2352 on the half sections markedly aid ,in rigidifying thewall panels. However, ithas been fou'iid advantageous to use stiffening ribs on at least the larger side and end panels to prevent buckling of the side and end panels when high localized stress is, applied thereto. In theparticular container shown, each of the side and end panels except the relatively small end panels 32 a and 32lrare provided with stilfening ribs designated 35. The ribs advantageously extendin; a direction generally transverse to the mating flanges 23a and 23b and,

preferably, taper in width and depth in a direction away from theiianges. In'accordance with the present invennan, a stress distributing off-set or channel designated 36a and fsob is provided on the container half sections 21 andZZ Iespectively to join the flanges 23a and 23b to the respective side and end panels. As best shown in FIG. 6, the offset portions 36a and 365 have generally Lshaped cross section and extend outwardly from their respective sid e and end panels and define a peripherally extendingchanrlel at the juncture with the mating flanges 23a and 23b. The base ends of the ribs 35 merge with the respective olfset portion 366; and 36b so that stresses applied to the ribs are distributed along the out-turned flanges 23a and 23b and are not transmitted directly thereto in the form of high localized stresses which would tend to rupture the flange. This offset portion also functions to further stiffen and rigidify the conainer along a band medially between the face panels 25a and 25b and markedly enhances the strength of the container against laterally applied. stresses. The face panels are also preferably formed with rigidifying ribs and, as shown, each of the facepanels are provided with crosswiseextending reinforcing ribs 38a and 38b. The ribs 3 8a and 38b in the. face panels are advantageously shaped to extend inwardly of the plane of the panels so as to not interfere with stacking of the containers on each other, and, as best shown in FIG. 6, the cross ribs 63:: and 38b are relatively deeper adjacent the mid portion of the ribs and progressively decrease in depth toward the opposed side panels of the container half sec; tionsQ The side and'nd panels of the container half sectionsare advantageously formed to taper inwardly 42a and d2!) disposed coplanar with the mating flanges 23 a and 2312 respectively. A finger receiving opening 4 is formed in the web portions 42a and 42b, and the web portions are heat sealed or otherwise bonded together along a line designated (see FIGS. 3 and 5) adjacent the outer periphery of the handle. The web portions 42a and 42b are also preferably laterally enlarged as indicated at 4511 and 451) along the outer periphery of the finger receiving opening 44- and inwardly of the seal 45 to provide a comfortable hand grip. These laterally enlarged portions also stiffen the outer portion of the hand grip and, advantageously,'the heat seal or bond 45 along the outer periphery of the handgrip is arranged to terminate in spaced relation to the heatseal 2i? for the mating flanges to provide a relatively flexible section between the out-er portion of the hand grip and the flanges 23a and 2312. As is shown in FIGS. 3 and 5, the hand grip projects intothe truncated corner of the container and is disposed within the generally rectangular outline of the container to enable cornpac't packing of the containers in side-by-side or end-to-end. relation. The hand grip is thus disposed in a plane substantially medially between the face panels 25a and 25b of the container and in the plane of the mating flanges 23a and 23b of the container valves. Since the hand grip is formed integrally with'the mating flanges, the load applied to the hand grip during carrying iseifectively distributed by the mating flanges around the peripher'y of the container so that high localized stresses on the container are thereby avoided. The olfset portions 36:: and 3612 on the container half sections also serves to aid in distributing the stress from the handle uniformly around the container.

7 While the container of the present invention can be manufactured in various different sizes to receive diiferent quantities of liquid, it is particularly for use in packaging relatively large quantities .of liquid, 'for example, halfgallon, gallon and even larger sizes. In containers with such capacity the weight of'the liquid itself becomes a substantial'factor and particular problems are presented in manipulating the container during dispensing of liquid.

In accordance with the present invention, a pouring spout is formed integrally with the container and is so arranged as to enable dispensing of at leasta major portion of, the

in a direction away from the respective flanges 23a and 23b, to enable nesting of the container half sections prior to assembly of the containers and, as previously noted, the stiffening ribs 35 on the side and end walls of the container half sections are also tapered in width and depth in a direction awayfrom'the mating flanges 23a and 23b to enable the aforedescribed nesting of the half sections prior to assembly. As best shown in FIG. 8, theribs have a generally wedge shaped cross section. Denesting stops 41 are conveniently provided on the side walls at 7 spaced'points therearound to control nesting'of the container half sections. -The stops are preferably located adjacenttheotfset portions 36a and 36b on the half sections'and are conveniently located between adjacent ribs. As shown, the denesting stops are arranged in pairs. However, if twoor more different molds are used liquid from the container, without requiring the container to be bodily lifted and supported during dispensing. With the present arrangement, liquid can be dispensed from the container substantially entirely with one hand and without requiring exertion of substantial effort. In panticular, a pouringspout 51 is formed integrally with the top face panel 25a to extend laterally of the face panel in a direction substantially normal to the plane through the handle.

7 The spout 51 is located at the end of the container adjain forming like halves, it is preferable to arrange the denesting stop in the different molds in relatively difierent locations so that, when container half-sections from the severalmolds are stacked together, the denesting stops are staggered.

A handle is formedintegrally with the container for carrying the container and to facilitate'handling of the container during dispensing. In accordance with the present invention, the handle is formed integrally with the V tmating flanges 23a and-23b of the half sections at the diagonally extending panels '33aand 33b. As bestshown cent the handle and is advantageously positioned in the corner of the upper face panel opposite the truncated corner 26a. As bestshown in FIG. 7, the spout 5-1 is conveniently formed with an enlargedbaseportion 52 at its juncturewith the top'panel 25a, to stiffen. and rigidity the same. In the form shown in FIGS. 1-11, the spout is formed with a re-entrant portion 54 forming a socket to receive the mouth spanning portion of a milk bottle cap C, and the lip of the spout is preferably rounded to form a seal with the channel-shaped rim of the cap. Alternatively, the spoutcan be formed with an externally threaded end 56 as shown in'FIG. 12 for receiving a threaded cap. In order to enable stacking of the containers on top of'each other for compact storage, the bottom-panel 25b of each container is formed with a d'epressionSS for receiving the :spout of the container therebelow. The depression is formed in the corner ofthe bottom wall which registers with the s-pout 51- and, advantageously, the deout of stacked relation to thereby minimize the overhead clearance required for stacking the. containers. This is of particular importance in milk containers and the like wherein it is necessary to stack the containers in confined compartments in a refrigerator.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that the containers can be stacked one upon the other with the spout of one container extending into the depression of the container thereabove. Since the depression in the bottom panel of the container is open at the side and end of the container, the containers can slide into and out of stacked relation. Further, since the containers have a generally rectangular configuration and the handle is disposed within the rectangular outline, the containers can be completely positioned in close side-by-side and end-to-end relation.

The generally fiat top and bottom panels 250: and 25b form the major sides of the container and are spaced apart a distance substantially less than the length of the container and preferably less than the width of the container so as to provide a low stable package when the containers rest on their bottom p-ane' During dispensing, it is only necessary to remove the cap from the container and then pivot the container up onto the end panel 311) as shown in FIG. 10. Since the spout extends laterally from the top wall of the container, liquid can be poured from the container while the end panel rests on the supporting surface, as shown in FIG. 10. As is apparent, the rate at which liquid is dispensed from the container can be accurately controlled by merely tilting thecontainer on the end panel and, when in this position, the mating flange 23a and 2312 on the end panel form a fulcrum to facilitate tilting of the container. The major portion of the liquid in the container can be dispensed therefrom while the container end panels 31a and 31]) rest on the supporting surface. Moreover, it is only necessary to use one hand to manipulate the container and to tilt it to an upright position and then to control dispensing of liquid from the corn tainer. As more and more liquid is dispensed from the container, it is obviously necessary to tilt the front panel downwardly at a progressively increasing angle in order to dispense additional liquid. After the major portion of the liquid has been dispensed from the container, a point is reached wherein it is necessary to lift the container to dispense additional liquid into a glass resting on the support surface. However, at this time, the weight of the remaining liquid is small as compared to the overall weight of the filled container, and the container can be easily lifted with one hand. Since the spout is located in the corner of the front panel adjacent the side opposite the side to which the handle is attached, the container can still be manipulated with one hand to dispense the re maining liquid from the container.

1 claim:

1. A plastic container for liquids having a generally rectangular overall configuration comprising, top and bottom face panels and a plurality of generally rectangular side panels extending between the face panels and defining a closed liquid receiving vessel, said top and bottom panels defining the major sides of the container and being spaced apart a distance substantially less than the length of the face panels to provide a low fiat vessel when the container is stored on the bottom face panel, said container having a pouring spout formed on said top panel adjacent one corner thereof and extending perpendicular to said top panel, and said bottom panel having a depression formed in the registering corner thereof for receiving the spout of a container therebelow, said depression in said bottom panel opening at the side and end of the container to enable sliding of the containers into and out of stacked position.

2. A plastic container for liquids having a generally rectangular overall configuration comprising, top and bottom face panels and a plurality of generally rectangular side panels extending between the face panels and defining a closed liquid receiving vessel, said bottom face panel being disposed generally parallel to said top panel for supporting the container during storage, an integral pouring spout on one corner of said top face panel of said container extending transverse to said top face panel, and a handle formed integrally with said container at a corner adjacent said one corner and disposed in a plane paralleling said face panels and substantially medially therebetween for carrying the container and for tilting the container laterally to dispense liquid through the pouring spout.

3. The combination of claim 2 wherein said bottom panel has a depression for receiving the pouring spout of a subjacent container to enable stacking of containers with face panels of adjacent containers in abutting relation, said depression opening at the side of the container to enable sliding of the containers into and out of stacked position.

4. A plastic container comprising, two cup-shaped halves having mating out-turned flanges joined together to define a closed liquid receiving vessel, said container halves each having a face panel generally paralleling said out-turned flanges and spaced side and end panels arranged in a generally rectangular pattern, said container halves also including a diagonal panel extending across one corner of the rectangular pattern defined by the side and end panels, a handle integral with said mating flanges and extending outwardly from said diagonal panel in the plane of said flanges, said handle being disposed sub stantially within the rectangular pattern defined by said side and end panels for compact storage of the containers, and a pouring spout formed on said container.

5. A plastic container comprising, two cup-shaped halves having mating peripheral edges joined together along a seam line to define a closed liquid receiving vessel, said container halves each having a face panel generally paralleling the plane of said seam line and spaced side and end panels arranged in a generally rectangular pattern, said container halves also including a diagonal panel extending across one corner of the rectangular pattern defined by the side and end panels, a handle integral with said container and extending outwardly from said diagonal panel in the plane of said seam line, said handle being disposed substantially within the rectangular pattern defined by said side and end panels for compact storage of the containers, and an integral pouring spout on a second corner of said container adjacent to said one corner and extending substantially perpendicular to said top panel.

6. A plastic container for liquids comprising, two cup-shaped halves having mating out-turned flanges joined together to define a liquid receiving vessel, said container halves each including a face panel having a generally rectangular outline with one corner truncated, said container halves also including generally rectangular side panels extending along each edge of the face panel to the respective flange, a handle integral with the mating flanges at said one corner of the container and disposed within the generally rectangular outline of the face panels to enable compact packing of adjacent containers, said face panels defining the major sides of the container and having a length greater than the width thereof and being spaced apart a distance substantially less than the length of the face panels to provide a low fiat package when the container is stored on one of the face panels, said container having an integral pouring spout extending laterally from a corner of one face panel adjacent said truncated corner, said spout extending transverse to a plane through said flanges and handle whereby to enable pouring of liquid from the container by tipping the container about one end of the same.

7. A plastic container for liquids comprising, two cupshaped halves having mating peripheral edges joined together along a seam line to define a liquid receiving vessel, said container halves each including a face panel having a generally rectangular outline with one corner truncated, said container halves also including generally rectangular side panels extending along each edge of the face panel to the seam line, a handle integral with the container at said one "corner of the container and disposed substantially within the generally rectangular outline of the face panels to enable compactpaclring of adja'cent containers, said face panels defining the major sides of the container and having a length greater thanthe width thereof and being spaced apart a distance substantially less than the length of the face panels to provide a low fiat package when the container is stored on one .of the face panel s, said container having an integral pouring spout extending laterally from'a corner of one face panel adjacent said truncated corner, said spout extending transverse to a plane through said seam line whereby to enable pouring of liquid from the container bytipping the container about one end of the same, said container-having a depression in theother of said panels at a point aligned with the spout on said one panel for receiving the spout on a container positioned therebelow, said depression opening at the side and ends of the container to enable sliding of the containers into and out of'stacked relation.

, 8. A plastic container for liquids comprising, two cupshaped halves having mating out-turned flanges joined stogether to define a liquid receiving vessel, said container halves each including a face panel having a generally rectangular outline with one corner truncated, said c0n 'tainer halves also including generally rectangular side panels extending along each edge of the face panel and having a marginal outwardly offset portion joining the side panels to the respective flange, said side panels having ribs formed therein transverse to said flanges and merging with said marginal ofiset portion, a handle integral with said mating flanges at said one corner of the container and disposed substantially within the rectangular outline of the generally rectangular face panels to enable compact packing of adjacent containers, and a pouring spout' a rim portion along at least a major portion of said seam line, which rim portion is laterally oflset from the side walls and is joined to the respective side wall by a transverse shoulder portion spaced from the plane of said seam line, said side walls having ribs formed therein extending along the side walls in a direction transverse to the plane through said seam line and merging with said rim portion on the respective cup-like half whereby the rim portion distributes stresses applied to the ribs on 50 the side walls along the seam line.

- 10. A plastic containercomprising, two cup-like halves each having mating peripheral edges joined together along a a seam line to define a liquid receiving vessel, said cuplike 'halves'each having side walls disposed transverse to a plane through said seam line, said side walls having a rim portion along at least a major portion of said seam line, which rim portion is laterally otlset outwardly from the side Walls and is joined to the respective side Wall by a transverse shoulder portion spaced from the plane of said seam line, said side walls having hollow ribs of generally U-shaped cross section formed therein and extending along the side walls in a direction transverse to the plane of said seam line, said ribs having the web portion thereof merging with said rim portion on the respective cup-like half and said hollow ribs decreasing in width and depth in a direction away from said rim portion to enable nesting of container halves prior to assembly.

11. A plastic container having-a generally rectangular configuration comprising two cup-shaped halves having mating out-turned flanges joined together to define a closed liquid receiving vessel, said container halves each having a face panel generally paralleling said out-turned flanges and spaced side and end panels extending transverse to the face panels'and arranged in a generally rectangular pattern, said container halves also including a diagonal panel extending across one corner of the rec- 'tangular pattern defined by the side and end. panels, a handle integral with'said mating flanges and extending outwardly from said diagonal panel in the plane of said flanges, said, handle being disposed substantially within the generally rectangular pattern defined by said side and end panels for compact storage of the containers, said handle including two sections each integral with respective ones of said flanges and bonded together at'a point spaced from the flanges, said sections having a finger receiving opening extending therethrough and having fiat' portions located adjacent the flanges which are in substantially abutting relation but not bonded together to provide a flexible portion on the handle.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS RAPHAEL lvl; LUPO Primary Examiner.

LOUIS J; DEMBO, Examiner.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/143, 215/398, 220/771, 222/465.1, 222/566, 222/173, 215/382, D09/528, 215/10, 220/4.24
International ClassificationB65D21/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D21/0231
European ClassificationB65D21/02E12B