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Publication numberUS3179414 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 20, 1965
Filing dateMar 25, 1963
Priority dateMar 25, 1963
Publication numberUS 3179414 A, US 3179414A, US-A-3179414, US3179414 A, US3179414A
InventorsArthur C Mertz, Jr Arthur A Cramer
Original AssigneeArthur C Mertz, Jr Arthur A Cramer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Opaque game board with spaced light transmitting zones
US 3179414 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1965 A. c. MERTZ ETAL OPAQUE GAME BOARD WITH SPACED LIGHT TRANSMITTING ZONES Filed March 25, 1965 OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OQOOOOOOQOGOOOOOOO @OQOOOQOOOQOOOOOOO oo o oo o

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Filed Mar. 25, 1963, Ser. No; 267,638 6 Claims. (Cl. 273130) This invention relates to a game board, and more particularly to a board for use in a game in which a player attempts by trial and error to reach a target in a position concealed from his view.

One of the common parlor games of this type that has been played for a long time is the well known game called battleship. Other variations of this type of game may be played very conveniently with the game board of this invention, as explained below.

Games boards of various types have been developed for use in such games as battleship, but all boards previously known are complicated andcumbersome to use. The game board of the present invention is simple in construction, easy to use, and contributes greatly to the enjoyment of whatever game is played with it, rather than detracting from that enjoyment because of some difiiculty or complexity in its use, as is true of the game boards previously developed. l

The game board of this invention includes a board having a target area and a playing area on opposite surfaces thereof, the target area surface being adapted to have marks recorded thereon by the players opponent to show target locations, and the playing area surface being adapted to have marks recorded thereon by the player to show thevarious moves that are made by the player during the course of a game. The game board also includes means game board is constructed of a plastic material and there are laterally and longitudinally spaced areas across the board which are transparent and through which both the players may see, with the intervening areas being opaque. The target and playing area surfaces may be smooth for marking with a wax pencil, they may be frosted or etched for marking with a lead pencil, or they may be any other type of surface upon which the players can mark the locations of targets and moves.

This invention will be further described in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a plan view of one embodiment of the game board of this invention showing the playing area surface as it might appear during use of the board for a game of golf; g 7

FIGURE 2 shows the same view ofthe game board of FIGURE 1, with marks shown in dashed line to represent targets seen by the players opponent on the opposite surface of the game board; and

of FIGURE 2.

In FIGURE 1, game boardll] is shown with playing area surface 11, which is adapted to have marks recorded thereon by the player using the board, to show moves made by him during the game. The board is shown as it might appear if it were being used in a parlor game designed to simulate a game of golf.

As seen, fairways 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 are first located upon playing area surface 11, either drawn by the opponent or carried over from a previously played game. In FIGURE 1, for simplicity of illustration, onlyfive fairwaysare shown, but in the'usual game nine will be employed.

Playing area surface 11 contains laterally and longitudinally spaced viewing zones 20. In the embodiment of FIGURE 1, for simplicity a reduced number of such spaced zones are shown; in the usual embodiment of the game board of this invention, there will be quite a few more such zones. At zones 20, game board 10 is at least translucent, so as to expose to the view of the players opponent any marks made by the player on playing area surface 11 in positions which coincide with the viewing zones.

Portions 21 which make up the remainder of game board 10 are opaque, so as to conceal from the players view any marks made on the opposite surface of game 'board 10, which is the targetarea surface 22 seen in FIGURE 3.

As stated above, when game board 10 is to be used in a parlor game of simulated golf, the first thing to be done is for the opponent to locate upon playing area surface 11 the boundaries of the fairways (indicated by designators 12 to 16 in FIGURES 1 and 2) to be used in the game. The fairways are then numbered consecutively around the board.

The next step in use of the board for the game of golf is for the opponent to locate on the reverse side of the game board one hole for each fairway. The holes are located by drawing a hidden cup around selected spaced viewing zones 20 on target area surface 22, as shown in FIGURE 2 by dashed lines 23, 24, 25, 26 and 27 for fairways 12 through 16, respectively. The cups are numbered by the opponent to correspond with the numbered fairways on playing surface 11 to which they correspond.

The opponent may also place an agreed number of hazards anywhere on the reverse side of game board 11) (target area surface 22) by designating the agreed number of spaced viewing zones 20. These hazards (not shown) maybe of specified geometrical shapes to represent, for example, sand traps, water holes and woods. When the'hidden cups and hazards are drawn by the opponent as just described, care is used that the markings recorded on target area surface 22 are all aligned with opaque areas 21 rather than viewing zones 20. Thus the cups and hazards are not visible to the player as he observes playing area surface 11, on theopposite side, of game board 16.

After the markings are made upon target area surface 22, the opponent returns the game board to the player. The player then marks his first shot or drive upon playing area surface 11, by teeing off from any viewing zone 20 located on the perimeter of the first fairway (indicated by designator 12 in FIGURE 2). The mark thus recorded on playing surface 11 constitutes the players initial attempt to ascertain by the method of trial and error the position of the first target concealed from the players view, i.e., cup 23.

' The initial drive and all subsequent shots in the parlor game of golf are made by drawing a straight line through a series of spaced viewing zones 20, either vertically, horizontally or diagonally. A shot must end when it reaches the boundary of the particular fairway being played. The players first shot on fairway 12 is indicated in FIG- URE 2 by horizontal line '39.

As will be seen, representative portions 31 of line 30 will be visible to the players opponent when the latter views target area surface 22 on the opposite side of game board 10. At the same time, of course, the target marked 23, which represents the hidden cup for fairway 12, is simultaneously exposed to the view of the players opponent.

Should the player desire to do so, he can simply draw a series of discrete marks 31 arranged in a straight line to represent his shot. In such case, the opponent will see the entire series of marks, rather than simply representative portions of a continuous line.

After each shot, the player holds game board up with target area surface 22 facing his opponent, and asks him whether the shot reached or crossed either the hidden cup or a hazard. If the shot runs into or passes through a hazard, the player loses a specified number of strokes, which must be added to his score for that hole. If the shot fails to reach the cup, another shot is made from the spaced viewing zone at which the line representing the last previous shot ended, and within the boundaries of the same fairway.

A shot is sunk by reaching or crossing the hidden cup. The player totals the number of strokes he took on the hole in question, and writes that number in a large figure I across the fairway on playing areasurface 11.

The game is played with each player alternately making a shot and then holding game board 10 up to ask his opponent the results as observed by the opponent when the latter views through zones 20 at least representative portions of the marks recorded on the playing area surface by the player, and at the same time views the target marks that he himself has made on target area surface 22. The game is won by the player or his opponent, depend ing upon which one completes the holes on game board 10 in the fewest number of strokes.

For succeeding games, the players may erase all markings and draw new fairways. Or, if they desire, they may erase only the hidden cups and hazards, and relocate them on target area surface 22 within the same fairway boundaries. As yet another variation of the game, the players may elect to switch game boards, so that each must play the fairways he originally drew, but within hidden cups and hazards placed on the back of the board (target area surface 22) by his opponent.

The game board of this invention may be produced from any single sheet of preferably transparent material by painting or otherwise rendering opaque portions 21 of playing area surface 11 which lie between laterally and longitudinally spaced viewing zones 20. A film of cellulose. acetate, or of the polyethylene terephthalate resin sold under the trademark Mylar, is a very suitable material for construction of I the game board.

A preferred form of construction which is easy and convenient to make, and likewise provides great flexibility in varying the-type of game to be played, is shown in FIGURE 3. This form is a laminated form in which an envelope closed on three sides is first formed by securing togetherfalong three edge portions 35, 36, 37 two sheets 38,39 of a clear plastic material. The sheet s edges 40 are left unsecured, to provide an opening for the envelope. A third sheet 41 is then provided for insertion in said envelope, sheet 41 being opaque except for latitudinally and longitudinally spaced portions 20 which are at least translucent. I

If playing area surface 11 and target area surface 22 are smooth, a wax pencil may be employed to record the target locations and theplayers moves. If playing area surface 11 and target area surface 22 are frosted or etched, the marks may be recorded thereon by lead pencil. In either case, the marks may be easily erased after each playing of the game is completed. If desired, different colored pencils or crayons may be employed fordifferent stages of a single game.

The game board of this invention is of course adapted for use in many other types of games besides the game of simulated golf, which has been described above, in which a player attempts to reach a concealed target by a series of trial-and-error moves.

The above detailed description of the invention has been givenfor clarity of understanding only. No unnecessary limitations should be understood therefrom, as modifications will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

We claim:

1. A game board for use in a game in which the player attempts by trial and error to reach a target located in a position concealed from his view, which comprises: a board having a target area and a playing area on opposite surfaces thereof, said target area surface being adapted to have marks recorded thereon by the players opponent showing target locations, and said playing area surface being adapted to have marks'hand inscribedthereon by the player showing moves made; first means for concealing from the players view said marks on the target area surface; and second means forsimultaneously exposing to the view of-the players opponent at least representative portions of said marks recorded on the playing area surface by the player, as well as any target on said target area surface.

2. A game board for use in a game in which the player attempts by trial and error to reach a target located in a position concealed from his view, which comprises: a board having a target area and a playing area on opposite surfaces thereof, said target area surface being smooth and adapted to have wax marks recorded thereon by the players opponent showing target locations, and said playing area surface being smooth and adapted to have wax marks recorded thereon by the player showing moves made; first means for concealing from the'players view said marks on the target area surface; and second means for simultaneously exposing to the view of the players opponent at least representative portions of said marks recorded on the playingarea surface by the player, as

well as any target marks on said target area surface.

3. A game board for use in a game in which the player I attempts by trial and error to reach a target located ina position concealed from his view, which comprises: a board having a target area and a playing area on opposite surfaces thereof, said target area surface being frosted and adapted to have lead pencil marks recorded thereon by the players opponent showing target locations, and said playing area surface being frosted and adapted to have lead pencil marks recorded thereon by the player showing moves made; means for concealing from the playeris view said marks on the target area surface; and means for simultaneously exposing to the view of the players opponent at least representative portions of said marks recorded on the playing area surface by the player, as well as any target marks on said target area surface.

4. A game board for use in a game in which the player attempts by trial and error to reach a target located in a position concealed from his view, which comprises: a board having a target area and a playing area on opposite surfaces thereof, said target area surface being adapted to have marks recorded thereon by the players opponent showing target locations, and said playing area surface being adapted to have marks recorded thereon by the player showing moves made, laterally and longitudinally spaced' zones of said board being light transmitting so as to expose to the view of the players opponent those portions of said marks recorded on the playing area surface by the player which are located in positions overlying said spaced viewing zones, the remainder of saidboard being opaque so as to conceal from the players view said marks on the target area surface.

5. A game board as described in claim 4 which in cludes a first sheet having said target area on its outer surface; a second sheet having said playing area on its outer surface, both of said sheets being light transmitting; a third sheet for insertion between said two sheets, said third sheet being opaque exeept for laterally and longitudinally spaced portions which are light transmitting; and means to hold said three sheets adjacent each other,

6. The game board of claim 5 in which said first two sheets are secured to each other along three edge portions only, to form an envelope open along its fourth edge, into which envelope said third sheet may be inserted during the period when the game board is used.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,988,301 1/35 Cofiin.

DELBERT B. LOWE, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1988301 *Feb 23, 1933Jan 15, 1935Coffin LouisGame board
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3532342 *Aug 27, 1968Oct 6, 1970Marguerite SimpsonChecker-type game with variously colored transparent squares and playing pieces
US4059275 *Jan 19, 1976Nov 22, 1977William Lawrence PriceBoard game
US4066265 *Aug 9, 1976Jan 3, 1978Bredlau Kenneth AAmusement device
US4170354 *Dec 9, 1977Oct 9, 1979Bredlau Kenneth AAmusement device
US4341385 *Jan 24, 1980Jul 27, 1982Doyle Holly ThomisElectronic board game apparatus
US4911452 *Apr 13, 1988Mar 27, 1990Marchese Jr Alfred JMethod of playing a category game
US4934708 *Aug 1, 1989Jun 19, 1990Kolkind Gerald LFamily quiz board game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/240, 273/277, 273/265
International ClassificationA63F3/02, A63F9/06, A63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00075, A63F9/0613, A63F2003/0075
European ClassificationA63F3/00A8, A63F9/06F