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Publication numberUS3184098 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 18, 1965
Filing dateJul 17, 1964
Priority dateJul 17, 1964
Publication numberUS 3184098 A, US 3184098A, US-A-3184098, US3184098 A, US3184098A
InventorsGeorge Sabaka
Original AssigneeGeorge Sabaka
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rip strip container
US 3184098 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 8, 1965 G. SABAKA 3,184,098

RIP STRIP CONTAINER Filed July 17, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIGURE 3 FBGURE 4 5 lnvemor May 18, 1965 Filed July 17, 1964 G. SABAKA RIP STRIP CONTAINER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 QORGE SAAKA tnventor United States Patent l 3,184,tl98 RIP STRIP CONTAINER George Sabaka, RD. 3, Hanover, Pa. Filed July 1'7, 1964, Ser. No. 333,406 3 Claims. (Cl. 229-54) The present invention is concerned broadly with an improved container that will effectively completely protect the contents therein from atmospheric conditions during extensive time periods of shipments and storage, and will thereafter, during periods of use of the contents, function to control the flow of the contents from the container and also protect the contents from atmospheric conditions. The container is particularly characterized by having a rip strip around the peripheral side thereof near one end thereof. The peripheral strip is further characterized in that, when removed, a movable collar is produced which will function to permit communication through a port or aperture from within to without the container, or to seal off the port or aperture.

In the storage, shipment and use of materials, it is known that it is very desirable to completely protect these materials from atmospheric conditions; such as humidity, moisture and the like, during the time periods for shipment and storage. It is also known that it is desirable to control the flow of the containers contents and to protect the contents from atmospheric and contamination conditions during the period of use. This is particularly true for erishables and materials adversely affected by moisture. Thus, many varied adaptations and modifications have been proposed and adapted for containers by the industry.

The present invention secures these objects and desirable aims by a unique container which has built into it a self-contained movable collar which functions as de scribed. The present invention may be fully understood by reference to the drawings which illustrates a number of embodiments of the same.

FIGURE 1 is a view in perspective which shows the top of a tubular container having the collar assembly at the top thereof about the periphery. FIGURE 2 is a side view of the container with the rip strips of the collar assembly removed, thereby producing the movable collar and the collar stops. FIGURE 3 illustrates in some detail the function of the movable collar with respect to the port or aperture from within to without the container. FIGURE 4 illustrates the position of the collar as the containers contents are removed, while FIGURE 5 illustrates the position of the collar for temporary storage.

FIGURE 6 illustrates an adaptation which will lock the I collar in the closed or top position against the downward force of gravity. FIGURE 7 illustrates an adaptation where the can crimp is used as the upper stop and FIG- URE 8 illustrates a structure using a single tear strip.

Referring specifically to FIGURE 1, a tubular container 1, only the top portion of which is shown, has a collar assembly 3 rigidly affixed about its periphery adjacent top cap 2. The elements of collar assembly 3 are aflixed one to the other in a manner that upper rip strip 7 and lower rip strip 6 of the collar assembly may be detached from the collar and the upper shoulder or stop 5 and the lower shoulder or stop 4 of the collar assembly when a tearing or ripping thrust is imparted to tab of the collar assembly. This detachment feature may be secured by conventional means known in the art such as by grooving, perforations, selective weakening and the like.

It is preferred that the collar assembly be attached to the container only by means of the shoulders 4 and 5 of the collar assembly. This may be secured by means known in the art such as by welding and the like. Another preferred modification is to have perforations 26 3,ldi,% Patented May 1%, I965 extend through the collar 9 of the assembly. While these perforations Ztl in FIGURE 1 are shown somewhat near port It) prior to removal of the rip strips of the con tainer, it is preferred that they be away from port 10 if used. Tab 8 is characterized by having two legs 8:: and 8b which in effect are extensions of rip strips 7 and 6 respectively of the collar assembly. In FIGURE 1, port 1% is shown as a relatively large single aperture.

Referring specifically to FIGURE 2, the rip strips 6 and 7 of FIGURE 1 have been removed as described, thereby producing movable collar 9 and shoulders or stops 5 and Port I0 is illustrated in this figure as a plurality of relatively small apertures and is partially exposed. FIG- URE 3 is a view taken through 3-3 of FIGURE 2 and shows details of the construction. Top cap 2 is crimped over the side of the tubular container 1 and upper stop 5 nests thereunder. The thickness of the collar assembly is preferably such as to have a flush surface between the crimp and upper stop 5. FIGURE 4 illustrates the movable collar 9 positioned along lower stop 4 thereby permitting material from within the container to freely flow to without the container through port It) which is fully exposed. FIGURE 5 illustrates the collar 9 adjacent the upper stop 5 thereby closing port 10.

FIGURE 6 illustrates an adaptation whereby the collar may be more positively locked in a fixed position. A protrusion 11 is affixed on the outer surface of the container which will seat in a recess 12 on the inner surface of the collar. It is preferred that this protrusion extend entirely around the outer surface of the container and the recess extend entirely around the inner surface of the collar. Thus, positive locking will be secured irrespective of the circular position of the collar, particularly when ports are positioned in the collar. A plurality of relatively small ports either in the container or in the collar will secure a sprinkling effect of the outflowing materials.

It is to be understood that collar 9 is movable vertically and also in a circular manner. Thus, if the structure is as illustrated in FIGURE 1, ports 20 of the collar may be moved in a circular manner to coincide with port 10 of the container. Normally, the positive locking feature illustrated in FIGURE 6 is not required since collar 9 will not move unless a force is applied thereto due to its frictional resistance to movement. However, if the container be exposed, for example, to prolonged vertical forces such as transportation in a carrier vehicle, this type of construction may be desirable.

FIGURE 7 illustrates an adaptation of the invention which may be used when the container is of a construction wherein top cap 2 is attached to the circular side of container 1 by means of an overextending crimp 21. Under this modification, the collar assembly is attached to con tainer 1 by means of lower stop 4. FIGURE 7 shows the single rip strip 6 removed and collar 9 closing port 10. Collar 9 is not attached along its upper edge to the crimp and thus may be moved downwardly against lower stop 4 to permit material to flow outwardly from the container. Overhanging crimp 21 serves as the upper stop. In many instances, this single rip strip is very desirable. This may be used when a tight seal is not required.

The container and collar assembly may be made of any materials such as paperboard, metal or plastic. The container may be of one material such as paperboard, and the collar assembly of a different material such as a metal; for example, iron, tin, copper, an alloy and the like. The dimensions may also be widely varied as, for example, from a tubular container of 3 inches long and 1 inch in diameter to six feet long and 3 feet in diameter.

The port in the container as well as in the collar, if used, may be a single relatively large one or a plurality of relatively small apertures. It is obvious that the width of the collar must be at least equal and preferably slightly exceed the diameter of the port. If a plurality of ports are employed in the container, the collar must be of sufiicient width to cover all ports.

Referring to FIGURE 8, the collar assembly consists of an upper stop 22, a lower stop 23%, a collar 24, and a tear strip 25 which closes port 26 in container 27. The collar assembly is rigidly afilxed to container 27 immediately below the top cap 28 by means of stop 22 of the collar assembly. The widths of the tear strip 25' and collar 24 are at least the diameter of the port 26. Thus, when tear strip 25 is removed, port 26 is open. Port 26 can be closed by moving collar 24 upwardly against upper stop 22. When this modification is employed, the lower stop 23 is rigidly affixed to the container in a separate operation and is not attached to the lower edge of collar 24. The stops should be of suflicient Width to permit their secure afiixation to the container. While a single tab is shown, it is within the concept of the present invention to employ two tabs, one on each rip strip.

Under certain circumstances, it may be desirable to adapt a modification of the present invention wherein the aperture in the container is somewhat lower along the side and is closed by moving the collar downwardly and exposed by moving the collar upwardly. Thus, the force of gravity will tend to maintain the collar adjacent the lower stop and in the closed position.

rip strip of said collar unit intermediate, (4) a first stop of said collar unit and, (5) a collar of said collar unit, (6) a second rip strip of said collar unit intermediate said collar and, (7) a second stop of said collar unit, said collar unit being rig-idly afiixed to said container solely by means of said stops, whereby when said strips are removed from said collar unit intervals will exist between said collar and said stops and said collar will be movable in 21 directly vertical direction between said stops over said port and will also be rotatable in a directly horizontal direction about the longitudinal axis of said container.

2. An improved container assembly which comprises a in combination (1) a tubular container having a port In all instances, the Width of the collar must be at least the diameter of the hole and preferably somewhat greater. The widths of the respective rip strips must be such when they are removed so as to permit the movable collar to completely seal the port or to completely clear the port or ports.

Thus, the present invention is concerned with a unique and effective container assembly which will function to protect materials contained therein while awaiting use, and will lthereafter function as an effective mechanism for the periodic use of these materials.

What is claimed is:

1. An improved container assembly which comprises in combination (1) a tubular container having a port communicating from within to Without said container, (2) a cylindrical integral collar unit rigidly affixed about the circumference of said container over said port, (3) a first communicating from within to without said container, (2) a cylindrical integral collar unit rigidly affixed about the circumference of said container over said port, (3) a first rip strip of said collar unit intermediate, (4) a first stop of said collar unit and, (5) a collar of said collar unit, (6) a second rip strip of said collar unit intermediate said collar and, (7) a second stop of said collar unit, said collar unit being rig-idly aflixed to said container solely by means of said stops, whereby when said strips are removed from said collar unit intervals will exist between said collar, and said stops and said collar will be movable between said stops over said port, and will also be rotatable about the longitudinal axis of said container, and said container contains a protrusion from its outer side and said collar contains a recess on its inner side thereby permitting said protrusion to seat in said recess when said tear strips are removed and said collar is over said port.

3. Container as defined by claim 2 wherein said protrusion extends around the entire outer surface of said container and said recess extends entirely around the inner surface of said collar.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,596,426 8/26 Goss 222549 2,480,606 8/49 Rabbitt 222480 3,001,674 9/61 Wooten 220-53 FRANKLIN T. GARRETT, Primary Examiner.

THERON E. CONDON, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1596426 *Jul 20, 1925Aug 17, 1926Bjornulf JohnsenCollapsible-tube-closure device
US2480606 *Jan 30, 1945Aug 30, 1949John RabbittPowder dispensing device
US3001674 *Oct 4, 1957Sep 26, 1961Wooten Barbara CContainer and cover therefor with removable band
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7007818Dec 9, 2002Mar 7, 2006Laura Ann MartinContainer assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/270, 222/480, 222/549, D09/416
International ClassificationB65D47/04, B65D47/26
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/26
European ClassificationB65D47/26