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Publication numberUS3180924 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 27, 1965
Filing dateJun 28, 1963
Priority dateJun 28, 1963
Publication numberUS 3180924 A, US 3180924A, US-A-3180924, US3180924 A, US3180924A
InventorsRowe Raymond N
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Busway connector
US 3180924 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 27, N RQWE' BUSWAY .CONNECTOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 28, 1963 //v vs/vro/e: RAYMOND M/ R0 WE,

ATTORNEY.

R. N. ROWE April 27, 1965 BUSWAY .CONNECTOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 28, 1963 United States Patent greases BUSWAY CQNNECTUR Raymond N. Rowe, Wakefield, RJL, assignor to General Electric Company, a corporation of New York Filed June 28, 1963, Ser. No. 291,374 2 @iaims. (Si. 174dt3) This invention relates to connectors, more particularly to connectors for electrically connecting the bus conductors at a joint between adjacent sections of a multisection busway, and it has for an object the provision of a simple, reliable, inexpensive and efficient connector of this character.

More specifically, the invention relates to a connector for two or more busbars in a busway and a more specific object of the invention is the provision of a single stab-in busway connector for two or more busbars.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a stab-in type busbar connector which is readily and easily installed.

Still another object of the invention is the provision of a stab-in busway in which the contact pressure on the busbars may easily be adjusted to any desired value within a range of permissible values.

In carrying the invention into efiect in one form thereof, a block of insulating material having mating cover and base sections is provided with a pair of parallel ducts separated by a partition and extending through the block from end to end to provide for insertion of a busbar in each end of each duct. In final position, the busbars in the parallel ducts are in parallel flat face to flat face relationship with each other, and the two busbars in each duct are in end to end relationship with each other. Separate contact bridging members in each duct make overlapping contact with a substantial portion of the flat surfaces of both of the end to end busbars therein. A spring mounted in a hole through the partition and insulated from the busbar in one of the ducts urges a bridging contact in each duct into contact with the end to end aligned busbars therein. The connector may comprise two or more two pole sections held together by a fastening means which furnish additional contact pressure when tightened.

For a better and more complete understanding of the invention reference should now be had to the following specification and to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a view in perspective of adjacent sections of a busway mechanically and electrically joined by a connector embodying the invention.

FIG. 2 is a view in section taken on the line 2-2 of FIG. 3 of a bus connector embodying the invention.

FIG. 3 is a view in section taken on the line 3-3 of FIG. 1 of the connector.

FIG. 4 is a view in perspective of one section of the molded base member of the connector, and

FIG. 5 is a view in perspective of a two section base assembly of a connector embodying the invention with one of the bridging contacts removed from its position in the assembly to reveal internal structural details.

Referring now to the drawings and particularly to FIG. 1 the busbars in sections 1 and 2 of a multisection busway are connected together by a two section connector 3 having two 2-pole sections 3a and 3b. Each busway section 1 and 2 has an elongated housing or enclosure comprising a generally channel shaped top member 4 and a fiat bottom wall member 5.

The two housing sections are joined together by a sleeve member 6 in which the connector 3 is captured.

Four busbars 7, 3, 9 and 1d are mounted in the bus- Way section 1 and are supported therein by suitable insulating supports (not shown). In section 2 of the busway four corresponding busbars 7a, 8a, 9a and Illa are similarly mounted and supported. Although the busway illustrated is of the 4-bar type, the invention is applicable to busways having either a greater or a lesser member than four bars.

Each of the connector sections 3a and 3b has a molded block base section 11 and an identical molded block cover section 12 made of a suitable molded insulating compound. Each of the base blocks 11 is provided with two longitudinally disposed parallel ducts 13 and 14 as shown in FIG. 4 and each of the cover blocks is provided with two corresponding longitudinally disposed ducts. The cover and base blocks are identical and when mounted in mating relationship, the corresponding ducts in base and cover blocks are in register and constitute a complete duct in which a busbar may be inserted at either end. In order that the busbars may be easily inserted in the connector, the sidewalls of the ducts are beveled at both ends to provide a busbar entrance that diverges outwardly toward the end.

Within each or" the ducts 13 and 14 are mounted a pair of bridging contacts 15' and lid. These bridging contacts are short flat straps and are made of a good conducting material such for example as copper or aluminum. As shown, each of these contacts has a bent portion at each end, such as the portions 16a and 16b of contact 16, and the sidewalls of the ducts 13 and 14 are recessed near their ends to receive the bent ends of the bridging contacts. For example, the sidewalls of the duct 14 near their ends are provided with recesses 17 and 18 to receive the bent ends 15a and 15b of contact 1% and are also provided with recesses 19 and 2G to receive the bent ends 116a and 16b of contact 16. The bent ends of bridging contacts provide sufiicient divergence at their ends to facilitate easy insertion of the busbars into the space between each pair of bridging contacts.

The base block 11 of each section of the molded insulator has a plurality of semicircular depressions molded in the top surface of the sidewalls and partitions between the two ducts 13 and 14. As best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the inside sidewall of the base block 11 has molded depressions 21, 22 and 23 and the partition between the ducts 13 and 14 has depressions 24, 25 and 2d. The outside sidewall has a centrally disposed semicircular depression 221: molded in its top surface. When the identical cover block 12 is placed on the base lock 11 in mating relationship the mating depressions in both base and cover blocks form complete holes.

Within the holes formed by depressions 24 and 26 in the base and mating depressions in the cover are mounted insulation cup members 27 and 28 and within these insulating cups are mounted springs. As shown in FIG. 2, spring 29 and 2% are mounted in insulating cups Z7 and 28 respectively. Thus, in the assembled connector, the spring 29 bears against one of the bridging contacts in duct 14 and the end of the insulating cup is forced by the spring to bear against one of the bridging contacts in duct 13.

When two 2-pole sections are assembled in parallel side by side relationship to form a 4-pole connector, insulating rods 3% and 31 are mounted in the holes formed by depressions 21 and 23 in the sidewall of one of the insulating blocks and in the holes in alignment register therewith in the sidewall of the adjacent insulator block. In the completed assembly, the rods 30 and 31 are situated between bridging contacts in adjacent insulating blocks and thus constitute a solid base against which the bridging contacts in adjacent ducts of adjacent sections of the insulating blocks are pressed when the sections themselves or the assembly of a plurality of such sections are compressed.

The complete assembly of two or more blocks is held together by means of a screw 32 which passes through the hole formed by depressions 22, 22a and 25 in both sections of the insulator and the holes 150 and Me in the bridging contacts. A sleeve 33 of insulating material insulates the screw from the bridging contacts.

The molded base 11 and the molded cover plate 12 are provided with integral molded bands 11a and 12a respectively. When the base and the cover are assembled the bands 11a and 12a constitute a single band encircling the assembly. This continuous band is raised a suitable amount, e.g., V inch above the outer surfaces of the base and cover plate. It serves to position the connector accurately in the housing sleeve 6. Clearance holes 6a and 6b are provided in the sleeve 6. This permits full application of the clamping force of screw 32 to the molded member. The pressure of the bridging contacts against the flat faces of the busbars may be increased by tightening the screw 32 to force both sections of the connector toward each other.

As many 2-pole units as may be required may be grouped together to connect the busbars of adjoining lengths of the busway with normally spring pressed contacts and with the additional feature of being able to increase the contact pressure by means of a clamping screw.

Alterations and modifications in the connector illustrated described may be made without departing from the true spirit of this invention or from the scope of the annexed claims.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is: 1. A busbar connector comprising;

(1) a pair of elongated generally rectangular blocks of insulating material arranged in side by side relationship with a sidewall of one adjacent a sidewall of the other,

(2) each of said blocks comprising mating complementary cover and base portions having a plurality of ducts separated from each other by a partition and extending through said block from end to end in spaced apart relationship to provide for insertion of a flat busbar in each end of each of said ducts and for mounting two busbars in each of said ducts in aligned end to end spaced apart relationship and in parallel flat face to flat face relationship with the busbars in the others of said ducts,

(3) a pair of flat bridging contact members in each of said ducts bridging the space between the busbars therein and overlying a portion of the flat surface at one end of each of said aligned busbars therein,

(4) a pair of holes in said partition on either side of the space between adjacent ends of the busbars in each of said ducts and communicating between ducts on opposite sides 'of said partition,

(5) a spring in each of said holes for pressing the bridging contacts in each duct into contact with the flat surface of the busbars therein,

(6) an insulating cup in each of said holes for insulating the spring therein from a bridging member in one of said ducts,

(7) an insulating screw extending through said adjacent blocks,

(8) a pair of additional holes on opposite sides of said screw in said adjacent sidewalls of each of said blocks, and

(9) a insulating rod in each of said additional holes and extending into engagement with a bridging member in each of said blocks to provide for increasing the contact pressure between said bridging members and said busbars in response to tightening said screw.

2. A busbar connector comprising:

(1) a pair of elongated generally rectangular blocks of insulating material arranged in side by side relationship with a sidewall of one adjacent a sidewall of the other,

(2) each 'of said blocks having a plurality of ducts separated from each other by a partition and extending through said block from end to end in spaced apart relationship to provide for insertion of a fiat busbar ineach end of each of said ducts and for mounting two busbars in each of saidducts in aligned end to end spaced apart relationship and in parallel flat face to flat face relationship with the busbars in the others of said ducts,

(3) a pair of fiat bridging contact members in each of said ducts bridging the space between the busbars therein and overlying a portion of the fiat surface at one end of each of said aligned busbars therein,

(4) a pair of holes in said partition on either side of the space between adjacent ends of the busbars in each of said ducts and communicating between ducts on opposite sides of said partition,

(5) a spring in each of said holes for pressing the bridging contacts in each duct into contact with the flat surface of the busbars therein, A

(6) an insulating cup in each of said holes for insulating the spring therein from a bridging member in one of said ducts,

(7) an insulated screw extending through said adjacent blocks,

(8) a pair of additional holes on opposite sides of said screw in said adjacent sidewalls of each of said blocks, and

(9) an insulating rod in each of said additional holes and extending into engagement with a bridging member in each of said blocks to provide for increasing the contact pressure between said bridging members and saidbusbars in response to tightening said screw.

ReterencesCited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,619,516 11/62 Schneider. 3,124,642

3/64 Meacham 17488

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2619516 *Jul 7, 1948Nov 25, 1952Schneider John GMultiple electric outlet
US3124642 *Oct 23, 1958Mar 10, 1964 Busway with resilient connecting means for plural busbars
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3339009 *Feb 23, 1965Aug 29, 1967Ite Circuit Breaker LtdBus duct with removable joint stack
US3372111 *Feb 21, 1966Mar 5, 1968Vahlsing IncTreatment of alkaline wastes from potato processing
US3384855 *Apr 15, 1966May 21, 1968Square D CoPlug-in bus duct having corrugated sidewalls
US3786394 *Mar 22, 1972Jan 15, 1974Cutler Hammer IncSingle-bolt joint for feeder and plug-in bus ducts
US3909098 *Apr 25, 1974Sep 30, 1975Square D CoCurrent take-off unit
US4008366 *Dec 8, 1975Feb 15, 1977Siemens AktiengesellschaftCoupling for bus bar system
US4146285 *May 11, 1977Mar 27, 1979Square D CompanyBus duct system
US4174143 *Mar 29, 1976Nov 13, 1979Cutler-Hammer, Inc.Bus duct joint employing lightly-loaded multiple-point electrical connector
US4445732 *Feb 11, 1982May 1, 1984Westinghouse Electric Corp.Electrical stab connecting means utilizing eddy current electromagnetic repulsion
US4493526 *Jan 17, 1983Jan 15, 1985Hosiden Electronics Co., Ltd.Jack
US4555604 *Dec 6, 1983Nov 26, 1985Westinghouse Electric Corp.Circuit breaker having improved stab assembly
US4627680 *May 8, 1985Dec 9, 1986Westinghouse Electric Corp.Bridging joint for electric power busway
US4679872 *Jan 27, 1986Jul 14, 1987Coe Larry DCylindrical back plane structure for receiving printed circuit boards
US5122072 *Dec 20, 1990Jun 16, 1992Square D CompanyCam-lock busway joint assembly
US5654527 *Jul 19, 1994Aug 5, 1997The Deutsch CompanyMethod and apparatus for connecting electric bus
US7819681 *Jun 19, 2009Oct 26, 2010Rodrigues Carlton RThermally efficient busway joint pack
US8911248 *Nov 9, 2012Dec 16, 2014Amazon Technologies, Inc.Busbar connection assembly
US9071028 *May 2, 2013Jun 30, 2015Sma Solar Technology AgElectrical connection between two busbars made of flat conductors and of an insulating layer disposed between the conductors
US9147948Dec 12, 2014Sep 29, 2015Amazon Technologies, Inc.Busbar connection assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification174/88.00B, 439/213, 439/212
International ClassificationH02G5/00
Cooperative ClassificationH02G5/007
European ClassificationH02G5/00D