Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3182840 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 11, 1965
Filing dateNov 5, 1963
Priority dateNov 5, 1963
Publication numberUS 3182840 A, US 3182840A, US-A-3182840, US3182840 A, US3182840A
InventorsPolzin Dean A
Original AssigneePolzin Dean A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Safety bottle closure
US 3182840 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 11, 1965 D. A. POLZIN 3,182,840

SAFETY BOTTLE CLOSURE Filed NOV. 5, 1963 FIG. 6 MENTOR DEAN A. POLZIN ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,182,840 SAFETY BOTTLE CLOSURE Dean A. Polzin, Warren, Mich. (12055 Elm St., Birch Run, Mich.) Filed Nov. 5, 1963, Ser. No. 321,483 Claims. (Cl. 215-9) This invention relates to bottle closures and more particularly to a safety closure for containers which prevents removal of the cap by children or through accidental means.

Safety closures of this kind are useful in preventing dangerous or poisonous substances from being removed from their containers other than by an intentional act on the part of an adult. Many substances dangerous to children are stored in containers in the home and are accessible to children. As a result, various safety closures have been suggested in the past, each intended to provide a container with a closure which could not be removed by children or through inadvertence.

One such bottle closure employs a series of teeth projecting inwardly from the inner surface of a resilient cap. T hese teeth are adapted to engage projections on the surface of the bottle neck and prevent rotation when the cap is moved in a counterclockwise direction. If the cap is to be removed, the user squeezes the resilient cap intermediate the teeth; this causes the portion of the cap adjacent to the teeth to flex outwardly so that the teeth no longer engage the projections on the bottle and the cap is free to rotate and be removed.

The disadvantage of such a closure is that the cap must be sufficiently resilient to allow the cap to be squeezed and thereby flex outwardly. As a result, the effectiveness of the seal is reduced, thus creating a serious leakage problem and thereby increasing, rather than decreasing, the possibility that the con-tents of the container will cause harm to children or others.

A further disadvantage of such a structure lies in the likelihood that the projections on the container will be damaged or broken Oh. The container, during its life, may undergo substantial abusive handling and be repetitively moved into cont-act with other containers or objects. As a result, the project-ions may be severely damaged or broken'off so as .to prevent the closure from being operative.

It is therefore the principal object of the present invention to provide a safety bottle closure of the general type described above, wherein the cap is constructed of a rigid material, and the bottle is constructed without projecting surfaces.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention which will be subsequently described in detail, the invention takes the form of a cap of substantially rigid material threaded along its interior walls so as to be normally mounted on the threaded neck of a container. At the lower edge of the cap, a springli-ke raised member is provided having a pointed end adapted to fit'within a matching recess in the -adjacent container neck. Rotation of the cap in the clockwise direct-ion tightening it about the neck, allows the pointed end to pass over the recess. When the cap is then rotated in the counter-clockwise direction, the pointed end of the spring-like member engages the inner wall of the recess in the container neck and the cap is thus prevented from further rotation.

An advantage of the present invention is that the cap may be constructed of rigid material such as plastic or container will not inadvertently leak out and cause harm to children or others.

"Ice

A further advantage of the invention is that it provide a safety closure which cannot be opened or removed b children or other accidental means.

Another advantage is that the bottle is provided with recess along its neck rather than projecting surfaces whic might be subject to damage in handling.

An additional advantage of the present invention 1 that it is extremely simple to manufacture, and provide a secure lock which is easy to actuate.

Other objects and advantages will be more readily a parent from the following detailed description of a pri ferred embodiment of the invention. The descriptio makes reference to the accompanying drawing in which FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of the upper portio of a container with a safety closure according to the pre: ent invention;

FIGURE 2 is a plan view of the closure and contains shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a side view of the closure and containe of FIGURE -1;

FIGURE 4 is a top section view of the present closur mounted on'the container neck in looking position, take along the lines 44 in FIG. 3;

FIGURE 5 shows the closure of FIGURE 4 with th springdike section depressed by the users fingers so as t release the cap for removal; and

FIGURE 6 is a section view taken along the lines 6- in FIGURE 3.

Referring to the drawing in detail, FIGURE 1 show a cap, generally indicated at 10, mounted on the neck 1 of a bottle 14.

As shown in FIGURE 6, the upper portion of the nee 12 includes threads 16. The cap 10 has a flat top It and an annular wall 20 projecting downwardly there from. The wall 20 is threaded as shown at 22 and adapted to fit along the threads 16 of the bottle neck 1-2 Adjacent the lower edge of the wall 20 a small stres relief hole 24 is formed. A retaining section 26 extend horizontally from the wall 20 below the hole 24. The re taining section 26 is curved in the horizontal plane suc that its midportion 28 projects outwardly beyond the Oil cumference of the cap 10. The free end 29 of the DE taining section is wider than the rest of the retainin section and has a pointed tip 30 which normally extend within the circumference of the cap.

The neck 12 of the bottle '14 includes a recess 32 be low the threads 16. The recess has a sharp angle or li portion 34 at one end and a flattened portion 36 at th opposite end.

As a result of its configuration and of the location 0 the stress relief hole 24, the retaining section 26 form a spring-like extension of the wall 20 with its midporti-o. 28 projecting outwardly and its tip 30 projecting inwardl of the circumference of the remainder of the cap 10.

When the cap 10 is to be mounted on the bottle use 12, it is rotated clockwise until it descends into sealin position. As it is rotated, the free end 2-? of the retainin section 26 passes over the flattened portion 36 of th recess 32 without engagement; since the tip 30 trails th wider portion of the free end in this movement, it cannc engage any portion of the recess 32.

When the cap is rotated counterclockwise, the tip 3 engages the lip 34 of the recess 32 and prevents furthe rotation of the cap. To release the cap for removal, th

user presses against the mid-portion 28 of the retainin sect-ion 26 as shown in FIG. 5. As the retaining sectioben-ds under this pressure, the inner face of the free en 29 is forced to slide along the recess 32 towards the Ii 34 and the tip 30 to move outwardly away from engage ment with the lip 34. The cap 10 is then free to rotat and may be removed from the bottle.

ones-nee nos the cap may not be removed from the bottle withapplying pressure to the retaining section, the cap tot be removed by children nor can it be removed by lent. In constructing the cap, the tension in the reng section can be increased as desired so as to increase tmount of pressure needed to remove the cap; this will ier reduce the likelihood of removal of the cap by vertence or by children. 1e'cap is preferably constructed of plastic, thin steel ther rigid material which perm-its flexing of the reng section. If desirable, the cap could be constructed ny suitable rigid or flexible material While the retainsection could be constructed separately of a suitable ble material and fixed to the lower portion of the so as to project in the manner decribed above. further alternative embodiment (not shown) employs nner annular member in which the recess is located, er than in the bottle neck. This inner member is fixed 1y about the neck of a conventional bottle, leaving lpper open end of the bottle exposed. The cap, con- :ted' as described above, is then screwed on to the llar member and locked in place as already described. embodiment of the invention permits the closure to :mployed on a conventional bottle rather than one tructed with'the recess provided in its neck surface. aving thus described my invention, 1 claim:

Container closure means, comprising:

container having a substantially cylindrical portion open at one extremity thereof, said portion having a recess along its outer surface;

cap adapted to be mountedin sealing engagement over said open end of said'cylindrical portion on said container; id rigidflexible retaining. means integral with said cap adapted to engage said recess and thereby prevent rotation of said capin a first direction required for removal of the cap and permit rotation in the opposite direction, said'retaining means flexing with respect to said recess in response to external pres-sure applied to said retaining means on said ca so as to permit rotational motion of said cap in said first direction.

Container closure means, comprising:

container having a substantially cylindrical portion open atone extremity thereof, said portion having a recess along its outer surface;

cap of non-resilient material having an annular portion adapted to threadably engage said cylindrical portion and a top portion adapted to seal said cylindricalpor-tionwhen saidcap is threadably mounted thereon; ld'rigid flexibie'retaining means integral with said cap adapted to engage said recess and thereby prevent rotation of said cap in a first direction required for removal of the cap and permit rotation in the opposite direct-ion, said retaining means flexing with respect to said recess in response to external pressure applied to said retaining means on said cap so as to permit rotational motion of said cap in said first direction.

Container closure means, comprising:

container having :a substantially cylindrical portion open at one extremity thereof, said portion having a it annular portion and integral with said cap, said member having its free end normally disposed within the circumference of the inn-er surface of said cap such that it is received within said recess when it is rotated into position adjacent thereto, said recess then resisting rotational movement of said retaining member in a first direction required to remove the cap and permitting rotational movement of said retaining member in the opposite direction, said retaining member having a midportion which, when depressed, causes said free end to move to a position along said recess permitting it to be rotated in said first direction.

4. Container closure means, comprising:

a container having a substantially cylindrical portion open at one extremity thereof, said portion having a recess along its outer surface;

a cap of non-resilient material having an annular por' tion adapted to threadably engage said cylindrical portion and a top portion adapted to seal said cyl'indrical portion when said cap is threadably mounted thereon;

and a flexible rigid retaining member integral with said cap and fixed to said annular port-ion at one end and having its free end normally disposed within the circumference of the inner surface of said cap such that it is received within said recess when it is rotated into a position adjacent thereto, said recess then abutting the tip of said free end and thereby resisting rotational movement of said retaining member in a first direction required to remove the cap, and permitting rotational movement of said retaining member in the opposite direction, said retaining member having a midportion which, when depressed, induces a flexing movement of. said ifr'ee end as tofreesaid tip from said recess and permit rotation of said cap in said first direction.

5. Container closure means, comprising:

a container having a substantially cylindrical portion open at one extremity thereof, said portion having a recess along its outer periphery, said recess having a sharp-angle portion at one edge thereof;

a cap of non-resilient material having an annular portion adapted to threadably engage said cylindrical portionand' a top portion adapted to seal said cylindrical portion when said cap is threadably mounted thereon;

anda flexible rigid retaining member integral with said cap fixed to said annular portion at one end and having its free end normally disposed Within the circumference of the inner surface of said cap such that it is received within said recess when it is rotated into a position adjacent thereto, the sharpangle portion of the recess then abutting the tip of said free end and thereby resisting rotational movement of said retaining member in a'first direction required to remove the cap, and permitting rotational movement of said retaining member in tation of said cap in said first direction.

References Cited by the Examiner UNrrnD STATES PATENTS 2,752,060 6/56 Martin 215-9 2,827,193 3/58 Martin 215'9 3,019,931 2/ 62' Thornton 2159 FRANKLIN TpGARRE'IT, Primary Examiner.

the opposite direction, said retaining member being

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2752060 *Feb 16, 1955Jun 26, 1956Martin Warren NContainer closure
US2827193 *Sep 6, 1955Mar 18, 1958Martin Warren NClosure cap for containers
US3019931 *Dec 3, 1959Feb 6, 1962Thornton Elbert H EReceptacles with positive locking closures
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3391813 *Feb 1, 1967Jul 9, 1968Gibson Ass IncChildproof closure
US3399796 *Apr 14, 1967Sep 3, 1968Maurice SteinerSafety stopper for pharmaceutical bottles and flasks
US4093096 *May 19, 1977Jun 6, 1978Societe Anonyme Dite: Arts Et Techniques NouvellesRemovable stopper for a screw-neck bottle
US4413742 *Dec 28, 1981Nov 8, 1983Jeffrey SandhausChild-resistant closure member
US4535905 *Sep 26, 1984Aug 20, 1985Jeffrey SandhausInterrupting nitration; dlution and treatment with ammonia or organic bases
US6279766 *Aug 10, 1999Aug 28, 2001Rexam Medical Packaging Inc.Safety closure with tamper-resistant locking tab and method and apparatus for making same
EP0011496A1 *Nov 15, 1979May 28, 1980The Afa CorporationChild-resistant closures
EP0025966A1 *Sep 16, 1980Apr 1, 1981Hans HeinleinChildproof closure
WO1983002262A1 *Dec 28, 1982Jul 7, 1983Sandhaus JeffreySafety and tamper-resistant closure and closure-container combination
WO1995028334A1 *Apr 13, 1995Oct 26, 1995Gv Eng Pty LtdTamper evident closure
WO1997008071A1 *Aug 30, 1996Mar 6, 1997Gv Eng Pty LtdTamper evident closure
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/216
International ClassificationB65D50/06, B65D50/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D50/066
European ClassificationB65D50/06F