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Publication numberUS3185070 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 25, 1965
Filing dateJan 24, 1963
Priority dateJan 24, 1963
Publication numberUS 3185070 A, US 3185070A, US-A-3185070, US3185070 A, US3185070A
InventorsSmith Lester L
Original AssigneeSmith Lester L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roof ridge ventilator
US 3185070 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 25, 1965 1.. SMITH ROOF RIDGE VENTILA'I'OR Filed Jan. 24, 1963 INVENTOR LESTE R L SMlTH M M, 6M v ATTORNEYS United States. Patent 3,135,076 RGGF REDGE "VENTILATQR Lester L. Smith, Peoria, ill. (Rt). Box 68, Princevilie, ill.) Filed .lau. 24, 1963, Ser. No. 253,671 7 Claims. (fill. 93-42) This invention relates to roof ridge ventilators, and more particularly to such ventilators which provide both improved weather protection from wind-driven rain, snow and the like and improved air circulation in the space below the roof of a building to which the ventilator is attached, irrespective of the direction of wind relative to the ventilator structure.

The ventilator structures disclosed herein embody improvements over those shown in my copending application, Serial No. 46,968, filed August 2, 1960, now Patent No. 3,079,853 granted March 5, 1963, for Root Ridge Ventilator.

It has been found in the course of development of ridge ventilator structures of the general type herein disclosed that some difierences of structure which, upon casual consideration, seem to be rather insignificant in importance, result in very definite and meritorious advantages in performance. Other such difierences of structure provide advantages in cost of production and in reductions of labor cost for installation. The herein disclosed structures provide such advantages.

It is one of the objects of this invention to provide a ridge ventilator with battles constructed, arranged and disposed, not only to afford added weather protection, but also materially to improve the ventilating performance of the ventilator irrespective of the wind direction relative thereto.

As another object, this invention comprehends a bathed ridge ventilator structure made up of components which are reasonably low in production cost, and which are readily and easily installable, so as to limit installation cost.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a firagmentary perspective view of a roof ridge ventilator embodying a preferred form of this invention;

FiG. 1A is a perspective view of a portion of the structure shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view of a roof ridge ventilator embodying a modification of the invention;

FIG. 2A is a perspective view of a portion of the structure shown in FIG. 2; and

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic view providing an illustration of the directions of air flow through and relative to ventilators of the types shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

In the exemplary embodiments of my invention which are disclosed in the accompanying drawings for illustrative purposes, a ventilator it) is adapted to mounting on the exterior of a building room in a position such that it extends along the ridge of the roof, the roof lines being designated at 12 and 13. The ventilator it) is substantially symmetrical in structure and contours with respect to a longitudinal central plane and has integral top cover portions 14 and 15 on opposite sides of a ridge 16 and extending in opposed and obtuse angular relationship relative toone another. In the disclosed structure, integral outer or upper side walls 17 and 13 extend downwardly from the outer edges of the top cover portions 14 and 15 respectively. Panels 19 and having widths less than the top cover portions 14 and 15 extend inwardly from the bottoms of the outer side walls 17 Bididld Patented May 25, 1985 ice and 13 respectively in opposed relationship to one another and in spaced relationship to the top cover portions id and 15. These panels are generally flat, and face downwardly toward the roof. Inner or lower side walls 22 and 23 extend downwardly in spaced, opposed and generally parallel relationship to one another from the inner extremities of the panels 19 and 28. Side flashing portions 24 and 25 of widths greater than that of the panels extend outwardly in angular relationship to one another from the lower extremities of the inner side walls 22 and 23 and are in spaced and opposed relationship to the panels 19 and 20. These flashing portions 24 and 25 may be flexed to some extent relative to the side walls 22 and 23, in order to accommodate variations in the pitches of dillerent roofs.

The panels 19 and 2% each have series of vent openings, such as 26 therein, which vent openings, in the disclosed structure, are arranged in rows extending laterally of the panels, and such rows are spaced from one another longitudinally of the panels. The vent openings 26 are covered by integrally formed louvers 27, which louvers, in the illustrated structure, extend upwardly from the panels, interiorly of the ventilator and outwardly toward the side walls 17 and 18 to provide maximum weather protection. In the structure illustrated, the areas of the air fiow spaces within the ventilator are balanced with respect to the vent openings 26, so that adequate space is provided for the flow of air within the ventilator; it being understood that the ventilator is mounted over a slot in the roof ridge which is at least as wide as the space between the inner side walls 22 and 23. With this arrangement of parts, air from within the building below the roof normally flows upwardly between the side walls 22 and 23 and is then divided to flow outwardly between the panels and cover portions of the ventilator, and then out through the vent openings Zr) to the exterior of the building.

The flashing portion 24 of the disclosed structure has an outer marginal portion 28 offset from an inner portion 29 through a narrow integrally formed angular portion 3% to provide additional rigidity to the flashing structure, and to serve as a guide for use in the placement of nails, such as 32, by which the ventilator is secured to a roof. Likewise, the flashing portion 25 has a marginal portion 33 offset from the plane of an inner portion 34- through a narrow and integral angularly disposed portion 35. Also, relatively narrow flanges 3-5 and 37 are provided along the outer margins of the flashing portions 24 and 25 respectively for providing rigidity to the structure and for providing an edge for engagement with roof shingles, which edge aifords watertight engagement with the shingles.

The ventilator structures, as thus far described in detail, are alixe in FIGS. 1 and 2, and corresponding reference numerals refer to similar parts in both figures. In order to provide improved weather protection, as well as to improve the air flow characteristics and efiliciency of the disclosed ventilators, and also to reduce the variations of air flow through the ventilator which result from changes in wind direction exterior to the building, baffles are utilized which extend upwardly from the outer edges of the flashing portions in spaced relationship to the outer side walls 17 and 18 and to levels above those of the baliles 19 and 26.

in the form depicted in FIGS. 1 and 1A, bafiles 38 and 39 have return bent flange portions 49 and 42 along the lower margins thereof which are spaced from generally planar mid-regions 33 and of the bailies so as to fit over and grip the angularly disposed flanges as and 37 of the flashing portions 24 and 25 respectively, thereby to hold the bat-lies firmly in erect positions relative to the ventilator when the ventilator is secured to a roof by nails extending through the outer marginal portions of the flashing portions. Along the tops of the battles 33 and 39, marginal portions 45 and 46 are bent outwardly to extend in obtuse angular relationship to the mid-regions 43 and 4d of the bafdes, so as to deflect air outwardly at the tops of the baflles as it moves upwardly across the baflies.

In the form depicted in FIGS. 2 and 2A, battles 4'7 and 48 have integral tabs 49 thereon at longitudinally spaced positions along the lower edge of the batlles, which tabs are adapted to be bent to positions such as that depicted in dotted lines at il -a in FIG. 2A to extend under the outer marginal portions of the flashing portion of the ventilator for holding the bafilesin erect positions at the outer edges of the battle portions. The tabs 49 may be utilized to indicate desirable spacing of nails, so that nails extend through the flashing portions and the nailing tabs for holding both the ventilator and the battles in place relative to a roof. As in the previously described form, top marginal portions and 52 of the battles 47 and 48 are bent to extend outwardly with respect to relatively planar mid-regions 53 and 54 of the baffles to serve for the outward deflection of air at the tops of the baflles.

The functions and operations of the two types of baffles herein disclosed are the same. As shown in the diagrammatic illustration of FIG. 3, and as was previously mentioned, the bail'les 38 and 33 extend upwardly to levels above that of the panels 3 .9 and 2% which have the vent openings therein for the passage of air from the interior to the exterior of the ventilator. By extending to this height, the direct impingement of wind and wind-driven rain or snow against the outer portions of the panels is practically prevented. As a matter of fact, on the windward side, the bafiles deflect air upwardly and over the ventilator 19 as indicated by arrows 55.

This provides an air flow pattern which tends to reduce the etective pressure of air between the bafile 33 and the side wall 17 of the ven ilator to an extent sufilcient to improve the air flow eiilciency of the ventilator for effecting the outward movement of air from the interior of the building structure, as indicated by arrows 55. On the opposite or offwind side of the ventilator, the bafiie 39 has a similar effect of improving encieucy for effecting the removal of air from the interior of the building as indicated by arrows 57, by limiting the formation of any currents of air, as indicated by arrows 58, closely adjacent the ventilator panels. This also provides an air flow pattern which tends to reduce pressure between the outer side wall 18 of the ventilator and the bafile 39. When the motion of air exterior to the ventilator is parallel to, or more nearly parallel, to 'a longitudinal axis of the ventilator, the battles and ventilator parts form a tunnel through which the air moves to improve the characteristics of the ventilator for effecting the removal of air from the interior of the building structure as indicated by the arrows 56 and 57. As is the case in respect to the other air flow characteristics of the disclosed ventilater, the spacing of the baffles and 39 from the outer side walls 17 and 13 of the ventilator provides adequate space for the flow of the quantity of air passing through the vent openings of the ventilator, but the spacing is gives improved ventilator elhciency and effectiveness, as

well as reducing tic variations of ventilator performance as a result of changes in exterior wind direction.

Having thus described my invention, what is claimed 1. A roof ridge ventilator comprising, in combination, opposite and adjoinerl side portions symmetrical with respect to .a longitudinal central plane and each including a top cover part sloping downwardly from the horizontal away from said central plane, outer side wall means extending downwardly from the top cover part remote from said central plane, a panel extending inwardly from the outer side wall means in spaced and opposed relationship to the top cover part and facing downwardly, the inward extent of said panel from said outer side wall being to a position spaced from said central plane, an inner side wall extending downwardly from the inner edge of said panel in generally parallel relationship to said central plane, a side flashing portion extending laterally outward from the bottom of the inner side wall and having an outer marginal portion which extends outwardly beyond the top cover part and panel, said panel having louvcred openings therein, and means providing a battle extending upwardly from the outer edge of said side flashing portion to a level above that of said panel, said batlle having a top marginal portion spaced outwardly from and extending along said outer side wall in opposed relationship thereto.

2. A roof ridge ventilator as defined in claim 1, and wherein said top marginal portion of the battle is bent to extend angularly with respect to the lower portion of the bar'lle and outwardly away from the opposed outer side wall of the ventilator.

3. In combination with a root ridge ventilator including top cover means and a panel having ventilating opentending downwardly from the panel so that the flashing means extends outwardly below said panel and cover means in spaced and opposed relationship to said panel, said flashing means also extending laterally outward beyond said panel, and a bafile extending upwardly from said flashing means at a position spaced laterally outward from the panel and to a height above that of the panel.

4. In the combination of claim 3, said batlle having means along'the top portion thereof for directing air moving upwardly of the surface of the battle remote from the ventilator outwardly and away from said ventilator.

5. In the combination of claim 3, said baffle having an upper marginal portion bent to extend outwardly and away from the ventilator in angular relationship to the lower portion thereof.

6. A roof ridge ventilator comprising, in combination, opposite and adjoined side portions symmetrical with respect to a longitudinal central plane and each including a top cover part sloping downwardly from the horizontal away from said central plane, outer side wall means extending downwardly from the top cover part remote from said central plane, a panel extending inwardly from the outer side wall means in spaced relationship to the top cover part and facing downwardly, the inward extent of said panel being to a position spaced from said central plane, an inner side wall extending downwardly from the inner edge of said panel in generally parallel relationship to said central plane, a side flashing portion extending laterally outward from the bottom of the inner side wall and having an outer marginal portion which extends outwardly beyond the top cover part and panel, said panel having louvercd openings therein, and means providing a battle extending upwardly from the outer edge of said side flashing portion to a level above that of said panel, said baille having a top marginal portion spacedoutwar' ly from and extending along said outer side wall in opposed relationship thereto, said outer marginal portion of the side flashing portion having a relatively narrow flange thereon which extends downwardly to an edge in angular relationship to the outer marginal portion, and said battle having a narrow bottom marginal portion folded back in spaced relationship to the bafiie to fit around said edge and engage opposite faces of said flange to hold the baflle in its normal upwardly extending position when said flashing portion is secured in position on a roof.

7. A roof ridge ventilator comprising, in combination, opposite and :adjoined side portions symmetrical with respect to a longitudinal central plane and each including a top cover part sloping downwardly from the horizontal away from said central plane, outer side Wall means extending downwardly from the top cover part remote from said central plane, a panel extending inwardly from the outer side wall means in spaced relationship to the top cover part and facing downwardly, the inward extent of said panel being to a position spaced from said central plane, an inner side wall extending downwardly from the inner edge of said panel in generally parallel relationship to said central plane, a side flashing portion extending laterally outward from the bottom of the inner side wall and having an outer marginal portion which extends 0utwardly beyond the top cover part and panel, said panel having louvered openings therein, and means providing a baffle extending upwardly from the outer edge of said side flashing portion to a level above that of said panel, said battle having a top marginal portion spaced outwardly from and extending along said outer side wall in opposed relationship thereto, said baffle having a series of integral nailing tabs projecting therefrom in spaced relationship longitudinally of the baflle and bendable to angular disposition relative to the genral plane of the battle for securement in place relative to said outer marginal portion of the side flashing portion by nails which extend through said tabs and the said side flashing portion.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,030,388 2/36 Muirhead 98-42.1 2,266,261 12/41 Pfeifer 9842.l 2,704,500 3/55 Bonforte 98-421 3,073,235 1/63 Smith 9842.1 3,079,853 3/63 Smith 98--42.1

ROBERT A. OLEARY, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US2704500 *Apr 2, 1952Mar 22, 1955 Bonforte
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Referenced by
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US3326113 *Sep 28, 1964Jun 20, 1967SmithRoof ridge ventilator
US4000688 *Jul 18, 1975Jan 4, 1977Leigh Products, Inc.Ventilator for roof ridge
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US5946868 *Sep 24, 1993Sep 7, 1999Liberty Diversified IndustriesMounted on a peak of a roof
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USRE44832Oct 27, 2003Apr 8, 2014Building Materials Investment CorporationRidge ventilation system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification454/365
International ClassificationF24F7/02, E04D13/00, E04D13/17
Cooperative ClassificationF24F7/02, E04D13/174
European ClassificationE04D13/17C, F24F7/02