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Publication numberUS3177924 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 13, 1965
Filing dateAug 29, 1960
Priority dateAug 29, 1960
Publication numberUS 3177924 A, US 3177924A, US-A-3177924, US3177924 A, US3177924A
InventorsShelvey C Mcphail
Original AssigneeShelvey C Mcphail
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Storm door assembly
US 3177924 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 13, 1965 s. c. M PHAIL 3,177,924

' STORM DOOR ASSEMBLY Filed Aug. 29, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 IN VEN TOR. SHEA ver CL M l-MIL ATTOQA/EY April 1965 s. c. M PHAIL 3,177,924

STORM DOOR ASSEMBLY Filed Aug. 29, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 IN V EN TOR. SHEL var C, M FHA/Z United States Fatent ,177,924 STORM DOOR ASSEMBLY Shelvey C. MePhail, 2801 NW. 20th St.,

Gklahoma City, Olrla. Filed Aug. 29, 1960, Ser. No. 52,588 11 Claims. (Cl. 160-91) This invention relates generally to improvements in storm door assemblies, and more particularly, but not by way of limitation, to a prefabricated storm door assembly.

In all storm door assemblies, perhaps the most important considerations in manufacture and design are the desirability of providing a door which is light in overall weight, and yet which is structurally strong and weathertight in function. Since such storm door assemblies are most frequently utilized as replacements for existing screen or storm doors, ease, speed and simplicity of installation also constitute important factors in the design and manufacture of such assemblies.

With respect to the weight of the material of construction, current practice has generally adapted extruded aluminum as the most feasible construction in view of the relatively great strength and light weight of this material. Improvements have been sought in the geometric configuration of the structural members of storm door assemblies to provide greater structural strength while requiring less material.

With respect to the requirement that the assembly provide an effective barrier against the elements, the storm doors per so are generally characterized by a top panel of glass, central screened panel, and a bottom panelconstructed of a thin plate of aluminum. A fourth panel of glass is provided which may be superimposed in Weathertight relation over the central screen panel to establish weathc-rtight integrity of the door during the winter season. The fourth panel may be slid upwardly into superimposed relation over the upper glass panel to permit the passage of air through the central screen panel during the warmer months of the year. The provision of the sliding glass panel has, of course, required that means he provided for establishing an effective seal between the sliding panel and the frame of the screen panel so that the passage of air and moisture through the storm door in the wintertime may be effectively prevented. Previous storm door constructions have frequently not provided an effective seal between the sliding glass panel and the screen panel, or else, in many cases, have provided a seal which remained effective only during arelatively short period of use of the storm door.

Another deficiency in the sealing ability of prior storm door assemblies has arisen from the utilization in such assemblies of an aluminum frame which is secured to the door jamb of the existing door opening for'supporting the storm door, and for cooperating therewith to seal the door opening when the door is closed. The difiiculty of establishing a weathertight seal between the frame and the storm door, or between the frame and the. door jamb, has often been the result of improper or inaccurate fitting of the frame in the opening. The problem of properly installing the frame in the door opening is complicated by the fact that standard door openings in which such storm door assemblies are to be installed often vary slightly in their vertical and horizontal dimensions so that the frame of the storm door assembly must be cut down and fitted by the home owner or installing personnel; It will be apparent that if the frame, when installed, is not tightly sealed against the door jamb around the entire periphery of the door opening, or if the frame is not in exact alignment with the vertical and horizontal edges of thestorm door; cracks and openings will exist which will permit air and moisture to enter the house from the outside.

3,177,924 Patented Apr. 13 1965 Also, in many previous types of storm door assemblies, a weathertight fit of the frame with respect to the door jamb has been prevented by the projecting heads of screws which are required to join the horizontal and vertical members of the frame to each other.

, The previous designs of the surrounding frame have also mitigated against installing the assembly with speed and ease in existing door openings. Thus, as discussed above, unless the frame happensto exactly fit the size of door opening which is to receive the assembly, it is necessary to extensively alter the frame by cutting away portions thereof to refit it in the particular door opening. Such cutting and fitting of the frame is a time-consuming operation, and is suificiently difiicult and exacting that a skilled workman'is usually required to satisfactorily accomplish the installation.

Another disadvantage of previous storm door assemblies is that they have usually been characterized by glass panels which are of non-standard size, making it necessary that such panels be installed by the manufacturer, or that the non-standard panels be shipped with the rest of the assembly to the retailer or home owner. When the latter procedure is followed, the installation of such panels in the storm door is a rather time-consuming and tedious operation which is beyond the aptitude of the average home owner insofar as the neat and effective ac complishment of the task is concerned. Also, the manufacturers freight rates are increased substantially by yirtue of the weight of the glass panels which must be shipped with the assembly.

The present invention contemplates a storm door assembly characterized by numerous improvements over the storm door assemblies previous manufactured. It may be stated without equivocation that, in general, the storm door assembly of the present invention is lighter, yet stronger, than the assemblies of the prior art, affords a much more effective seal of the door opening in which it is installed, and may be installed more rapidly and easily than previous types of storm doors. The frame Which is provided is novelly constructed to tightly seal against the door jamb completely around the periphery of the door opening and to fit standard door openings of various sizes without major alteration .of the frame. The assembly design also affords a saving in material of construction without sacrifice in structural strength. The previous requirement of screws for joining the horizontal and vertical elements of the frame to each other has been eliminated so that there are no projecting screw heads to interfere with the fit of the frame in the door opening. Moreover, a positive resilient seal is provided between the frame and the door jarnb so that an effective weather seal is maintained throughout the life of the assembly. Between the frame and the storm door proper, a triple seal has been provided completely around the door, which triple seal assures against the ingress of any air or moisture into the, home. 'The' hinges of the door are disposed with respect to the frame so that they do not interfere with, or interrupt, this triple seal.

The present invention also contemplates a storm door assembly in which many of the moving parts, or parts 'which move relatively to each other, are constructed of a durable thermoplastic material which is more corrosionresistant than the aluminum or metal previously employed. Such material is also characterized by a low coefficient of friction, thuspermittingsliding panels and other members to be more easily displaced when required, and is even lighter than the aluminum or metalpreviously utilized, thus reducing the overall weight of the stor-m door. assembly. The utilization of such plastic material has the further advantage of permitting rapid and simple adjustment of the size and lit of the parts made thereof by the simple expedient of filing them down as necessary.

This, of course, may be easily and quickly accomplished by the home owner.

The storm door assembly of the present invention is further characterized in having a self adjusting locking mechanism which permits the lock carried by the storm door to engage the frame which is utilized without requiring a striker plate to be mounted upon the frame as has been the case in previous storm door constructions. It is also unnecessary to chisel out an aperture in the door jamb to receive the latching member when the door is closed. In many previous storm door constructions, the need to provide such an opening in the door jamb has resulted in delayed installation time as well as the permanent defacement of the door jamb.

Another important feature of the present invention is the design of the panels of the storm door proper. Thus, in the case of both the movable and the stationary glass panels, standard-size glass is utilized, and the frames into which it is fitted are designed so that the installation of the glass may be quickly and easily accomplished by a relative novice. It is thus unnecessary for the manufacturer to install or to ship the glass panels with the rest of the storm door assembly, but it is instead now possible for the retailer or home owner to purchase the standardsize panels and quickly and easily install them as effectively as they might have been installed by the manufacturer. The freight rate for shipment of the assembly is thus considerably reduced since the weight of the glass panels previously constituted no small portion of the overall weight of the assembly.

The seals provided between the sliding glass panel and the screened panel have also been considerably improved, and the ease with which the rails which receive the glass panel frames may be secured in the door has been enhanced so that a substantial saving in the time and cost of fabrication during the manufacturing process may now be realized.

It is accordingly a major object of the present invention to provide a storm door assembly which may be easily and rapidly installed in a standard door opening, regardless of the slight variations which are frequently encountered in the size of such openings.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a storm door assembly which may be easily installed by the average home owner in an existing door opening.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a storm door assembly which is relatively light in total weight, but which is structurally rugged, and is characterized by a long and effective service life.

A further object ofthe present invention is to provide a frame for a storm door, which frame establishes a highly effective seal with the door jamb of an existing door opening in which the frame and door are to be installed.

An additional object of the present invention is the provision of a storm door having screen and glass panels which may be quickly and easily removed from the surrounding members of the door for the purpose of cleaning or repair.

An additional object of this invention is to reduce the time and expense required to manufacture storm door assemblies by providing certain interlocking parts of the assembly which may be quickly snapped together using hand tools and without requiring the use of screws or the ike.

A further object of the invention is to reduce the cost 3f storm door assemblies by utilizing less metal in the :onstruction thereof -without sacrifice of structural strength.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a itOlIIl door which is characterized by glass panels of itandard size, and by specially constructedfrarnes for re- :eiving said glass panels which permit such panels to e rapidly and efficiently installed by an unskilled worknan.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a storm door assembly which is characterized by certain moving parts which are constructed of a resinous material of inherently lubricous and corrosion-resistant properties.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a storm door of the type having a sliding glass panel which may be superimposed over a central screen panel, which storm door provides for more effective and complete drainage of water entrapped between the sliding glass panel and the screen panel.

Yet a further object of the invention is to provide a novel improvement in the combination of stationary and sliding glass panels utilized to provide a weathertight seal of an opennig such as a door or window.

Another object of the invention is to provide, in a storm door assembly, a frame for supporting the storm door in an existing door opening, which frame is characterized by the absence of screws, bolts and the like customarily employed to join the vertical and horizontal members of such frames.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel hinge arrangement for a storm door which permits an improved seal to be established and maintained between the door and its surrounding frame.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel locking mechanism in a storm door assembly, which locking mechanism does not require a cooperating striker plate, and does not require the existence of an aperture in the door jamb for receiving a latch bolt or other portion of the locking mechanism.

In summary, the broad objects'of the invention are to provide a storm door assembly which can be less expensively and more rapidly manufactured, is less costly to ship, can be more easily and rapidly installed, and which more effectively seals a ,door opening in which it is installed over a longer operating lifetime than storm door assemblies which have been previously manufactured.

The manner in which the invention achieves these objects will become apparent, and other objects and advantages will be appreciated, from a reading of the following portion of the'specification concurrently with a study of the accompanying drawings which illustrate my invention.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is an elevational view of the front of a storm door assembly constructed in accordance with this invention. A portion of the door adjacent one corner thereof has been broken away to illustrate the manner of joining of top and side members of the door.

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view as taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1.

FIGURE 3 is a sectional View as taken along line 3-3 of FIGURE 1. V

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view as taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 1.

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view as taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 1.

FIGURE 5A is a sectional view as taken along line Ea-Sa of FIG. 5.

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view as taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 1.

FIGURE 7 is a sectional view as taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 1.

FIGURE 8 is a perspective view of a portion of the sliding glass panel and its associated frame as they would appear if viewed from the rear of the door. Parts of the panel and frame have been broken away in order to more clearly illustrate the manner in which the latching mechanism of the panel is secured in its frame and the manner in which the horizontal and vertical portions of the frame are joined to each other.

Before commencing a detailed description of the drawings, the frame of reference with respect to directional adjectives which are to be employed should be set forth.

floor or the threshold of the door opening. upwardly refer, to elements extending toward, or facing, the top of the door opening. "andforward are terms which will be used to describe the 'house than other elements.

tions secured to the opposite ends thereof.

The door opening will be considered as the center of the frame of reference.

Thus, the terms outwardly, out and outer, when used, refer to elements which extend,

' or face, in a direction away from the center of the door UP and Front, forwardly parts or elements which extend toward, or face, the outside of the house in which the door opening is located, or which are located relatively closer to the outside of Rear, back and rearwardly are terms which will be used in referring to those portions of the storm door assembly which face or extend toward the inside of the house, or which are located relatively closer to the inside of the house than other elements.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, and particularly to FIG. 1, reference character It) generally designates a storm door assembly constructed in accordance with *this'invention, which storm door assembly includes a top bar 12 of generally Z-shaped cross section having side bars 14 and 16 also of generally Z-shaped cross-sec- The upper ends of the side bars 14 and 16 and the two ends of the top bar 12 are mitered at 45 degrees to provide a generally rectangular-shaped frame work when they are joined together. into a standard door opening 13 (see FIGS. 2, 5 and 6) The rectangular frame work thus formed fits with the lower ends of the side bars 14 and 16 resting upon the threshold 20 of the door opening. The frame "thus formed is frequently referred to as a Z-bar or less than the expected width of the door opening 18 to assure that the top bar may be fitted in the upper end of the door opening. The side bars 14 and 16 are formed slightly longer than the average height of the door opening 18 to assure that they will have suflicient length. If necessary, the home owner may then simply cut off the ends of the side bars 14 and 16 to fit the entire buck frame in the existing door opening 18.

Each of the bars 12, 14 and 16 has the same cross- "sectional configuration, as typified by the top bar 12 shown in FIG. 2. As shown in FIG. 2, the bar 12 has a facing flange 22 which extends outwardly with respect to the door opening 18 and overlaps the forward face of the door jamb 24. The facing fiange 22 is provided with a plurality of sharp-edged corrugations or serrations 26 which bite into the door jamb 24 and thusestablish an effective weathe rtight seal between the buck frame and the door jamb. The width of the facing flanges 22 permits a substantial portion of the flanges -22 to sealingly engage the door jamb 24 despite difierences in the width of the door opening. The fitting of a -the buck frame in door openings 18 of slightly varying 16 are aligned when the bars are interconnected at the upper corners of the door opening.

A main body portion 30 of the side and top bars 12, 14 and 16 extends at a right angle to the facing flange-22 parallel to the respective side of the door opening 18 when the frame is fitted in the opening. The main body portion 30 of the bars is characterized by a generally T-shaped or undercut channel 32 formed in the outer surface thereof, and a second and smaller generally T- shaped channel 34 formed in the inner surface thereof. To facilitate the joining of the Z-shaped bars 14 and 16 to the top bar 12, the T-shaped channels 32 in the outer surface .of the body portions 30 of the bars receive and frictionally grip a right-angular, L-shaped brace 36 at each of the upper corners of the buck frame. This construction may best be understood by'referring to. FIGS. 1 and 2. I

Where they are unoccupied by the L-shaped braces 36, the T-shaped channels 32 carry a sealing strip 38 which is constructed of a suitable resilient material. The configuration and resiliency of the sealing strip 38 assure that the thin portion of the strip will be constantly urged against the door jamb 24 to provide an effective seal during the entire life of the storm door assembly. Toassure that the sealing strip 38 occupies theposition shown in FIGS. 2, 5 and 6 relative to the door jam 24 after the buck frame is installed, the thin portion of the strip 38 may be held flatly against the medial portion 30 of the buck frame by adhesive tape during positioning of the frame, and then released by removing the tape from the inside of the door opening after the frame is in place. 'A second sealing strip 49 of generally T-shaped configuration is pressed into the smaller T-shaped channel 34 in the inner surface of the main body portionSt). The-T-shaped sealing strip 40 is characterized by a lip 42 which projects inwardly from the inner surface of the main body portion "30 and symmetrically tapers to a relatively sharp inner edge. The sealing strip 40 is coextensive in length to-the bars 12, 14 and 16 and thus extends entirely around the buck frame.

i also be noted that a sealing strip 46 is secured in a suitable groove. 48 in the enlarged portion 44 of the backing flange 4?. The sealing strip 46 has a thin, flexible lip 47 which is angled back along the front surface of the backing flange 43 and resiliently engages the inner face of the storm door when the latter is closed. It will be understood that one of the sealing strips 46 is secured on each of the bars 12, 14 and 1% around the top and sides of the door opening 18. It is also reiterated that the bars 12, 14 and 16 are of identical cross-sectional configuration,

and each is fitted with sealing strips in the same manner as the top bar 12 which is illustrated in FIG. 2 and which has been specifically described.

A storm door, designated generally by reference character 50, includes side members 52 and 54, a top member 56 and a bottom member 58,.each having a cross-sectional configuration as illustrated in FIGS. 2,5, 6, and 7.

In referring to these figures, it will be perceived that each of the side members 52 and 54. and the bottom; and'top members 5 3 and 56, respectively, comprises a..hol1oW housing which is generally rectangular in cross section. Each of the hollow housings. is of unitary construction,

and ispreferably formed from extruded aluminumto provide a lightweight and attractive construction. It has been found that the walls of the members 52, 54,56 and 58 may be made thinner without sacrificing structuralstrength by providing the internal surfaces of the walls with ribs 'or, corrugations 60. The top and bottom members 56 and 58, as well as the side members 52 and 54, are each further characterized in having a depression or channel 62 formed in the medial portion of the outer side of each of the members and, extending throughout the length thereof. This channeling of the outer sides of the several peripheral members 52, 54, 56 and 58 of the storm door 50 permits the top and bottom members 56 and 58, respectively, to be joined at their ends to the two side members 52 and 54 by screws, the heads of which are located in the channels 62 and which thus do not interfere with the seal established between the storm door and the top and side bars 12, 14 and 16 of the buck frame.

The precise method of joining top and bottom menn bers 56 and 58 to the side members 52 and 54 does not form a part of this invention and may be accomplished in any suitable fashion. For example, L-shaped brackets may be inserted in the meeting members at the ends thereof and engaged by screws passed through the outer sides of the members.

Along each side of the channel 62 there are formed a pair of T-shaped channels 64 and 66. When the storm door 50 is closed, the T-shaped channel 64 which is lo cated near the front side of the storm door 50 receives the sealing strip carried by the buck frame. This tongue-and-groove relationship of the sealing strip 40 and the T-shaped channel 64 is most clearly illustrated in FIGS. 2, 5 and 6. A slightly different situation exists in the case of the bottom member 58 than exists in the case of the side members 52 and 54 and the top member 56 in that the T-shaped channel 64 is provided with a resilient sealing strip 68 for a purpose to be subsequently explained (see FIG. 7). The second T-shaped slot 66 which is provided in the rear portion of the outer side of the members 52, 54, 56 and 58 carries a resilient sealing strip 70. It should be noted that the sealing strip 70 extends in the opposite direction with respect to the adjacent Z-shaped description of the storm door and the surrounding side and top bars 12, 14 and 16, respectively, it will be apparent that the present invention provides a storm door assembly 10 which is characterized by the establishment of an absolutely weathertight seal between the storm door 50 and surrounding buck frame when the door is closed, as Well as between the buck frame and the door jamb 24 to which it is secured.

The side members 52 and 54 and the top and bottom members 56 and 58, respectively, of the storm door 50- have identical inner sides, designated generally by reference character 30. The inner side 80 comprises an inwardly facing portion 82, a rearwardly facing portion 84, and a generally C-shaped web 86 which connects the inwardly facing portion 82 to the rearwardly facing portion 84. The generally C-shaped web 86 defines a socket 88 which is generally trapezoidal in cross section. This construction of the inner side 80 of the members 52, 54, 56 and 58 of the storm door 50 permits the glass and screen panels which generally characterize storm doors of this type to be more rapidly and easily installed than has previously been possible; This advantage will be more fully explained in conjunction with the subsequent description of the several panels which are provided.

As has been previously indicated, a stationary glass panel 90 is provided at the top of the storm door 50. At the bottom of the door 50, a solid panel 92, termed the kickplate, is provided. A central screen panel 94 is positioned between the stationary glass panel. 90 and the kickplate 92 and is of substantially the same size as the glass panel 90. A sliding glass panel 96 of substantially the same size as the screen panel 94 and the stabar from the direction of extension of the sealing strip 46 carried by the backing flange 42 of the respective Z- shaped bar. Thus, the possibility of both seals being blown out or disrupted by forces acting in the same direction is minimized.

It is an important feature of the present invention that the triple seal formed by the sealing strips 40, and 46 extends completely around the two sides and top of the storm door '50 and is not terminated or interrupted at any point. In many previous types of storm door construction, the establishment of such continuous seals has been prevented by the interference of the door hinges with the seal continuity. The construction of the storm door assembly 10 of the present invention has permitted this difiiculty to be overcome, however, as may be seen in referring to the hinge construction illustrated in detail in FIG. 6. In hanging the storm door 50, a plurality of half-butt hinges 72 are utilized. The swinging leaf 74 of each of the hinges 72 is bent rearwardly into the space between the storm door 50 and the medial portion 30 of the side bar 14, and is then bent'parallel to the face of the door 50 to pass through a slot in the outer face of the side member 52. In this way the swinging leaf 74 of each of the hinges 72 is secured to the internal wall of the hollow side member 52 and is not visible from either side of the storm door 50. The stationary leaf 7'6 of each of the hinges 72 projects through an aperture 78 which is provided in the facing flange 22 of the side bar 14. With the hinges 72 mounted in this manner, they do not interfere 'with, or interrupt, the sealing strips' 40, 46 and 70. 1 I

Along the bottom of the door 50, a double weather seal is provided by the sealing strips 68 and 70 carried by the T-shaped channels 64' and 66, respectively (see FIG. 7). as the storm door 50 is opened and closed and, because of their flexibility and resiliency, establish a relatively longlasting double seal which tends'to constantly conform itself to the upper surface of the threshold despite uneven wearing thereof through heavy use. From the foregoing The strips 68 and 70 wipe across the threshold 20 unskilled person.

tionary glass panel 90 is positioned to the rear of the latter panels (see FIGS. 3, 4, 5 and 6) and is slidingly mounted in the storm door 50 in a manner more fully described below.

To provide for the installation of the several panels in the side and top members 52, 54 and 56, respectively, a generally F-shaped rail or channel member 98 having a toe portion 100 is secured to each member by snapping the toe portion 100 into the socket 88 in the inner side of the respective top or side member of the door. The manner of securement of the F-shaped channel member 98 is best illustrated in FIGS. 2, 5 and 6. The snap-fit, interlocking relation of the rails 98 to their respective side and top members eliminates the use of screws or bolts and the like previously employed to secure such rails around the storm door, and expedites the fabrication of the door during manufacture. The F-shaped channel member 98 is further characterized in having a main body portion 102 from which project a pair of spaced arms 104 and 106. The main body portion 102 of the F-shaped rail is backed flatly against the inwardly facing portion 82 of the inner side 80 of the respective members 52, 54, 56 and 58, and the two arms 104 and 106 form a double track or channel with the rearwardly facing portion 84 of the inner side 80. It will be perceived, in referring to FIGS. 2, 5 and 6, that the front track designated by reference character 107 receives the stationary glass panel at the top of the door 50 and the screened panel 94 in the center of the door. The rear track 108 formed by the two arms 104 and 106 receives the sliding glass panel 96.

As has been previously mentioned, the frames which carry the panels of glass utilized in the storm door 50 are of a novel construction which facilitates the rapid and workmanlike installation of the glass by a relatively The frames, designated generally by reference character 109a and 10%, are illustrated in cross section in FIGS. 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, and a perspective view with parts broken away showing the frame 109!) of the sliding glass panel 96 is illustrated in FIG. 8. Each of the frames 109a and 10% is generally U-shaped incross each have inwardly projecting rectangular ribs 116 which oppose each other and are equally spaced from the bight portion 114 so that the ribs 116 form with the bight portion 114 a rectangular chamber 117 extending completely around each of the frames 109. As illustrated in FIG. 8, the rectangular chamber 117 receives'an L-shaped right angular brace 118 located at the corners of the frame 10917 and joining the vertical and horizontal members of the frame to each other. The leg 110 of each of the frames 109a and 109i) is struck with a suitable punch as indicated by reference character 119 to secure the braces 118 in place.

The legs 112 of the frames 109a and 10912 extend inwardly with respect to the door opening a substantially greater distance than the legs 110 and are each cut away adjacent their free ends to provide a shoulder 120. The

shoulder 120 extends completely around each of the frames 109a and 109b, and the size of the frames is such that the edges of a glass panel of standard size will abut the shoulder when the panel is inserted in the frames as best illustrated in FIG. 8. The front face of the glass panels will rest flatly against the cutaway portion of the legs 112. The free end of the legs 110 of each of the frames 109a and carries an inwardly extending flange 122. A resilient glazing strip 124 is pressed into 10917, it is thus only necessary to apply a suitable'adihesive to the face of the glass panels around their periphery where they contact the :cutawayportion of the leg 112 of their respective frames, place them in their frames, and then press the glazing strips 124 into position.

The frame 10% which carries the sliding glass panel 96 is provided with cylindrical guide members 126 which project outwardly from the bight portion 114 near the upper corners of the frame (see FIG. 8). The guide members 126 extend into the rear track 108 of the F- shaped rails 98 land are preferably constructed of a suitable thermoplastic material which is characterized by a low coeflicient of friction. The location of the guide members 126 assures that sliding contact will be established between the arm 106 and the guide members when the sliding glass panel 96 is moved up and down in the door 50. A forwardly projecting sealing strip 127 is carried upon the front surface of the leg 112 of each of the frames 109 to establish a seal with the adjacent top or side member 56, 52 or 54 (see FIG. 2), or the adjacent frame 109 of the superimposed glass panel 96,

as the case may be.

The locking mechanism which permits the sliding glass panel 96 to be retained in the raised position is illustrated in FIG. 8. A generally L-shaped skirt 128 depends from the bottom side of the frame109b and extends horizontally across the storm door 50. The L-- shaped skirt 128 is provided with an upwardly extending lip 130 to provide a horizontal channel which slidingly receives a generally rectangular latch member 132.

The latch member 132 carries a cylindrical lug 134 which Notches (not seen) are vertically spaced at suitable shaped rails 98 to engage the cylindrical lug 134 and ret ain the sliding panel 96 in the desired position relative to the other panels of the door 50. The latch member 132 is connected by a web 136 to a rectangular bolt 138 which is slidingly fitted in the rectangular chamber 117' of the frame 10%. The bight portion 1140f the frame 19% is slotted as indicated by reference "character 139' in FIG. 4 to permit the interconnecting web 136 to extend therethrough, and the length of the slot 139 is suflicient to permit the latch member .132 and bolt 138 to be moved a sufficient horizontal distance to withdraw the cylindrical stud 13 4 from its engaged position. A short distance inwardly from the termination of the bolt 138 in the chamber 117, a tine 140 is pressed into the chamber from the leg of the frame. 10%. A compression spring 142 is positioned between the tine and the bolt 138 to constantly urge the boltrand its associated lathing member 132 and cylindrical stud 134 toward the outer edge of the storm door 50. 'A boss 144 is provided on the latch member 132 to facilitate the disengagement of the locking mechanism against the pressure of the spring 142 by use of the thumb or fingers.

Although a number of suitable materials may be employed, I prefer to construct the bolt 138,'web 136, latch member 132 and cylindrical stud 134 from a relatively hard thermoplastic material, such as polymerized ethylene sold under the trade name Marlex, or polymerized tetrafiuroethylene sold under the trade name Teflon. Both of these materials have relatively low coefficients of friction which impart to them self-lubricating properties, thus assuring a minimum of resistance to the movement of the latching member 132 and the bolt 13-8 relatively to the frame 109b, as well as a minimum of frictional resistance to the sliding movement of the cylindrical stud 134 in the track 108. Before concluding the description of the frames 10% and 10% in which the glass panels 90 and 96 are mounted, it should be noted that the horizontally extending lower portion of the frame 109a in which the stationary glass panel 90 is mounted is provided with a downwardly extending flange 148 which abuts the frame of the screen panel 94 (see FIG. 3), and forms an overlapping seal therewith. It should also be noted that the lower surface of the skirt 128 is ribbed as indicated by reference chanacter 149 (see FIGS. 4 and 8). The purpose of these ribs is more fully explained below.

The retractable latching mechanism, and the manner in which the glass panel 96 and its frame 10% are secured in the F-shaped rails 98 permit the frame and panel to be easily removed from the track 108 for cleaning purposes. Thus, it is only necessary to retract the cylindrical bolts 134 from their engaged positions, swing the bottom of the frame 10 9b rearwardly from the door 543, and then rotate the frame 10% to swing the guides 126 free of the track 108. The frame 10912 in which the stationary glass panel 90 is mounted may also be fitted with a retractable locking mechanism to permit its removal for cleaning if desired.

The frame in which the screen panel 94 is mounted comprises a hollow, generally rectangular frame 150 which is characterized by a rectangular groove 152 in the forward face'thereof. The edges of the screen panel 94 are secured in the groove 152 by means of a rod 154. The rods 154 utilized along the vertical sides of the frame 150 are provided with a resilient sealing lip 156 which is attached thereto and extends toward the outer edge of the frame 1513 for a purpose to be presently explained. -The frame 150 is provided with guide members 158 which project outwardly fromthe sides thereof and retain the frame 150 and its associated screen panel 94 in the front tracks 107 which exist between the arm 104 of the F-shaped rail' 98 and the rearwardly facing portion 84 of'the members 52 and 54. In referring to FIGS. 5 and 6, it will be seen that the resilient lip 156 which is provided on the vertical sides respectively. Unlike the side, top and bottom members, however, the cross-mullion 169 is provided with a broad plastic sealing strip 162 at its upper side which extends transversely across the storm door 50. The sealing strip 162 is characterized by a pair of T-shaped projections 164 which fit into the T-shaped channels 64 and 66 of the cross-mullion, and by a trapezoidal projection 166 which fits into the channel 62 of the cross-mullion. A plurality of spaced hemispherical bosses 168 (see FIGS. 1 and 4) are formed on the upper surface of the sealing strip 162 and support the frame 150 in which the screen panel 94is mounted. A resilient lip 170 projects upwardly from the rear side of the upper surface of the sealing strip 162 and cooperates with the frame 169 of the sliding glass panel 96 when the latter is in its lowered position. The sealing strip 162 is also provided with ribs 171 on its upper surface adjacent the lip 170. The manner in which the ribbed lower surface 149 of the L-shaped skirt 128 mates with the ribs 171 of the sealing strip 162 to establish weathertight integrity is best illustrated in FIG. 4.

The novel door latching mechanism of the storm door 50 is most clearly shown in FIG. 5. A conventional doorknob 174, bolt 176 and sleeve 178 are provided in the side member 54 in approximately the center of the storm door 50. On the inside of the storm door 50, the bolt 176 is connected to a handle 180 which is generally rectangular in cross section, as illustrated in FIG. A. The handle 180 comprises a medial portion 182 and a winged portion 184 which extends substantially normal to the medial portion 182.. A bifurcated latching member designated generally by reference character 186 includes a pair of parallel legs188 which straddle the medial portion 182 of the handle 180 and an inclined striker portion 190 which interconnects the legs 188. The striker portion 190 is inclined at an angle with respect to the longitudinal axes of the legs 188 and is gently radiused at its inner end as indicated by reference character 192. A relatively thin lip 194 is provided at the front edge of the striker portion 190 and projects beyond the legs 188. That part of the striker portion 190 which connects the legs 188 to each other is notched, as shown by reference character 196, to

, receive one end of a compression spring 198. The other end of the compression spring 198 is received by a notch 200 in the medial portion 182 of the handle 180. To

a second notch 202 through which is extended a pin 204 interconnecting the legs 188 of the bifurcated latching member 186. I prefer to construct the latching member 186 of a thermoplastic material of inherently self-lubricating properties of the type described above.- Such construction, of course, reduces the overall-weight of the "storm door'assembly and also provides an inclined striker portion which will slide more easily past the backing flange 42 of the buck frame when the storm door 58 is closed. It will be apparent that the spring 198 which is utilized between the handle 180 and the latch member 186 permits the striker portion 190 to be self-adjusting so that slight variations from standard sizes in the side bars 14 and 16 and top bar 12 will not prevent the door from closing and latching properly. Moreover, the relatively thin lip 194 on the striker portion 190 may be quickly and easily filed away, if necessary, to permit the striker portion to function properly in engaging the backing flange 42 of the side bar 14.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that the present invention provides a novel storm door assembly which is lighter in weight by virtue of the hollow construction of many of the parts and the use of relatively lightweight plastic material in other of the parts. The storm door assembly does not, however, sacrifice structural strength to secure such overall improvement in weight, but instead employs a ribbed construction which enhances the strength of the structural components. Assurance of weathertight integrity between the frame and the door jamb, as well as between the storm door and the frame, is provided by the incorporation of well designed and strategically located plurality of resilient sealing strips. The novel latching mechanism of the storm door makes the use of a striker plate secured to the frame or the door jamb unnecessary. The snap-in feature of the F-shaped rails permits rapid and relatively inexpensive manufacture of the door. The novel design of the frames for the standard glass window panels permits them to be installed quickly and elficiently by a home owner without requiring the use of putty or caulking compound. In the latter connection, it should be noted that the entire storm door assembly can, in almost every instance, be installed by the home owner using only a screwdriver, ice pick and plumb line. Moreover, the assembly is particularly attractive from the manufacturers viewpoint, since it is of light weight and it is unnecessary to install and ship the glass panels therewith, thus permitting a considerable reduction in freight rates to be realized.

Changes may be made in the combination and arrangement of parts or elements as heretofore set forth in the specification and shown in the drawings, it being understood that changes may =be made in the embodiments disclosed without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the following claims. For example, although the storm door assembly has been described with reference to a standard door opening, it will be apparent that the door construction disclosed may be utilized to provide a closure for other types of openings.

I claim:

1. A storm door comprising a pair of opposed side members; a bottom member and a top member, said members each being hollow and generally rectangular in cross section with the internal walls thereof having longitudinally extending corrugations whereby the structural strength of said members is enhanced, and said side and top members each having an inwardly opening, longitudinally extending socket of trapezoidal cross section on their inwardly facing sides, said storm door being further characterized to include F-shaped rails each having a resilient toe portion snap-fiitted in said longitudinally extending sockets, said F-shapeed rails being coextensive with said side and top members and forming therewith a double track for receiving the frames of the panels of said storm door.

2. A storm door comprising a pair of opposed side members; a bottom member and a top member, said members each being hollow and generally rectangular in cross section and said side and top members each having an inwardly opening longitudinally extending socket on their inwardly facing sides; an F-shaped rail having a main body portion, two parallel arms extending substantially normal to said body portion on one side thereof, and a resilient toe pontion snap-fitted in each of said longitudinally extending sockets and frictionally retaining said F-shapcd rail in abutting contact with said side and top members, said toe portion being inclined at an acute angle with respect to said body pontion such that said angle must be varied in size by resilient deformation to snap-fit the toes in their respective longitudinally extending sockets, said F shaped rails being coextensive with said side and top members and forming therewith a double track for receiving the frames of the panels of said storm door.

3. A storm door comprising a pair of opposed side members; a bottom member and a top member, said members each being hollow and generally rectangular in cross section with the internal walls thereof having longitudi- .nally extending corrugations whereby the structural strength of said members is enhanced; a stationary transparent panel adjacent the top of said door; a stationary screen panel at approximately the center of said door; a vertically sliding transparent panel movable between a position of superimposition to the rear of said screen panel and a position of superimposition to the rear of said stationary transparent panel; a kickplate at the bottom of said door; a mullion extending transversely across said door between said kickplate and said screen panel, said mullion having a plurality of grooves extending for its length in the upper surface thereof; a resilient sealing strip secured in said grooves and having a vertically extending lip at the rear edge thereof cooperating with the frame of said sliding transparent panel to establish a seal when said sliding panel is superimposed over said screen panel to the rear thereof; and a plurality of bosses of resilient material on the upper surface of said sealing strip for supporting said screen panel in spaced relation from the upper surface of said sealing strip.

4. A storm door as claimed in claim 3 wherein said screen panel is secured to a hollow frame having a longitudinal channel therein for receiving the edges of said screen panel; and further characterized to include elongated rods pressed into said channels for retaining the edges of said screen panel therein, and a resilient sealing strip projecting from said channel and cooperating with the side members of said storm door to provide a seal between said screen panel frame and said side members.

5. A storm door as claimed in claim 3 wherein the resilient sealing strip secured in the grooves of said mullion has a width substantially equivalent to the width of the upper surface of said mullion, and the upper surface of said sealing strip slopes from the rear of said storm door toward the front thereof.

6. A storm door as claimed in claim 3 wherein said transparent panels are each mounted in a generally rectangular frame of generally U-shaped cross section, said rectangular frames comprising two parallel legs; a bight portion interconnecting said legs; opposed ribs projecting inwardly toward each other from a medial portion of each of said legs and defining with said bight a generally rectangular chamber coextensive in length with said rectangular frame; and a lip at the end of one of said legs extending toward the other of said legs.

7. A storm door as claimed in claim 6 wherein each of said transparent panels is mounted in its respective rectangular frame with one surface of said panel flatly abutting one leg of said respective rectangular frame, and further characterized to include a grooved, resilient glazing strip pressed into the open mouth of said rectangular frame between said panel and the other of said legs with said lip projecting from said other leg and frictionally engaging the groove in said resilient glazing strip.

8. A storm door as claimed in claim 6 and further characterized to include a right angle brace telescoped into said rectangular chambers at each corner of said rectangular frames to join the sides of said rectangular frames to the tops and bottoms thereof, and wherein said right angle braces are retained in fixed position relative to the legs of said rectangular frames by indentations in said legs and recesses in said right angle braces mating with said indentations. V

9. A storm door as claimed in claim 6 and further characterized to include guide members extending outwardly from said bight portions at each vertical side of the rectangular frame in which said sliding transparent panel is mounted; and a retractable latching mechanism slidingly mounted in the rectangular chamber of said sliding panel frame and cooperating with one of said tracks formed by said F-shaped rail, said guides and said latching mechanism being constructed of a thermoplastic material having a low coefiicient of friction.

10. An assembly for providing an all-weather closure for an opening in a building comprising a double-track rail around the sides and top of said opening; a stationary transparent panel in the top of said opening; a stationary screen panel below said transparent panel; a sliding trans parent panel behind said screen and stationary transparent panels; a hollow rectangular frame supporting said screen panel and positioned in one of the tracks of said rail; other rectangular frames of U-shaped cross section supporting said transparent panels and positioned adjacent said tracks; a retractable latching mechanism carried by the other rectangular frame which supports said sliding transparent panel and extending into the other of said tracks of said rail when not retracted; cylindrical guides extending outwardly from the other rectangular frame which supports said sliding transparent panel and supporting said sliding panel and its associated frame in the other of said tracks; a horizontal sealing strip extending across said opening at its lower side; a vertical resilient lip along one edge of said sealing strip and cooperating with the frame of said sliding transparent panel to seal said opening when said sliding panel is in its lowermost position behind said screen panel; and a plurality of bosses spaced from each other along the upper surface of said sealing strip and supporting said hollow rectangular frame whereby moisture entrapped between said screen panel and said sliding transparent panel may be permitted to drain therefrom.

11. An assembly as claimed in claim 10 wherein said retractable latching mechanism and said cylindrical guides are constructed of a thermoplastic material characterized by a low coeflicient of friction, and said assembly is further characterized to include side and top members framing said opening and detachably receiving said doubletrack rail, said side and top members each having an integrally for-med trapezoidal socket therein, and said double-track rail having a resilient toe portion which may be pressed into said socket to secure said rail to said members.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,349,543 5/44 Escher et al 292-202 2,396,648 3/46 Gould -91 2,541,948 2/51 Swartswelter 189-76 2,565,092 8/51 Reynaud 292-202 2,595,975 5/52 Nothdurft 160-91 2,726,745 12/55 Quinn 189-46 2,752,014 6/56 Watson 189-46 2,778,461 1/57 Girschowitch 189-75 2,781,090 2/57 Semling 160-91 2,816,632 12/57 Nardulli 189-76 2,818,146 12/57 Palmieri 189-46 2,877,840 3/59 Hurowitz 160-91 2,917,790 12/59 Espenschied 20-16 3,024,837 3/62 McPhail 189-46 HARRISON R. MOSELEY, Primary Examiner,

I. D. BEIN, J. SCHNALL, Examiners.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3284976 *Feb 27, 1964Nov 15, 1966Kadish FrankDoor construction
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Classifications
U.S. Classification160/91, 49/168, 49/484.1, 292/63, 49/63
International ClassificationE06B3/04, E06B3/26, E06B5/00, E06B7/23, E06B7/22
Cooperative ClassificationE06B5/003, E06B7/231, E06B2003/2615, E06B3/2605
European ClassificationE06B7/23B1B, E06B5/00B, E06B3/26C