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Publication numberUS3178050 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 13, 1965
Filing dateNov 29, 1960
Priority dateJan 21, 1960
Also published asDE1170312B
Publication numberUS 3178050 A, US 3178050A, US-A-3178050, US3178050 A, US3178050A
InventorsHans Doerpinghaus Ernst
Original AssigneeContainer Patent Co G M B H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Connections between rigid and flexible bodies
US 3178050 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 13, 1965 E. H. DOERPINGHAUS 3,178,050

CONNECTIONS BETWEEN RIGID AND FLEXIBLE BODIES 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 29, 1960 April 13, 1965 E. H. DOERPINGHAUS 3,178,050

CONNECTIONS BETWEEN RIGID AND FLEXIBLE BODIES Filed Nov. 29,1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Je fij. if@ F/ G'. 5

INVEN TOR. ffm/.5r f. Mrap/6,9405

April 13, 1965 CONNECTIONS BETWEEN Filed NOV. 29, 1960 E. H. DQERPINGHAUS RIGID AND FLEXIBLE BODIES 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 April 13, 1965 E. H. DOERPNGHAUS CONNECTIONS BETWEEN RIGID AND FLEXIBLE BODIES Filed NOV. 29,. 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 April 13, 1965 E. H. DOERPINGHAUS 3,178,050

CONNECTIONS BETWEEN RIGID AND FLEXIBLE BODIES Filed Nov. 29, 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet, 5

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United States Patent O 3,178,050 CNNECTINS BETWEEN RGED AND FLEXEBLE BQDES Ernst Hans Doerpinghaas, Hamburg, Germany, assigner to Container Patent Co., tG.m.b.H., Hamburg, Germany Filed Nov. Z9, 1%0, Ser. No. 72,363 Claims priority, application Germany, tlan. 21, 196),

s claims. (bi. 22a-s) The present invention relates to improvements in connections between rigid and flexible bodies, and more particularly to connections which a-re especially suited for securing flexible components to rigid components in co1- lapsible containers.

An important object of the invention is to provide a connection which is equally suited for securing a tubular ilexi-ble component to a rigid component or for providing a firm joint -between a cable-like flexible component and a rigid component.

Another object of the invention is to provide a permanent connection between a rigid component and a flexible component which may be formed lat a very -low cost, which may be utilized for the formation of permanent Ibonds between materials of widely different characteristics, and which can withstand very high stresses, for example, the stresses arising when a heavily loaded ilexible container is towed in turbulent waters.

A further object of my invention is to provide a connection of the above outlined characteristics which is especially' suited for permanently anchoring the end portions of a tubular flexible component in the rigid cornponents of a collapsible container, and which is equally useful for securing the ends of cable-like suspending de- -vices in the rigid components of such containers.

An additional :object of the instant invention is to provide a connection of the above descri ed type which is equally useful for securing reinforced and/or non-reinforced flexible components to the rigid components of a collapsible container.

A concomitant object -o-f the invention is to provide a connection which is completely duid-tight, which can withstand the chemical and/or physical action of all types of cargo, and ywhich will withstand .the changes in temperature arising when the container is in actual use.

Still another object of my invention is to provide a collapsible `container which embodies a connection of the above outlined characteristics.

A further object of the invention is to provide a container whose llexible component or components are permanently `bonded to its rigid components.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a container wherein the connections between the flexible and rigid components require no mechanical elements and are capable of organically bonding the components to each other so that they can remain unchanged for practically unlimited periods of time.

With the above `objects in view, the invention resides in the provision of a connection in the form of a suspending arrangement which comprises a hard plastic body or iiller preferably consisting of a thermoplastic synthetic material which is permanently bonded to the flexible component and which is preferably permanently anchored in and secured to the rigid component. In one of its preferred forms, the hard filler is anchored in a preferably conical space of and is actually bonded to the rigid component. The radial dimension of the -liller increases in a direction away from the exible component so that the ller acts as a wedge and is even more firmly retained in the rigid component when the forces tending to separate the two components increase. Alternately, the filler may be merely anchored in a cylindrical or con- ICC ical space provided in .the rigid component, i.e., it need not actually adhere to the adjacent walls of the rigid component.

The improved connection may provide an exceptionally strong joint between a rigid component and a flexible component if the latter is formed by or includes longitudinally and/or diagonally extending threads, such as textile threads, synthetic plastic filaments or metallic wires. ln such instances, the randomly distributed ends of the threads are individually embedded in the material of the filler to insure that the connection remains intact even if the bond between the liller and the liexible component proper should be weakened or destroyed for a certain reason. For example, the threads may constitute a reinforcing layer in a plastic flexible component or they may actually constitute the entire llexible component, such as a hemp cord, a plastic rope, a braided wire cable, or the like.

ln accordance with another feature of my invention, a connection including a hardened ller consisting of a material not capable of `forming a strong bond with the material of the flexible component may include one or more elements whose material or materials may be firmly secured both to the filler and to the tlexible component. Thus, such types of connections establish an indirect bond between the filler and the ilexible component or between the filler and a 4rigid component if the latters material, too, cannot -form a strong bond with :the filler. Such intermediate elements may consist of strips made of a synthetic plastic material which is capable of forming a strong connection with the ller and with the respective component, of strips made of a textile or like material which may be penetrated by the materials of the tiller and of the respective component, or of a combination of such strips.

The novel features which are considered as characteristic for .the invention are set forth in particular in the appended claims. The invention itself, however, both as to its construction and its method of operation, together with additional objects and advantages thereof, will be best understood from the following detailed de scription of certain specific embodiments when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FlG. 1 Vis a partly elevational and partly sectional view of a collapsible seagoing container embodying two slightly diierent forms of my invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of the connection between the tubular flexible component and the rigid upper component of the container shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is enlarged fragmentary sectional view of the connection between the tubular flexible component and the rigid lower component of the container shown in FIG. 1;

FG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view of a connection between a non-reinforced tubular flexible component and a rigid component;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view of a connection between a reinforced hollow spherical flexible component and a rigid component;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view of a connection between a non-reinforced hollow spherical exible cornponent and a rigid component;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary partly elevational and partly sectional View of a modiiied container which comprises two tubular flexible components;

FIG. 8 is a greatly enlarged fragmentary sectional view of a connection between two tubular llexible components and a rigid component;

FIG. 9 is a partly elevational and partly sectional view of a connection between a rigid component and a cablelike liexible component;

FIG. is a fragmentary sectional view of a modified connection between a rigid component and a cable-like flexible component; and

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary sectional view of la further connection between a rigid component and a cable-like exible component.

Referring now in greater detail to the drawings, and rst to FIG. l, there is shown a collapsible container I which comprises a rst rigid component A, a second rigid component B, and a ilexible component C. The flexible component C assumes the form of la tubular body, preferably of circular cross sectional contour, Whose end portions 6a, 6b (see FIGS. 2 and 3) are respectively secured and permanently bonded to the rigid components A and B in accordance with two slightly different embodiments of my invention. The connections between the cylindrical flexible component C and the rigid components A, B are of permanent nature, and are preferably fluid-tight so that the cargo chamber CC of the container I may receive a liquid, pulverulent, granular or even gasiform material. In one of its preferred forms, the ilexible component C consists of synthetic plastic material which is reinforced by one or more inserts of lamentary material, e.g. textile fabrics whose threads respectively extend in longitudinal and circumferential directions of the flexible component. Alternately, the vreinforcing inserts in the exible component C may consist of non-connected layers of alternating longitudinal and circumferential threads which are embedded in a deformable synthetic plastic substance, e.g. polyvinyl chloride, polyamide artificial rubber or the like. The longitudinally extending threads take up tensional 'stresses caused by the weight of the lower rigid component B, by the weight of the cargo contained in the chamber CC, vand eventually by the superatmospheric pressure of a gaseous substance lling the chamber CC. The circumferentially extending threads take up such stresses which tend Vto expand the exible component C, i.e."the stresses produced by the pressure ofthe material received in the chamber CC. Of course, it is equally possible to reinforce the ilexible component C by diagonally extending layers of threads or, if necessary, with longitudinally, circumferentially and diagonally-extending threads.

The rigid components A, B may consist entirely or in part of a synthetic plastic material, of metal, or even of wood. The rigid upper component A comprises a substantially semispherical buoy or shell 1 which carries at its outer side a centrally located suspending device in the form of an eye 2 adapted to be engaged by the hook of a crane or another transporting means on which the container I is suspended during storage, transportation, filling of cargo, or evacuation of cargo. As is shown in FIG. 2, the annularlower end portion 1a of the shell 1V is spacedly surrounded by an outer annular member 3v so that the annular portion 1a and the annular member 3 define between themselves an annular filler-receiving space 4 adapted toV receive a hardened plastic body or ller 5 whose material is of such nature as to adhere with very great force to the inner side ofthe annular member 3 as well as to the outer side of the annular portion 1a in orderV to rmly hold these parts in the position of FIGS. l and 2 and to simultaneously retain the upper end portion 6a of Vthe ilexible component C so that the hardffiller 5 constie tutes a connecting block between the rigid component A vand the flexiblecompone'nt C. In order to insure that the bond between the hardened plastic massr which constitutes the hard filler 5 andthe annular upper end portion 6a of the flexiblecomponent C will be capable of withstanding very high tensional stresses in the longitudinal direction of the container I, it is preferred to extend the randomly distributed upper ends 7a of the longitudinal reinforcing threads 7 beyond the upper edge of the end portion 6a so that the projecting ends 7a of the threads -7 are individuallyV embedded'in Vand are `bondedjto the .ller 5. These longitudinal threads 7 extend the full length of the flexible component C. Of course, if the flex- Yof the cargo in the chamber CC and regardless of any other` longitudinal stresses which may arise during transportation, storage or handling of the container I. The material of the filler 5 and the length Vof the end portion 6a are selected by full consideration of the weight of the container I in loaded condition. Furthermore, the axial length of the space 4 is such that the length of projecting ends 7a of the threads 7 is suflicient to insure a satisfactory bond between the ends 7a and the iiller 5 even if the direct connection between the ller and the flexible component -is weakened or destroyed. It will be readily understood that the circumferential reinforcing threads (not shown in FIGS. 1-3) need not extend into the filler. 5.

l The connection between the lower rigid component B and the lower annular end portion 6b of the flexible component is shown on a larger scale in FIG. 3. The lower component B comprises an inner annular member Svwhich is of conical shape and which diverges in a direction toward the exible component C. This inner annular member '8 is spacedly surrounded by a suitably profiled outer annular member 9 so that the annular members' 8, 9 define between themselves an annular space 10 which receives a hard filler '11. The hardened .material of the illerll ills the .annular space '10 all the Way from the open ends of the annular members 8, 9 which are adjacent to the end portion 6b and to the inwardly extending annular flange 9a of the outer annular member 9 provided at that end of this annular member which is distant from the end portion 6b. The randomly distributed lower ends 'b of longitudinal and/ or diagonal reinforcing threads 7 extendV beyond the lower end portion 6b of the ilexible component C and are' firmly embedded in the-hard filler 11. As shown, the

'radial width of the space l@ diminishes in a direction toward the lower end portion 6b of the flexible component C so that the cross section ofthe filler 11 assumes the. shape of a Wedge which also contributes to its retaining action by preventing the hardened filler from passing through the narrower upper end zone of the space 10 even if the filler should become separatedfrom the inner side of the outer annular member 9 or from the outer side of the inner` annular member 8. Since the weight Vof the inner annular member 8 andthe weight Vof cargo contained in the lowermost zone of the chamcorne separated fromV the lower grid component B. The

inner annular member S is subjected to radially outwardly directed deforming stresses when the container I is suspendedron the eye 2; therefore, its thickness must vbe sufficient to withstand such'stresses under all condi-- The rigid lower component B comprises a substantially buoy-shaped shell 12 whose open upper end portion is preferably releasably connected with the smaller-diameter end .of the inner annular Vmember 8.' The connection lbetween the open end portion of the shell l2 andthe inner annular member 8 comprises a clamping ringV .13 which is of U-shaped cross sectional contour and whose exact constructionA and mounting will ,be .described in c? greater detail in connection with FIGS. 7 and 8, as Well as an annular gasket 14 which seals the cargo chamber CC from the surrounding atmosphere in a plane l indicating the line of connection between the shell i2, and the inner annular member 8. The inwardly extending annular portions or arms of the clamping ring 13 are received in complementary annular grooves provided in the parts 8 and l2, and the gasket 14 is sufficiently cornpressed to prevent escape of cargo or the entry of air along the plane i5. The clamping ring 13 serves as a means for transmitting tensional stresses from the shell 12 to the inner annular member d and thence to the exible component C.

The lowermost end of the shell l2 is formed with an opening i6 which communicates with a preferably flexible pipe 17 serving as a means for filling or evacuating the cargo chamber CC. The upper end of the pipe ll carries a rotary nut 18 which may be screwed onto an externally threaded nipple i9 secured to the lowerrnost end of the shell l2 and defining therewithin the aforementioned opening lo.

Referring back to FIGS. 2 and 3, it will be readily understood that, particularly if the container I is comparatively small and if it is intended for the reception of lightweight cargo, i.e. a cargo with low specific weight, the outer annular members 3 and 9 may be dispensed with so that the strength of the permanent connection between the end portions 6a, 6b of the flexible component C and the rigid components A, B, respectively, depends solely on the strength of the bond between the filler 5 and the shell portion la on the one hand, as well as between the filler il and the inner annular member 3 on the other hand. The outer annular member 3 in the connection of FlG. 2 serves an additional purpose of preventing deformation of the lower end portion la of the shell 1 in response to substantial pressures prevailing in the cargo chamber CC because such deformation of the end portion 1A could produce fissures in the ller 5 and would weaken or destroy the bond between the filler 5 and the shell l. in addition, the outer annular members 3, 9 are of great assistance during the introduction or" liquefied filler material into the annular spaces il, it), respectively, by bounding the outer sides of these spaces so that the llers l, il may harden and may assume the form of annuli with uniform cross sectional area. The thickness of the inner annular member 8 in the connection of FIG. 3 is sufficient to prevent deformation in response to internal pressures so that the outer annular member 9 need not be dimensioned with a View to assist the companion member S in retaining its shape in actual use of the container.

FG. 4 illustrates a. modified connection which is often preferred in the event that the tubular flexible component C1 is without a reinforcing fabric layer. The connection comprises an inner annular member 2) which is shown in the form of a thick-walled cylinder, an outer annular member 2l which is formed with an inwardly extending annular flange 2in and which defines with the inner annular member 2li an annular space Z2 for a hard tiller 23, the latter being of such nature as to adhere with great force to the outer side of the inner annular member 20 as Well as to the inner side of the outer annular member 2l. The end portion 24a of the flexible component C1 is assumed to be of such material that it does not form a good bond with the material of the ller 23. Therefore, the opposing sides of the end portion 24a are coated with plastic strips or bands 25, 25 which are capable of forming a good and strong bond with the material of the flexible component C1. The exposed sides of the strips 25, 26 are respectively coated with liners 2*?, 28 of textile material which, in turn, are firmly embedded in the filler 23. coated with liners 27, 2S, espectively, in a separate manufacturing step so that the composite strips 25, 27 and 26, 23 may be bonded or Welded to the end portion 24a For example, the strips 25, 26 may be in a first step and may be embedded in the still plastic filler 23 in a subsequent step. In such instances, the strips Z5, 2o may consist of the same plastic material of which the flexible component C1 is made. It has been found that the bond between the exposed sides of the liners Z7, 28 and the filler 23 is frequently sufficiently strong, particularly if the container is comparatively small, so that the forces acting in the longitudinal and/or circumferential direction of the flexible component are within a permissible range, if the container is utilized for the reception of goods with a low specific weight, or if the flexible component C1 need not take up all longitudinal or circumferential stresses. For example, the llexible component C1 may constitute a protective outer or inner coat or wrapper for the actual or main flexible component which latter is normally reinforced in a manner as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 so that it can withstand substantial stresses in actual use of the container. Such external or internal Wrappers are often desirable to prevent direct frictional contact of a solid object with the main flexible component or to provide a duid-tight outer or inner coat for the latter. Furthermore, the main flexible component might be strong enough to take up substantial longitudinal and/or circumferential stresses but its material might be such that it cannot withstand the action of certain solid, gaseous or liquid substances, c g. various chemicals. ln such instances, the main flexible compo nent may be provided with an external wrapper, such as the flexible component C1, whose composition is such that it can withstand the action of aforementioned solid, gaseous or liquid substances. Of course, the flexible component C1 may also constitute an internal casing for the main flexible component'so as to prevent direct contact between the main exible component and the cargo, to provide a thermal insulation between the cargo and the main flexible component, or to form a huid-tight seal between the cargo and the main ilexible component.

The flexible component C1 may consist of soft polyvinyl chloride, of polyethylene or of a Similar Synthetic plastic substance. Certain of these substances cannot form permanent adhesive bonds with a number of materials, eg. with the material of the filler 23, with the material of the inner annular member 2G, or with the material of the outer annular member 21. On the other hand, it is often desirable to utilize a flexible component C1 (either as an external Wrapper for the main flexible component or as an internal casing for the main flexible component) whose plasticity is so high that it cannot form a satisfactory bond with a filler or with a solid metallic or plastic body, such as the annular member 2li or 2l.

It will be noted that the connection of FIG. 4 corresponds in many respects to the connection shown in FlG. 2 or 3. Thus, the filler Z3 adheres to the adjacent sides of two rigid annular members 2d, 2l, and the threads of the liners 27, 2% are bonded to the filler 23 as Well as to the end portion Een of the ilexible component C1. 0f course, it is equally possible to bond the liners Z7, 2S directly to the opposite sides of the end portion 24a, i.e. to omit the strips ZS, 2o, or to replace the liners 27, 2S by strips consisting of felt or the like in a manner to be described in greater detail in connection with FIG. 8. However, it has been found that it is simpler to apply liners of a textile or like material to individual strips 2.5, 26 in a first Step, and to thereupon weld the strips 25, 25 to the end portion 24a in a subsequent step, either simultaneously with the introduction of the filler 23 into gte annular space 22 or prior to the introduction of the ler.

PEG. 5 illustrates a modiiied connection which is particularly suitable for sealing an opening in a substantially spherical or semispherical ilexible component C2. For example, the llexible component C2 may form part of a container which has a lower end formed by a rigid component similar to the rigid component B of FIG. l. As shown in FG. 5, the semispherical flexible component C2 Y out actually stitching the folds to each other.

snr/e050 is formed with segmental portions or darts 30 whose overlapping edges are secured to each other by stitches 3l. Of course, it is equally possible to simply form the cylindrical component with la number of folds or pleats with- The annular end portion 32a of the flexible component C2 which surrounds a substantially circular cutout therein assumes the shape of a hollow cone and is received in an annular space 35 formed between an inner annular member 33 and an outer annular member 34. The inner annular member 33 is provided with a coaxial extension or nipple 33a which is formed with internal threads so as to receive lan externally threaded plug 35 which includes a suspend- 'ing device in the form of an eye 37 serving las a means Vfor suspending 4the container on the hook `of a crane or the like. Of course, the eye 37 represents but one of the many possible suspending devices for facilitating the handling of the container.

The conically shaped annular members 33, 34 diverge outwardly in a direction away from the cylindrical nipple 33a which latter defines an opening 38 through which cargo may be introduced into or evacuated from the chamber CC defined by the eXible component C2.

will be noted that the outer ends of the annular members 33, 34V converge toward each other so that the cross sec- 'tional area (i.e. the radial dimension) of the space V35 decreases in a direction away from the opening 38. This space receives a tiller 39 consisting'of a hardened synthetic plastic substance 39 which adheres with .great @force tothe adjacent sides of the annular members 33, r34 so that these annular members normally retain their positionwith respect to each other. The annular end portion 32a of the liexible component C2, isV embedded in andbonded to the filler 39 so that it forms a rigid Vunit with the two annular members. In order to insure that the connection Vof FIG. 5 may withstand substantial ten- Y sional stresses, theends 40a of the reinforcing threads 40 inthe plastic material of the flexible component C2 ,project in random distribution beyond the end Vportion 32a and are firmly embedded in the hardened material :v of the iller 39 in a manner as fully described in connection with FIGS. 2 and 3.

It will be noted that the smaller-diameter annular edge V.face 34a of the outer annular member 34 is outwardly inclined with respect to the periphery of the nipple 33a i so as to form a comparatively narrow outwardly diverging annular gap 41 which serves as an inlet during the pouring of liquefied plastic bonding material into the an- .nular space 35 to form the ller 39. In forming the connection of FIG. it is preferred to insert the end u portion 32a of the flexible component C2 between the outer ends of the annular members 33, 34 in a first step,

vand to thereupon press the outer annular member 34 against the inner annular member 33 so that their largerdiameter ends sealingly engage the opposite sides of the flexible component C2. The liquefied plastic Vis then poured through the inlet 41 so that the annular space 35 and the yinlet 4l are completely filled. The liquefied plastic cannot escape from the space 35 because the ilexible component C2 is sealingly wedged between the annular'members 33, 34. As the plasticV material sets toV form the filler 39, the hardened material in the inlet 4l forms an outwardly diverging neck 39a and the inclined 'Y edge face 34a of the outer annular member 34 prevents any displacements of this annular Vmember with respect to its companion member 33. Since the cross section of the filler 39 in a radial plane is similar to a wedge, the filler cannot be withdrawn in a direction away from the Y nipple 33a even if its bond with the adjacent sides of the annular memlbers 33, 34 is terminated, i.e. the flexible Vvcomponent C2 will remain safely connected with' the annular members 33, 34 as long as its bond with the iiller 39 can withstand stresses acting in the direction of the arrow 42 or circumferentially of the flexible component.

The plug 36 may be replaced by a faucet or a valve,

particularly if the cargo chamber CC is intended for reception of a liquid or pulverulent substance.

FIG. 6 illustrates a connection which is a combination 'of the connections shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. The flexible of the flexible component C3 are bonded to a pair of lplastic strips 44, 45 whose material may be the same as the material of the end portion 43a, i.e. the end portion 43a is capable of forming a very satisfactory bond with the strips 44, 45. The outer sides of the strips 44, 45 are respectively coated with textile or like liners 46, 47 each of which is firmly embedded in the material of the hardened ller 39. In this manner,V one can obtain a very satisfactory connection between the non-reinforced flexible component C3 and the rigid component including the annular memlbers 33, 34 even though the material of the flexible component cannot be welded directly to the filler 39. Of course, it is equally possible to replace the composite strips 44, 45 and 45, 47 by single strips'of a plastic materialV which forms agood bond not only with the material of the flexible component C3 but any other substance which can resist deformation and which can withstand stresses arising duringtransportation, handling or storage of a loaded container.

Referring now to FIG. 7, lthere is shown a portion of a'collapsible container Il which comprises essentially a rigid upper component A4, Ya Vmain flexible component C4, and a rigid lower component Bf, which latter is assumed to consist of a disc-shaped plate so that the con- Y tainer Il may be supported on the ground. The container further comprises a second flexible component 50 which constitutes an internallining for the main flexible component C4. ln the embodiment of-FlG. 7, not only the main flexible component C4 but its flexible liner Si), too, is

formed Vwith one or more layers of reinforcing textile material so that the lining Sil is capable of taking up substantialy longitudinal and circumferential stresses and that the kcomposite flexible component C4, 50constitutesa very strong wall for the cargo chamber CC.

The rigid upper componentrAg comprises a main body portion in the form of a Vhollow conical shell or buoyV Y 51 whose larger-diameter end is integral with and sealed Vby a convex or semispherical end wall or bottom 52. The

shell 5l is coaxially traversed by a pipe 53 which communicates with the cargo chamber CCV and Whose upper Yend ispconnected to a threaded nipple 54 serving as a means for retaining one end of a hose 55 which is con- `nectable to a source Vof cargo so that the cargo may be introduced into .or evacuated from the chamber CC by flowing through the interior Vof the pipe 53 and through the hose 55. The pipe 53, the 'conical shell 5l, and the latters Vconvex endwall 52 define between themselves "a'fluid-tight compartment 56 which may be iilled with air or withV another'gas inrorder Vto increase the buoyancy of the container Il if the container is utilized as a partly or fully submerged seagoing receptacle for `large quantities of cargo in a manner as disclosed in my copending application Serial No. 684,813 for Floating Tank. In such instances, the hose 55 may simultaneously serveV as a cable for connecting the containerll to a watercraft and for moving the container in the direction indicated by the arrow 57.Y

The frigid upper component A4 further comprises a Y substantially conical outer annularmember 5S and a sub- Y sarebbe stantially conical inner annular member 59, these annular members serving as a means for retaining between themselves the upper end portion 6th: of the main flexible component C4. The outer annular member S is connected with a reinforced zone 5in of the shell Si which is provided at the junction of this shell with the convex bottom 52. To that end, the reinforced zone Sla and the outer side ot' the outer annular member 58 are respectively formed with` annular grooves 6l, d2 to receive the inwardly extending annular flanges or arms at the opposite ends of a clamping or retaining ring 63. Thus, the clamping ring 63 transmits tensional stresses from the outer annular member 5S to the shell Si, and vice versa.

The annular members S3, 59 detine between themselves an annular space 64 which receives a filler e5 whose hardened material forms a strong bond with the adjacent sides of the annular members S3, 59. lt will be noted that the upper portion of the annular space 64 is bounded by corrugated or otherwise roughened walls so as to insure a more rm connection between the hard filler 65 and the annular members 5S, 59. In addition, the conically diverging annular space 64 is of meandering cross sectional contour which also contributesto a firmer engagement between the iiller 65 and the annular members 5S, S? not only by increasing the total area of contact but also by insuring that the hard iller 65 remains in the space 64 even if its bond with the one or the other of annular members 58, 59 is terminated. The upper end portion 69a of the main flexible component C4 is iirmly embedded in the lowermost zone of the ller 6d, whereas the ends 66a of the reinforcing textile threads 66 project beyond the end portion 69a and are permanently embedded in the upper zone of the liller 65. Such configuration of the filler ed and of the space ed insures a very satisfactory connection between the annular members 5?, 59 and the ilexible component C4 which is strong enough to successfully withstand very large stresses which might arise if a heavily loaded container is towed in turbulent waters. Of course, and as mentioned hereinabove, the reinforcing layer or layers 66 need not extend only longitudinally of the tlexible component C@ but may extend diagonally thereto as well as in circumferential direction to assist the flexible component in withstanding substantial expanding forces.

When the clamping ring 63 is removed to permit a separation of the shell 51 from the outer annular member 58, the aperture within the inner annular member 59 may serve as a manhole to provide access to the cargo chamber CC, for example, for inspecting the condition or the lining Si), for facilitating the cleaning of the lining 50 in the event that the chamber CC is about to receive a diierent cargo, for facilitating more rapid filling of the cargo chamber, for facilitating more rapid evacuation of the cargo chamber, or for any other reason.

The slight radial gap 67 between the shell 5l and the annular member 58 is sealed by an annular gasket d which is inserted into suitable annular notches of the reinforced zone Sla and of the inner annular member 59. This gasket ed may consist of a rubber-like material, of a resilient synthetic plastic substance, or it may assume the form of a hydraulic or pneumatic seal of any known design..

A third or innermost annular member 69 of U-shaped cross sectional contour is provided adjacent to the inner side of the inner annular member 59 to serve as a means for connecting the upper end portion 56a of the lining S@ with the rigid component A4. The end portion Stia extends into the downwardly opening annular space within the innermost annular member 69 which contains a filler '7d consisting of a hardened material adapted to form a :firm bond with the inner sides of the member 69. As shown, the ends 'a of the reinforcing layer or layers 71 in the lining Sti extend beyond the end portion 5ba and are rmly embedded in the hard iiller 7d. The connection between the annular members 5%, 69 consists of an annular gasket 72 which simultaneously seals the narrow gap between the adjacent sides of the annular members 59, 69 so that the intermediate space S between the main iiexible component C4 and its lining Sti is sealed from the atmosphere. Of course, a stronger connection between the annular members 59, 69 might become necessary if the lining 5b? Ais called upon to take up substantial longitudinal and/or circumferential stresses. it will be readily understood that, in the event that the intermediate space S between the iiexible component C4 and its lining 5) need not be sealed from the cargo chamber CC and from the atmosphere, the gasket 72 may be replaced by a conventional snap ring or the like.

The connection between the rigid lower component B and the lower end portions of the iiexible components C4, S@ may be the same as the connection of these flexible components with the rigid upper component A4.

PEG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of the connection between the rigid upper component A4 land the main iiexible component C4, further showing the connection bet-Ween the rigid component A4 and a slightly different lining 75. This lining is not reinforced and, therefore, its connection with the inverted U-shaped innermost annular member 69 is preferably of the type as shown in FGS. 4 and 6. Thus, the opposing sides of the end portion 75a forming part of the lining 75 are coated with two strips 76, '77 consisting of felt, of a textile or like material, and these strips are permanently embedded in the material of the hard filler 7h. It will be noted that the lower ends of the two concentric portions forming part of the innermost annular member d are bent toward each other, as at 73 and '79, so as to prevent complete withdrawal of the tiller 7b even if this filler should become separated from the adjacent sides of the annular member 69. As clearly shown in FIG. 8, the inwardly bent portion 7S of the annular member 69 simultaneously provides a seat for a snap ring Si) which holds the innermost annular member 69 in position with respect to the inner annular member 59.

FlG. 8 illustrates in greater detail the corrugated walls V8l., S2 of the annular space 64 which receives the iiller 65. These walls contribute to the retaining action of the annular members 5S, S9 and this retaining action is further enhanced owing to the fact that the cross Sectional area of the annular space 64 diminishes in a direction toward the lower edges of the annular members 58, S9, i.e. that the filler d5 acts as a wedge and lirmly holds the ends 71a of reinforcing threads 7i in order to provide a safe and strong connection between the main exible component C4 and the rigid upper component A4. lt will be noted that FG. 8 shows a connection wherein only the thread ends 71a are embedded in the iiller 65 though Vit is normally preferred .to provide at least sporadic direct Contact -between the iller and the llexible component.

The connection between the feltor textile strips 76, 77 and the end portion '75a of the lining 75 may be established by heating the material of the end portion 75a to such an extent that it becomes plastic and by simultaneously pressing the plasticized lining against the strips so that the material of the lining at least partially penetrates the pores of the strips 76, 77, whereupon the strips are embedded in the filler '70. The gasket 6g simultaneously seals the cargo chamber CC and the intermediate space S between .the flexible component C4, and its lining 7S against the entry of atmospheric air.

FIG. 9 illustrates a connection between a rigid component A5 and a iiexible component C5, the latter assuming the form of a cable or rope and serving as a suspending device to replace the eye 2 shown in FIG. 1 or the eye 37 of FIG. 5. The rigid component A5 may constitute the upper end plate of a collapsible container lll of the type described in full detail in my aforementioned copending application Serial No. 684,813. The rigid component A5 is formed with an inclined conical -on the hookV 89 of a crane or the like.

Yand on the flexible component C5.

Y tion from the upper toward the lower side of the com- -ponent A5. The space 85 receives a hard tiller 86 which -serves as a means for connecting the end portion 87a of the flexible component C to the rigid component A5.

The acute angle a enclosed by the axis 88 of the conical space 85 and the upper side of the rigid component A5 is selected in such a way that the exible corn- 'ponent C5 need not be flexed at the point where it emerges from the space 85 to pass toward and to be suspended The wall of the space 85 at the upper side of the rigid component A5 is rounded, as at 90, to insure that the flexible component C5 cannot be worn away if its inclination with respect to the upper side of the rigid component A5 assumes an angle other than the angle a.

It is preferred to provide the end portion 87a of the flexible component C5 with a deformable sleeve 91 whose diameter is larger than the diameter of the upper end fof the space 85 ,(within the rounded wall portion 90) so that the sleeve 91 actually seals one end of this space when it assumes the position of FIG. 9. In the next step,

Y.a liquefied synthetic resin is poured into the space 85 to Vform the ller 86 and to provide a firm bond between the rigid* component A5 and the exible component C5. If Vthe viscosityof the liquefied resin is so low that it can penetrate into the material of the end portion 87a, it is 4advisable torpermeate the endvportion 87a with a substance which repels the resin and which prevents ex- Acessive hardening of the flexible component in the space S5. For example, the end portion 85a' may be immersed ,in paraine before being inserted into the space 85.

An important advantage of the connection shown in FIG. 9 is that the hard filler S6 may be removed by drilling in the event that the exible component C5 requires replacement. Upon insertion of a new flexible component, the space S5 may be refilled with a synthetic resin ,or another filler material so that the container comprising the rigid component A5, the main flexible component 92,

`and the non-illustrated second rigid component may be put to renewed use. Y FIG. illustrates a slightly modified connectionbe- Vtween a difrerent rigid component A5 and a flexible cornponent C5 which latter again asumes the form of a cable or rope forming a part of or constituting the entire suspending device for a container. -The rigid component A5 assumes the form of an end plate which comprises a substantially disc-shaped or polygonal portion 95 and a downwardly extending collar like portion 95a. The end portion 96a of the flexible components C5 is received in aV deformable sleeve 97 which has a tight t in an aperture 9S `provided in the portion 95 of the rigid component A5. The aperture98^is bounded by a rounded wall 99 Which prevents excessive Wear and tear on the sleeve 97 As shown, ythe randomly distributed ends 109 of the threads or wires of f which the iexible component C5 consists project beyond the end portion 96a andare embedded in a hard ller 15111 which adheres to the inner side of the collar a and preferably also to the underside of the portion 95. Of course,

the end portion 96a cannot be withdrawn from the aperture 98 in a direction indicated by'the arrow 102 even if the ller 101 does not adhere to the rigid component A5; however, it is normally preferred to provide a strong Vperpendicular .to the plane of the portion 95, i.e. the Vangle enclosed by the upper side of the rigid component A5 and the flexible component C5 is 90 degrees.

The rigid components of FIGS. 9 and 10 consist of a synthetic plastic material, e.g. a polyester which is reinforced by glass fibers. Of course, and as stated before, the rigid components mayfalso consist ofmetal, of Wood 'arising during the storage, handling orl transportation ofV the container.

. A very important advantage of the ilexible connections shown in FIGS. 2-6 and 8-10 is that they maybe formed at an extremely low cost and also that they need not include any mechanical parts such as chains, eyes, screws, shackles, thimbles or the like. Furthermore, the novel connections insure an organic bond between the flexible component and the rigid component, i.e. each thread or wire 11W of the connection shown, for example, in FIG. 10 is organically bonded to the filler 161 and hence to the rigid component A5. The exible components C5, C5 may consist of synthetic plastic material, of hemp or of steel wire, and may be utilized not only as suspending devices for a container but also as a means for maintaining a container in collapsed condition or for connecting two or more containers to each other.

Referring finally to FIG. ll, there is shown a further connection between a cable-like flexible component C, and a rigid component A. The latter comprises two suitably profiled members or shells 105, 106 which may be permanently or releasably secured to each other to form a substantially disc-shaped or polygonal end plate for a collapsible container. The outer shell 105 is formed with an aperture 167 which sealingly receives a sleeve 108 disposed about the lower end portion 1tl9a of the flexible component C5. The sleeve 16S consists of a deformable synthetic plastic or like material, and its lower end is embedded in the hard filler which forms a block and whose configuration is such as to abut at least two mutually inclined sides of the rigid component A7. As shown, the shells 105, 196 define between themselves an annular space 111 which accommodates the filler 110.

kThe filler abuts against the inner side of the shell 105 andV against the inner side of the latters downwardly extending peripheralcollar ltla. In addition, the length of the filler 11) is selected in such a way that it abuts against the upper side of the shell 106 in the space 111 so that the vfiller is held against movements in the space 111 even if it should become separated from the shell 105 or even it its material were such that it could not form a good bond with the material of the rigid component A7. As shown, the randomly distributed threads. or Wires 112 of the exible component C7 project beyond the lower end ofthe sleeve108 and are embedded in the hardened filler 110 so that the flexible component is lintegrally connected With the filler and is thus anchored in the rigid component'Aq since the filler cannot be withdrawn from the space 1.11 excepting upon complete separation from the tiexible component. It will be seen that it is not always necessary to actually bond the ller to the rigid component as, long as the filler is safely anchored in the latter, either by providing a conical space for the filler or by inserting the yfiller into a space of such configuration that the filler cannot be displaced when .the container is in use. However, it is always necessary to provide a permanent bond betweenV the flexible component and the filler, regardless of Whether the flexible component assurnes the shape of a tubular body or the shape of a cable. Y It will be 'readily understood that the configuration of the shell 106 shown in FIG; 1l may be such as to provide a space 111 of an 'area equal to or more closely approxnnating the configuration Vor' the filler 110, i.e. Vthat the filler may completely ll this space.

The ller which is described thereabove according toV Moreover this filler may `beby applying current knowledge, readily adapt it for various applications without omitting features that, from the standpoint of prior art, fairly constitute essential characteristics of theV generic and speciiic aspects of this invention and, therefore, such adaptations should and are intended to be comprehended within the meaning and range of equivalence of the following claims.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

l. A tension-resistant suspending arrangement comprising a rigid component dening an annular space; a hard plastic body received in said annular space and bonded to the rigid component; and a tubular exible component having an annular end portion extending into said annular space and permanently embedded in said hard plastic body so that said plastic body acts as sole tension transmitting means between and prevents separation of said components, said tiexible component comprising at least one reinforcing layer consisting of threads having ends projecting beyond said end portion, at least some of said ends individually embedded in said plastic body.

2. In a container, a twin tension-resistant suspending arrangement comprising a rigid component including an outer annular member, and inner annular member within and deiining with said outer annular member an annular space; a tubular exible component having an end portion extending into said space; a hard plastic body received in said annular space and adhering to said annular members, said end portion permanently embedded in said hard plastic body so that said plastic body acts as sole tension transmitting means between and prevents separation of said components; an innermost annular member disposed within and secured to said inner annular member, said innermost annular member dening a second annular space; a second tubular exible component disposed within said first mentioned ilexible component and having an end portion extending into said second annular space; and a second hard plastic body received in said second annular space and adhering to said innermost annular member, said last mentioned end portion permanently embedded in said second plastic body so that Said second plastic body acts as sole tension transmitting means between said second flexible component and said rigid component.

3. A suspending arrangement as set forth in claim 2, wherein at least one of said flexible components comprises at least one layer of threads having ends projecting beyond the respective end portion, said ends individually embedded in the respective plastic body.

4. A suspending arrangement as set forth in claim 2, wherein the radial dimension of at least one of said plastic bodies increases in a direction away from the respective flexible component so that said one plastic body is wedged between the respective annular members when the respective ilexible component is subjected to tensional stresses in a direction to Withdraw its end portion from said one plastic body.

5. ln a container, a tension-resistant suspending arrangement comprising a rigid component including a conically diverging irst annular member and a conically diverging second annular member, said annular members dening between themselves a conically diverging annular space; a hard plastic body received in said annular space and adhering to at least one of said annular members; and a tubular leXible component comprising a tubular end portion extending into said annular space and permanently embedded in said hard plastic body'so that said plastic body acts as sole tension transmitting means between and prevents separation of said components, said liexible component further comprising reinforcing threads projecting beyond said end portion and individually embedded in said plastic body.

6. A towable floating container comprising, in combination, a tubular flexible cover member; a rst and a second rigid end component each disposed adjacent one of the ends of said tubular .flexible cover member, at least one of said rigid end components including an outer annular member and an inner annular member located within said outer annular member, said outer and inner annular members dening an annular space therebetween; and a hard bonding body positioned in said annular space and firmly bonded to the walls thereof and to the end portion of said tubular flexible cover member, said tubular iexible cover member having embedded therein lengthwise reinforcing threads, said threads having free ends protruding from the ends of said tubular exible cover member and being rmly anchored in said hard bonding body.

References Cited bythe Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 592,899 1.1/97 Willson 2815--239 2,180,960 l l/ 39 Kennedy 285-238 2,329,966 9/43 Wiggins 220-81 X 2,476,446 7/49 Lndell 220--67 X 2,477,852 8/49 Bacon 154-45.9 2,725,087 1l/55 Potter 15G- 0.5 2,751,109 6/56 Moore 220--80 2,899,103 8/59 Ebert 220--91 X 2,951,613 9/60 Hardigg 220-80 X 2,952,378 9/60 Renslow 220--5 2,978,004 4/ 61 Smith 220--24 X 3,043,465 7/ 62 Horner 220-80 X FOREIGN PATENTS 704,473 3/41 Germany.

THERON E. CONDON, Primary Examiner, EARLE I. DRUMMOND, Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3950017 *Apr 29, 1974Apr 13, 1976United Technologies CorporationLeakproof connection for polyethylene tubing
US4021342 *Sep 23, 1975May 3, 1977Robert Bosch G.M.B.H.Liquid filter
US4597425 *Oct 23, 1984Jul 1, 1986Tally David NCollapsible liquid storage tank
US6786364Aug 8, 2001Sep 7, 2004Mcbride DaleTransportable storage with an autonomous dispensing system
US7107921 *Oct 30, 2001Sep 19, 2006Albany International Corp.End portion for a flexible fluid containment vessel and a method of making the same
US20030081861 *Oct 30, 2001May 1, 2003Davis Trent W.End portion for a flexible fluid containment vessel and a method of making the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/4.13, 220/613, 220/611, 285/238
International ClassificationB63B35/28, B63B35/00, B65D90/02, B65D90/08, B65D90/00, B65D88/00, B65D88/08
Cooperative ClassificationB65D90/0033, B65D90/08, B63B35/285, B65D88/08
European ClassificationB65D88/08, B65D90/00D, B65D90/08, B63B35/28F