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Publication numberUS3179063 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 20, 1965
Filing dateNov 9, 1961
Priority dateNov 9, 1961
Publication numberUS 3179063 A, US 3179063A, US-A-3179063, US3179063 A, US3179063A
InventorsCase Noel L, Gilbert Wayne A
Original AssigneeMarx & Co Louis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Railway and road toy
US 3179063 A
Images(4)
Previous page
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 20, 1965 N. L. CASE ETAL 3,179,063

RAILWAY AND ROAD TOY Filed Nov. 9, 1961 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS 4 051, 4. wx 1/4/44: 4. s/waer April 1965 N. L. CASE ETAL RAILWAY AND ROAD TOY Filed Nov. 9. 1961 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS 4/054 4. as!

p l 20, 11965 N. 1.. CASE ETAL 3,179,063

RAILWAY AND ROAD TOY 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Nov. 9, 1961 r J r w, T2 2 mm w v 4 y mi. a M W WW 5 4 y; m F g Z 4 a z E J I a ll m F a m a w z w F /6. E /98 z I N. L. CASE ETAL RAILWAY AND ROAD TOY F/G. I4 26 April 20, 1965 Filed Nov. 9. 1961 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 244 I I I! 2 3 United States Patent 3,179,063 RAILWAY AND ROAD TOY Noel L. Case and Wayne A. Gilbert, Girard, Pa., assignors to Louis Marx & Company, Inc., New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Nov. 9, 1961, Ser. No. 151,392 20 Claims. (Cl. 104149) This invention relates to traflic toys, and more particularly to such a toy which combines a railway and a road toy.

The general object of the present invention is to provide a traflic toy which combines rail and road traffic. Both the rail and road trafiic are electrically operated and may be controlled independently of one another by conventional speed regulating devices. The railway portion of the toy may be of standard type, preferably the HO gage, but the invention may also make use of 0 gage trains.

A more particular object is to enhance the realism and excitement obtained from operation of the toy, and for this purpose the toy is provided with grade crossings and crossing gates. A further object is to provide automatic closing of the crossing gates and stopping of the road vehicle at the gate. For convenience the road vehicle is referred to as an auto, but it will be understood that it may simulate a truck or bus or other such vehicle.

In accordance with further features and objects of the invention, the auto approaches the crossover at high speed so that it seems to race the train to the crossing. If too late, it is stopped abruptly, just ahead of the gate. If not too late, it crosses the track at maximum speed. This has the additional advantage that the crossover may be devoid of power strips at the railway track, thereby simplifying the structure of the crossover, and in addition keeping the railway track clear for depending coupler mechanism of conventional type on the railway cars.

Still another object of the invention is to make it possible for the train to run in either direction without spoiling the automatic control of the crossing gates and autos. Still another object is to provide a two-lane road or highway with autos running in opposite directions, and with appropriate gates on both sides of the railway for control of both autos. Still another object of the invention is to provide a loop of road which is crossed by the railway, there then being two crossovers and four crossing gates when using two lane road sections, and to appropriately control all of the crossing gates without additional complication of the control mechanism required.

To accomplish the foregoing general objects, and other more specific objects which will hereinafter appear, the invention resides in the road and rail toy elements and their relation one to another, as are hereinafter more particularly described in the following specification. The specification is accompanied by drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic plan view and wiring diagram explanatory of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view showing a crossover with two road lanes and crossing gates;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view explanatory of the construction of the road sections;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing a relay which forms a part of the invention;

FIG. 5 is an exploded perspective view explanatory of the construction of a crossing gate;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view explanatory of the operation of a sleeve type ramp used on the railway to control the crossing gate;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary plan view explanatory of the construction of the road sections;

FIGS. 8 and 9 are side and bottom views of an auto 3,179,063 Patented Apr. 20, 1965 which may be used on road sections like that shown in FIGS. 2, 3, and 7;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary transverse section through one rail of the railway at a sleeve type ramp;

FIG. 11 shows schematically how the metal wheels of the locomotive are used for connection to the locomotive motor in a two rail system;

FIG. 12 is a similar view showing the use of insulation wheels for the railway cars following the locomotive;

FIG. 13 is a similar view showing how a special contact shoe and the wheels are used for connection to the motor of an O gage locomotive operating on three rail track;

FIG. 14 is a sectional view explanatory of a detail of the construction of the crossover;

FIG. 15 is a wiring diagram explanatory of the power supply for the railway track part of the toy;

FIG. 16 is a wiring diagram explanatory of the power supply for the roadway part of the toy;

FIG. 17 is a wiring diagram showing both parts supplied from a single power supply source; and

FIG. 18 is a wiring diagram for an AC power supply for an O gage railway.

Referring to the drawings, and more particularly to FIG. 1, the tralfic toy comprises toy railway track sections indicated at 12 and 14. Some may be curved as at 12, and some straight as at 14, to effectuate any desired track layout. The track sections include metal rails 17 and 18 for power supply, here indicated to be connected to the terminals 20 and 22. An electrically driven locomotive with metal wheels is assumed to be running on the railway, and as usual is followed by a train of cars coupled to the locomotive. For simplicity, these are not shown in FIG. 1. The metal locomotive wheels on one side are insulated from those on the other side, and the car wheels are made of insulation material.

The toy further comprises highway or road sections indicated at 15 and 16. The curved sections 15 and straight sections 16 make up a closed loop of road only part of which is shown in the drawing. The upper end of the road loop, not shown, is smaller than and is located within the railway loop.

There is an electrically driven auto 24 running on the road sections, and the latter include both guide means and metal power supply strips. In FIGS. 2 and 3 the guide means consists of a groove 26, and the power supply strips are metal strips disposed edgewise and embedded in a plastics body or section 28, as shown at 30 and 32. These strips preferably are embedded deeply so that the :top edges project only slightly from the insulation material 28.

The toy further comprises a special crossover section best shown in FIG. 2. This matches the track sections 14 in one direction, as shown at 34, and it matches the road sections 16 in the other direction, as shown at 36. There is also an electrically operated crossing gate generally designated 38 at the crossover, this including a gate arm 40 which may be lowered to a closed position across the road, or may be raised to an open position as shown.

A control section of one of the metal power supply strips, in this case the strip 32, is isolated from the remainder, as indicated at 42, for control purposes, it being bypassed by a conductor 44, and it being separately energized through a control relay which is housed within and concealed by a simulated gatemans shanty 46.

Referring now to FIG. 4, the relay has a first coil 48 and a second coil 50 for moving a ferrous armature 52 which is pivoted at 54. The relay has a pair of spring contacts 56 eyeletted at 58 to an insulation base 60. These may be called gate contacts because they close a power supply circuit to the crossing gate in order to e9 lower the same. The relay has another pair of spring contacts 62 which may be called go contacts because they supply power to the control section of the road to propel the auto over the crossing. The armature 52 carries a conductive piece 64 which engages and bridges either the contacts 56 or the contacts 62, but not both. With this relay construction the relay has a stick action, that is, even if deenergized it remains in the position it last occupied until the opposite relay coil is energized.

Referring now to FIG. 1, the railway has .a ramp 70 ahead of the crossing, this being electrically connected to the first relay coil 48 for closing the gate cont-acts 56 and thereby lowering or closing the crossing gate 44 and at the same time opening the go contacts 62 and thereby dc-energizing the control strip 42 as a locomotive approaches the crossing from the right. There is also a ramp 72 beyond the crossing an amount at least equal to the length of the train, and the ramp 72 is connected by wires 74 and 76 to the other relay coil 50 for opening the gate contacts 56 and closing the go contacts 62, thereby opening the crossing gate 40 and energizing the control strip 4 2.

The road sections preferably simulate a two lane highway so that autos can run simultaneously in opposite directions, as indicated in FIG. 1 by the autos 24 and 78. FIGS. 2 and 3 show how each road section has a guide groove 226 and power supply strips 230 and 232, in addition to the groove 26 and strips 30 and 32. FIG. 2 shows further how the special crossover section has two crossing gates on opposite sides of the track, there being a gate 238, 240, in addition to the gate 38, 40. These gates are alike but preferably are disposed on opposite sides of the road and point in opposite directions, so that gate 49 serves primarily for the auto approaching its side, and gate 240 primarily for the auto approaching its side. However, if desired, the arms may be disposed close to the road ancl/ or lengthened so that they cross both lanes.

In FIG. 2 it will be seen that there is an isolated control section 242 of power strip 232, this being bypassed by a conductor 244. The control strip 242 is on the approach side, that is, on the side of the railway opposite to the control strip 42. It serves the same purpose as strip 42, but for an auto coming in opposite direction. It is controlled by the same relay housed at 46.

Reverting to FIG. 1, the road sections preferably form a closed loop which is crossed or intersected by the track sections 14. In consequence there are two of the grade crossings previously described, with four crossing gates, one on each side of the railway track at each of the two crossovers. The additional crossing gates are marked 340 and 449. There are also four control strips, one for each highway lane on the appropriate approach side of the railway track, and the additional control strips are marked 342 and 442.

Inasmuch as the length of a usual railway train may be comparable to or even exceed the spacing between the sides of the road loop, and inasmuch as either auto running on its road loop travels at such speed that it would have to be stopped by a gate on one side or the other of the loop, the control mechanism is greatly simplified by using :a single control relay for simultaneous control of all of the crossing gates and control strips. The crossing gates are electrically operated, in this case by solenoids, and the solenoids for the respective gates are indicated at 38, 238, 338, and 43 8 respectively. On examination of FIG. 1, it will be seen that the relay contacts 56 (the gate contacts) are connected to all of the solenoids through conductors 80, 84, 86 and gt). In the present case the solenoids are wired in series, and the return circuit is through conductor 92 to terminal 94, with the circuit originating at terminal 96.

Similarly the go contacts 6 2 serve to energize all of the control strips, and in the present case the current supply is through conductor as to strip 42, thence through conductor 1% to strip 242, thence through conductor 102 to strip 442, and through conductor 104 to strip 342. The propulsion power supply originates at terminal 106, and the return is through the other power supply stri 30 and conductor 108 leading to terminal 110.

The speed of the autos may be regulated independently of one another and of the train. In the present case auto 24 is controlled by a rheostat 114 which also may be moved to an off position, thereby stopping the auto. The speed of auto 78 may be regulated by a similar rheostat 112 which also may be turned to an off position. it will be noted, however, that the control strips 42, 24-2, 342 and 442 are supplied from a conductor 116 which is connected to terminal 106 ahead of the rheostats, so that maximum voltage is applied to the control strips.

This is a desirable feature of the invention for several reasons. One is that it makes the autos race the train to the crossing at high speed so that the operation of the toy is exciting to watch. Anothe is that it eliminates the need for a power strip from one side of the railway track to the other. Thus, in FIG. 14 the power strip 118 is cut away or depressed, as shown at 120, so that it underlies and does not interfere with the railway rails 122 and 124. The auto runs fast enough to cross the track by coasting over the track, and this is true even when the auto has been stopped at the crossing and resumes travel when the gate is raised. The auto is small and accelerates rapidly under the applied maximum voltage.

With this simplified crossover the rails of the track may be and are continuous, and in addition, the crossover may be given a molded contour at 126 (FIG. 2) which largely fills the space between the rails except for clearance for the flanges of the railway wheels. This provides a rerailing action which helps guard against derailing at the crossover.

Still another advantage of interrupting the power strips at the railway track is that there then is no interference with depending coupler mechanism associated with the car couplers. HO gage trains generally employ a standard coupler with depending sensing elements to facilitate remote coupling control. These sensing elements depend to a low point, and with the present construction there is no danger of hitting a power strip.

Reverting to FIG. 1, an additional feature is that the train may be operated in either direction, either by reversing it, as is commonly done under remote control, or by turning the entire train end-for-end to operate in counterclockwise instead of clockwise direction. For this purpose there are two spaced ramps 70 and 128 ahead of the crossovers, and two spaced ramps 72 and 130 beyond the crossovers. The inner or nearer ramps 70 and 130 are corn nected to one another and to the relay coil 48 by con-- ductors 132 and 134. The outer or further ramps 72 and 128 are connected together and to the relay coil 5t? by conductors 74 and 76. A locomotive proceeding clockwise and engaging the ramp 128 causes no change because the armature 52 is already in its right hand position. However, on engaging the ramp 70 the relay shifts, the gates close, and the autos stop. When the locomotive reaches the ramp 130 it causes no change because the armature is already in its left position, but when the locomotive reaches ramp 72, the relay shifts and the gates open and the autos proceed. Thus the ramps 7% and 72 alone are effective, as previously described, and the additional ramps 123 and 134 are idle or superfluous. However, when a locomotive approaches in counterclockwise direction, it is the ramps 13% and 128 which become effec tive, and the ramps 72 and 70 are idle.

The detailed construction of the crossing gate may vary Widely, the only essential being that it be electrically operated. However, the construction of the particular gets here shown may be described with reference to FIG. 5, in which the parts are all separated. The gate arm 40 with its counterweight 140 are carried, at a hole 142, on shaft 144. This is turned by a pinion 146 which meshes with a rack 148. The rack is made of brass or other nonferrous metal, and in the present case is a circular rack so that there is no concern over its orientation about its longitudinal axis. The rack is secured end to end with a ferrous plunger 150 vertically slidable in a solenoid coil 38. The magnetic circuit is preferably completed and made more efiicient by ferrous outside frame pieces 152 which are assembled on opposite sides of the coil 38. These parts are all received within housing sides 154 and 156, which are preferably molded out of a plastics material. One of the sides may include a mast 158 with a crossover warning 160. The bearings for shaft 144 are shown at 162. The parts may be held in assembled relation by a screw 164 passing through holes 166 and 167, the latter being threaded. The gate arm 40 is supported outside the housing 154, 156, as will be clear from inspection of FIG. 2.

The toy vehicle running on the road may simulate a passenger car, truck, bus, racing car, or the like. Such vehicles are already known, and referring to FIGS. 8 and 9, the particular vehicle here shown employs a depending projection or pilot pin 170 which runs freely in the guide groove 26 or 226 shown in FIGS. 2, 3, and 7. It also has a pair of spring contact shoes 172 and 174, which run on the exposed top edges of the metal power supply strips 30 and 32 (or 230 and 232). The resilient contact shoes 172 and 174 are preferably disposed adjacent the guide pin 170, and all are preferably near the forward end of the vehicle, thus giving the rear end some freedom for sideward or skidding movement in rounding turns at high speed. This skidding may be limited by making the projection 170 elongated instead of circular.

The road sections may be assembled in different known ways. In the particular case here shown the sections are aligned by dowels 176 (FIG. 7) and are held together by a spring clip 178 which is received in mating slots. The power strips project horizontally or lengthwise at one lane, as shown at 180, and these projections are received tightly alongside the non-projecting power strips of the next section to provide continuous electrical contact. The next section similarly has projecting ends on the other lane, as shown at 182. The plastic material is cut away as shown at 181 to help receive the projecting ends 180 and 182, that is, to permit sideward flexing of the nonprojecting ends.

The ramps shown at 70, 72, 128 and 130 in FIG. 1 are shown in greater detail in FIGS. 6 and 10. The track section here is of the HO gage type and comprises an insulation base 184 which simulates the ties of a railway track, and two metal rails 17 and 18, which are secured to the insulation base. Various constructions have been devised for such track, and the rails may be either solid metal or hollow sheet metal. The ramp consists of a sleeve of very thin insulation 186, for example Mylar, and a sleeve of very thin metal 188 around one of the rails, as is best shown in FIG. 10.

The sleeve is so thin that the wheels readily ride over it. The sleeve is short enough so that when one wheel is on the sleeve, as shown in FIG. 6, at least one other wheel is off the sleeve. These are locomotive wheels 198 and 192, and are therefore made of metal and are electrically connected together on one side, in conse quence of which the rail 18 is momentarily connected to the sleeve. A clip 194 for receiving a wire lead forms a part of the assembly, and is connected to the sleeve, and provides a pulse of current through an outside wire to operate the relay. A sleeve of this type may be made as a separate accessory which may be clipped on to the track section at any desired point, or one particular section may be provided permanently with two such ramps.

In FIG. the thin metal 188 is held by additional sheet metal 187 and 189, and the latter is eyeletted at 6 193 to clip 194. The thicknesses and clearances have been exaggerated in the drawing, and it will be understood that in practise the sleeve material fit's closely about the rail and base.

The relay coil circuit back to terminal of the power supply is completed because the outer railway rail 18 is connected to the inner strip 30 of the roadway, and thence to terminal 110 by way of wire 108. This connection is conveniently provided and built in at the crossovers, and while not necessary, there are four such connections to strips 30 and 230, shown by heavy dots on the drawing at the crossovers.

It will be understood that other ramp systems may be used to provide the closing of a contact or in other ways to supply a pulse of current to operate the relay.

With the sleeve ramps here shown it is assumed that only the locomotive has metal wheels. The cars fol lowing the locomotive are assumed to have insulation wheels. This is the normal practise in H0 gage trains. Referring to FIG. 11, the locomotive 196 has metal wheels 198 and 190, in order to pick up current to energize the locomotive motor 200. The wheels are insulated from one another, as by use of an insulation axle 202.

Referring to FIG. 12, the motorless car 204 has insulation wheels 206 which may be molded integrally with their axle 208. This insulates the wheels at one side from the other in order not to short circuit the rails, which carry current of opposite polarity. In the present toy it is only the locomotive that affects the ramps.

In the wiring diagram of FIG. 1 the solenoids of the crossing gates are connected in series. This is not essential and is done merely for economy. The accessory power supply to terminals 94, 96 may be at say 16 volts, and with the gate coils connected in series, they each may be wound for four volts, resulting in a cheaper construction than would be the case when using four solenoids in parallel, each wound for sixteen volts. However, the latter may be done, if desired. Also the coils could be wound for eight volts each, with two connected in series for one crossover, and two in series at the other crossover, and the two crossovers then connected in parallel with one another.

In FIG. 1 the terminals 20, 22 are connected to a standard toy railway power supply, and the terminals 186, 110 are connected to a standard roadway power supply. A typical railway power supply is shown in FIG. 15, in which a step-down transformer 220 is connected to a rectifier 222 which in turn leads to a polarity reversing switch 224. Terminals 226 are connected ahead of the switch 224 and provide a fixed voltage of unchanged polarity for the operation of accessories. Terminals 228 are connected to the track rails and provide a reversible voltage for reversing the direction of train operation. This is readily accomplished because the miniature motors used in H0 gage trains usually have a permanent magnet field. A rheostat 230 serves to vary the track voltage, and also may open the circuit, thus making it pos sible to vary the speed of the train or to stop it altogether.

The power supply for the road part of the toy is simpler and may be like the first part of FIG. 15. This is shown in FIG. 16, there being a step-down transformer 232 connected to a rectifier 234, leading to terminals 236. Separate rheostats are shown in FIG. 1 at 112 and 114 for independent speed control of the two autos. The speed controls could be combined with the power supply, if desired, but usually separate ones are preferred.

Separate power supplies for the railway and road portions of the toy are desirable because of the polarity reversing switch which is wanted for the railroad, but not for the autos. In the present toy the autos are to be run only in forward direction, and it would not do to have them reversed when the train is reversed. There is no manufacturing inconvenience in providing separate power supplies because the standard units already available are used. It is also an operating convenience when several children play together, for one may operate the train, and another the autos. Indeed, it is for this reason that the separate speed controls 112 and 114 are pre ferred for the autos, because two children may independently control them.

The terminals 94 and 96 shown in FIG. 1 for the crossing gates have been shown separately because they may be energized from either power source. Indeed, they may be operated by A.C. as well as DC, and therefore when using an C gage train operated by A.C., the terminals 94, 96 may be connected to the accessory terminals of the A.C. power supply. The control relay coils are here shown energized from the roadway power supply, and the track contact ramps function as they do because one railway track, in this case the outer track 18 which has the ramps, is connected at either or both crossovers to either or both of the inner roadway strips, in this case the strips 30 and 230.

If desired, a single power supply may be provided for both the railway and roadway parts of the toy, and such an arrangement is illustrated in FIG. 17 of the drawing. In this case there are five terminals at 250, the first two of which (marked 1 and 2) correspond to the terminals 226 in FIG. 15. The last two (marked 4 and 5) correspond to the terminals 228 in FIG. and are connected by conductors 240 to the railway track 242. The first two terminals are connected by conductors 244 to the roadway 246, and therefore correspond to the terminals 106, 110 in FIG. 1, as well as to the terminals 226 in FIG. 15. The reversing switch affects the railway and not the roadway. An extra conductor 248 leads to a fifth terminal 3 which is connected to the relay coils 48 and 50, the circuit being completed by track ramps as before, and here symbolized at 70 and 72. Because of the connection 248 the relay coils receive full voltage, and

yet the polarity is reversed when the train polarity is reversed. In this case the railway tracks are not connected to the roadway power supply strips at the crossovers, and any reversal of polarity for the train does not affect the autos.

With a three-rail system, as for O gage trains, the locomotive wheels and car wheels are all grounded. The locomotive is wired as suggested in FIG. 13, in which car 210 is grounded, and has metal grounded wheels 212. The current supply for propulsion motor 214 is picked up through an insulated contact shoe 216 engaging the middle or third rail.

Separate power supplies may be assumed, as in FIG. 1, and the common connection of the relay coils remains through conductor 116, as in FIG. 1. The outer leads of the relay coils are connected to ramps mounted on the center rail of power supply third rail of the railway track. This center rail of the railway track is connected at the crossovers to the inner supply strips 30 and 230 of the roadway. The system then functions as previously described for FIG. 1, and the terminals 94 and 96 may be connected to the A.C. accessory terminals of the toy railway transformer.

The latter may be arranged as shown in FIG. 18, in which the terminals 252 provide a variable A.C. supply for the railway track, and the terminals 254 provide a fixed voltage A.C. supply for accessories. The roadway power supply may be a fixed voltage D.C. supply, as shown in FIG. 16, and as previously described.

It is believed that the construction and operation of my improved railway and roadway toy, as well as the advantages thereof, will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description. The autos 24 and 78 (FIG. 1) are driven in opposite directions at any desired speed, as controlled by rheostats 112 and 114. The train is independently operated, and its speed is controlled by a rheostat (as at 230 in FIG. 15) connected to terminals 20, 22 in FIG. 1. If the train is moving clockwise, it passes ramp 128 without shifting the relay, but on reaching ramp 70, the relay changes;the power strips approaching the crossover are de-energized; and the gates are closed. The cars come to a stop as they approach a closed gate.

The cars are very small and light in weight, and they come to a quick stop even though travellng at high speed. When the locomotive reaches the ramp it has no efiect, but on reaching the ramp 72 (at which time the last car of the train should have reached or passed the last gate), the relay returns to original position; the gates are opened; and the power strips are energized. Inasmuch as the power strips receive the full voltage, the cars accelerate rapidly, and they easily coast over the railway track portion of the crossover.

It will be understood that while the invention has been shown and described in a preferred form, changes may be made without departing from the scope of the invention, as sought to be defined in the following claims. In the claims the term auto has been used for convenience, but it is intended to apply to any road vehicle, and the term locomotive has been used for convenience, but is intended to apply to railway rolling stock.

We claim:

1. A traific toy comprising toy railway track sections including metal rails for power supply, an electrically driven locomotive with a propulsion motor and at least some metal wheels running on said rails, toy road sections including auto guide means and metal power supply strips extending collaterally of the guide means, an electrically driven auto having a propulsion motor and running on said road sections, said rails being incapable of positively receiving said auto and said road sections being incapable of operatively receiving said locomotive, a special crossover section matching said track sections in one direction and matching said road sections in the other direction, an electrically operated crossing gate movable to a position across a road section at said crossover, a control section of power strip approaching the gate being isolated from the main power strip for purpose of control of an auto supplied with power thereby, a relay having first and second coils for moving an armature in one direction or the other to close either gate contacts or go contacts respectively, said gate contacts being in and closing a power supply circuit to the crossing gate to close the same, said go contacts being in a circuit connected to and supplying power to said control section, a ramp on a railway section ahead of the crossing and electrically connected to the first relay coil for closing the gate and deenergizing the control section to stop the auto on approach of the locomotive, and a ramp on a railway section beyond the crossing and electrically connected to the second relay coil for opening the gate and energizing the control section to start the auto on departure of the locomotive.

2. A traific toy as defined in claim 1 in which there are two spaced ramps on the railway on one side of the crossover, and two spaced ramps on the railway on the other side of the crossover, the inner or nearer ramps being connected to the first relay coil, and the outer or further ramps being connected to the second relay coil, whereby the locomotive may be run on the railway in either direction.

3. A traffic toy as defined in claim 1 in which the road sections have two trafic lanes for simultaneous operation of autos in opposite direct-ions, and in which there are two crossing gates on opposite sides of the railway track, and in which there is a control section of power strip in each lane on the opposite approach sides of the railway track and crossing gates, and in which the gate contacts of the relay are connected to close both gates, and in which the go contacts of the relay are connected to energize both control strips.

4. A traffic toy as defined in claim 1 in which the road sections have two traffic lanes for simultaneous operation of autos in opposite directions, and in which there are two crossing gates on opposite sides of the railway track, and in which there is a control section of power strip in each lane on the opposite approach sides of the railway track and crossing gates, and in which the gate contacts of the relay are connected to close both gates, and in which the go contacts of the relay are connected to energize both control strips, and in which there are two spaced ramps on the railway on one side of the crossover, and two spaced ramps on the railway on the other side of the crossover, the inner ramps being connected to the first relay coil, and the outer ramps being connected to the second relay coil, whereby the locomotive may be run on the railway in either direction.

5. A trafiic toy as defined in claim 1 in which the road sections form a closed loop of road which is intersected by the track sections, and in which there are two crossovers, one for each side of the road loop, and in which there is a crossing gate and a control power strip for each crossover, and in which the approach ramp is ahead of the road loop and both crossovers, and in which the departure ramp is beyond the road loop and both crossovers, and in which the gate contacts are connected to both crossing gates, and the go contacts are connected to both control strips.

6. A trafiic toy as defined in claim 1 in which the road sections form a closed loop of road which is intersected by the track sections, and in which there are two crossovers, one for each side of the road loop, and in which there is a crossing gate and a control power strip for each crossover, and in which the gate contacts are connected to both crossing gates, and the go contacts are connected to both control strips, and in which there are two spaced ramps on the railway on one side of the loop and both of the crossovers, and two spaced ramps on the railway on the other side of the loop and both of the crossovers, the inner ramps being connected to the first relay coil, and the outer ramps being connected to the second relay coil, whereby the locomotive may be run on the railway in either direction.

7. A .trafiic toy as defined in claim 1 in which the road sections have two trafiic lanes for simultaneous operation of autos in opposite directions, and in which the road sections form a closed loop which is intersected by the track sections, and in Which there are two crossovers, one for each side of the loop, and in which there are four crossing gates, one on each side of the railway track at each crossover, and in which there are four control strips, one for each lane on the appropriate side of the railway track, and in which the gate contacts of the relay are connected to operate all four crossing gates, and in which the go contacts of the relay are connected to energize all four control strips.

8. A traffic toy as defined in claim 1 in which the road sections have two traific lanes for simultaneous operation of autos in opposite directions, and in which the road sections form a closed loop which is intersected by the track sections, and in which there are two crossovers, one for each side of the loop, and in which there are four crossing gates, one on each side of the railway track at each crossover, and in which there are four control strips, one for each lane on the appropriate approach side of the railway track, and in which the gate contacts of the relay are connected to operate all four crossing gates, and in which the go contacts of the relay are connected to energize all four control strips, and in which there are two spaced ramps on the railway on one side of the loop and both of the crossovers, and two spaced ramps on the railway on the other side of the loop and both of the crossovers, the inner ramps being connected to the first relay coil, and the outer ramps being connected to the second relay coil, whereby the locomotive may be run on the railway in either direction.

9. A traflic toy as defined in claim 1, in which a speed controlling rheostat is connected in series with the power supply to the road sections for the auto, and in which the maximum available voltage is connected directly to the go contacts of the relay for maximum power supply to the control section of the power strip.

10. A traflic toy as defined in claim 1, in which a speed controlling rheostat is connected in series with the power supply to the road sections for the auto, and in which the maximum available voltage is connected directly to the go contacts of the relay for maximum power supply to the control section of the power strip, and in which the power strip is omitted in the region across and between the rails.

11. A traflic toy comprising toy railway track sections including metal rails for power supply, an electrically driven locomotive with a propulsion motor and at least some metal wheels running on said rails, a variable power supply source connected to said rails, toy road sections including auto guide means and metal power supply strips extending collaterally of the guide means, an electrically driven auto having a propulsion motor and running on said road sections, a variable power supply source connected to said power strips, said rails being incapable of positively receiving said auto and said road sections being incapable of operatively receiving said locomotive, a special crossover section matching said track sections in one direction and matching said road sections in the other direction, an electrically operated crossing gate movable to a position across a road section at said crossover, a control section of power strip approaching the gate being isolated from the main power strip for purpose of control of an auto supplied with power thereby, a relay having first and second coils for moving an armature in one direction or the other to close either gate contacts or go contacts respectively, said gate contacts being in and closing a power supply circuit to the crossing gate to close the same, said go contacts being in a circuit connected to and supplying power to said control section, a conductive short sleeve ramp insulatedly mounted on a railway rail ahead of the crossing and electrically connected to the first relay coil for closing the gate and deenergizing the control section to stop the auto on approach of the locomotive, and a conductive short sleeve ramp insulatedly mounted on a railway rail beyond the crossing and electrically connected to the second relay coil for opening the gate and energizing the control section to start the auto on departure of the locomotive.

12. A traffic toy as defined in claim 11 in which there are two spaced sleeve ramps on a railway rail on one side of the crossover, and two spaced sleeve ramps on the railway rail on the other side of the crossover, the inner or nearer ramps being connected to the first relay coil, and the outer or further ramps being connected to the second relay coil, whereby the locomotive may be run on the railway in either direction.

13. A trafiic toy as defined in claim 11 in which the road sections have two tratfic lanes for simultaneous operation of autos in opposite directions, and in which there are two crossing gates on opposite sides of the track, and in which there is a control section of power strip in each lane on the opposite approach sides of the railway and crossing gates, and in which the gate contacts of the relay are connected to close both gates, and in which the go contacts of the relay are connected to energize both control strips.

14. A trafiic toy as defined in claim 11 in which the road sections have two trafiic lanes for simultaneous op eration of autos in opposite directions, and in which there are two crossing gates on opposite sides of the track, and in which there is a control section of power strip in each lane on the opposite approach sides of the railway and crossing gates, and in which the gate contacts of the relay are connected to close both gates, and in which the go contacts of the relay are connected to energize both control strips, and in which there are two spaced sleeve ramps on a railway rail on one side of the crossover, and two spaced sleeve ramps on a railway rail on the other side of the crossover, the inner ramps being connected to the first relay coil, and the outer ramps being con- 1 1 nected to the second relay coil, whereby the locomotive may be run on the railway in either direction.

15. A traffic toy as defined in claim 11 in which the road sections form a closed loop of road which is intersected by the track sections, and in which there are two crossovers, one for each side of the loop, and in which there is a crossing gate and a control power strip for each crossover, and in which the approach sleeve ramp is ahead of the road loop and both crossovers, and in which the departure sleeve ramp is beyond the road loop and both crossovers, and in which the gate contacts are connected to both crossing gates, and the go contacts are connected to both control strips. I H

16. A traffic toy as defined in claim 11 in which the road sections form a closed loop of road which is intersected by the track sections, and in which there are two crossovers, one for each side of the loop, and in which there is a crossing gate and a control power strip for each crossover, and in which the gate contacts are connected to both crossing gates, and the go contacts are connected to both control strips, and in which there are two spaced sleeve ramps on a railway rail on one side of the loop and both of the crossovers, and two spaced sleeve ramps on a railway rail on the other side of the loop and both of the crossovers, the inner ramps being connected to the first relay coil, and the outer ramps being connected to the second relay coil, whereby the locomotive may be run on the railway in either direction.

17. A traflic toy as defined in claim 11 in which the road sections have two trafiic lanes for simultaneous operation of autos in opposite directions, and in which the road sections form a closed loop which is intersected by the track sections, and in which there are two crossovers, one for each side of the loop, and in which there are four crossing gates, one on each side of the railway track at each crossover, and in which there are four control strips, one for each lane on the appropriate approach side of the railway track, and in which the gate contacts of the relay are connected to operate all four crossing gates, and in which the go contacts of the relay are connected to energize all four control strips.

18. A traffic toy as defined in claim 11 in which the road sections have two traffic lanes for simultaneous operation of autos in opposite directions, and in which the road sections form a closed loop which is intersected by the track sections, and in which there are two crossovers, one for each side of the loop, and in which there are four crossing gates, one on each side of the railway track at each crossover, and in which there are four control strips, one for each lane on the appropriate approach side of the railway track, and in which the gate contacts of the relay are connected to operate all four crossing gates, .and in which the go contacts of the relay are connected to energize all four control strips, and in which there are two spaced sleeve ramps on a railway rail on one side of the loop and both of the crossovers, and two spaced sleeve ramps on a railway rail on the other side of the loop and both of the crossovers, the inner ramps being connected to the first relay coil, and the outer ramps being connected to the second relay coil, whereby the locomotive may be run on the railway in either direction.

19. A trafiic toy as defined in claim 11 in which the maximum available voltage is connected directly to the go contacts or" the relay for maximum power supply to the control section of the power strip.

20. A traffic toy as defined in claim 11 in which the maximum available voltage is connected directly to the go contacts of the relay for maximum power supply to the control section of the power strip, and in which the power strip is omitted in the region across and between the rails.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,666,559 4/28 Dorgan 246-126 X 1,686,251 10/28 Phillips 246-31 1,696,534 12/28 Gill 246-31 1,804,491 5/31 Becker 246-255 1,891,739 12/32 Wenger 246-127 X 1,912,193 5/33 Handy 246-255 2,096,894 10/37 Hall 246- 2,171,634 9/39 Rexford et al.

2,188,756 1/40 McKe'ige et al 104-149 X 2,218,074 10/40 Smith 246-31 2,804,543 8/57 Petrick 246-114 EUGENE G. BOTZ, Primary Examiner.

PHILIP ARNOLD, Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3362350 *Apr 5, 1965Jan 9, 1968Marx & Co LouisRacing toy
US3363109 *Jan 23, 1963Jan 9, 1968John R. WilhelmModel railroad electric power supplies and distribution equipment
US4369943 *Dec 29, 1980Jan 25, 1983Said HusseinModel train crossing gate
US5297484 *Jul 3, 1991Mar 29, 1994Train Products, Inc.Vehicle guidance track system
US5678789 *Dec 5, 1995Oct 21, 1997Pipich; Robert B.Model railroad car position indicator
US6791788 *Dec 27, 2001Sep 14, 2004Storage Technology CorporationSegmented power strip for an automated robotic device and method for joining same
US6798612Dec 27, 2001Sep 28, 2004Storage Technology CorporationPower strip distribution system and method for an automated robotic device in a data storage system
WO1993001066A1 *Jul 1, 1992Jan 21, 1993Train Products IncVehicle guidance track system
Classifications
U.S. Classification104/295, 105/1.5, 246/114.00R, 246/473.00R, 238/12, 246/127, 104/305, 246/31, 238/10.00E, 246/255, 246/465
International ClassificationA63H18/02, A63H18/12, A63H18/00, A63H19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H18/026, A63H18/12, A63H19/00
European ClassificationA63H18/02E, A63H18/12, A63H19/00