Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3185198 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 25, 1965
Filing dateSep 23, 1963
Priority dateSep 23, 1963
Publication numberUS 3185198 A, US 3185198A, US-A-3185198, US3185198 A, US3185198A
InventorsEugene D Bryan
Original AssigneeEugene D Bryan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fire fighting devices
US 3185198 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. D. BRYAN 3,185,198

FIRE FIGHTING DEVICES Filed Sept. 23, 1963 May 25, 1965 FIG! INVENTOR.

EUGENE D. BRYAN ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,135,198 FEE FIGHTHNG DEVICES Eugene D. Bryan, 8839 Jordan, St. Louis 47, Mo. Filed Sept. 23, 1963, Ser. No. 310,674 6 Glaims. (Cl. 159-52) This invention relates in general to certain new and useful improvements in fire fighting devices, and more particularly to a container which is adapted to retain a burning article.

One of the most diflicult to handle and hard to extinguish fires for the modern day fire fighter is a mattress fire. The case of mattress fires caused by burning cigarettes, is quite typical of a fire which cauws great difliculty to fire fighters. When the fireman arrives at the scene of the fire he usually enters the dwelling with a high pressure water hose or device for discharging fire retardant foam, if the fire occurs in the interior of the dwelling. Those articles which have ignited are then saturated with water or a fire retardant foam.

When a burning mattress has been ignited by a cigarette, the flames are usually emitted from a hole where the cigarette contacted the surface of the mattress. This external flame is easily extinguished by the fireman. However, there is often a smoldering fire which takes place internally of the mattress. The fireman is therefore faced with the necessity oftearing up the mattress and spraying all portions rthereof to insure complete smothering of the fire. This is a rather difficult chore to perform in a room which may still contain considerable quantities of smoke. Consequently, the fireman is faced with the necessity of transporting the mattress from the interior of the dwelling in which the fire occurred.

Due to the size, weight and bulkiness of mattresses, they are diflicult items to transport. This difii-culty is increased if the mattress has absorbed a good deal of water during the original attempt to smother the fire in the dwelling, or if smoke is still emitted from the internal portions thereof. In order to obviate this transportation problem, the fireman often throws the mattresses from a window of the dwelling. There are, however, other dangers connected with disposing of a mattress in this fashion. The mattress may strike and sever telephone or electric power cables. The mattress may also damage any property upon which it lands, or possibly injure a bystander. Moreover, the onru-sh of air may revive a fire which may be smoldering internally in the mattress.

It is therefore the primary object of the present invention to provide a container for transporting burning and smoldering articles.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a container of the type stated which includes an air-tight pocket and thereby aids in smothering the fire of an article contained therein.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide a container of the type stated, which is fireproof and is sturdy in its construction.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a container of the type stated which can be folded into a neat, compact package, when not in use.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide a container of the type stated which is relatively inexpensive to manufacture.

With the above and other objects in View, my invention resides in the novel features of form, construction, arra-ngement and combination of parts presently described and pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings (one sheet):

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a fire fighting device constructed in accordance with and embodying the present invention;

3,185,198 Patented May 25, 1965 FIGURE 2 is .a bottom plan view of the fire fighting device of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view of the device of FIG- URE 1 illustrated in the open position;

FIGURE 4 is a vertcial sectional view taken along line 4--4 of FIGURE 1; and FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along line 5-5 of FIGURE 1.

Generally speaking, the device of the present invention is a container which is sized to contain ignitable articles such as mattresses and the like. The device is readily and easily opened for inserting an article thereinto. When closed, the air supply to the article is removed, thereby smothering any internal fire. Moreover, the device provides an easy and convenient means for transporting smoldering and smoking articles.

Referring now and more detail by reference characters to the drawings, A designates a container for mattresses, cushions and the like, preferably constructed of a fire resistant material such as a heavy asbestos or any suitable textile which has been impregnated with a fire resistant or fire retardant material can be employed. For example, cellulosic fabrics which have been impregnated with any conventional fire retardant material such as ammonium bromide, phosphoric acid, sodium stannate, potassium hydroxide and potassium thiocyanate have been found to be suitable for use in the present invention.

The container A is divided into left and right sections 1, 2, each having mottom walls 3, 4, respectively connected by relatively thick but flexible overlapping hinge panels 5, 5, which are integrally formed with the bottom walls 3, 4, and which extend for the greater portion of the length of the bottom walls 3, 4, respectively. Each of the sections 1, 2, have pairs of abutting end walls 6, 7, abutting top walls 8, 9, and spaced opposed side walls 10, 11, respectively.

The side wall 10, is secured to the top wall 8, the bottom wall 3, and to each of the end walls 6 through a welt 12, and each have inturned flanges 13, 14, which are secured through lines of double stitching 15. Similarly, the side wall 11 is secured to the top wall 9, the bottom wall 4 and each of the end walls 7, through a large welt 16, and each have inturned flanges 17, 18, which are secured through double lines of stitching :19.

The two sections are optionally attached through a zipper 2t composed of zipper tracks 21, 22, each being secured to the opposed margins of the top walls 8, 9, end walls 6, '7, and the portion of the bottom walls 3, 4, not secured by the hinge panels 5, 5'. The zipper 20 is preferably provided with a pair of movable elements so that the container A can be opened simultaneously from each side. The panel 1 is integrally provided with an overhanging flexible flap 23, along the top wall 8, end walls 6, and bottom wall 3, which is disposed over the zipper 20, in the manner as shown in FIGURE 4.

Secured to the interior surfaces of each of the opposed side walls Iil, 11, through lines of stitching 24, 25, in approximate horizontal alignment are relatively thick but flexible support strips 26, 27, respectively. The strips 26, 27, are preferably located midway'between the upper and lower margins of the side walls 10, 11, and extend for the greater portion of the overall length of the side walls 10, 11.

Secured to the interior surfaces of each of the strips 26, 27, through lines of stitching 23, 29, are four spaced aligned U-shaped mattress support straps 3h. The straps 34) are preferably formed of relatively thick canvas so that they are flexible and yet sufficiently strong to support the weight of a water soaked mattress. The straps 30 assume a U-shaped configuration when the container A is in closed position as illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 4.

Four spaced aligned handle-forming straps 31 are secured to the exterior surface of the side wall through upper and lower lines of stitching 32, 33, which pass through the strip 26 and form four loops through which pass a rope-handle 34. The rope-handle 34 is provided with knots 35 at each transverse end for retaining the rope-handle 34 within the handle-forming straps 31. Four spaced aligned straps as are similarly secured to the exterior surface of the side wall 11 through upper and lower lines of stitching 37, 38, which pass through the strip 27 and form four loops through which pass a ropehandle. 39. The rope-handle 39 is also provided with knots 44 at each transverse end for retaining the ropehandle 39 within the handle-forming straps 36. In this connection, it should be understood that while the container A has been illustrated with rope-handles, that any suitable handle-forming means could be employed.

In use the container A can be conveniently and easily folded up and stored on a. fire truck or in fire closets of public accommodation institutions such as hotels, etc. In view of the fact that the container A is formed of a flexible material, it can be folded into a neat compact unit. Furthermore, it can be rapidly unfolded and opened by means of the zipper 20.

7 When the fire fighter enters the dwelling and discov ers a mattress or similar type of cushion on fire, he will spray the same with Water or some type of fire extinguishing foam or liquid to eliminate the external fire. He

can then load the mattress into the container A and close the two sections 1, 2, through the zipper 20. The container A can then be easily transported from the interior of the dwelling. Inasmuch as the container A is almost completely air tight, any internal fire within the mattress or cushion will be smothered in a few minutes due to the lack of an oxygen media. Moreover, any smoke created by the smothered fire will be contained in the container A.

It should be understood that changes and modifications in the form, construction, arrangement and combination of parts presently described and pointed out in the claims can be made and substituted for those herein shown without departing from the nature and principle of my invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I desire to claim and secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A device for retaining and transporting mattresses and similar large and bulky ignitable elements, said device comprising a foldable container constructed of a flexible material which is capable of being folded a plurality of times into a small compact unit, said container being divided into two sections which are adjoined and pivoted with respect to each other along a common margin, said sections having spaced opposed walls, securement means operatively associated with at least one of said sections along the remaining margins thereof for securing each of said sections, support strips secured to and extending lengthwise along each of said opposed walls, and a plurality of flexible straps operatively secured to the support strips on each of said opposed Walls for maintaining said ignitable element in spaced relation to the wall having said common margin.

2. A device for retaining and transporting mattresses common margin, and handle forming means on the exterior surfaces of each of said opposed walls and being secured through said walls to said support strips.

3. A device for retaining and transporting ignitable elements, said device comprising first and second sections, said first section having a side wall, end walls and a bottom wall, said second section having end walls, a bottom wall and a side wall spaced from the side wall of said first section, means for pivotally adjoining the bottom walls of each of said sections along a common margin so that said first and second sections can'be pivoted to an open position where the end walls of each section are separated and to a closed position where the end 'walls of each section are in abutting relationship, said first and second sections forming an internal compartment for enclosing said ignitable elements when in the closed position, support strips secured to and extending lengthwise along each of the opposed side walls, a plurality of flexible straps rigidly attached to said support strips on each of said side walls for holding said ignitable elements in spaced relation to the bottom walls of each section, handle-forming means on the exterior surfaces of each of said side walls and being secured to said support strips, and closure means on said end walls for holding the first and second sections in a closed position.

4. A device for retaining and transporting ignitable elements, said device comprising first and second sections, said first section having a side wall, end walls and a bottom wall, said second section having end walls, a bottom wall and a side wall spaced from the side wall of said first section, means for pivotally adjoining the bottom walls of each of said sections along a common margin so that said first and second sections can be pivoted to an open position where the end walls of each section are separated and to a closed position when the ,end walls of each section art in abutting relationship, said first and second sections forming an internal compartment for enclosing said ignitable element when in the closed position, support strips secured to the interior surfaces of and extending lengthwise along each of the opposed side walls, a plurality of flexible straps rigidly attached to said support strips on each of said side walls for holding said ignitable element in spaced relation to the bottom Walls of each section, handle-forming means on the exterior surfaces of each of said side walls and being secured through said side walls to said support strips, and closure and similar large and bulky ignitable elements, said desections having spaced opposed walls, securement means operatively associated with at least one of said sections along the remaining margins thereof for securing each of said sections, support strips secured to and extending lengthwise along each ofxsaid opposed walls, a plurality of flexible straps operatively secured to the support strips on each of said opposed walls for maintaining said ignitable element in spaced relation to the wall having said means on said end walls for holding the first and second sections in a closed position.

5. A device for retaining and transporting ignitable elements, said device comprising first and second sections, said first section having a side wall, end walls, a top wall and a bottom wall, said second section having end walls, a bottom wall, a top Wall and a side wall spaced from the side wall of said first section, means for pivotally adjoining the bottom walls of each of said sections along a commonmargin so that said first and second sections can be pivoted to an open position where the end walls and top walls of each section are separated and to a closed position where the end walls and top walls of each section are in abutting relationship, said first and second sections forming an internal compartment for enclosing said ignitable element when in the closed position, support strips secured to and extending lengthwise along each of the opposed side walls, a plurality of flexible straps rigidly attached to said support strips on each of said side walls for holding said ignitable element in spaced relation to the bottom walls of each section, handle-forming means on the exterior surfaces of each of said side walls and being secured to said support strips, and closure means on said end walls and top walls for holding the first and second sections in a closed position.

6. A device for retaining and transporting mattresses and similar large and'bulky ignitable elements, said device being constructed of a flexible material and capable of being folded a plurality of times into a small compact unit, said device comprising first and second sections, said first section having a side wall, end walls and a bottom wall, said second section having end walls, a bottom wall and a side wall spaced from the side wall of said first section, means for pivotally adjoining the bottom walls of each of said sections along a common margin so that said first and second sections can be pivoted to an open position where the end walls of each section are separated and to a closed position where the end walls of each section are in abutting relationship, said first and second sections forming an internal compartment for enclosing said ignitable elements when in the closed position, support strips secured to and extending lengthwise along each of the opposed side walls, a plurality of flexible straps rigidly attached to said support strips on each of said side walls for holding said ignitable elements in spaced relation to the bottom walls of each section, handle-forming means on the exterior surfaces of each of said side walls and being secured to said support strips, and closure means on said end walls for holding the first and second sections in a closed position.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,913,021 6/33 Butterick 190-41 2,018,809 10/35 Rodgers 190-41 2,143,062 1/ 39 Ericson et al 190-41 2,157,833 5/39 Plotkin 190-4 1 2,313,350 3/43 Lebus 220-88 2,526,385 10/50 Meyer 190-41 2,554,215 5/51 Schell et a1 190-58 2,561,891 7/51 Tucker 161-403 2,624,894 1/53 McCarthy 161-403 2,939,200 6/60 Ewing et a1 161-403 3,073,367 1/63 Samara 190-41 FRANKLIN T. GARRETT, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1913021 *Jun 3, 1931Jun 6, 1933Butterick Naason ZWardrobe suitcase
US2018809 *Jun 5, 1935Oct 29, 1935Rodgers Leo JConvertible hand bag
US2143062 *May 1, 1937Jan 10, 1939Ericson Warren TTraveling kit
US2157833 *Mar 13, 1937May 9, 1939Dresner & Son Inc SHand luggage
US2313350 *May 24, 1940Mar 9, 1943Protectoseal Company Of AmericSafety wash tank
US2526385 *May 18, 1949Oct 17, 1950Siegfried MeyerGarment cover
US2554215 *Jun 7, 1949May 22, 1951Horace R SchellFlat opening case
US2561891 *Jul 28, 1949Jul 24, 1951Johns ManvilleInsulating fabric
US2624894 *Dec 1, 1951Jan 13, 1953Treesdaie Lab And Textile ProcMattress construction
US2939200 *May 12, 1954Jun 7, 1960British CelaneseFabric woven from coated yarns
US3073367 *Jun 24, 1958Jan 15, 1963Ferris A SamaraFoldable bag and the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3292748 *Jun 1, 1964Dec 20, 1966Arnold S RifkinFire-resistant enclosure
US5524754 *May 19, 1994Jun 11, 1996Port, IncorporatedCarrying case for notebook computer
US5775497 *Dec 10, 1996Jul 7, 1998United States Luggage, L.P.Portable cradle for a personal computer
US6612742 *Oct 25, 2001Sep 2, 2003James E. CarterInsulated container with internal harness
US6691843 *Mar 7, 2001Feb 17, 2004Trg Accessories, LlcProtective carrying case
US6976586 *May 10, 2002Dec 20, 2005Asm America, Inc.Delicate product packaging system
US7658281 *Feb 20, 2003Feb 9, 2010Swatch AgDevice for receiving a commodity in a fixed position
US8567578Feb 13, 2009Oct 29, 2013Targus Group International, Inc.Portable computer case
US8763795Jan 23, 2013Jul 1, 2014Targus Group International, Inc.Dual support flap case
WO2002071888A1 *Mar 7, 2002Sep 19, 2002Trg Accessories L L CProtective carrying case
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/6, 383/113, 190/39, 383/97, 169/91, 206/583
International ClassificationA62C99/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62C99/009
European ClassificationA62C99/00F