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Publication numberUS3182613 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 11, 1965
Filing dateApr 3, 1963
Priority dateApr 3, 1963
Publication numberUS 3182613 A, US 3182613A, US-A-3182613, US3182613 A, US3182613A
InventorsFrancis Hagan Leo
Original AssigneeFrancis Hagan Leo
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cluster tables and the like
US 3182613 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y '1, 1965 L- F. Hmm I 3,182,613

CLUSTER TABLES AND THE LIKE Filed April 3, 1963 WFIGA.

ATTORNEYS Stats The present invention relates to improvements in cluster-type or stacked tables and the like, suitable for household or ofiice use.

It is an object of the invention to provide a set of basically similar pedestal-type tables which, when not in use, may be arranged in a compact nested cluster, at least one of the tables of the set in such an arrangement being adapted to support a plant, an ash tray or any dec rative or like object, thus providing a handsome unit lending itself to an attractive appearance of the room. When in use, as individual cocktail tables or the like, they are separated from the set and disposed conveniently adjacent the user and, again, afford individually attractive pieces. Whether thus used, or used in cluster, the tables of the set have a highly attractive sculptural appearance, and can be ornamented in bright contrasting or blending colors to brighten up the decor as a whole.

Structurally considered, it is an object of the invention to provide a table cluster setting for the purposes referred to, which is constituted by generally similar table components of different heights, each table including a top panel and central supporting stem or pedestal. In accordance with the invention, the table panel is formed to provide radially inwardly extending slots or notches from equally spaced points about its perimeter; and the width of such slots is chosen only slightly in excess of the diameter or thickness of the supporting stem or pedestal. Thus, with the panels in laterally overlapped relation to one another in a descending order in accordance with the height of the table, the slots of the panels beneath the topmost of the set are fitted to straddle the pedestal of panels thereabove.

This enables the clustered set to be put in a very compact arrangement, with the respective pedestals or stems in close side-to-side relation to one another. In the alternative, the tables, while still clustered, internested or stacked as desired, may be spread outwardly somewhat to expose from above a greater portion of the area of each table, and thus increase the ability of the set to support objects when not in individual use of its components.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a clustered table set made up of individually similar pedestaltype table components, each of which includes an upper table panel as described, and a similar slotted base pedestal. In accordance with the invention, the pedestals may have removable threaded engagement with the panel centers at opposite sides thereof, thus affording a table construction which may be dismantled for compact packaging in shipment or storage.

In the alternative, the invention contemplates table components having slotted top panels as described, but in which the base support is afforded by radiating legs of one design or another. The connections of these legs to the respective pedestals are at different height, so as to prevent interference of the legs of one table with those of another when the set is compactly clustered.

In any embodiment of the invention, it is an object to provide a clustered table set which, by reason of the intermeshed engagement of the slots of the respective tables with pedestals or stems of others, permits a shutterlike action automatically bringing the table components to a desired cluster pattern by' simply manipulating the pedestals of two tables of the set, the intermeshed engagement of pedestals and slots automatically bringing out a carruning adjustment.

Generally, it is an object to provide a clustered table atet ice

set, and individual table components of such set, which are light in weight, simple in design, and capable of being manufactured at extremely low cost. This is possible because of the fact that all table panels are identical in their slotted contour, hence may be stamped by a single die. The stock of the pedestal or stem is also standard, and threading formation for assembly of the parts is also done very inexpensively.

The simplicity of the design makes it possible to produce the units in an extremely wide variety of interesting and attractive designs, which may also be ornamented in a large number of different ways. Regardless, however, of the design chosen, the cluster set is characterized uniformly by an attractive, floral petal-like appearance. Yet functionality is not impaired in so far as the object supporting action of the tables is concerned, inasmuch as the width of the slotting thereof for the purposes of the invention is not sufficiently great to bar the supporting effect of a continuous supporting plane.

The foregoing as well as other objects will become more apparent as this description proceeds, especially when considered in connection with the accompanying drawing illustrating preferred embodiments of the invention, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a three-table set arranged in a clustered relationship;

FIG. 2 is a horizontal sectional view along line 2-4 of FIG. 4, showing the set of tables in a very compact nested grouping;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view showing the tables in a more widespread cluster design;

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of the cluster;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary enlarged scale view illustrating a proposed threaded connection of panel and pedestal table components;

FIG. 6 is a bottom plan view of a table panel or plane of one of the components of a cluster;

FIG. 7 is a similar plan vieW of another design of panel component;

FIG. 8 is a side elevational view showing a modified type of cluster set, in which the tables have spread supporting legs, as distinguished from the design of FIGS. 1 through 4; and

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary perspective View illustrating still another modified design of leg type stem or pedestal.

Referring first to FIGS. 1 through 6, there is shown a cluster of three tables 10, 11 and 12 of increasing heights in the order mentioned. In other dimensional respects the tables are identical, and a set may be constituted by a number greater than two or three. The latter has been chosen for the purpose or" illustration, and because it makes possible a shutter-like action as the tables 10, 11 and 12 are varied in regard to the closeness of their spacing, as appears in FIGS. 2 and 3. It is seen that an attractive floral petal-like visual effect may be had, the tables automatically positioning themselves relative to one another by reason of structural features to be described.

In the interest of simplicity, and because as indicated above the component tables differ from one another only in height, structural features of only one thereof, i.e., the lowest table 10, will be described, on the understanding that corresponding structural features of the intermediate table 11 will be designated by corresponding reference numerals, primed; while corresponding features of the highest table 12 will be designated by corresponding reference numerals double primed.

The table 16 comprises a flat, top object supporting panel or plane 14, an identical bottom or base panel or plane 15 and an upright central pedestal or stem 16. In the interest of simplicity and low cost of production, the panel components .14, 15 are identical, being capable of being formed by a single die, just as are those of the tables 11, 12, using the same die. Likewise, the pedestal 16 may be of a desired length of standard rod or tube stock. Moreover, for a simple connection of panels to pedestal, it is contemplated that the pedestal 16 shall be provided with threads 17 at opposite axial ends thereof, for releasable engagement in tapped openings 18 of the top and bottom panels or planes 14, 15, respectively. This permits compact packaging of the table parts for shipment and/ or storage.

In accordance with the design of FIGS. 1 through 6, the panel elements 14, 15 are generally circular. However, FIG. 7 shows an alternative design in an octagonal outline. Other contours of more or less intricate shape are of course possible. However, regardless of this variable, in any embodiment the panels 14, 15 exhibit radially inwardly convergent slots or notches 20 on diameters of the panel, these slots extending equidistantly from openings through the periphery of the panels 14, 15. The width of the slots 20 is only slightly in excess of the diameter or thickness of the stem or pedestal 16, and they are equidistantly spaced from one another in the angular sense about the center connection of panel and stem.

The tables 10, 11 and 12 are arranged, when clustered, in a manner which will permit this nesting without interference. That is, the base panel or plane 15 of the lowest table rests on the floor F (FIG. 4). The base panel of the tallest table 12 is placed upon base element 15. The third table 11 of intermediate height is then placed in position with a pair of the slots of its base panel or plane 15' straddling the stems 16 and 16" of tables 10 and 12, respectively, the base panel 15 resting upon the panel 15", just as the latter rests upon the lowermost panel 15.

With the tables 10, 11 and 12 then disposed in this partially overlapped or interleaved relation to one another, inward pressure exerted on the stems 16, 16" of the shortest and tallest tables 10, 12, respectively, will cause the table set to be brought to the compactly clustered outline appearing in FIG. 2, the straddling of slots and stems automatically occasioning the action. A reversal of the force results in the more Widespread overlapped petal effect of FIG. 3, by a reversed cam action.

It is evident that, in cluster, the set of tables may be used as an ornamental support for objects, such as ash trays, planters, a lamp or the like. When separated the tables may be employed as in the usual fashion of individual cocktail tables, or for any other convenient purpose. While differing in height, they are eminently practical for these purposes.

FIG. 7 illustrates an optional alternative design of table panel, here specially designated 22, but similar in all other respects than its octagonal outline to the table 10. Accordingly, corresponding reference numerals have been utilized to show corresponding parts.

While the design of FIGS. 1 through 6 affords a very attractive type of table characterized by identical top and bottom panels or planes, it is contemplated that other types of base support may be employed, so long as the top table panels permit the internested stem and slot grouping of the tables as described above. Thus, FIG. 8 shows an arrangement of three tables 24, and 26 of progressively diminishing height; and the pedestals or stems 27 of these are provided with tripod-type legs 28. These are of different height above the fioor F to permit nesting or clustering without interference.

FIG. 9 illustrates an alternative base arrangement, including stems 2?, 3t) and 31 fitted with leg-type bases 32, 33 and 34, respectively, which are of diminishing height in that order. In each case, the legs 32, 33 and 34 include horizontal, radially extending portions 35 and downturned feet 36 on each, the difference in height being the result of a proportioning of the feet 35 as to length.

It is to be understood that in the embodiments of FIGS.

8 and 9 the use of leg-type bases of different heights will. enable the table top panels to be brought to the desired different elevations, using stern components of the same. Moreover, While the various embodiments herein shown feature a central connection of the supporting stem to the top panel or plane, which is also shown as being of a symmetrical outline, it may be found desirable, for aesthetic or functional reasons to vary the construction in either or both of these particulars.

The individual tables are light in weight and readily shifted about a living or office space as desired; and they may be constructed of any relatively inexpensive material, for example, molded plastic paneling, compressed material such as masonite, attractively plated metal, and the like. The top and/or base panels may be finish sprayed or other wise finished or coated in any desired manner. Regardless of specific design, any arrangement of the clustered table sets gives a natural floral effect which is very attractive, indeed.

Since pedestal-type tables having means to adjust the stern thereof as to height are known to the art, it is to be understood that the present invention contemplates the use of such means for the purpose of providing different table heights in the herein intended cluster table set.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. A cluster table set comprising a plurality of generally similar tables each having a table panel member and an upright supporting stem member, said stem members being connected to the respective panel members to support the latter at different elevations, at least some of said panel members having an inwardly extending slot proportioned in width for horizontal straddling engagement with the stem member of another table, thereby enabling an adjustable, laterally overlapped and clustered positioning of the tables, with their stem and panel embers thus engaged, upon relative movement of said stem members in said slots.

2. A cluster table set comprising a plurality of generally similar tables each having a table panel member and an upright supporting stern member, said stem members being connected substantially centrally to the respective panel members to support the latter at different elevations, at least some of said panel members having an inwardly extending slot opening outwardly of the perimeter thereof and proportioned in width for horizon tal and removable straddling engagement with the stem member of another table, thereby enabling an adjustable, laterally overlapped and clustered positioning of the tables, with their stem and panel members thus engaged, upon relative movement of said stem members in said slots, and a release of said tables from said clustered relation for individual use.

3. A cluster table set in accordance with claim 1, and further comprising generally similar, stable supporting base structures on the bottoms of the respective stern members, which structures are interclustered to permit said clustered positioning of tables.

4. A cluster table set in accordance with claim 1, and further comprising generally similar, stable supporting base structures on the bottoms of the respective stem members, which structures are interclustered to permit said clustered positioning of tables, said base structures comprising slotted base panel members similar to the respective table panel members, the base panel members being in vertically stacked engagement with one another, slots of those above the lowermost having said straddling engagement with stem members of tables whose base members are said lowermost and that of at least one above the lowermost.

5. A cluster table set in accordance with claim 1, and further comprising generally similar, stable supporting base structures on the bottoms of the respective stem members, which structures are interclustered to permit said clusters positioning of tables, said base structures comprising slotted base panel members similar to the respective table panel members, the base panel members being in vertically stacked engagement with one another, slots of those above the lowermost having said straddling engagement with stem members of tables whose base members are said lowermost and that of at least one above the lowermost, the stem members being of difierent heights.

6. A cluster table set in accordance with claim 1, and further comprising generally similar, stable supporting base structures on the bottoms of the respective stem members, which structures are interclustered to permit said clustered positioning of tables, said base structures comprising a set of radially outwardly extending floor engaging legs on each stem member.

7. A cluster table set in accordance with claim 1, and further comprising generally similar, stable supporting base structures on the bottoms of the respective stem members, which structures are interclustered to permit said clustered positioning of tables, said base structures comprising a set of radially outwardly extending floor engaging legs on each stem member, the legs of the respective base sets being of diiterent heights.

8. A cluster table set in accordance with claim 1, and further comprising generally similar, stable supporting base structures on the bottoms of the respective stem members, which structures are interclustered to permit said clustered positioning of tables, said base structures comprising a set of radially outwardly extending fioor engaging legs on each stem member, the legs of the respective base sets being of different heights, the stern members being of substantially equal height.

9. A table of the type described, comprising a table panel member, an upright supporting stem member connected to said panel member to support the latter, said panel member having a plurality of radially inwardly extending, circumferentially spaced slots opening outwardly of the perimeter thereof and somewhat greater in width than the thickness of said stem member for straddling engagement with the stem member of another similar table, and a stable supporting base structure on the bottom of said stem member, comprising a base panel member similar to said table panel member and having slots similar to those of the latter.

10. A table of the type described, comprising a table panel member, an upright supporting stem member connected substantially centrally to said panel member to support the latter, said panel member having a plurality of radially inwardly extending, circumferentially spaced slots opening outwardly of the perimeter thereof and somewhat greater in width than the thickness of said stern member for straddling engagement with the stem member of another similar table and a stable supporting base structure on the bottom of said stem member, comprising a base panel member similar to said table panel References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 723,114 3/03 Witt 211-177 1,893,799 1/33 Harrington 248194 1,919,838 7/33 Hadly 248194 1,955,771 4/34 Roth 248194 12,170,006 8/39 Brandt 248194 2,376,955 5/45 Ball 211 2,409,027 10/46 Fergusson 108-91 2,967,565 1/61 Schultz 297--239 3,017,969 1/62. Nielsen 5280 3,073,660 1/63 Schultz 108-150 3,083,052 3/63 Thorson 297 3,100,459 8/63 Liss 10853 FOREIGN PATENTS 535,995 2/22 France. 683,250 11/52 Great Britain.

FRANK B. SHERRY, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US723114 *Jan 18, 1902Mar 17, 1903Frank F WittClothes-rack.
US1893799 *Nov 21, 1930Jan 10, 1933Central Scientific CoLaboratory support
US1919838 *Dec 23, 1931Jul 25, 1933Hadly James TorrenceNested base for lamps, etc.
US1955771 *Feb 16, 1933Apr 24, 1934Roth William KDisplay fixture
US2170006 *Sep 27, 1937Aug 22, 1939Robert J BrandtBase construction
US2376955 *Mar 13, 1944May 29, 1945Ball Norris CMilk pipe rack
US2409027 *Mar 8, 1944Oct 8, 1946Fergusson Alan RNested serving table
US2967565 *Jan 4, 1960Jan 10, 1961Knoll AssociatesStacking chair
US3017969 *May 28, 1956Jan 23, 1962Nielsen Harold RPortable partitions
US3073660 *Feb 2, 1961Jan 15, 1963Knoll AssociatesTable and top with petal-simulating sections
US3083052 *Oct 27, 1961Mar 26, 1963Thorson Ole ATable and chair set
US3100459 *Aug 2, 1962Aug 13, 1963Jules LissNested tray stand
FR535995A * Title not available
GB683250A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3327656 *Mar 31, 1966Jun 27, 1967Edward M SchwartzSupport devices
US3347186 *Mar 24, 1966Oct 17, 1967Nasri KhattarNestable supports
US4193351 *Nov 15, 1978Mar 18, 1980Belokin Paul JrDisplay rack assembly
US4653803 *Apr 27, 1983Mar 31, 1987Crowe Scott DSettee seating unit and settee-cluster frames therefor
US5802989 *Oct 1, 1997Sep 8, 1998Veyhl GmbhTable support structure
US5810181 *Aug 30, 1996Sep 22, 1998Emalfarb; Bradley S.Reconfigurable display stand
US6662731 *Dec 27, 2001Dec 16, 2003Steelcase Development CorporationNestable table with slotted table top
Classifications
U.S. Classification108/91, 108/92, D06/687, D06/697.1
International ClassificationA47B7/02, A47B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B7/02
European ClassificationA47B7/02