Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3184806 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 25, 1965
Filing dateMar 22, 1963
Priority dateMar 22, 1963
Publication numberUS 3184806 A, US 3184806A, US-A-3184806, US3184806 A, US3184806A
InventorsBragman Clifford I
Original AssigneeBragman Clifford I
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sliding closure structures
US 3184806 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 25, 1965 c. l. BRAGMAN SLIDING CLOSURE STRUCTURES Filed March 22, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR CLIFFORD I. ERAEMAN HIE: ATTORNEY May 25, 1965 c. BRAGMAN 3,184,806

SLIDING CLOSURE STRUCTURES Filed March 22, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 kii 5 z 5 ELIFFEIRD l yfi'l R'MAN J BY W W m; AITDRNEY C- l. BRAGMAN SLIDING CLOSURE STRUCTURES May 25, 1965 INVENTOR.

3 Sheets-Sheet 5 HIE! ATTDRNEY Filed March 22, 1963 United States Patent 3,184,806 SLIDING CLUSURE STRUCTURES iiiford I. isragrnan, 4875 N. Cumberland Blvd,

Whitefish Bay, Wis. Filed Mar. 22, 1963, Ser. No. 267,039 11 Claims. (Ql. 20-52) This invention relates generally to sliding closure members, and more particularly to sliding window or door structures.

In the ideal, a window should be very tight to prevent air or water infiltration. At the same time ease of sliding is a very important consideration. Prior efforts have been directed to achievement of both goals. But in practice tightness has been sacrificed for ease of sliding operation.

It is therefore an object of the invention to provide a sliding window that is air and water tight, and at the same time admits of easy sliding movement.

It is another object of the invention to provide a sliding window meeting the just-stated objectives, and at the same time admitting of simple and economical manufacture and installation.

A still further object is provision of sliding windows meeting the stated objectives, and suitable for use in conventional structural arrangements, such as horizontally slidable, vertically slidable, single-hung, double-hung, etc.

In accordance with the invention as applied to a horizontal sliding window, the lower sash rail is channeled. Within the channel are mounted at least two blocks which are notched so as to be capable of riding on a track which is an integral part of the window sill. The two blocks are located at the lower corners of the bottom sash rail, substantially flush with the vertical sash sides, and substantially wholly within the mentioned channel. The track on which the blocks ride are notched so as to permit the blocks and therefore the entire sliding window to drop into closed position. The notches are therefore spaced apart by substantially the width of the window. In open position, the blocks ride on the main, unnotched portion of the track in easy sliding movement. Suitable clearance is provided to permit the top sash rail to ride up and down as necessary. In the closed position of the window, the exterior side of the bottom sash rail is sealed off by means of a fin-type weather strip made preferably of vinyl, which is embedded under the sash in a groove in the sill. Sealing for the remaining exterior, and also the interior sides of the sash rails is by means of wool pile weather strips that are inserted in extruded channels of the sash, and engage bulged surfaces of the stationary receiving rails in the closed position of the window.

To arrive at the vertical sliding window, the structure of the horizontal sliding window should be thought of as being rotated by 90. Accordingly the rail that slides on the stationary track constitutes one vertical sash rail, and that window is closed when its blocks drop into the notches of such track. In place of urging by gravity for the horizontal window, resilient means, such as leaf springs are provided on the other vertical sash rail. The resilient means is stressed sufficiently so that the window is maintained in any given open position, as well as the closed position. Additional pairs of notches may be provided in the stationary track which receives the blocks; such additional pairs of notches provide selectable open positions for the window with greater stability. The additional pairs of notches may also be provided in the case of the horizontal sliding window.

In the preceding description, as well as in the subsequent description and the appended claims which form a part of the Specification, the term window is used to describe generically windows in the strictest sense, doors and similar closure members, whether they be transparent or not.

"ice

The invention will be better understood from the following more detailed specification, when considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an elevational isometric view, partly fragmentary, of horizontal sliding window structure in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, viewed from the exterior, or street side;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view of the window of FIG. 1, with the section plane horizontal and taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1. FIG. 2 illustrates the window of FIG. 1 latched in closed position and also illustrates interlock of the sashes;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view, with the section plane vertical and taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2, and illustrating the sliding sash in closed position;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to that of FIG. 3, but illustrating the sliding sash in an open position;

FIG. 5 is a partly sectional isometric view, with the section taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 2, and illustrating the sliding sash in closed position;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to that of FIG. 5, but illustrating the sliding sash in an open position;

FIG. 7, illustrating the sliding sash in closed position, and FIG. 8, in open position, are enlarged and fragmentary versions of FIGS. 3 and 4 respectively, and illustrate the lower left corner of the sliding sash in greater detail;

FIGS. 7A and 8A are sectional views, with the section vertical and taken along lines 7A-7A of FIG. 7 and 8A8A of FIG. 8 respectively;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary isometric elevational view, partly in section, of a vertical sliding window in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention viewed from the room side;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary sectional View with the section plane vertical and taken along lines 1illll of FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary sectional view with the section plane vertical and taken along line 11-11 of FIG. 9 or FIG. 12, and

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary sectional view, with the section plane horizontal and taken along line 1212 of FIG. 11.

In the following description, reference numerals on occasion are sufiixed with letters to indicate relative location of a particular part, and also to indicate that there exists a symmetrical part. The sufiix letters used herein, and the locations identified by them, are as follows: L, left; R, right; U, upper; D, lower; P, front; B, back (rear). The description on occasion is presented explicity for a left member, and is to be construed as equally applicable to the right member by substituting R for L. Specific differences will be pointed out explicitly. In this manner needless repitition of identical verbiage is avoided.

Referring to FIGS. 1-8, and more specifically to FIGS. 1 and 2, the illustrated horizontal sliding window structure comprises frame structure which is generally rectangular in overall outline and includes lower or sill frame structure 20D, upper frame or header structure ZilU, left and right structure ZZL-and 22R. These parts are intended to be anchored or embedded in building struc ture, and are so shown in FIG. 2. These frame members, as well as those of the sashes themselves described hereinafter, are made preferably of thin-walled aluminum because of its light weight. This is in furtherance of the objective of ease of sliding. If desired, other suitable conventional window frame material may be employed. The four frame structures may be formed by extrusion separately and joined together by suitable fastening means such as screws upon installation. The assembly practice is conventional. For this reason the illustration of FIG. 1 is simplified to present these parts as integral.

Proceeding from front to rear in FIG. 1, and referring anchoring to building structure, by cementing for exampie. The same consideration applies to the peripheral Joined to the sill memparts of the remaining frame structures ZtlU, 221. and

Joined to the rear end of sill member 25 is a step which includes vertical strip-like member 27, followed by horizontal panel 28. In the illustration of FIG. 1, the strip 7 is set back with respect to member 26; in the illustration of FIGS. 5 and 6 by way of alternative, elements 26 and 27 are continuous. As may best be seen in FIGS. 5 and 6, the horizontal panel member 28 is in itself stepped, having a thicker front portion 29, and a somewhat thinner rear portion 39, the latter'being joined at its rear extremity with a vertical member 31; The members 39 and 31 thus appear in cross section generally as a T, and the members 27, 28, and 31 as an inverted U.

Upward of the member 36 the member 31 forms a bulge $2 inwardly. The bulge engages, in the closed position (FIG. 5), a wool pile weather strip 33 which is inserted in a channel-like recess of theconfronting side of the lower rail 34 of the sliding sash 35 to provide a Jind'seal. In the open position (FIG. 6) the wool pile strip 33 rises to above the bulge. 32.

. 4;: v is symmetrical with respect to the plane of the window pane, and is composed of verticalpanel members 423 and 42F which are joined towards their upper endsby a horizontal panel member 4-3 to form an inverted U. The panels 428 and 42F extend upwardly beyond the member 43 so as to form with the latter a channel. The panels 423 and 42F are provided towards their lower ends with inward bulges 44F and 44B respectively which, in the closed position, engage wool pile weather. strips 45F and 45B of the upper rail of the sliding sash, in a manner similar to engagement ofbulge 32 and weather strip 33. In theopen position (FIG. 6), the latter weather strips are seen to have risen above the bulges 44F and 44B. As may best be seen in FIG. 1, the vertical panel 42F is joined at its upper end by a horizontal panel 46, which exten s frontwardly of member 42F. Joined to the panel A resilient type weather strip, made preferably of vinyl or the like, is inserted in a conforming recess in the horizontal panel member 28 (FIG. 6). As illustrated, this weather strip includes a horizontal portion 36, which isv As may best'be seen in FIG. 8A, upstanding from the panels 28, is a track 3% on which a notched nylon block 39L rides. As will be described more fully hereinafter the block 39L and a symmetrical block 39R are disposed in a channel of the lower sash rail and ride ontrack 38. In FIG. 7A, the sliding sash has dropped into closed position, sothat the track 38 is partly invisible. At the same time, the weather strips 33 and 37 have been brought into engagement as previously described.

Referring to FIGS. '1 and 4, the rail 38 is shown to be notched downwardly at its right extremity at k: As may best be seen inFIGS. 3 and 7, a similar notch 40L is provided in the rail 28, spaced from the notch 40R by the width of the sliding sash 35. As may best be seen in 4-6 is dependent frame structure member 47. In the illustrated embodiment, the members 42F, 46, and 47 constitute frame structure for the fixed light. 48, which frame structure will be discussed in greater detail subsequently.

Considering the structure of the sliding window, as may best be seen in FIGS. 5 and 6, the pane 35 at its top and bottom is received within generally U-shaped recesses formed in the upper and lower frame members 55U and 551). The recesses'are filled with a gasket or filler material 56, also known in the art as bedding or glazing compound. This may be poly-vinyl chloride for example, also known'asa vinyl glazing channel. Taking the upper frame member ESU as exemplary also for'the lower frame 55D, the frame structure is bifurcated above the vinyl glazing channel 56 so as to fornrinteriorchannel 58 which has a cross-section approximately that of a major arc of a circle. Channels such as 53 wherever shown are utilized to receive machine screws for fastening purposes, such as screw 59 (FIG. 8), which is used to secure the left frame member 55L to thelower frame member 55D. Still considering theupper frame structure SSU (FIG. 5) above the gasket 56, exteriorly it is of semi-circular shape, and finally terminates in spaced rail members 68F and 603, which are of 'C-shape in cross-section. and receive the respective wool pile weather strips F and 45.8. In regard to the corresponding rail member 61F of the lower frame D, it is similarly (Z-shaped. It does not receive any wool pile weather strip; this. isunnecessary in view of the fact that the rail 61F engages the vinyl weather strip 37 for sealing purposes; The channel 61F is nevertheless formed as shown to render the upper'and lower frame members uniform. andinterchangeable for simplified extrusion manufacture.

As may be seen frornFIG. 2,. the left and right frame membersSSL and 55R are similar tothe upper frame FIGS. 3, 7, and 7A the nylon block 3L has dropped into its notch MEL, and the same is true of the corresponding members 39R and MR. As a result, the sliding sash is in closed position shown in FIG. 3. In FIGS. 4, 8, and 8A the blocks $9-ride atop rail 33 at normal'height.

blocks 39 have'not dropped into notches 40;, is an open position If desired, furthenpairs of notches, similarly spaced, may be provided on 'rail 28 to alford selectable open positions of known location,- rather than random sash 35.

Thus, any random position for'th'e sliding sash, in which the 22R." Themember 72R is specially shaped so as to engage The header structure ZllUisB generally similar to but simpler than :the sill'structure 2D.. Asmay best be seen @in'FIGS; 5 and 6, theconfiguration of theistructure ZGU members 64F and 64R are joined at their ends by a closing memberQdSIifor neatness in"appearance. 'Wool pile weather strips; are provided on both sides of the right member 65R but only onthe frontside of the left memher .651. as are necessary for wind seal.. 7 r

The joiningrmember 651; is formed to a hook or latch at its front end so as to engage a mating, wedge-likeprojection of the middle jamb 63. of the fixed .light dli described herein in 'greater detail subsequently; The arrangementis such that the meetingrail 55Lengages'the middle jamb, 68 in the closed'iposition ofwindow .35. At the same/time. a latch 76, which is affixed to the right frame member 65R, is'in position to be-latched to a flange light extension .72R'of.the right frame or jamb structure the} conforming right. end, part, of the latch 7071b, permit lockingof the fixed light. V V i The left frame or jarnb structure ZZL-is; symmetrical to the right jamb' 22R,'and the remainden of the description of the jambs will be given with-reference to'the left jamb. The left jamb-is seen to be provided with'allongitudinal extending flange part 76L, which bears against the building structure 77L, to the front of the latter and projects laterally to both sides of the structure 771.. The rear flange member 72L extends from the interior side of the building structure 77L laterally inwardly. The build ing structure 77L is wider to the rear of the flange 72L so that the resulting shoulder permits seating of the jamb 22L. The flange members 721 and 76L are joined, short of their right ends, by a bridging member 86L, which pro vides rigidity to the unitary assembly. The flanges 72L and 7 6L are approximately co-extensive at their right ends. The former terminates in latch-receiving lip 81L, although in the illustration of HG. 2 it is not intended to receive a latch. The provision of lip 81L is in the interest of manufacturing economy, and also in the interest of symmetrical appearance of the channel structure when viewed from the room side.

The member 76L is joined at its right end to a member 82L which extends frontally of member 76L and is in turn joined at its front end by a laterally outwardly extending member 83L which is approximately co-extensive with flange member 72L. The member 82L, which serves to secure the fixed light 48 is provided at about its middle point and on its exterior side with a screw receiving channel 85L, which is utilized to join the jamb 22L to the upper and lower frame members ZtlU and 25D by means of screws (not shown).

The member 32L is provided to its right with additional structure to support the fixed light 48, and this structure is symmetrical with respect to the structure provided for a corresponding member 82M of the middle jamb structure 68. The parts of the latter are identified by the same reference numeral as those of member 82L except for substitution of the suffix M for L. The member 82L is provided towards its rear with a rib-like projection 86L, which serves together with member tiZL proper to receive a wedge-like structure 871., which in outline is an isosceles right triangle with legs running in front-rear and left-right directions. The pane 48 is seated between the latter leg and a co-extensive flange light member 88L, which fills the residual gap between the members 87L The pane 48 is actually seated Within gasket material 39L which :fills the residual gap between the members 87L and 83L.

The middle jamb structure 6% is formed to a shape of two similar rectangles, one offset to the right and to the rear of the other with overlapping parts omitted. The member 82M constitutes one of the longer sides of the front rectangle.

To resume the description of the sliding sash, referring first to FIGS. 1, 3, 4, 7, and 8, it is seen that the four frame members are mitered. In assembling the sliding sash in manufacture, the upper and lower frame member 55U and 55D are fastened to the side members 65R and 65L by means of fastening screw pairs 59R and 59L,

. which as shown in FIG. 1 extend from the side frame member 65R into the screw receiving channels 58 (FIG. 5).

It will be recalled that the upper and lower frame members SSU and 55D are channeled. As may best be seen in FIGS. 1, 3, 4, 7, 7A, 8, and 8A, the notched nylon blocks 39R and 39L are situated within the channel of the lower rail 55H, substantially wholly in it, and their exterior sides are substantially flush with the frame sides 65R and 65L. This configuration is particularly advantageous for .the following reasons. It permits fastening of the blocks in a simple operation that is simultaneously with the fastening of the sideframes 65R and 65L by means of the fastening screw pairs SfiR and 59L previously mentioned. The screws are of the self-threading type so that prethreading of the receiving channels is unnecessary. Also, the location of the blocks wholly within the receiving channel and flush with the frame sides contributes to attractive appearance. It should be recog nized that the just described location of the blocks h) is preferred, but is not absolutely necessary for purposes of the invention. In particular, the blocks could be disposed farther inwardly, that is closer together and spaced apart from the respective frame sides. This would entail spacing the notches 40 in the track 38 at a like distance. The blocks are made preferably of nylon, as this is resistant to wear, but similar suitable materials may be substituted. If desired, a single block may be used, located on the vertical center lines of the sliding sash and of sufiicient width to afford stability, particularly in the open position. The cooperating track notch would be located appropriately for engagement with the single block in the closed position of the window. Although the riders 39L and 39R are illustrated literally in block shape, it should be understood that this configuration is not absolutely necessary for purposes of the invention, and this fact should be borne in mind in construing the claims.

The horizontal sliding window has been described with one sliding sash and one fixed sash. The window could obviously be constructed double-hung simply by making a fixed light 48 a substantial duplicate of the sliding sash 35, coupled with a duplication of the track 33 with its notches 4t and of the vinyl strip 37. In regard to the latter, vinyl is the preferred material, but it will be appreciated that other suitable resilient weather stripping material may be substituted. The Weather strip material for elements 33 and 45 has been designated as wool pile; if desired, they may be made of other weather strip material, for example a resilient material such as is used for the weather strip 37. Here too, the equivalence should be borne in mind in the construction of the claims.

The vertical sliding window illustrated in FIGS. 9-12 is basically alike to the horizontal sliding window but rotated by Note that the vertical sliding window is illustrated as viewed from the room side. It is therefore unnecessary to refer to each and every element of the vertical sliding window in detail; these may be recognized by reference numerals previously used for conjunction with the sliding window. The track 38 is shown on the right side of FIGS. 9 and 10, and includes notches here designated as idU and 46D. The nylon blocks 39 are obscured from view by the right jamb member 22R.

The remainder of the sill structure (FIG. 9) has not been rotated, but is retained as the lower part 2&1 and as such includes the ledge member 25 and saddle member 28 which has embedded therein the resilient weather strip 37 for the purposes previously mentioned for the horizontal sliding window.

In the case of the horizontal sliding window the sash was maintained in open or closed position by gravity action. Since such action is not available for the vertical sliding window, there are provided at the left corners of the vertical sliding sash a pair of resilient members 96U and 96]), which are fastened to the outsides of respective upper and lower frame members 65U and 651). The resilient or spring leaf member $6 are symmetrical, and the description of the upper member %U is suflicient for both. Referring also to FIGS. 11 and 12 the member 96U' is made of a relatively thin strip of resilient material, and has an initial planar portion which is flush with the upper frame member 65U. It is fastened to the latter by means of the fastening screw 59?} which serves also to fasten together the frame member 65U to the left frame member 65L.

The spring member 915D extends laterally of the frame member 65L and then is formed to the shape of an S so as to engage the frame member 65L and also the left jamb member 43L.

The leaf springs 96U and 96D are formed with sufficient stiffness so as to maintain the sliding sash 35 in position for either the closed position, or any of the random open positions. As in the case of the horizontal sliding window, further notched pairs, similar to and spaced the same as the notchedmembers dtlU and 40D may be provided to afford selectable open positions. In regard to the requirement of pairs of notches in track 38, it should be borne in mind that an intermediate notch, such as the illustrated notch -ttlU is already paired with the notch 49D but could be paired with an additional notch, spaced the height of the sliding sash upward from the notch 46U. Thus three notches could constitute two pairsthe same applies to the horizontal sliding Wind0wand this should be borne in mind in construing the claims.

For purposes of latching the vertical sliding sash (FIG. 9) a member $3 of arcuate cross-section is formed integrally with the lower frame member ZtlD, is substantially coextensive with it longitudinally, and extends frontwardly from it. The cooperating latch $9 is mounted on the lower frame structure 651) of the sliding sash.

The modifications recited for the horizontal sliding window are similarly applicable to the vertical sliding window. The provision of plural pairs of notches in the track 38 has already been mentioned; further, the construction of a double-hung Window is accomplished by a similar duplication of the sliding sash 35 for the fixed light 48, together with provision of the associated track 38, notches 4t), and blocks 39.

The described window structure meets fully the objectives of the invention stated in the introductory part of the specificaton. A working embodiment, conforming to the disclosure, was subjected to tests of required pull force to operate the sash and for air infiltration. United States Federal Housing Authority standards are 10 pounds of pull force, maximum, and 0.75 cubic feet per minute per foot of perimeter air infiltration, maximum. A sash in accordance with this disclosure required only 4 pounds of pull force and experienced 0.41 cubic feet per minute per foot of perimeter air infiltration.

The invention has been described by reference to two presently preferred embodiments thereof, and modifica tions of the basic embodiments have been indicated. Eurther modifications may occur to those skilled in the art, and it isintended that such modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention and following claimsbe embraced within the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A sliding sash having horizontal and vertical frame members arranged in the shape of a rectangle, for mounting in a receiving structure, a

the latter having a sill member, an upperhorizontal header member, and two vertical jarnb members, also arranged in the shape of a rectangle, at least two of the three last-mentioned members being channeled, each channel being formed of a front surface, a rear surface parallel to the front surface, and i an end surface joining the parallel surfaces,

' each parallel surface for sealing engagement of a correspondingly oriented surface of the sash frame member when said sash is mounted in said receiving structure and is in closed position,

said correspondingly oriented surfaces carryingweathe strip means and said parallel surfaces having bulges adapted to engage in said closed position, their re-- provide the sealing said sill member being stepped so as to'form, towards its rear a vertical surface havinga forward bulge, the rear side of the lower'horizontal sash frame member carrying weather. strip means adapted to engagev sealingly said forward bulge insaid closed position,

at least one of those sash frame 'members awhich in i said closed position is to engage a cooperating receiv- 5 ing structure n ember, being channeled and such cooperating memberhaving a track. that is disposed for projecting into the last-adverted-to channel, a pair of blocks secured-to, and disposed within the latter channel, said blocks being notched for reception within the notches of said track to afford sliding'movement on said track for said sash, V said track having at leasttwo tooth-gap-like notches that are spaced apart from one another substantially the same distance as said blocks, and are located such that when said blocks drop into them, said sash is in a said closed position.

2. A horizontal sliding sash having horizontal and vertical frame members arranged in the shape of a rectangle,

for mounting in a receiving structure,

the latter having a sill member, an upper horizontal header member, and a first and a second vertical jamb member, also arranged in the shape of a rectangle,

said upper horizontal and at least said first verticaljamb members being 7 channeled, each channel being .fromed of a front surface, a rear surface parallel to the front surface, and an end surface ioining the paraliel surfaces,

each parallel surface for sealing engagement of a correspondingly oriented surface of the sash frame memher when said sash is mounted in said receiving structure and is in closed position,

said correspondingly oriented surfaces carrying weather strip means and said parallel surfaces having bulges adapted to engage in saidclosed' position, their respective weather strip means to provide the sealing engagement,

the sill member having attached to it horizontally extending resilient weather strip means that isdepressible by the underside of the lower horizontal sash frame member in said closed position for Weather sealing,

said sill member'being stepped so as to form towards its rear a vertical surface having a forward bulge,

the rear side of the lower horizontal sash frame membercarrying weather strip means adapted to engage sealingly said forward bulge in said closed position,

at least the lover horizontal sash frame member being channeled and its cooperating sill jamb member having a track that is disposed for projecting into the last-advertcd-to channel,

a pairof blocks secured to, and disposed substantially wholly within, and respectively substantially at the ends of the latter channel, I

said blocks being notched for reception within the notches of said track to afford sliding movement on said track for said sash,

said track having at least two tooth-gap-like notches that are spaced apart from one another substantially the same distance as said blocks, and are located such that when said blocks drop into them, said sash is in said closed position. Y

3. A vertical sliding sash having horizontal and vertical.

frame members arrangedrin the shape of a rectangle, for mounting in a receiving structure, A V

the latter having a sill member, an upper jhoriz'ontal header member, and two vertical jamb members,

also arranged in the shape ofa'rec tangle, at. least said vertical jamb .members being channeled, each channel being formed of a front surface, a rear surface-parallel tothe front surface; andza'n end surface-joining'theparallel surfaces,

respondingly oriented surface ,of" the sash frame member when said ash is mounted in saidre ceiving V structure and is in closed position, t 1 said corresponding oriented surfaces carrying weather strip means and-said parallel surfaces having bulges each parallelsurface: for sealing engagement ofra cor-.

" adapted: to engage in said closed position, theirrestructure is arranged to support a second sash having a frame member meeting with the otherwise free frame member of the sliding sash, provided with mutually inter- 9 spective weather strip means to provide the sealing engagement,

the sill member having attached to its horizontally extending resilient weather strip means that is depressible by the underside of the lower horizontal sash frame member in said closed position for weather sealing,

said sill member being stepped so as to form towards its rear a vertical surface having a forward bulge,

the rear side of the lower horizontal sash frame member carrying weather strip means adapted to engage sealingly said forward bulge in said closed position,

at least the first of the vertical sash frame members being channeled and its cooperating vertical jamb member having a track that is disposed for projecting into the last-adverted-to channel,

a pair of blocks secured to, and disposed substantially wholly within, and respectively substantially at the ends of the latter channel,

said blocks being notched for reception within the notches of said track to afford sliding movement on said track for said sash,

said track having at least two tooth-gap-like notches that are spaced apart from one another substantially the same distance as said blocks, and are located such that when said blocks drop into them, said sash is in said closed position,

and resilient means attached to the second of the vertical sash frame members and arranged for compressive engagement of the channel of its cooperating 30 jamb member, for urging said blocks against said track to maintain said sash in open and closed positions.

4. A sash according to claim 1, wherein the jamb 10 locking weather seal means on the two meeting frame members.

5. A sash according to claim 2, wherein the jamb structure is arranged to support a second sash having a frame member meeting with the otherwise free frame member of the sliding sash, provided with mutually interlocking Weather seal means on the two meeting frame members.

6. A sash according to claim 3, wherein the jamb structure is arranged to support a second sash having a frame member meeting with the otherwise free frame member of the sliding sash, provided with mutually interlocking weather seal means on the two meeting frame members.

7. A sash according to claim 1 wherein the jamb structure and track is made of aluminum.

8. A sash according to claim 1 wherein the blocks are made of nylon.

9. A sash according to claim 1 wherein the resilient weather strip means is made of vinyl.

10. A sash according to claim 1 wherein the bulgeengaging weather strip means is made of wool pile.

11. A sash according to claim 1 wherein the track is provided with at least one further pair of tooth-gap-like notches that are spaced from one another substantially the same distance as the aforesaid track notches, each further notch pair when receiving the blocks affording a selectable open sash position.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,786,240 3/57 T obiaz 2052.8 2,917,792 12/59 Franzblau et al 20-5 2.8

FOREIGN PATENTS 160,1 10 4/3 3 Switzerland.

HARRISON R. MOSELEY, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2786240 *Jan 30, 1956Mar 26, 1957Leitner Equipment CompanyCabinet
US2917792 *Aug 17, 1956Dec 22, 1959Franzblau AbrahamWindow construction
CH160110A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7685774 *Dec 30, 2005Mar 30, 2010Speyer Door And Window, Inc.Closing system for sealing system of sliding door/window
US7685775 *Dec 30, 2005Mar 30, 2010Speyer Door And Window, Inc.Combined sealing systems for sliding door/window
US8074399Jun 1, 2007Dec 13, 2011Secura-Seal Technologies LlcSealing system modules for door/window
US8074400Jun 1, 2007Dec 13, 2011Secura-Seal Technologies LlcCombined modular sealing systems and seal activation system for door/window
US8091282Jun 20, 2006Jan 10, 2012Secura-Seal Technologies LlcCombined sealing system and seal activation system for door/window
US8109037Aug 28, 2007Feb 7, 2012Secura-Seal Technologies LlcActive sealing system for single-hung door/window
US8336258Feb 25, 2009Dec 25, 2012Secura-Seal Technologies LlcSelf-driving combination sealing system for single-hung door/window
US8468746Mar 31, 2009Jun 25, 2013Tyto Life LLCSealing systems for garage door
US8484899Feb 25, 2009Jul 16, 2013Tyto Life LLCDriving and driven sealing systems for single-hung door/window
US8516756Oct 13, 2009Aug 27, 2013Secura-Seal Technologies LlcDoor panel with thermal break
US8539717Jan 28, 2008Sep 24, 2013Secura-Seal Technologies LlcElectronic control for door/window
US8627606Mar 31, 2009Jan 14, 2014Tyto Life LLCCombined sealing system for garage door
US8656643Feb 22, 2010Feb 25, 2014Tyto Life LLCSeal activation system positioned within panel for door/window
US8701346Nov 3, 2011Apr 22, 2014Tyto Life LLCCombined modular sealing systems and seal activation system for door/window
US8800223 *Feb 8, 2013Aug 12, 2014Pella CorporationFenestration unit water restrictor and method
US20130212961 *Feb 8, 2013Aug 22, 2013Pella CorporationFenestration unit water restrictor and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification49/226, 49/458, 49/438, 49/436, 16/93.00R
International ClassificationE06B3/32, E06B3/46
Cooperative ClassificationE06B3/4618
European ClassificationE06B3/46B2