Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3177833 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 13, 1965
Filing dateJun 18, 1962
Priority dateJun 18, 1962
Publication numberUS 3177833 A, US 3177833A, US-A-3177833, US3177833 A, US3177833A
InventorsPassons William E
Original AssigneeBroad Street Machine Company I
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tufting machine with pattern control means
US 3177833 A
Abstract  available in
Images(8)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 13, 1965 w. E. PAssoNs TUFTING MACHINE WITH PATTERN CONTROL MEANS 8 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 18, 1962 A ril 13, 1965 w. E. PAss oNs TUFTING MACHINE WITH PATTERN CONTROL MEANS 8 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 18, 1962 April 13, 1965 w. E. PASSONS TUFTING MACHINE WITH PATTERN CONTROL MEANS Filed June 18, 1962 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 April 13, 1965 w. E. PAssoNs TUFTING MACHINE WITH PATTERN CONTROL MEANS 8 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed June 18, 1962 m a ga N 5 m m ggwwww w April 13, 1965 w. E. PASSONS TUFTING MACHINE WITH PATTERN CONTROL MEANS Filed June 18, 1962 8 Sheets-Sheet '7 April 13, 1965 w. E. PASSONS TUFTING MACHINE WITH PATTERN CONTROL MEANS Filed June 18, 1962 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 p 3,177,833 e H Patent d Apr- 13., 6

3,177,833 TUFTENG MACHINE PATTERN CONTROL BEANS Wiliiam E. Passons, Chattanooga, Tenn, assignor to Broad Street Machine Company,' Inc, Chattanooga, Tenn, a corporation of Tennessee Filed June 18, 1962, Ser. No. 203,981 13 Claims. (Cl. 112-79) The present invention relates to tufting machines and more particularly to tuitirn machines of the type utilizing needles for inserting tufting stitches into a base fabric or textile web.

One of the conventional types of needle tufting machines for producing a varying pattern of tufting stitches in a base fabric utilizes a plurality of needle bars mounted on a vertically reciprocating member for vertical reciprocation therewith. These needle bars carry needles at the lower ends thereof for inserting tufting stitches in the fabric and are individually latched to the reciprocating member by spring biased latches'such that the needle bars move collectively with the vertically reciprocating member. A pattern mechanism is connected to the spring biased latches by a linkage arrangement for selectively unlatching certain of the needle bars from the'vertically reciprocating member such that these selected needle bars will not be reciprocated thereby. Therefore, the stitches which would have normally been inserted by the needles carried by said certain needle bars will be omitted to thereby form a pattern of tufting stitches with the active needles.

This type of tufting machine is extremely complicated due to the necessity'of having the spring biased latches for each of the needle bars and the associated linkage connecting these latches to the pattern mechanism such that the same are selectively unlatched. Therefore, these machines are expensive to manufacture and hence, are expensive to purchase. Also, problems have been encountered in the use of such machines because of high maintenance costs and since the machines are frequently out of order and have to be removed from production while being repaired. Also, the latches frequently bind in their mounting and are not returned to'latching posi-. tion after being retracted by the pattern mechanism which results in a missing stitch or void in the pattern and, hence, seconds or poor quality goods. 7

Another type of conventional tufting machine utilizes a solenoid for each of the needle bars with the plungers of the solenoids connected to the needle bars for exerting downward force thereon and with springs beingprovided for retracting the needle bars upwardly upon the de-ener gization of the solenoids. The solenoids of this apparatus are selectively energized by a pattern mechanism for forming a varying pattern of stitches in the base fabric. This conventional tufting machine is also quite complicated in that an electrical system including numerous stitches and the like for energizing the solenoids is required which considerably increases the maintenance cost encountered in the operation of this machine. Also, this machine relies upon springs to retract the needle bars upwardly and therefore, if a needle bar binds in its mounting, the same interferes with the other stitch forming mechanisms resulting in damage to the fabric andppossibly, in broken needles or other parts. I

The present invention obviates the aforementioned problems, and deficiencies found in conventional tufting machines by providing a simplified needle tufting machine having a plurality of individually operable needle bars, a vertically reciprocating pattern mechanism engageable with the needle bars for supplying the motive power to selective ones of the needle bars to move the same downwardly so that needles carried thereby are moved into penetrating engagement with the base fabric, and a lifting mechanism also engageable with the needle bars for positively retracting the same upwardly to move the needles out of penetrating engagement with the base fabric. The present invention also provides novel indexing means for indexing the pattern mechanism to form a predetep mined repeating pattern of 'tufting stitches in'the base fabric. A i

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a simplified needle tufting machine wherein the motive power for reciprocating the needle bars is provided by a reciprocable pattern mechanismhaving a plurality of spaced rows of needle bar engaging means for engaging selective ones of the needle bars to impart reciprocation thereto and indexing means for indexing" said pattern mechanism to reciprocate said needle bars in a predetermined pattern.

.A more specific object of the present invention is to provide a tufting machineof the, character described including lifting means movable 'With said pattern mechanism and engageable with said needle bars for positively 1 retracting said needle bars upwardly to move the needles out of penetrating engagement with a base fabric.

A further more specific object of the present invention is to provide a tufting machine ofthe character described having a bank of individually operable needle bars mounted for reciprocation, a rotatable pattern drum also mounted for reciprocation and wherein the path of travel of the needle bars coincides with at least a portion of'the path of travel of said pattern drum, said pattern drum 7 having rows of needlebar engaging lugs spaced equidistant therearound forengaging selectedones oft-he needle bars upon downward reciprocation ofthe pattern drum for imparting downward movement to said selected needle bars and indexing means operatively connected to said' pattern drum for successively positioning each of said rows in operative position relative to the needle bars to form a predetermined pattern ofstitches in a base fabric. Some of the objects of the present invention having been stated, other objects will appear as the description proceeds, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which-- I FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary vertical section of a tufting machine incorporating the features of the present invention; v I 7 FIGURE 2 is a view similar to FIGURE 1 showing the remaining portion of the tufting machine, aportion of which is shown inFIGURE 1; i j Y FIGURE 3 is a vertical section taken substantially along line 3?: in FIGURE 1; I

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary rear elevational view-of the apparatus shown in FIGURE 'l shoWin-g' one embodiment of the indexing means of the present invention;

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken substantially along line' 5- -5 in FIGURE 4'and showing thc ratchet gear and pawl superimposed thereon in phantom lines; l r I FIGURE 6 is an enlarged fragmentary isometric view of the pattern mechanismand needle bars shown in th medial portion of FIGURE3 with portions broken away and parts removed for clarity of illustration;

FIGURE 7 is a view similar to FIGURE 6 showing the presser foot mechanism shown in the lower medial portion of FIGURE. 3; i V

FIGURE 8 is a vertical section taken substantially along line 8-8 in FIGURE 2; s 1

FIGURE 9 is a view similar to FIGURE 4 but showing another embodiment of the indexing means of'the present invention; 1 i

FIGURE 10 is a side elevational view looking from the left of FIGURE 9 with portions broken away for clarity;

FIGU'REAI is an enlarged horizontal sectional view taken substantially along line 1111 in FIGURE 9 with the elements turned 90 to show the same in a position corresponding to the position of subsequent figures;

FIGURE 12 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken substantially along line 12- 12 in FIGURE 9;

FIGURE 13 is a view similar to FIGURE 12 with the parts shown in different operational positions; and

FIGURE 14 is a View similar to FIGURES 12 and 13 showing the parts in still further different operational positions. Referring now to the drawings and more particularly to FIGURES 1 and 2, there is shown a tuf ting machine generally indicated at incorporating the features of the present invention. 'Tufting machine 20 comprises a housing 21 which includes a base 22, a standard 23, an overhanging arm 24 and a head 25. Housing 21 encloses the working elements of tufting machine 20 and serves as supports therefor in a manner to be described presently. A main pulley 26 (FIGURE 2) is drivingly mounted on one end of a shaft 27 which is journaled for rotation in a bearing boss 30 carried by standard 2-3. The inner end. of shaft 27 is' suitably threaded and has a nut 31 positioned thereon for retaining shaft 27' in bearing boss 30. Main pulley 26 is driven by a belt 32 which is trained therearound and which is mounted at its other end around the drive pulley (not shown) of a suitable drive means such as a motor (also not shown).

A drive pulley 33 is mounted on shaft 27 for rotation therewith between pulley 26 and bearing boss 39. A belt 34 is trained around pulley 33 and a-t its other end is trained around a drive pulley 35 which is drivingly mounted on a main shaft 36. Shaft 36 is joumaled for rotation in a pair of bearings 37 which are disposed at spaced. points therealong and which are in turn mounted in brackets 40. Brackets 40 are mounted on overhanging arm 24 in any suitable manner. A hand wheel 41 is formed integral with pulley 35 for manual rotation of shaft .36. A collar 42 is mounted on shaft 36 in abutting relation to the side. of the bearing 37 adjacent to pulley 35 to prevent longitudinal movement of shaft 36 toward head 25.

Stitch forming instrumentalities A plurality of needle bars are vertically disposed and are individually mounted for vertical reciprocatory movement in vertically alined openings formed in a pair ofspaced apart needle bar mounting members 51 and 52'. Needle bar mounting member 51 is mounted at op: posite ends on a pair of bosses 53 (FIGURE I) extending inwardly'from head 25 by suitable bolts 54. Needle bar mounting member 52 ismounted on the lower end of the head 25 by bolts 55 and is connected to needle bar mounting member 51 by spaced vertically disposed rods 56 (@FIGURE 6) which are fixedly connected at opposite ends thereto.

Each of the needle bars 50 has a finger 60 mounted thereon byany suitable means such as welding or the like and extending laterally outwardly therefrom at a point between needle bar mounting members 51 and 52. is noted that fingers 60. are positioned a distance above needle bar mounting member 52 greater than the length of reciprocation of needle bars 50 from the inoperative position to the operative position so that the same will not interfere with such movement. Needle bars 50 are biased upwardly toward the inoperative position by springs 61 which are connectedat one end to projecting fingersj60 and at their other end tothe web portion 62a of a generally inverted U-shaped bracket 62. The leg portions 62b of. inverted U-shaped bracket "62' extend downwardly'from web portion 62a and are connected to needle barjmounting member 52 by suitable screws 63.

:Needle bars 50 have needle mounting means at the lower ends thereof which receive needles 64 which are releasably secured therein by suitable set screws 65 (FIG-- URE 1). Needles 64 have eyes 64a (FIGURE 3) which fabric. Threads T are supplied to needles 64 from suitable sources of supply (not shown) and pass through a plurality of eyelets formed in a thread guide member 66. Thread guide member 66 is mounted on overhanging arm 24 by any suitable means and extends upwardly therefrom.

The threads T then pass through suitable tension mechanisms 67 mounted on head 25. Tension mechanisms 67 are of conventional construction comprising two wheels 67a, 67b between which .threads T pass. Wheel 67b is biased toward wheel67a by springs 670 for placing a frictional retarding force on threads T. From tension mechanisms 67, the threads T pass downwardly beneath a thread guide bar 79 mounted at opposite ends on a pair of upstanding brackets 71 which in turn are mounted at their lower ends on needle bar mounting member 52 by any suitable means.

Threads T then pass through eyelets 72 mounted on needle bars 50 at a point spaced slightly upwardly from projecting fingers 6tl and on the opposite side of needle bars 50 therefrom. From eyelets 72, the threads pass to the eyes 64a of the needles 64. It is noted that when the needle bars 50 move to the upper or inoperative position, the same pull upwardly on the threads T and sets the stitches in conventional manner and at the same time act as thread pull-off mechanisms for providing the necessary length of thread for the insertion of the next stitches. It is to be understood that separate thread pull-off and take-up mechanisms may be provided within the scope of the present invention.

A bank of loopers 73 (FIGURES 1 and 3) is disposed in base 22 and the loopers 73 are equal in number to the number of needles 64. Loopers 73 engage and hold the stitch loops inserted by the needles as the needles move upwardly out of penetrating engagement with the fabric. Loopers '73 are mounted for individual adjustment in suitable horizontal openings in a looper mounting bar 74. Looper mounting bar 74 is mounted at its opposite ends on one leg of a pair of generally L-. shaped members 75, the other legs of which are connected to a pair of crank arms 76. Crank arms 76 are mounted on a rock shaft 77 for oscillatory movement therewith by bolts 78.

A bank of knives 80 (FIGURES 1 and 3) is also dis posed in base 22 and the knives are equal in number to loopers 73 and cooperate therewith to sever the stitch loops to form out pile. Knives 80 aremounted in a knife mounting bar 81 for individual vertical adjustment so that the upper end or cutting surface thereof is disposed at the same height as the upper or hook portion of loopers 73. Knife mounting bar 81 is mounted at its opposite ends on a carrier portion of a rock shaft 82 in off-set relation to the axis thereof for oscillatory movement therewith. Rock shaft 82 in turn is journaled at its-opposite ends in a pair of spaced bearing brackets 83 for oscillatory movement therein. One end of a crank arm 84 (FIGURE 3) is drivingly connected to rock shaft 82 and is pivotally connected at its other end to alink 85 by a bolt 86. Link 85 is pivotally connected at its other end to one endof a crank arm 87 by abolt 88. The other end of crank arm 87 is mounted on rock shaft 77 by a bolt 89 for oscillatory movement therewith. It is noted thatrock shaft 77 is journaled for rotation in the spaced bearing brackets-83 and is also journaled for rotation in another bearing bracket 83 mounted on base 22 beneath standard 23. V

A crank arm 90 is drivinglymountedon rock shaft 77; (FIGURE '8) by a bolt 91 and has a generally elongate horizontally extending-opening 92 formed therein. A bolt 93 penetrates through elongate opening 92 and is threadably received in a suitably internally threaded opening in a connecting'nipple 94. The other end of connecting nipple 94 has a nut 95 mounted thereon (FIGURE 2) in which is disposed an externally threaded end portion of a connecting rod 96. Connecting rod 96 extendsup:

wardl from connecting nipple 94 and is connected at its other end to a nut 97 which is mounted on the lower end of a strap member 1%. Strap member 1% encircles an eccentric 1611 which is mounted on main shaft 35 for rotation therewith. Strap 1% is maintained in encircling relation to eccentric 1611 by a bolt 192.

Therefore, when main shaft 36 rotates, eccentric 161 will impart vertical reciprocatoiy movement to connecting rod 95 through strap 1% which will oscillate crank member 9% through connecting nipple 94. As crank 919 oscillates, the same will drive rock shaft '77 in like manner which in turn will oscillate cranks '76 to impart the conventional pick up and drawing motion to loopers 73 through the L-shaped members 75 and looper mounting bar 74. At the same time, rock shaft 77 imparts oscillatory movement to crank 87 which imparts like oscillatory movement to rock shaft 82 through connecting link 35 and crank arm 84. Due to the off-set nature of the knife mounting bar 31 relative to rock shaft 82, knives 8d are thereby moved both upwardly and forwardly to cut the loops of threads T held by loopers 73.

Fabric feeding mechanism The fabric feeding mechanism of tufting machine 211 comprises a feed dog mechanism and a presser foot mechanism which cooperate in conventional manner to feed the fabric through the machines. The feed dog mechanism comprises a feed dog mounting plate 163 (FIGURE 1) which has a plurality of upstanding feed dogs 164 (FIGURE 3) formed integrally therewith or suitably mounted thereon, which feed dogs have serrated edges for engaging and gripping the fabric. The upstanding feed dogs 1134 are equal in number to the needles 64- and loopers 73 and are disposed in elongate openings formed in a throat plate 1135 over which the fabric is to be fed.

Feed dog mounting plate 1113 is mounted at its opposite ends on a pair of feed dog operating members 1% for movement therewith. Feed dog operating members are connected to a pair of crank arms 1197 by a shaft 1% extending through suitable openings formed in the feed dog mounting members 1% and in one end of crank arms 197. Crank arms 137 are mounted on a rock shaft 119 by suitable bolts 111 (FIGURE 3). Rock shaft 1113 is journaled at opposite ends for oscillatory movement in suitable bosses 112 (FIGURE 8) formed on base 22.

The other end of each of the feed dog mounting members 196 has a laterally opening, generally horizontally extending elongate opening 113 (FIGURE 3) which has a pin 114- disposed therein. Pins 114 are connected to a pair of crank arms 115 mounted at spaced points along a rock shaft 116 by bolts 117. Rock shaft 116 is journaled for oscillatory movement in bosses 120 (FIGURE 8) formed integral with base 22.

Shaft 11!? has a crank arm 121 (FIGURE 8) drivingly mounted thereon by a bolt 122 at a point underlying standard 23. Crank arm 121 has a horizontally extending elongate opening 123 formed therein which receives a bolt 124 therein. Bolt 124 extends into a suitably internally threaded opening formed in a connecting nipple .125 to adjustably and pivotally connect nipple 125 to crank arm 121. A nut member 126 is mounted on the upper end-of connecting nipple 125 and matingly receives the externally threaded lower end portion of a connecting rod 127. Connecting rod 127 extends upwardly from connecting nipple 125 and is connected at its upper end to a nut 13% (FIG- URE 2) mounted on the lower end of a strap 131. Strap 131 is disposed in encircling relation to an eccentric 132 mounted on main shaft 3:; for rotation therewith and is maintained in such encircling relation by a bolt 133.

Shaft 116 has a crank arm 134 (FIGURE 8) drivingly mounted thereon by a bolt 135 at a point underlying standard 23. Crank arm 134 has a horizontally extending elongate opening 136 formed therein with a bolt 137 penetrating therethrough and into an internally threaded opening in a connecting nipple 149. A nut member 141 is mounted on the upper end of connecting nipple and receives the threaded lower end portion of a connecting rod 142. connecting nipple 140 and is connected at its upper end to a nut member 143 (FIGURE 2) which is mounted on the lower end of a strap 144. Strap 144 is disposed in encircling relation to an eccentric 145 mounted on main shaft 36 for rotation therewith and is maintained in such encircling relation by a bolt 146.

A presser foot 159 (FIGURES 1, 3 and 7) is mounted on head 25 for cooperating engagement with-feed dogs 194 and operates to clamp the fabric against throat plate 1t15 to insure good frictional gripping engagement of feed dogs 1%. with the fabric so that the same may properly feed the fabric. Presser foot 156 is preferably of a greater length than the combined width of the bank of needles 64 and is of a width at least as large as the length of the fabric engaging portion of feed dogs 104. Presser foot 156 has suitable slots or elongate openings .151 formed therein to allow needles 64 to penetrate therethrough. Presser foot 159 has a pair of spaced bosses 152 formed integrally therewith and extending upwardly therefrom with alined horizontal openings therein. Presser'foot is mounted for vertical movement between an operative position wherein the same is in engagement with throat plate 1515 and an inoperative position wherein the same is spaced above throat plate 165 by a pair of generally L- shaped mounting members 153 (FIGURE 7) having horizontal leg portions 153a and vertical leg portions 153b. The horizontal leg portions 153a of members 153 are bifurcated and receive the bosses 152 therein. Members 153 are connected to bosses 152 for limited pivotal movement by pins 154. i

The vertical leg portions 11317 of members 153 are preferably cylindrical and are vertically adjustably mounted in vertical openings 155 formed in a bracket member 156 and are retained therein by set screws 157 (FIGURE 7). Bracket member 156 is mounted on the lower end of a pair of vertical rods 16% for vertical reciprocation therewith. Vertical rods 160 are slidably mounted in a pair of brackets 161 mounted on a plate 162 by suitable screws 163. Plate 162 is mounted on head 25 of housing 21 by any suitable means (not shown); Brackets 161 include base portions 161a projecting outwardly from plate 162 and generally L-shaped standard portions 161i) having vertical legs extending upwardly from base portions 161a and horizontal legs overlying base portions 1121a. Base portions 161a and the horizontal legs of standard portions 1611? have vertically alined openings slidably receiving rods 160 therein.

A collar 164- is fixedly mounted on each of the rods 160 in spaced relation to the bracket portions 161a and 16112. A compression spring 155 is disposed in surrounding relation to each of the rods 16% between collar 164' and the horizontal leg of bracket portion 161bto bias the respective rods 16h downwardly and hence presser. foot 159 toward the operative position. A pair of generally brackets 161 through a suitable opening formed in head 25 and has a handle 1'71 mounted on the end thereof for manual oscillation of shaft to cam followers 166 upwardly and thereby to raise rods'169 and presser foot Pattern mechanism A mechanism generally indicated at 181) (FIG- URES l, 3 and 6 is mounted in head 25 of housing 21 Connecting rod 142 extends upwardly from' which is substantially cylindrical and a flange portion 183i;

extending radially outwardly from base portion 183:: and disposed adjacent the innermost end thereof. Flange member 1831) has a plurality of radially extending, outwardly opening grooves 185 out therein to a depth generally equal to the height of flange portion 1233b such that the bottom of grooves 185 is substantially alined with the outer surface of base portion 183a. The number of the outwardly opening grooves 185 corresponds to the number of pattern stations or needle bar engaging stations on pattern drum 181 which may be of any desired number with the preferred number, as shown in the drawings, being fourteen. It should be understood that the number of stations on the pattern drum 181 may be varied as desired without departing from the scope of the present invention.

Hub base portion 183a has a plurality of internally threaded openings 186 formed therein in lateral alinement with grooves 185. Openings 136 matingly receive headed bolts "187 therein which have enlarged head portions for, reasons to be presently described.

A plurality of lug mounting members 191 are mounted at their opposite ends on hub members 183 and have reduced end portions 190a disposed in grooves 185. End portions 190a are clamped between the head portions of bolts 187 and the bottom of grooves 185 and hub base portion 183a to removably mount the same on the hub members 183. Lug mounting members 191) have a plurality of spaced openings 191 (FIGUREY6) formed therein, which openings are equal in number to the number of needle bars 50 and are disposed in vertical alinement therewith. A plurality of lugs 192 are mounted on each of lug mounting members 190 by screws 193 penetrating through a mounting portion 192a thereof and into the openings. 191. Lug mounting portion 192:: is

preferably formed of metal and has a needle bar engaging portion 192!) mounted thereon by screws 194. Needle bar engaging portion 192b is preferably formed of a resin impregnated fibrous material having good wear resistant characteristics while being capable of dampening noise. It is .noted that the number of lugs 192 mounted on each lug mounting member 190 and the position thereof along mounting member 190 will vary in accordance with the number and selected ones of the needle bars 50 which are desired to be reciprocated by the respective lugs 192 and mounting member 190 to' form the predetermined pattern of tufting stitches.

Shaft 182 is journaled for rotation in spaced bearings 195 (FIGURE 6) which are mounted in openings formed in a pair of spaced hanger members 196. Hanger members 196 have nuts 197 mounted on the upper end there of which receive the threaded lower ends of drive rods 200. Each of the rods200 is mounted for vertical reciprocation in a pair of vertically alined sleeve bearings 201, 202 (FIGURE 1). Bearings 201, 202 are mounted in openings'forrned in bosses 203, 204 formed integral with overhanging arm 24 of housing 21. Pairs of collars 205 are mounted on shaft 182 on opposite sides of pattern drum 181 and on the opposite side of hanger members 196 from pattern drum 181 to prevent longitudinal movement of pattern drum,181 relative to. shaft 182 and shaft 182 relative to hanger members 196.

A pair of blocks 206 are fixedly mounted on rods 2% between sleeve bearings 201 and 202 by bolts 267. Blocks e2 2196 have horizontal openings formed in the sides thereof facing toward each other. A connecting rod 210 has opposite ends thereof disposed in the openings in blocks 206 and connects blocks 266, and hence the rods 200, together. A bearing 211 is mounted on rod 21.0 intermediate :its ends and is disposed in an opening formed in a connecting link 212. Bearing 211 allows oscillation of link 212 relative to rod 210 without binding or undue wear.

The opposite end of connecting link 212 has a similar opening formed therein through which penetrates a bolt 213 which has its inner end matingly received in an internally threaded opening (not shown) formed in a crank member 214. The suitably internally threaded opening in crank member 214 is off-set laterally from the axis of rotation of crank member 214 (FIGURE 3) and therefore connecting link 212 is connected to crank member 214 at a point off-set from the axis thereof. Crank member 214 is mounted on the end of main shaft 36 for rotation therewith by a set screw 215 (FIGURE 1) which penetrates through the hub portion of crank member 214 and engages shaft 36. It is noted that the hub portion of crank member 214 cooperates with collar 42 to prevent longitudinal movement of main shaft 36 relative to bearings 37.

A pair of lifter arms 216 (FIGURE 6) is freely mounted on shaft 182 at their upper ends and extend downwardly and slightly rearwardly therefrom to a point below projecting fingers 60 on needle bars 50. It is noted that lifter arms 216 are disposed in cut out portions in web portion 62:: of U-shaped bracket member 62. Therefore, the cut out portion and leg portions of bracket member 62 serve to guidelifter arms 216 in their vertical reciprocatory movement as shaft 182 reciprocates. A lifter bar 217 is mounted on the lower end portions of lifter arms 216 by suitable screws 218 and extends thcrebetween in underlying relation to projecting fingers 60 on needle bars 50.

Therefore, on the upward stroke of the vertical reciprocation of shaft 182, lifter bar 217 will move into engagement with the lower surface of projecting fingers 60 on needle bars 51 and will exert a positive lifting action on needle bars 58 to positively move the same to the upper or inoperative position. This will effectively in-. sure that needle bars 51 will be moved upwardly from the operative position to the inoperative position thereby moving needles 64 out of penetrating engagement with the fabric.

Indexing mechanism Referring now to FIGURES 1, 3, 4 and 5 wherein there is shown one embodiment of an indexing mechanism for pattern drum 181 to successively move the rows of lugs .192 carried by lug mounting members into operative position overlying the bank of needle bars 50. A sprocket 2211 is drivingly mounted on the end of shaft 182 and has a sprocket chain 221 trained therearound. Sprocket chain 221 is trained around a drive sprocket 222 at its other end and has an idler sprocket 223 engaging the. upper reach thereof for maintaining proper tension therein. It is noted that sprockets 220 and 222 are of the same size so that the same rotate at the same rotational speed.

Sprocket 223 is mounted on a shaft 224 which in turn is mounted at opposite ends in the bifurcated leg portion of a suspension bracket 225. Bracket 225 is mounted on the lower end of a vertically disposed rod 226. (FIGURE 4). Red 226 is mounted for vertical reciprocatory movement in a pair of spaced bosses. 227 formed integral with a bracket 230 which is mounted on the side of overhanging arm 24. A collar 231 is mounted on rod 226 by a set screw. 232 in spaced relation to upper boss 227. A compression spring 233 is disposed in surrounding relation to rod 226 between collar 231 and upper boss 227 to bias rod 226, and hence idler sprocket 223 carried thereby, downward ly toward engagement with sprocket chain 221. It is' noted that idler sprocket 223 is maintained in contact with sprocket chain 221 during the vertical reciprocation of sprocket 229 with shaft 182. A guide member 234 is mounted on the upper end of rod 226 by a set screw 235 and has one side thereof disposed in engagement with bracket 235 to guide rod 226 in its vertical reciprocation and to prevent rotation of rod 226 in bearing bosses 227.

Sprocket 222 is mounted on a shaft 249 (FIGURE 4) for rotation therewith by a set screw 241 extending through the hub portion thereof. Shaft 240 is journaled for rotation in the lower end of a bracket 242 which is mounted on the side of overhanging arm 24 by suitable bolts 243, only one of which is shown.

A washer 244 is disposed between the hub portion of sprocket222 and bracket 242 to reduce friction between sprocket 222 and bracket 242. A ratchet gear 245 is drivingly mounted on shaft 240 by a set screw 246 and has teeth thereon which are equal in number to the number of rows of lugs 192 on pattern drum 181. There is also a washer 247 disposed between the hub portion of ratchet gear 245 and bracket 242 for the same reason as set forth above.

A pawl mounting member 250 is mounted at one end on the lower end of bracket 242 and extends downwardly and rearwardly therefrom. The outer end portion of member 25% has a horizontally extending opening therethrough in which a shaft 251 is mounted. A pawl 252 is pivotally mounted on shaft 251 and has a hook 252a at its upper end which is normally disposed in holding engagement with one of the teeth of ratchet gear 245 to prevent the same from rotating. A cam follower portion 25212 is formed integral with pawl 252 and extends laterally outwardly from hook 252a. A spring 253 has one end formed in suitable coils which are disposed in surrounding relation to shaft 251 and is fixed at this end to a collar 254 mounted on shaft 251. The other end of spring 253 engages pawl 252 and serves to bias the hook 252a thereof toward engagement with the teeth of ratchet gear 245. It is noted that the tension in spring 253 may be varied by rotating collar 25% in the appropriate direction.

A drive sprocket 255 is freely mounted on shaft 249 for rotation relative thereto and includes a hub 255a which is disposed adjacent ratchet gear 245. Hub 2550! shaft 249 and engages the opposite side of thrust member 261 to bias thrust member 261 into engagement with drive sprocket 255 to urge the same against ratchet gear 245. A collar 253 is mounted on shaft 240 and engages the opposite end of compression spring 262 and is locked in position by a nut 264. The tension in spring 252 may therefore be adjusted by varying the position of collar 263 along shaft 240.

A sprocket chain 255 (FIGURE 3) is trained around drive sprocket 255 at one end and around a sprocket 265 (FIGURE 4) at its other end. It is noted that sprocket 255 is three times the size of sprocket 256 such that a three-to-one speed reduction is effected therebetween. An idler sprocket 267 is mounted for rotation on a shaft 279 which in turn is mounted in a generally L-shaped bracket 271 and normally engages chain 265 for-maintaining uniform tension therein. L-shaped bracket 271 is mounted for limited rotation on a shaft 272 which in turn is threadably mounted in an internally threaded opening in a bracket 273. Bracket 273 has a'portion thereof abutting against bracket 271 and the abutting faces of brackets 271 and 273 have cooperating teeth 274, 75 respectively. Therefore, the angular position of bracket 271 may be changed by loosening shaft 272 and moving teeth 274 out of cooperating engagement with teeth 275 and then rotating bracket 271 around shaft 272 to thereby vary the tension in sprocket chain 265. Bracket 273 is mounted on bracket 24-2 by suitable bolts 276. 1

Sprocket 265 is mounted on a shaft 235 (FiGURE 3) for rotation therewith which is .journaled for rotation in the upper end of bracket 242. A sprocket 281 is drivingly mounted on the opposite end of shaft 285 and has a has a plurality of internally threaded openings (not shown) formed at spaced points there around. A plurality of earns 2.55 are mounted on hub 255a by suitable screws 257 which penetrate through openings formed therein and into the internally threaded openings in hub 255a. Cams 256 have cam portions 256:: which project radially outwardly from hub 255a a distance greater than the distance that cam follower portion 252k on pawl 252 is disposed from hub 255a. Therefore, cam follower portion 25% is disposed in the pathof travel of cams 256 as the same rotate with hub 255a of drive sprocket 255. Therefore, when a cam portion 256:; moves into underlying relation to cam follower portion 252b, the hook 252a of pawl 252 will be moved out of engagement with the tooth of ratchet gear 245.

A friction disc 25%) is positioned between the face of hub 255a of drive sprocket 255 and the face of ratchet gear 245. Friction disc 260 defines a friction clutch connecting ratchet gear 245 to drive sprocket 255 when hook 252a of pawl 252 is out of engagement with the teeth of ratchet gear 245. It is noted that cam portions 255a are of such a width that hook 252a is moved out of engagement with the teeth of ratchet gear 245 only long enough to allow one tooth to pass thereby with hook 252a catching the next successive tooth.

' A thrust member 251 is freely mounted on shaft 245 and is disposed in engagement with the opposite side of drive sprocket 255 from hub 255a. A compression spring 262 is also disposed in surrounding relation to sprocket chain 282 trained therearound. The opposite end of sprocket chain 252 is trained around a drive sprocket 253 mounted on. main shaft 36 for rotation therewith. it is noted that sprocket 231 is twice as large as sprocket 253 such that a two-to-one 'speed reduction is efiected therebetween. Therefore, there is a six-to-one speed reduction between main shaft Edand drive sprocket 255, i.e., drive sprocket 255 makes one revolution for each six revolutions of main shaft 36.

Since there are the same number of teeth on the ratchet gear 245 as there'are rows of lugs 192'on pattern drum 281, and since the cam portions 256a on cams 256 are only in engagement with cam follower portion 252k on pawl 252 to move the same out of engagement with one tooth on ratchet gear 245, shaft 152 will be rotated. one-fourteenth A of a revolution for each cam 256 dispose on hub 255a of drive sprocket 255. It is noted that the number of cams 256 mounted on'the drive sprocket 255 may'be varied to vary the number of stitches inserted in the base fabric between indexing movements of pattern drum 181. 7

As shown in the drawings, there are three cams 256 mounted on hub 255a of sprocket 255and therefore, for each revolution. of sprocket 255, the pawl 252 will be moved out of engagement with the teeth of ratchet gear- 245 three times. Consequently, ratchet gear 245 will rotate one-fourteenth of a revolution three times during a single revolution of sprocket 255. Pattern drum 151 will thereby be indexed three times for each revolution of sprocket 255 and since there is a six-to-one speed reduction between main shaft as and sprocket 255, pattern drum 151 will index upon every two revolutions of main shaft 36. Therefore, there will be twostitches inserted between each indexing movement of pattern drum 181.

t should be readily understood that if there is a single cam 256 on hub 255a of srocket' 255 there would besix stitches inserted between indexing movements of'pattern drum 181. If there were two cams- 256 thereon, there would be three stitches inserted between each indexing movement, of pattern drum 181 and, if there were six cams 256, the pattern drum 181 would'be indexed into the end opening of groove 312. As theplate 294 rotates under force of cam surface 31 on the roller 295, the rotation continues until the next trailing roller 2% comes in contact with the outer surface of body portion 31% (FIGURE 14). When this occurs, further rotation of indexing plate 2-4 is prevented and the roller 295 being engaged cooperates with cam surface 31411 to cam the actuator block 314 inwardly sufficiently to let the same pass by the roller 2%. A positive indexing of plate 294 is thereby achieved with further indexing being prevented and with no possibility of a backward indexing of plate 294 and with no possibility of the actuating block 31-? moving past the roller 295 without indexing plate As the plate 294 indexes, shaft 240' is rotatedv thereby which rotates pattern drum 1S1 one-fourteenth or" a revolution to move the next successive row of lugs 192 thereon into overlying relation to the bank of needle bars in like manner to the previously described indexing mechanism.

Operation In operation, main shaft 36 is rotated by main driving pulley 26 (FIGURE 2) through pulleys 33, 35 and belt 34. As main shaft 36 rotates, crank member 214 (FIG- URE 1) is rotated therewith which vertically reciprocates connecting link 212 which in turn vertically reciprocates connecting rod 21%. As rod 21% reciprocates, it reciprocates drive rods 26% in bearings E 31, 262; which reciprocates shaft 132 through hanger members 196.

On the downward stroke, shaft 182 moves pattern drum 131 including any lugs 192 carriedby the respective lug mounting member 1% disposed in overlying relation to needle bars 5% into engagement with the upper ends of needle bars 50 disposed therebeneath to move needles 64 into penetrating engagement with the base fabric. Needles 64 carry threads T downwardly through the fabric and loopers '73 catch the stitch loops and hold the same as needles 6 are moved upwardly by lifter bar 217. To effect this upward movement of needles '64, lifter bar 217 is moved upwardly into engagement with projecting tingers 63 on needle bars 553 by lifter arms 216 as shaft moves upwardlyin the upward stroke of its reciprocation. Loopers '73 are moved into position to catch the stitch loops and are then moved to draw the stitch loops and to position the same for severingupon rotation of shaft 36 by eccentric 191 and strap 1&2

' through connecting rod $6, crank 98, rock shaft 77 and spaced cranks '76.

Knives 3% cooperate with loopers 73 to sever the stitch loops held thereby and are moved into severing position in timed re.ation to the movement ofloopers 73 by crank .87, connecting link 85 and shaft 22 on which knife mounting member 31 is mounted.

The base fabric is fed be eath needles 65 and above loopers 73 and knives 8% in a step by step manner by feed dogs 164- (FIGURE 3). The positive feedin and retracting strokes are imparted to feed dogs 1L4 upon rotation of shaft Baby eccentric 132 (FIGURE '2) and stra 131 through connecting rod 127,.crank 121, rock shaft 11%, crank 1 37 and shaft 1% (FIGURE 3). Feed dogs 1 54 are lifted upwardly into engagement with the fabric and moved downwardly'out of engagement therewith by eccentric 145 and strap 14- through connecting rod 142, crank 134, rock shaft 116 and cranks 115.

indexing rive sprocket 255 is driven from main shaft 36 by sprocket 283, chain 232. and sprocket 2%]. which drives shaft 23% which in turn drives sprocket 266 and chain As stated above, sprocket255 rotates one time for each six revolutions of main shaft 36. 'As the same rotates, cams Z56 rotate therewith and cam portious 256a engage cam-follower portion 252!) on pawl 25?. move the hook 252a thereon out of holding engagement to'the tooth on ratchet gear 245. Ratchet gearZ-S is then rotated one-fourteenth of a revolution by sprocket 255 through friction disc see. It is gagement with cam follower portion 252!) of pawl 252 for a length of time required for one tooth to move past hook 252a and then spring 253 moves pawl 252 into i catching engagement with the next successive tooth of ratchet gear 245'. a

As ratchet gear 245 rotates, the same rotates shaft 240 which in turn rotates sprocket 22.2. Sprocket 222 drives chain 221 which rotates sprocket 22% mounted on shaft 132. As stated above, sprockets 220 and 222 are of the same size and therefore, shaft 182 rotates the same increment of rotation as shaft 24%. Therefore, pattern drum 181 is rotated one-fourteenth of a revolution for each cam ass. The next successive lug mounting member 19il'and lugs 1% carried thereby isthereby moved into operative position in overlying relation to the upper ends of needle bars 5%. i

The operation of the indexing mechanism shown in FIGURES 9-14 will now be described. Indexing drive member 3% isrotated in a four-to-one speed reduction from main shaft 36 through chain 282', sprocket 2S1, shaft 389', sprocket 266, chain 265' and sprocket 305 mounted on shaft Still. As indexing drive member 3% rotates, actuating blocks 314 rotate therewith and successively engage one of the rollers 295 on indexing plate 294. Rollers 295 engaged by actuating blocks 314 cam the respective actuating blocks 314 inwardly against the action of spring 316 which allows the roller'295 to move partially .into the end opening of groove 312 to allow indexing plate 294 to rotate. When the roller 2% is not positioned in the mouth of groove 312, plate 294 is held against rotation by two rollers 295 thereon disposed in engagement with the convex outer surface of body portion 310 of member 3%.

Upon continued rotation of drive member 300, the cam surface 314-12 on actuating block 314 exerts a force on the roller 295 tangentially to indexing plate 294 to rotate the plate until the next successive roller 295'thereon engages the outer surface of body portion 310; Furthere rota'tion of indexing plate 294 is thereby prevented I and the roller' 2% being engaged by actuating block 314 earns the actuating block further inwardly against the action of spring 316 to allow the actuating block to pass thereby. e

As plate 294 is circularly indexed, shaft 249' is likewise circularly indexed which rotates sprocket'222' a fraction of a revolution. Sprocket 222 circularly indexes pattern drum 181 a corresponding fraction of a'revolution to move the next successive lug mounting member 1% and lugs'192 carried thereby into overlying relation to needlebars 50. p

It will therefore be apparent that a novel tufting machine is provided wherein a vertically reciprocable pattern mechanism is movable into engagement withindividually operable needle bars for reciprocating the needle bars downwardly to move the needles carried thereby into penetrating engagement with the fabric. There is also provided a positive lifting mechanism carried by the pattern mechanism which positively lifts the needle bars upwardly moving the needles out of penetrating engagement with the fabric. Still further, there is provided a novel indexing mechanism for indexing circularly the pattern mechanism to efiect a predetermined pattern of cutting stitches upon the base fabric which indexing mechanism is positively driven and is held against further indexing orbackward indexing.

In thedrawings and specification there has been set forth a preferred embodiment of the invention and, although specific terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only, and not for purposes of limitation, the scope of the invention being'defined in the claims. Y i

I claim: a

1. A machine for tufting a textile web comprising (a) a bank of independently'operable, elongate needle amass 15 bars mounted for longitudinal'reciprocatory move ment between operative and inoperative positions,

(b) a needle carried by one end of each of said needle bars for movement therewith and being adapted to penetrate a textile web to insert tufting stitches therein as said needle bars move to the operative position,

() a rotatable pattern drum positioned adjacent said bank of needle bars and having its axis disposed parallel to said bank of needle bars and being mounted for reciprocation in the same direction as said needle bars, said pattern drum having a plurality of rows of needle bar engaging means spaced equidistantly around the periphery thereof and each being of a length corresponding to the length of said bank of needle bars for engaging selected ones of said needle bars to impart movement thereto toward theoperative position at said pattern means reciprocates in one direction,

(d) means operatively connected to said patterndrnni for indexing the same to successively position said rows of needle bar engagingmeans relative to said needle bars for movement of the needle bars thereby.

2. The structure set forth in claim 1 wherein each of said rows of needle bar engaging means comprises radially arrangedlugs corresponding in number to the selected needle bars to be reciprocated thereby.

3. A machine for tufting a textile web, said tufting machine comprising (a) a bank of independently operable, vertically disposed needle bars mounted for vertical reciprocatory movement between an upper, inoperative position and a lower, operative position,

(b) a needle carried by the lower end of each of.

said needle bars for movement therewith and being adapted to penetrate the textile web to insert tufting stitches thereinas said needle bars move downwardly,

(c) a rotatable pattern drum mounted adjacent said needle bars for vertical. reciprocation and having a plurality of equidistantly spaced rows of varyingly arranged needle bar engaging means for engaging selected ones of said, needle bars as said pattern drum moves downwardly, to thus impart downward movement to, said selected needle bars to form the desired pattern, and i (d) meansoperatively connected to said pattern drum for indexing said pattern drum to successively position said rows of needle bar engaging meansrelativeto said needle ,bars for movement ofthe needle bars thereby.

4. The structure set forth in claim 3 wherein said pattern drum comprisesa hub, a plurality of elongate bars removably mounted on said hub at points spaced equidistant therearound and each having a length corresponding to the length of said bank of needle bars, and lugs removably mounted on said bars and extending laterally outwardly therefrom, said lugs on each bar corresponding in. number to the selected needle bars to be moved thereby.

5. The structure set forth in claim 4 wherein said lugs include needle bar engaging portions constructed of a Wear resistant. andnoise dampening resin impregnated fibrous material. a

6. A machine for tufting a textile web, said tufting machine comprising V (a) a bank of independently operable, vertically disposed needle bars mounted for vertical reciprocatory movement between an upper, inoperative position and a lower, operative position,

(b) a needle carried by the lower end of each of said needle bars for movement therewith and adapted to penetrate the textile web to insert tufting stitches 16 therein as said needle bars move downwardly to the lower position,

(0) a rotatable pattern drum mounted for vertical reciprocation between a first position wherein the same is disposed above the upper ends of said needle bars and a second position spaced downwardly from said first position, said pattern drum having a plurality of elongate bars spaced equidistant therearound and a plurality of elongate lugs mounted on each of said bars and extending laterally outwardly therefrom such that the same are radially disposed relative to the pattern drum axis, said lugs on each of said bars corresponding in number to selected ones of said needle bars to be reciprocated thereby,

(a') lifting means connected to and movable with said pattern drum and engagable with said needle bars as said pattern drum moves upwardly for positively moving said needle bars upwardly to the upper, inoperative position, and

(e) indexing means operatively connected to said pattern drum for indexing said pattern drum to successively position said bars and lugs carried thereby in overlying relation to the upper ends of said needle bars.

7. A machine for tufting a textile web, said tufting machine comprising (a) a bank of vertically disposed needle bars,

(b) means mounting said needle bars for independent vertical reciprocatory movement between an upper,

inoperative position and a lower, operative position,

(c) a needle carried by the lower end of each of said needle bars for movement therewith and being adapted to penetrate the textile web to insert tufting stitches therein as said needle bars move downwardly, V

(a!) a rotatable pattern drum mounted in overlying relation to said needle bars for vertical reciprocation and having a plurality of equidistantly spaced rows of varyingly arranged needle bar engaging means for engaging selected ones of saidneedle bars as said pattern drum moves downwardly to thus impart downward movement to the selected needle bars to form the desired pattern,

(e) resilient means operatively connected -to each of said needle bars for normally maintaining the needle bars in the upper, inoperative position, and t (1) means operatively connected to said pattern drum for indexing said pattern drum to successively position said rows or needle bar engaging means relative to said needle bars for movement of said needle bars thereby.

8.'The structure set forth in claim 7 wherein each of said needle bars has a finger projecting laterally outwardlytherefrom and each of said resilient means comprises a spring connected at its lower end to said projecting finger and at its upper end to said needle bar mounting means for biasing each of said needle bars toward the upper, inoperative position.

9. The structure set forth in claim 8 including lifting means carried by and movable with said pattern drum and engageable with said projecting fingers on said needle bars as said pattern drum moves upwardly to positively move said needle bars from the lower, operative position to the upper, inoperative position.

10. A machine for tufting a textile Web, said tufting machine comprising (a) a bank of independently operable, vertically disposed needle bars mounted for vertical reciprocatory movement between an upper inoperative position and a lower operative position,

(b) a needle'carried by the lower end of each of said needle bars for movement therewith and being adaptedto penetrate the textile web to insert tufting equidistant around the periphery thereof such that the rows are spaced the same angular distance apart around the axis of said pattern drum, said needle bar engaging means being engageable with selected ones of said needle bars as said pattern drum moves downwardly to thus impart downward movement to the selected needle bars,

(d) means operatively connected to said pattern drum for indexing the same to successively position said rows of needle bar engaging means relative to said needle bars, and

(e) main drive means operatively connected to said pattern drum for vertically reciprocating the same and being operatively connected to said indexing means for operating the same in timed relation to the reciprocation of said pattern drum.

11. The structure set forth in claim wherein said indexing means comprises second drive means operatively connected to said main drive means for rotation thereby, rotatable means operatively connected to said pattern drum, and means carried by said second drive means and engageable with said rotatable means for intermittently rotating said rotatable means for a fraction of a revolution corresponding to the angular distance between said rows of needle bar engaging means on said pattern drum to thereby rotate said pattern drum in a step-by-step manner to successively position the rows of needle bar engaging means relative to said needle bars.

12. The structure set forth in claim 10, wherein said indexing means comprises a rotatable drive sprocket opin timed relation to the reciprocation of said pattern means, a ratchet gear rotatably mounted adjacent to said drive sprocket and having teeth thereon corresponding in number to the number of rows of needle bar engaging means on said pattern drum, a pawl pivotally mounted adjacent said ratchet gear and including a hook normally disposed in holding relation to one of the teeth of said ratchet gear to prevent rotation of said ratchet gear, cam means carried by said drive sprocket and engageable with eratively connected to said main drive means for rotation said pawl for moving the hook thereof out of holding engagement with the tooth of said ratchet gear, said cam means moving out of engagement with said pawl to permit said pawl to return into holding engagement with the next successive tooth on said ratchet gear, frictional means positioned between and in engagement with said drive sprocket and said ratchet gear for intermittently rotating said ratchet gear when said pawl is moved out of holding engagement with the teeth of said ratchet gear, and means connecting said ratchet gear to said pattern drum to thereby rotate said pattern drum in a step-by-step manner to successively position the rows of needle bar engaging means relative to said needle bars.

13. The structure set forth in claim 10 wherein said indexing means comprises a rotatably mounted drive member, means connecting said drive member to said main drive means for rotating said drive member in timed relation to the reciprocation of said pattern means, a plate mounted adjacent said drive member for rotation in a plane parallel to the plane of rotation of said drive member, a plurality of rollers mounted on said plate parallel to and spaced radially outwardly from the axis of rotation of said plate and extending laterally outwardly from one face of said plate toward the plane of rotation of said drive member, means carried by said drive member and successively engageable with said rollers for intermittently rotating said plate a fraction of a revolution corresponding to the angular distance between said rows of needle bar engaging means on said pattern drum, and means connecting saidplate to said pattern drum to thereby rotate said pattern drum in a step-by-step manner to successively position the rows ofneedle bar engaging means relative to said needle bars.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,033,477 7/ 12 Schustek 74-436 1,477,430 12/23 Creighton 112-80 2,049,690 8/36 Cunningham 74436 X 2,768,593 10/56 Lombard 112,-79 2,959,061 11/60 Bauer 74-436 X 3,056,364 10/62 Dedmon 112-79 3,084,644 4/63 Card 112-79 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,243,447 9/60 France.

41,760 12/87 Germany.

JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primary Examiner; DAVID J. WILLIAMOWSKY, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1033477 *Jan 19, 1911Jul 23, 1912Andrew SchustekMechanical movement.
US1477430 *Aug 30, 1921Dec 11, 1923Creighton Claud LEmbroidery tool
US2049690 *Dec 5, 1932Aug 4, 1936IbmDrive mechanism
US2768593 *Feb 16, 1954Oct 30, 1956Ben LombardApparatus for tufting
US2959061 *Jun 4, 1958Nov 8, 1960Pye LtdIndexing mechanisms
US3056364 *Dec 29, 1958Oct 2, 1962Singer Cobble IncApparatus for sewing separate yarns into the same row of stitching
US3084644 *Mar 23, 1960Apr 9, 1963Singer Cobble IncApparatus for tufting skip-stitch patterns
DE41760C * Title not available
FR1243447A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3583346 *Dec 27, 1968Jun 8, 1971Bloch Elsie CoulsonTufted loop pile fabric
US5392723 *May 12, 1994Feb 28, 1995Ohno Co., Ltd.Tufting machine and method for producing design in carpeting and the like
US9399832Jan 14, 2013Jul 26, 2016Card-Monroe Corp.Stitch distribution control system for tufting machines
US9410276Jul 1, 2014Aug 9, 2016Card-Monroe Corp.Yarn color placement system
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/80.43, 112/221
International ClassificationD05C15/12, D05C15/00, D05C15/26
Cooperative ClassificationD05C15/26, D05C15/12
European ClassificationD05C15/26, D05C15/12