Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3186565 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 1, 1965
Filing dateJan 15, 1962
Priority dateJan 15, 1962
Publication numberUS 3186565 A, US 3186565A, US-A-3186565, US3186565 A, US3186565A
InventorsGeorge H Williamson
Original AssigneeJohns Manville
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic shingle stacker
US 3186565 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1, 1965 G. H. WILLIAMSON AUTOMATIC SHINGLE STACKER 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 15, 1962 ow v M IIJ Md h. IA

M mx 3 M nn M wn

INVENTOR. GEORGE H.W\u.mu\sou 41- ATTORNEY June 1, 1965 G. H. WILLIAMSON AUTOMATIC SHINGLE STACKER 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 15, 1962 INVENTOR. Gnome H.W||.|.|AM$ on ATTORNEY J1me 1965 K G. H. WILLIAMSON 3,18 65 AUTOMATIC SHINGLE STACKER Filed Jan. 15, 1962 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 ATTORNEY June 1965 G. H. WILLIAMSON 3,186,565

AUTOMATIC SHINGLE STACKER Filed Jan. 15, 1962 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. GIORGE H.W| LLIAMSou ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,186,565 1 AUTOMATIC HINGLE STACKER George H. Williamson, Somerville, NIL, assignor to .lohns-Manville Corporation, New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Jan. 15, 1962, Ser. No. 166,335 (Ilairns. (Cl. 214-6) This is a continuation-in-part of application for Letters Patent Serial No. 69,905, filed November 17 1960, for Automatic Shingle Take-Off. Serial No. 69,905 relates to a method and apparatus for stacking asphalt shingles, and the like, into bundles of a convenient size for handling and shipping.

Disclosed in the above-mentioned application are two similarrotary catch pans having an equal number of radially disposed arms or plates mounted for counter rotation on parallel axes adjacent the end of the conveyor of a shingle manufacturing line. The rotary catch pans receive the shingles from the conveyor, and after timed intervals of predetermined count, are indexed a quarter turn to drop the shingles to a rotary table below; If the shingle dimensions are uniform, the stack of shingles on the table may he transferred directly to a removal conveyor. If the shingles are thicker along one elongated edge, because of a thick butt portion or because of an adhesive stripe thereon, the table is intermittently rotated 180 after each indexing movement of the catch pans. This results in a final bundle comprising a plurality of stacks of shingles alternately arranged so that the thicker edge of each consecutive stack lies on alternate sides of the bundle.

t has been found that while the rotary catch pans of the above-mentioned application can readily handle shingles manufactured at maximum line speed, it is difficult to rapidly rotate the table 180 in order to accommodate such high speed manufacturing, due to the relatively great mass of the table and the relatively long distance through which the outer edge thereof must travel.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide an improved automatic shingle stacker for stacking asphalt shingles and the like, having one elongated edge thicker than the opposite parallel edge, in a staggered or alternate manner.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for stacking asphalt shingles, and the like, which shingles have one elongated edge thicker than the opposite parallel edge.

A further object of the invention is to provide an automatic shingle stacker for stacking shingles having one elongated side edge thereof thicker than the opposite parallel edge, said stacker being capable of handling shingles manufactured at maximum line speed.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an automatic shingle stacker which is relatively simple in design, efiicient in operation, and economical to manufacture.

A further object of the invention is to provide a novel reciprocating carriage for use in an automatic shingle stacking machine.

Briefly, the invention contemplates substituting a reciprocating carriage and a stationary tablefor the rotary table disclosed in Serial No. 69,905. Thecarriage is reciprocated into position beneath the rotary catch pans in timed relation to the indexing thereof to receive a first predetermined number of shingles dropped by the rotary catch pans. The carriage is then retracted to a position remote from the shingle receiving position, and is rotated 180 about a horizontal axis while a second predetermined number of shingles is dropped by the rotary catch pans to the stationary table. The carriage is again moved to a position, beneath the rotary catch pans, at which posi- 3,1855% herniated June 1, 19 55 ion it drops the previously received stack of shingles to the stationary table, and receives another stack of shingles dropped by the rotary catch pans. The carriage is then retracted to its remote position again. This sequence of operations is continued until a predetermined number of "ice ' stacks have been deposited on the table, at which time the shingles are transferred from the table to a removal conveyor. In this manner, a relatively large stack or bundle of shingles is formed of relatively small stacks of shingles alternately arranged so that the thicker edges of consecutive stacks are on opposite sides of the bundle.

The reciprocating carriage is relatively light in weight, as compared to the rotary table of the above-mentioned application, and it travels a lesser distance from remote position to shingle receiving position than the rotary table travels during rotation of 180". In addition, the carriage does not have to be positioned under the rotary catch pans during every indexing movement thereof, but only during every other indexing movement. Due to these features, the shingle stacking apparatus of the present'invention can operate at higher speeds and greater eiiiciency than the rotary table type of apparatus disclosed in the abovementioned application.

The nature of the invention will be more full understood and other objects may become apparent, when the following detailed description is considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan viewof the rotary catch pans positioned adjacent the end of the conveyor of a shingle manufacturing line;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view on line 2-2 of FIG. 1, showing the rotary catch pans and the reciprocating carriage;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation of the automatic shingle stacker, showing the rotary catch pans, the stacking table, and the take-off conveyor;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the reciprocating carriage with the top cover plate thereof removed for clarity;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view on line 55 of FIG. 4, showing the reciprocating carriage with the top cover plate included; and

FIGS. 6A to 6B are diagrammatical views illustrating the sequence of operations of the automatic shingle stacker.

Referring to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 of the drawings, rotary catch pans 10 and 12 are positioned adjacent the end of a conveyor 14 of a shingle manufacturing line, not shown. The rotary catch pans 10 and 12 comprise parallel shafts 16 and 18, which are approximately parallel to the direction of movement of the conveyor 14 and are mounted in bearings 20 and 22. Arms or plates 24 and 26 radiate at intervals from the shafts l6 and 18 so that when the plates are positioned as illustrated in FIG. 2, adjacent horizontal plates form the support of a shingle receiving compartment, and the upper vertical plates act as shingle guide walls. The ends of the plates 24 and 26 most remote from the conveyor 14 are connected to discs or plates 28' and 39 which serve to limit the movement of the shingles as they are deposited into the compartment formed by the radially disposed plates. To eliminate bounce-back of the shingles, a plate 32 is fixed to the shaft 16 at the end adjacent the conveyor 14, and is of such dimensions that the shingles will clear the plate when they are fed into the catch pans but will contact the plate upon bouncing back from limit plates 28 and 3h. Disposed at right angles to. the shaft 18 and fixed to the plates 26 are two projecting strips 34 which are so located that the slots commonly provided in shingles will be positioned adjacent thereto. Ifthe shingle is provided with two such slots, the leading edges of the central and rear flaps formed by the slots will rest on the projecting strips 34 to prevent the slots of a shingle from catching on the next lower shingle as it is deposited into the rotary the plates 24 and 26 adjacent.

even though the compartment formed by the catch pans V is not properly aligned with the path of travel of the shingles as they leave the conveyor.

Positioned betweenthe end of the conveyor blend the rotary catch pans 16 and 12 is a plate 49 for supporting the shingles as they move from the conveyor to the.

Positioned above and on'either side of the support plate 40 are upper and side guide plates 42, 44-

.catch pans.

58. A continuously driven-motor 60 drives the indexing unit 58 through gears 62 and 64. The indexing unit 58 may take any convenient form such as a' combination clutch and brake unit in which normally, the brake is on and the clutch is disengaged, but, upon receiving an electrical impulse, the clutch is engaged and the brake is taken oif. The electrical impulse may be supplied by any suitablemeans such as an electric eye, for example, which may take the form of a, transmitter 66 and a receiver 68 positioned so that the beam of light extending therebetween is broken by a shingle as it leaves the conveyor 14. The structure thus far described is disclosed in the above-mentioned application in a more specific manner.

In accordance with the present invention, -a projection or cam 70 is provided on each of the. plates 26 atthe end thereof adjacent the conveyor 14. A limit switchLSl is positioned adjacent the catch pan 12 so that a cam 79,1

whenthe plate on which it is mounted is in the lower vertical position, will contact and close the switch. A

cam 72 is positioned'on one of the-plates 24 of the catch pan 10 adjacent the conveyor 14. and is adapted to contact and close a limit switch LS2 positioned similarly to LS1. The purpose of the limit switches LS1 and LS2 will be made clear hereinafter.

As best shown in FIGS. 2 'and.3, a stacking table 74 is positioned beneath the rotary catch pans and comprises an endless conveyor 76 entrained about a driving-roll g 78, an idler roll 89, and a plurality of small'diarneter idler 'rolls 82, which form with the endless conveyor the upper surface of the table 74. The driving roll 78 is drivenby a continuously driven'motor 84through gears 86 and 88 and'a clutch and brake unit' 90. Positioned adjacent to the table 74 and approximately 'parallelto the direction of movement of the endless conveyor 76, is

a removalconveyor 92 driven by a roll 94. The driving means for the roll 94 may be provided by a gear train,

not shown," driven by the continuously driven motor 84, if desired@ A huger belt 96, driven by a roll 98, is posi- 92 so that it engages the'to'p shingle of a bundle of shingles in order to keep the bundle properly aligned.

The clutch andbrakeunit ,90, which may be similarto the indexing unit 58. previously described, may receive an electrical impulse from a suitable circuit activated'by the closing of LS2; The circuit could include-a timer which, after a suitable delay to allow for a .stack of, shingles to be dropped by the rotary icatch pans, would energize a relay, which in-turnwould actuate the clutch and brake unit 90 for driving the conveyor 76. Upon.

movement of the conveyor 76,.a bundle of shingles supported thereon would be transferred to the continuously 'tioned a suitable distance above the removal conveyor drivenremoval conveyor 92,, which would transport the bundle to. a wrapping station." A limit sWitch LSS-is positioned in the path of thebundle of shingles as it is transported by the removal conveyor 92, which switch, upon beingcl'osed by the bundle, serves toopenuthe relay r 1 controllingthe clutch and brake unit 90, and thereby stop movement of the conveyor 76. r

Positioned adjacent the four sides of the table 74 are support plates. on .which stack straightening plates 102 are pivotally mounted" for movement by cylinders 104. Actuation of cylinders 1'84 is-"contr'olled through a timing mechanism energized bythe closing of limit switch LS1 'by one'of the cams. 70 eachtime rotary catch pan 12 is indexed a quarter turn; Thus, after each stack of shingles is dropped to vthetable 74, the straightening plates 102 are actuated to maintain theflstack in proper alignment. Thelplate 102-between the table and the conveyor 92 pivots to a horizontal {position when at rest to allow a bundle of'shingles to be transferredto the conveyor 2. The other plates 162 .need pivot away fromthestack only about 20-30- i V Straddling the table'74 and extending approximately perpendicular to the direction ofmovement of the conveyor 76, aretwo tracks 106 supported by'suitablesupporting legsltls. A carriage, 1111 is mounted on the tracks 106-by wheels 1112 for-reciprocating movement along the length of thetracksfi'Asbest shown in FIGS; 2, 4 and 5, the carriage comprises a shaft 114 on which the wheels 112 are rotatably mounted. The shaft 114 is rotatably: mounted in and extends. through the; legs of a generally C-shapedframe 116. Connected to the midi point of theelongated portion of the C-shaped frame 116 is the piston rod of a cylinder 118 for reciprocating the carriage along the. tracks 18.6. Operation of the cylinder 1181s controlled by a suitablecircuit containing solenoid air valves and a latching switch, which latching switch is energized after'a suitabledelay by the closing of limit switch LS1 byonevof the :cams .76 as the rotary catch pansareindexed a quarterturn. L-shaped frames 122 are attached at each side of theC-shaped frame 116 to the ends of the legstherejof. Carried on support plates 124, which are attached to the --L:shaped fram'es122, are cylinders 126, the piston rods of which carry gear racks 128. Pinion gears 131i, fixed on both ends of the shaft 114,-are adapted to mesh with the gear racks 128, so that .upon actuation of the cylinder 126, the pinion gears and the Shafllflll will be'rotated 180 The cylinder's126 are also controlled by a suitable circuit containing solenoid air .valves and a latching switch; Another limit switch LS4, mounted in the pathiof travel of the carriage 110 such that itfis contacted thereby as the carriage reaches its remote position, may actuate the latching switch of the control circuit of thecylinde'r 126.

A generally rectangular enclosure is formed'by horizoutal cover plates 132 andy134 positioned on opposite sides of theshaft 114; The cover plates 132 and 134 are joined by side walls 136 whichare fixedly mounted onthe shaft 114, This enables'theenclosure 'to rotate with the shafti114 as it is rotated-by .thegear and rack assembly 128 and 13h. The enclosure is completed by front and back walls 138 which connect the cover plates 132 and 134. The front anclhack walls 13% extend beyond the .coverplates and are'flared outwardly away frornthe shaft .114. .This construction proyides forthe shingles to drop onto the cover plates with a minimum of interference from the walls' 138. The extended portions of'the walls 138also'act as guide ,walls to maintain the shingles in proper alignment. p

Positionedonssuitable supports on opposite sides-of the shaft 114 and at each endlthereof adjacentthe. side walls 136 are cylinders 142. Thepiston rods of the cylinders 142 extend throughsuitable slots 714,4 in/the-front and back walls 138 and are, connected to horizontally disposed plates146, the lengths of which are; slightly less than the lengthsof walls 138, but the widthsof whichare greater than thedistancebetweenthe cover plates 132- and 134-. A'plurality of fingers-148; Whi'ch. are connected 'to and extend approximately perpendicular, to'the plate146 in the direction of the, shaft 114, are mounted for sliding movement.throughslots 154) inithe front and back walls 138. The ends of the fingers I48 are flared away from the cover plates 132 and 134 so that when the plates 146 and the fingers 14% move from open to closed position, the fingers willglide over the top of a shingle stack with a minimum of interference. The cylinders 14?. may be controlled by a relay actuated by the closing of limit switch LS3, which is positioned in the path of the movement of the carriage 1143 so that it is closed by the carriage as it reaches the end of its travel toward its shingle receiving position beneath the rotary catch pans.

Referring to FIGS. 2, 3, 4, 5 and particularly to FIG. 6A through 6B, the operation of the shingle stacker will be described. Assume that the carriage 114 has just moved into position beneath the catch pans 10 and 12 as shown in FIG. 6A, and that a bundleof shingles has just been transferred to the removal conveyor 92. With the carriage in this position, .limit switch LS3 is closed and will have energized a relay to maintain the cylinders 142 in extended position so that the fingers 148 will not interfere with a stack of shingles to be dropped onto the cover plate 132. The shingles are continuously fed from the conveyor 14 to the rotary catch pans It) and 12 until a predetermined number of shingles have accumulated therein to form a stack I. Upon receiving a signal from the electric eye, the indexing unit 58 is energized and the rotary catch pans are indexed a quarter turn to drop the stack I onto the cover plate 132 of the carriage Iii At the end of this indexing movement, the cam '70, attached to the plate 26 which is now in the lower vertical position, closes the limit switch LS1. This aotuates a timer, which, after a suitable delay to permit the stack of shingles to fall, actuates the straightening cylinders 104 to straighten any shingles lying, on the table '74-. There are no shingles on the table at this point, but there are after each of the other indexing movements of the rotary catch pans during rotation thereof through 360. Closing of the limit switch LS1 also energizes a latching switch in a suitable circuit for controlling the cylinder 3113. The cylinder 118 is then retracted to withdraw the carriage 110 from beneath the catch pans to its remote position. As the carriage moves away, limit switch LS3 opens and the relay controlled thereby causes the cylinders 142 to retract, thereby closing the fingers 148 to hold the shingles of stack I in place.

When the carriage reaches the end of its travel away from the catch pans 10 and 12, it contacts limit switch LS4, which energizes a latching switch in a suitable circuit to cause the cylinders 126to retract. The gear and rack arrangement 128, 130 rotates the shaft 114 and the enclosure attached thereto through 180. The carriage 110 is now in the position shown in FIG. 6B, and the stack I has been inverted from its original position and is held in place by the fingers 148. Thus, if one elongated edge of each shingle in the stack I is thicker than the opposite parallel edge, the thicker edge of the shingle stack would now be opposite its original position. During this time, a second stack of shingles II will have collected in the rotary catch pans 10 and 12, as shown in FIG. 6B. The catch pans are again indexed to drop the stack II to the table '74 and to close limit switch LS1. The cylinder 118 is again actuated, but in the opposite direction, so that the carriage 110 is moved backinto position beneath the catch pans, and the straightening plates 192 are pivoted up for a short length of time to straighten the stack II. The carriage again contacts limit switch LS3 which actuates a relay to cause the cylinders 142 to move the fingers 148 to open position, thereby permitting the stack of shingles I to drop on top of the stack II, as shown in FIG. 6C. If the thicker edge of the stack 11 is at the .right of FIG. 6C, then the thicker edge of stack I will be at the left, and the combined stacks I and II will form an even, regular stack.

A third stack III will now have accumulated in the rotary catch pans, and upon an indexing movement thereof the stack is dropped into the open carriage'llt). LS1 is again closed and the carriage goes through the same sequence of operations as described above until it reaches the position shown in FIG. 68, at which time four stacks of shingles will have been dropped onto the table '74.

A fifth stack V, upon indexing of the rotary catch pans, is then dropped into the open carriage lit), and the limit switch LSll is again actuated. At this indexing movement, however, the cam '72 is now positioned so that it contacts and closes the limit switch LS2, which actuates a suitable timing mechanism and relay to cause the clutch and brake unit hit to rotate the driving roll 78. This causes the conveyor 76 to move the bundle of shingles comprised of stacks I, II, III and IV to the removal conveyor 92;. The conveyor 7e continues to move until the bundle of shingles on the take-off conveyor d2 contacts the limit switch LS5, which opens the relay and deactuates the clutch and brake unit 9%). Thus, after every fourth stack of shingles has been dropped by the rotary catch pans I0 and I2, the conveyor '76 will transfer the shingles to the removal conveyor 92. Because the small stacks of shingles which comprise each bundle are alternately inverted, the thicker elongated edges of the shingles are compensated for, and the final bundle is of even, regular shape.

It should be understood that the relatively small stacks of shingles formed in the catch pans may comprise any de sired number of shingles, and that, if desired, the timing of the operations could be adjusted so that every third or fourth stack is inverted, instead of every other stack as described above.

It should be further understood that the invention is not limited to the specific embodiment disclosed but may be modified in a number of ways. For example, instead of providing latching switches in the circuits which control cylinders 113 and 126, an integral program timer could be provided for controlling all sequential operations of the shingle stacker unit. The cylinders may be either pneumatic or hydraulic, or, if desired, solenoids may be substituted therefor. The table '74 may be stationary, with a cylinder actuated reciprocating stack remover, such as that disclosed in Serial No. 69,905, provided to transfer the shingles from the table to the removal conveyor. If desired, the number of cylinders 126 and 142 may be reduced, and appropriate mechanical linkages provided where necessary.

Obviously, many modifications of the present invention are possible in the light of the foregoing disclosure, and such modifications are intended to fall within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

' What I claim is:

1. Apparatus for stacking flexible shingles transported on a conveyor, comprising (a) means for receiving said shingles from said conveyor and forming them into relatively small stacks;

(b) means for causing said receiving means to intermittently drop said stacks;

(c) means for receiving only every other dropped stack and inverting the same;

((1) means for causing said latter means to drop said v inverted stacks in timed relation to the operation of 'the first mentioned stack receiving means; and

(e) a table positioned to receive said stacks of shingles,

whereby a relatively large stack comprising alternately inverted small stacks is formed on the table.

2. Apparatus for stacking flexible shingles transported on a conveyor, comprising i (a) means for receiving said shingles from said con- ,veyor and forming them into relatively small stacks;

(b) means for causing said receiving means to intermittently drop said stacks;

(c) means for receiving only predetermined dropped stacks and inverting the same;

(d) means for causing said latter means to drop said.

inverted stacks in timed relation to the operation of the first mentioned stack receiving means; and

(a) means for receiving said shingles from said conveyor and forming them into relatively small stacks; (b) means for causing said receiving means to intermittently drop said stacks; (c) carriage means; a (d) means for intermittently reciprocating said carriage means to a position'beneath said receiving means in timed relation tothe dropping of said stacks to receive predetermined stacks;

(e) means-on said carriage means for inverting said predetermined stacks;

(f) means for'causing said carriage means to drop said inverted stacks While positioned beneath the receiving means in timed relation to the operation of said stack receiving means; and (g) a table positioned to receive said stacks of shingles, whereby a relatively large stack is formed on the table of the'relatively small stacks, the predetermined small stacks being inverted.

4. Apparatusfor stacking flexible shingles transported on a conveyor, comprising (a) means for receiving said shingles from said conveyor and forming them into relatively small stacks;

(b) means for causing said receiving means to intermittently drop said stacks;

(c) carriage means;

(d) means for intermittently reciprocating said carriage means to a position beneath said receiving means tin timed relation to the dropping of said stacks to receive predetermined stacks;

(e) means for inverting said predetermined stacks when the carriage means is outof shingle receiving position;

(f) means for causing saidcarriage means to drop an inverted stack at substantially the same time that it receives another predetermined stack; and

(g) a table positionedto receive said stacks of shingles, whereby a relatively large stack is formedton the table, of the relatively small stacks, the predetermined small stacks being inverted 5. Apparatus for stacking flexible shingles transported I c on a conveyor, comprising (e) means operable when the carriage meansis in remote position for rotating the predeterminedfstack on said carriage through 180 to invert said stack;

(f) means for causing said carriagemeans to drop an inverted stack at substantially the same time. it is receiving ianother predetermined. stack; and V (g) a table positioned to receive said stacks of shingles,

whereby a relatively large stack is formed on :the

table of the relatively small stacks, the predetermined small 'st-acks being inverted. r

6. Apparatus for stackingfiexible shingles transported on aconveyor, comprising i t (a) means for receiving said shinglesfrom said'con- -veyor and forming them into relatively small stacks;

(b) means'for causing said receiving means to intermittently drop saidostacks;

(c) carriage means; V

(d) means for intermittently reciprocating said carriage means between a shingle receiving position beneath said receiving means and a position remote therefrom,

said reciprocating means operating in timed relation to the dropping of saidstacks in order to'receive predetermined stacks;

(e) means operable when the carriage is out of shingle receiving position toflhold said predetermined stacks,

said latter means releasing said stacks when the carriage is in shingler'eceiving position, i g

(f) means operable when the carriage means is in remote position for rotating-the predetermined'stack on said carriag'e'through180 to invert said stack;

(g) means for causing said carriage means to drop said inverted stacks'at'substantially the same time it is receiving another; predetermined stack; and

(h) a table positioned to receive said stacks'of shingles, whereby a relatively large, stack is formed on the table of the relatively small stacks, the predetermined small stacks being inverted. I

.7. A method for stacking shingles transported on a conveyor, comprising'the steps of (a) forming relatively smalltstacks of shingles;

(b) intermittently dropping said stacks onto a support;

(c) catching predetermined'stacks and inverting'them, the other dropped stacks being permitted to fall to thesupporn and (d) dropping said invertedstacks to said support in timed relation to the dropping of the other stacks to said support, whereby a relatively large stack is formed on said support including the inverted predetermined stacks. V p f 8. A method for stacking shingles transported on a conveyor, comprising the steps of t (a) forming relatively small stacks of shingles;

(b) intermittently dropping saidrstacks; f

(c) catching predetermined stacks of shingles and withdrawingthem' from the path of droppingstacks;

(d) inverting said withdrawn stacks; V

(efpermitting,the othertstacksto fall to a support; and

(f).'dropping said inverted @SiilCkS .to'said support in timed relation-to'th e dropping ,of and ,in the same location as, the 'oth'e'r stacks, whereby a relatively large stack is formed on said support including the inverted predetermined stacks. p

9. 'In a method for stacking shingles transported on a conveyor, the steps of V V V (a) forminga relatively small stack of shingles;

(b) dropping said stack; 7

(c) c'atchin'gtsaid stack and inverting it;

(d) forming a second relatively small stack of shingles;

' (e) dropping said second stack to a support; and

(f) dropping said inverted stack'on top of the previ-' ously dropped second stack to form at least part of a'relativel-y large stack of shingles,- V

10. In a method for stacking shingles transported on a conveyor, the steps of 7 a p (a) forminga relatively small stack of shingles;

(b):dropping said'stack; i i I (c) catching said sta'ckand withdrawing it from the path'of'the dropping stacks;

(d) inverting said'withdrawn' stacks;

(e) forming a second relatively sm'all'stack'of shingles;

(f) dropping said second stack to. a support;

(g) moving said invertedstack' over the previously dropped second stack; and Q 7 e (h) dropping said'inve'rted stack on top of the previously dropped second stackt'to form at least part ofra;

relatively largestack of shingles. 7

11. In an apparatusfor stacking flexibleshingles, tran sported on a conveyor, 7 p 7 t p i Y (a) a carriage adapted to reciprocate snbstantiallyhorizontally between a position beneath a shingle stack forming means and a position remote therefrom, said carriage comprising (b) a main frame;

(c) a second frame rotatably mounted about a substantially horizontal aXis on said main frame;

(d) means carried by said second frame for receiving a stack of shingles;

(e) means movably mounted on said shingle stack receiving means for holding a stack of shingles therein; and

(f) means on said main frame to rotate said second frame through 180 thereby inverting a stack of shingles held in place on the second frame by the stack holding means.

12. In an apparatus for stacking flexible shingles transported on a conveyor,

(a) a carriage adapted to reciprocate substantially horizontally between a position beneath a shingle stack forming means and a position remote therefrom, said carriage comprising (b) a main frame;

(c) a second frame rotatably mounted about a substantially horizontal axis on said main frame;

(d) means carried by said second frame for receiving a stack of shingles;

(e) means movably mounted on said shingle stack receiving means for holding a stack of shingles therein;

(f) means carried by said second frame for moving said stack holding means between a holding position and a releasing position; and

(g) means on said main frame to rotate said second frame through 180 when the stack holding means is in holding position, thereby inverting a stack of shingles held on the second frame by the stack holding means.

13. Apparatus for stacking on a conveyor, comprising (a) means for receiving shingles from said conveyor and forming them into relatively small stacks;

(b) means for causing said receiving means to intermittently drop said stacks;

(c) carriage means;

(d) the carriage means comprising a main frame and a second frame rotatably mounted on said main frame;

(e) means on the second frame for receiving a stack of shingles;

(f) means for intermittently reciprocating said carflexible shingles transported riage means between a shingle receiving position beneath said receiving means and a position remote therefrom, said reciprocating means operating in timed relation to the dropping of said stacks to cause the shingle receiving means in the second frame to receive predetermined stacks of shingles;

(g) means on said main frame and operable when the carriage means is in remote position for rotating the second frame through 180 to invert the stacks carried thereby;

(l1) means for causing said second frame to drop an inverted stack at substantially the same time it is receiving another predetermined stack; and

(i) a table positioned to receive said stacks of shingles, whereby a relatively large stack is formed on the table of the relatively small stacks, the predetermined small stacks being inverted.

14. Apparatus for stacking flexible shingles transported on a conveyor as recited in claim 13 including additional.- 20 -ly, means movably mounted on said shingle stack receiving means for holding a stack of shingles therein.

15. Apparatus for stacking flexible shingles comprising,

(a) means for intermittently dropping relatively small stacks of shingles fed thereto,

(b) means for receiving and supporting stacks of shingles dropped from the dropping means;

(c) means for receiving predetermined dropped stacks before they reach the first mentioned receiving means and rotating the stacks about a horizontal axis, and

(6) means for dropping the rotated stacks to the location on the first-mentioned receiving means where the stacks which have not been rotated are located, whereby the relatively small stacks form a relatively large stack on the first mentioned receiving means, the predetermined small stacks being inverted with respect to the other stacks.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS HUGO o. SCHULZ, Primary Examiner. ERNEST A. FALLER, IR., Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1382994 *Sep 27, 1909Jun 28, 1921Guardian Trust And Savings BanMethod and apparatus for making glass articles
US2656051 *Jan 10, 1951Oct 20, 1953Jenkins Phil HTurnover mechanism
US2668483 *Jan 11, 1951Feb 9, 1954Toronto Star LtdStacking device
US2697388 *May 21, 1951Dec 21, 1954Cutler Hammer IncSystem for stacking newspapers and the like
US2865517 *Oct 26, 1954Dec 23, 1958Wm Hollingsworth Machine Co InInverter for printed sheets
US3115090 *Nov 4, 1960Dec 24, 1963Elander DouglasPacking machine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3469714 *Nov 13, 1967Sep 30, 1969Taylor & GaskinStacking machine
US4384813 *Feb 27, 1981May 24, 1983Manville Service CorporationShingle stacker with shingle inverting feature
US5024569 *Jun 20, 1986Jun 18, 1991Eds Technologies, Inc.Stacking method and apparatus
US5676517 *Jul 26, 1995Oct 14, 1997Lotz; Walter E.Method and apparatus for stacking thin sheets carrying product
US20100272553 *Apr 22, 2009Oct 28, 2010Aschenbeck David PMethod And Apparatus For Handling Shingles
Classifications
U.S. Classification414/788.3, 414/793.9, 414/791.3
International ClassificationB65G57/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65G57/06
European ClassificationB65G57/00