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Publication numberUS3179299 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 20, 1965
Filing dateAug 25, 1964
Priority dateAug 25, 1964
Publication numberUS 3179299 A, US 3179299A, US-A-3179299, US3179299 A, US3179299A
InventorsAllegraud Jean Baptiste, Ollivry Victor
Original AssigneeLever Brothers Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible containers
US 3179299 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1965 J. B. ALLEGRAUD ETAL 3,179,299

COLLAPSIBLE CONTAINERS Original Filed Sept. 6, 1962 INVENTORS JEAN BAPTISTE ALLEGRAUD a BY VICTOR OLLIVRY M 41L M ATTORNEYS their United States Patent ()fifice 3,179,299 Patented Apr. 20, 1965 This application is a continuation of the application Serial No. 221,853, filed September 6, 1962.

The invention relates to collapsible containers, for example resilient collapsible tubes.

Resilient collapsible containers have the well-known disadvantage that when they tend to recover their original shape after a portion of their contents has been squeezed out, air is sucked in. When the contents of the container consist of a substance susceptible to desiccation or to oxidation, such air not only affects good conservation of the product but also hinders satisfactory dispensation from the container. Owing to the presence of air, the contents on exertion of pressure on the container do not emerge immediately and when they do a stream is formed which is not continuous but which is interrupted by air bubbles. Moreover, the air bubbles bursting are apt to spatter the contents in all directions.

It is an object of the invention to mitigate or obviate the above-mentioned disadvantages in the use of resilient collapsible containers.

According to one aspect of the invention a resilient collapsible container is provided comprising a body portion to contain a substance to be dispensed, a head portion defining a passage through which the substance can be disepnsed, and an apertured diaphragm across said passage at a position inward from the outer end of said passage, the arrangement being such that after some of said substance has been dispensed and the container starts to resile,

a quantity of said substance on the outside of the diasage ata position inward from the outlet, the arangemerit being such that any of said substance outside said diaphragm and in said passage will hinder the sucking back of air in said body portion.

According to yet another aspect of the invention a resilient collapsible tube is provided in which an apertured diaphragm is disposed across the passage through the nozzle of the tube at a position inward from the outer end of the nozzle to hinder the sucking back of air nto the tube after any of the tube contents have been dispensed.

Owing to the presence of a quantity of said substance covering the outer side of the diaphragm, at least initially such substance will tend to be sucked in rather than air, so that air will be prevented from being sucked back into the container at least for a time which should be sufficient to allow the user of the tube toreplace the cap. Thus this measure can ensure that little or no air is present in the body of the container which would have to be driven out before thecontentsof the container could be subsequently dispensed.

Preferably the diaphragm is at the inner end of said passage, however, this isnot always essential provided there is a sufficient cavity in the passage, outward of the aperture, to enable the invention to be achieved.

The diaphragm can be convex inwards or outward.

A larger area will then be available in which to arrange the aperturing.

If the diaphragm is convex towards the interior and the aperturing is in the form of several openings, this arrangement promotes coalescence of the streams which will emerge from each opening during dispensation, particularly if these openings are arranged near the periphery of said diaphragm.

The aperturing can be provided by one or more slots, which have considerably greater length than width. With this arrangement it is preferred that the diaphragm be convex outwards because then each slot can readily open out when the contents are dispensed.

An insert can be provided to promote coalescence of streams emerging from the aperturing of said diaphragm.

The outer end of said pasasge can have a reduced diameter. With this arrangement the or each stream which will emerge from the aperturing when dispensing will more nearly fill the cross-sectional area of the outer end of said passage. This will tend to drive out any air in said passage and allow the contents to be more evenly dispensed. If the aperturing is in the form of a plurality of openings, said reduced diameter can cause the streams which emerge from said openings to coalesce. The outer end of said passage can be provided with such a reduced diameter that the contents can be dispensed drop by drop.

The arrangement of the diaphragm and said passage can be such that any off-centre stream of substance which emerges from said apertured diaphragm during dispensing, will be deflected towards the axis of said passage, so

as to promote coalescence. For example, the passage can have an annular inward projection, of t which the side facing the diaphragm has an annular recess on which the streams can impinge.

Several embodiments of the invention will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying diagrammatic drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 shows the discharge end of a collapsible tube in axial section;

FIGURE 2 is a similar View of a second embodiment;

FIGURE 3 is a similar view of a third embodiment;

FIGURE 4 is a similar view of a fourth embodiment;

FIGURE 5 is a similar view of a fifth embodiment;

FIGURE 6 shows a similar view of a sixth embodiment; and

FIGURE 7 shows a similar view of a seventh embodiment.

The collapsible tube shown in FIGURE 1 is made of thermoplastic material and comprises a body portion 1, shoulder 2 and a head portion 3 provided with an external screw thread 4 for a closure cap (not shown). The head portion 3 has a passage 5 through which contents of the tube can be dispensed and an apertured diaphragm 6 across said passage at a position inward from the outer end of said passage, in this case the inner end thereof.

The diaphragm 6 is apertured by provision of a number of small openings 7 arranged so that on squeezing the tube, the contents, as separate streams, pass from the interior of the body 1 through the openings 7 into the disof a quantity of these contents on the outer side of the diaphragm prevents any air being sucked back into the tubebody portion-1. Thus, on release of the pressure exerted on the tube, sucking of air into the body portion 1 is delayed for a sufiiciently long period of time to allow the user of the tube to replace the closure cap.

The embodiments shown in FIGURES 2' to are provided with diaphragms which are convex towards the interior of the body portion. In FIGURE 2 the diaphragm is cylindrical, in FIGURE 3 it has the shape of a truncated cone, in FIGURE 4 it is conical and in FIGURE 5 the diaphragm is spherical. The convex shape of the diaphragm makes a larger area available in which to arrange the small openings 7. Moreover, by arranging the majority ofthe openings near the periphery of the diaphragm 6, formation of a single solid stream from the separate thin streams which emerge through the openings is furthered. Formation of a singlestream is also furthered by provision of an insert 9 in the outer end of the discharge passage, as shown in FIGURE 6. This insert 9 has a central opening 10, the radial dimensions of which are smaller than those of the discharge passage of the tube. if the dimensions of the opening 10 are small enough the tube can be used for dispensing its contents drop by-drop.

In FIGURE 7 anotherf-orm of insert is shown. This insert 10 has an annular inward projection, of which the side facing the diaphragm 6 has an annular recess 1-2.v

The thin streams of material extruded through the narrow openings 16 arranged near the periphery of the diaphragm 14 impinge on the annular recess 12 and are deflected towards the axisro-fthe discharge passage, whereby the formation of a solid stream of substance and expulsion of air present in the chamber 15 is assured. The central opening 111 may be flared as shown in the drawing when it is desired that a thick stream of material is to be dispensed.

In an example of the invention toothpaste of viscosity 40,000 centipoises was contained in a tube having a conical diaphragm similar to that shown in FIGURE 4. The cone was directed inwards and had ten apertures of 1 mm. diameter, six. being situatedat the peripheral base of the cone and four further up the walls of the cone.

in a second example similar toothpaste was contained in a similar tube, however, only six apertures in the cone were provided this time, each being of -1 mm. diameter and on the walls of the cone.

In a third example liquid shampoo having a viscosity of 4,000 centipoises was contained in a tube having a cylindrical diaphragm directed inwards and similar to that shown in FIGURE 2, Two apertures, each of 0.5 mm. diameter, were providedin the curved surface of the diaphragm.

We claim:

1. A resilient collapsible container comprising a body portion containing a. substance to be dispensed, a head portion connected to said .body portion defining an elongated passage through which a viscous substance can be dispensed, and an apertured diaphragm across saidelongated passage at a position substantially inward from the outer end of said elongated passage, said diaphragm having a plurality of apertures at least two of which are spaced closer to the side walls of said elongated passage than to each other, the arrangement being such that the substance to be dispensed fills substantially all of said elongated passage outside of said diaphragm when it is first dispensed and, thereafter, said substance outside saiddiaphragm in said elongated passage acts in conjunction with the apertures of the diaphragm to delay the instant at which air can be sucked into said body portion when the container starts to resile. I

2. A resilient collapsible container comprising, a body portion containing a substance to be dispensed, a head portion connected to said body portion defining'an elongated passage through which a viscous substance can be dispensed, and an apertured diaphragm across said passage .at' a position inward from the outer end of said passage, the passage outside of said d-iaphragmbeing at least two of which are spaced closer to the side walls of said elongated passage than to each other, the arrangement being such that the substance to be dispensed fills substantially all of said elongated passage outside of said diaphragm when it is first dispensed and thereafter said substance outside of said diaphragm in said elongated passage hinders the sucking of air into the body portion of said container throughsaid apertures when the container attempts to resume its original shape after the release of external pressure on its outer surface.

3. A resilient collapsible container as defined in claim 2,wherein said diaphragm is convex toward the interior of said body portion, the arrangement being such that when the outside of said diaphragm is covered with the substance to be dispensed, air cannot pass into said body portion.

4. A resilient collapsible container as defined in claim 7 2 wherein said diaphragm has at least two surfaces extending inwardly into said body portion, said inwardly extending surfaces each having an aperture therein which is designed to direct the substance to be dispensed through said aperture in a direction transverse to the longitudinal axis of said elongated passage, the arrangement being such that the substance to be dispensed fills: substantially all of said elongated passage outside of said diaphragm when it is first dispensed and thereafter hinders the sucking of air into the body portion of said container through said apertures when the container attempts to resume its original shape after the release of external pressure on its outer surface.

5. A resilient collapsible container comprising a body portion containing a substance to be dispensed, a head portion connected to said body portion defining an elongated pass-age through which a viscous substance can be dispensed, a first apertured diaphragm extending across one end of said elongated passage at a position inward from the outer end of said passage, the passage outside of said diaphragm being elongated, a second apertured diaphragm across .the other, outer end of said elongated passage, the arrangement being such that the substance to be dispensed fills substantially all of said elongated passage between said first and second diaphragms when it is first dispensed and said substance between said diaphragms and in said elongated passage, thereafter hinders the sucking of air into the body portion of said container through the aperture in said first diaphragm when the container attempts to resume its original shape after the release of external pressure on its outer surtace.

6. A resilient collapsible container comprising a body portion containing a substance to be dispensed, a head portion connected to said body portion defining an elongated passage through which a viscous substance can be dispensed, a first apertured diaphragm across one end of said elongated passage at position substantially adjacent the area where said head portion joins said body portion, and a second apertured diaphragm across the other outer end of said elongated passage, the arrangement being such that the substance to be dispensed fills substantially all of said elongated passage between said first and second diaphragms when it is first dispensed and thereafter hinders the sucking of air into the body portion of said container through the aperture in said first diaphragm when the container attempts to'resume its original shape after the release of external pressure on its outer surface.

7. A resilient collapsible containeras defined in claim 6 wherein the aperture in-said second diaphragm is spaced laterally with respect to the aperture in said first diaphragm, the arrangement being such that the substance to be dispensed fills substantially all of the elongated passage between said first and second diaphragms when it is first dispensed and thereafter hinders the sucking of air into the body portion of said container through the aperture in said first diaphragm when the container attempts to resume its original shape after the release of external pressure on its outer surface.

8. A resilient collapsible container as defined in claim 7 wherein said second diaphragm has a tapered aperture diverging outwardly from said elongated passage and being spaced laterally from the aperture in said first diaphragm, the arrangement being such that the substance to be dispensed fills substantially all of said elongated passage when it is first dispensed and thereafter hinders the sucking of air into the body portion of said container through the apertures when the container attempts to resume its original shape after the release of external pressure on its outer surface.

9. A resilient collapsible container comprising a body portion containing a substance to be dispensed, a head portion connected to said body portion defining an elongated passage through which a viscous substance can be dispensed, a first apertured diaphragm across said passage at a position inward from the outer end of said passage, the passage outside of said diaphragm being elongated, said diaphragm having a plurality of apertures at'least two apertures each of which is closer to the side wall of said elongated passage than to each other, and a second apertured diaphragm across the other outer end of said elongated passage, the arrangement being such that the substance to be dispensed fills substantially all of said elongated passage between said first and second diaphragms when it is first dispensed and thereby hinders the sucking of air into the body portion of said container through the apertures in said first diaphragm when the container attempts to resume its original shape after the release of external pressure on its outer surface.

10. A reslient collapsible container as defined in claim 9 wherein said second diaphragm has an aperture substantially in its center and spaced laterally from the apertures in said first diaphragm, the arrangement being such that the substance to be dispensed fills substantially all of said elongated passage between said first and second apertures when it is first dispensed and thereafter hinders the sucking of air into the body portion of said container through the apertures when the container attempts to resume its original shape after the release of external pressure on its outer surface.

11. A resilient collapsible container as defined in claim 10 wherein said second aperture has a tapered aperture diverging outwardly from said elongated passage and spaced laterally from the apertures in said first diaphragm.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,869,808 8/3 Hancock 222496 2,042,836 6/36 Friden 222575 X 2,682,974 7/54 Smith 222107 2,800,253 7/57 Henderson 222209 FOREIGN PATENTS 186,803 9/56 Austria;

521,815 5/40 Great Britain.

981,395 1/51 France.

LOUIS J. DEMBO, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1869808 *Dec 18, 1929Aug 2, 1932Hancock William TDispensing tube
US2042836 *Jan 19, 1934Jun 2, 1936Sun Tube CorpCollapsible tube
US2682974 *Jul 9, 1948Jul 6, 1954Smith Harry APlastic tube for pastes and other viscous materials
US2800253 *Oct 7, 1952Jul 23, 1957Edward HendersonDrop dispenser and container
AT186803B * Title not available
FR981395A * Title not available
GB521815A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3244330 *Oct 10, 1962Apr 5, 1966American Can CoContainer
US4616768 *Jun 1, 1984Oct 14, 1986Lingner & Fischer GmbhDischarge barrier for collapsible tubes
US6343704 *Oct 2, 1999Feb 5, 2002John Gilbert PrentissInfant feeding nipple
US6364218Apr 4, 2000Apr 2, 2002Sealant Equipment & Engineering, Inc.Viscous material dispense system
US7690539Dec 12, 2001Apr 6, 2010Tudor Thomas RViscous material dispense system
US8701928 *Sep 17, 2010Apr 22, 2014Ilan Zadik SamsonSpout for a spill-proof beverage container
US20120168450 *Sep 17, 2010Jul 5, 2012Ilanm Zadik SamsonSpout for a Spill-Proof Beverage Container
US20140183153 *Mar 4, 2014Jul 3, 2014Paul H. AndrewsInverted bottle assembly
EP2489600A1 *Feb 16, 2011Aug 22, 2012Albéa ServicesTube head provided with a non-rebreathing grating
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/207, 222/565, 222/563, 215/900, 215/40
International ClassificationB65D35/08
Cooperative ClassificationY10S215/90, B65D35/08
European ClassificationB65D35/08