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Publication numberUS3188681 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 15, 1965
Filing dateJan 24, 1962
Priority dateJan 24, 1962
Publication numberUS 3188681 A, US 3188681A, US-A-3188681, US3188681 A, US3188681A
InventorsErnstberger Alfred F, Ivar Jepson, Wolter Gilbert R
Original AssigneeSunbeam Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vacuum cleaner
US 3188681 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 15, 1965 l. JEPSON ETAL VACUUM CLEANER 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 24, 1962 Zfld 274 INVENTORS.

June 15, 1965 JEPSON ETAL VACUUM CLEANER 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 24, 1962 INVENTORS:

June 1955 l. JEPSON ETAL VACUUM CLEANER 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Jan. 24, 1962 June 15, 1965 Filed Jan. 24, 1962 I. JEPSON ETAL 3,188,681

VACUUM CLEANER 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 i 12 1059 1 INVENTORS:

June 15, 1965 1. JEPSON ETAL 3,188,581

VACUUM CLEANER Filed Jan. 24, 1962 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 55 Z] V: 156 11a 4-?! 129 6 f I I; u a i l 1 4 1 I 144 k A INVENTORS June 15, 1965 l. JEPSON ETAL VACUUM CLEANER 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Jan. 24, 1962 INVENTORS;

United States Patent 0 3,133,681 VACUUM CLEANER Ivar Jepson, Oak Park, Gilbert R. Welter, Elmhurst, and

Alfred Ernstherger, Broadview, ill., assignors to Sunbeam orporation, (Ihicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Filed Jan. 24-, 1962, Ser. No. 168,4tit) 16 Claims. (Cl. 15-337) The present invention relates to vacuum cleaners, and more particularly to vacuum cleaners of the type commonly designated as upright vacuum cleaners.

Vacuum or suction cleaners, particularly useful for use in the home, have comprised two general types. One of these types, commonly referred to as an upright vacuum cleaner, has usually comprised a housing having at the underside of the forward end thereof a suction nozzle. To produce the necessary suction, an electric motor, a fan driven thereby, and usually a rotatable brush and heater arrangement driven by the motor are mounted in this same housing. Such an upright cleaner further includes a bag for receiving dirt removed during the vacuum cleaning operation. The second type of cleaner, commonly referred to as a tank or cannistertype cleaner, gets its name from its construction. It commonly comprises a tank or similarly shaped unit containing a motor driven fan for producing a suction, and connected to this tank through a flexible hose are various cleaning attachments. The present invention is directed to the first described or upright-type vacuum cleaner.

For many years, by far the most popular cleaner was the so-called upright-type cleaner. Initially the upright cleaner was primarily used for cleaning rugs and carpets, and it was felt that the motor-driven brush and beater was an essential part of the device to accomplish a good cleaning operation. The tank-type cleaner, at that time, relied primarily upon suction and had no means for heating or brushing the rug to aid in the cleaning operation. has become more popular due to the fact that attachments were provided, including turbine-driven brushes, for performing a rug cleaning operation commensurate with that performed by the upright cleaner. Additionally, upright cleaners, by virtue of the motor mounted in the same housing defining the suction nozzle were fairly large and could not readily be moved under low objects to perform a satisfactory cleaning operation. Also, the attachments commonly provided for upright cleaners to perform cleaning operations other than rug cleaning operations, were complicated to attach and the means for eliminating the suction at the nozzle in the housing and for rendering the rotating brush ineffective also were very complicated, often requiring putting a closure plate over the nozzle and removing the belt driving the brush and heater.

It would be desirable to provide an upright-type vacuum cleaner in which the housing defining the nozzle and supporting the rotatable brush and heater has a very low silhouette of the order of three inches or less so that it may be moved under almost any piece of furniture with the same facility as the nozzle of the tank-type cleaner. Additionally, it would be desirable to provide an upright-type cleaner whereby attachments could readily be connected thereto for performing certain cleaning operations other than the cleaning of rugs or carpets wherein the mere insertion into the suction area of the vacuum cleaner of the tube connected to the attachment not only disables the drive to the brush and heater, but also closes off the suction to the primary suction nozzle.

In recent years, the tank-type cleaner dd dfihi Fat-exited June 15, 1955 Accordingly, it i an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved upright cleaner having the desirable features enumerated above.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a new and improved upright-type vacuum cleaner whereby the motor for supplying the suction and driving the brush and heater arrangement is mounted adjacent the handle portion of the upright cleaner.

Still another object of the present invention resides in an improved upright vacuum cleaner wherein a first housing defining the suction nozzle is pivoted to the lower end of a second housing containing a motor driven fan drivingly connected to a rotatable brush in the first hous- A still further object of the present invention resides in an upright-type vacuum cleaner with improved means of disabling the brush and beater arrangement upon the mere insertion of a portion of the attachment into the suction area of the vacuum cleaner.

Still another object of the present invention resides in improved counterbalancing means for counterbalancing the upper of the pivotally related housings so that the weight of the motor and fan in the housing secured to the handle need not be supported by the person manipulating the cleaner.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an upright-type cleaner in which the housing defining the nozzle and housing the rotatable brush is sufficiently low so that it can be moved underneath almost any type of furniture in the same manner that the nozzle of the tank-type cleaner can be manipulated.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent as the following description proceeds and the features of novelty which characterize the invention will be pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of this specification.

For a better understanding of the presentinvention, reference may be had to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of the upright-type vacuum cleaner of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the cleaner of FIG. 1 with certain portions thereof shown in section taken substantially on line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a greatly enlarged bottom view of the lower housing portion of the upright-type vacuum cleaner of the present invention and the lower portion of the upper housing pivotally connected to the lower housing, with certain portions cut away more clearly to illustrate the present invention and with the upper housing pivoted to its lowermost position;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken on line 44 of FIG. 3, assuming that FIG. 3 shows the complete structure and with certain other portions broken away;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken on line 55 of FIG. 3, again assuming that FIG. 3 shows the complete structure;

FIG. 6 is a greatly enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on line 6-6 of FIG. 3, also assuming that FIG. 3 shows the complete structure;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken on line 77 of FIG. 6, assuming that FIG. 6 shows the complete structure;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line 88 of FIG. 6, again assuming that FIG. 6 shows the complete structure;

'FIG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional View taken on line 99 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line ltl1tl of FIG. 9, assuming that FIG. 9 shows the complete structure;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged fragmentary view of a portion of FIG. 5 but with the pulley and clutch portion thereof FIG. 13 is an exploded perspective view of certain por tions of FIG. 11 plus a portion of a cleaner attachment to illustrate how a cleaner attachment connected to the upright v-acuumwcleaner of the present invention disables the brush and beater arrangement and diverts the suction from the primary nozzle to the attachment.

'Brie'fiy, the present invention is concerned with an upright-type vacuum cleaner comprising a very lowpflat, wheel-mounted unit or firs-t housing defining the principal nozzle at the bottom -front thereof and having a rotatable brush and beater arrangement contained therein adjacent said nozzle. The lower housing or wheel-mounted unit includes simple 'counterbalancing means for counterbalancing an upper housing and handle member pivoted to the wheel-mounted unit, the upper housing containing the motor and suction producing'means in the form of atan. Means are, of course, provided to transmit the suction from the upper housing, where it is produced, to the wheel-mounted unit, and, specifically, the primary nozzle defined therein. Additionally, the upper housing includes a disposable dust bag into which dirt and other 'foreign matter, which is sucked through the nozzle portion of the device, may be retained for subsequent disposal. Power is transmitted from the motor through a clutch to a jack shaft located in the wheel-mounted unit on the pivotal axis between this unitand the'upper housing, and then power is also transmitted from this jack shaft to the brush and beater arrangement rotatably mounted in the lower housing adjacent the primary nozzle. The upper housing includes a first removable cover, affording access to the disposable bag, and a second removable cover adjacent the clutch, afiording access to the suction area. This second 7 removable cover includes an access opening through which one may insert the tube portion of an attachmenhand the mere'insertion of this tube portion cuts as the suction passageway leading to the lower-housing and, at thessame time, .actuates the clutch to terminate the rotation of the jack-shaft driving the brush and beater -arrangement.-

Referring nowto-thedrawings, there is illustrated-in FIGS. 1 and 2 .an upright-type vacuum cleaner, generally. designated by the reference numeral The vacuum cleaner comprises a lower or first housing comprisinga wheel-mounted -unit,-generally. designated as 21,.which is a verylowunit having an overall height of the order of three inches or less. Specifically,the wheel-mounted unit ZLincIudessupport means in .the form of a pair .of. front wheels 22. and a pair of rear wheels23, bestshown in FIG. 3 of the drawings. .In addition to-the wheelmounted un-it21, the upright vacuum cleaner includes a second or upper housing, generally designated at 24,.thelower end of which is pivotally-connected in a-manner described in detail hereinafter. to the .rear of the unit 21.. The upper end of the upper housing.24 is connected to a handle member 25,. preferablyv formed 'of a molded plastic.

The handle member is of tubular. configuration comprising an upper hand grip portion 25a disposed .at an angle relative to the main body portion of the handle member 25 and a lower, flared, open bottom cup-shaped portion 25b, having such a. size and configuration to smoothly conform to the upper end of the top of upper housing 24 when secured thereto, as is clearly shown in- FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings. Disposed within and adjacentthe-lower open end of the flared portion 25b are a plurality of bosses 25c integrally molded with the. handle member 25, containing either tapped openings or a tapped insert for receiving suitable'fastening means 27 for securing the handle 25 to the upper end of the upper housing 24. V r

To accommodate a suitable power cord, generally designated at 28, the handle member 25 is provided with a 7 suitable opening through which this cord can extend. Preferably a strain relief 29 is secured in this opening in any well-understood manner. Also, for the purpose of supporting a suitable control switch for the electric motor of the vacuum cleaner of the present invention, the-front of the'hand grip portion 25:: of handle member 25 is provided with a suitable opening 30.for supporting a removable plate '31, which plate supports the conventional control switch'32, having the switch knob 32a. Preferably the handle member 25 includes bosses 25d and 25e for suitable securing means which together with brackets 34 and 35 rem-ovably secure the'switch plate.31 and switch 32 in position.

For the purpose of removably securing .or latching in position a cover for the upper-housing 24, described hereinafter, and also to provideacord support, there is'pivotally mounted to the flared portion 25b of handle member 25 a combined latch and cord support 36, pivotally mounted as indicated at The upper portion 36a of the element 36 is a cord hook for supporting the power cord 28 when the vacuum cleaner is not in use,;and also a manual lever for actuating. the latch portion 36b of element 36 which, in turn, cooperates with a latch plate 38 secured to a cover defining part of upper housing 24.

Considering now the upper housing 24, the upper end of which is connected to the handle member'25, it comprises a main elongated, rectangular, boxlike member or container 40, open on one side, preferably formed of a molded plastic or the like, and a pair of cover members 41 and 42 for closing the open side of container 40. The upper housing 24, defined by the container 40 and covers 41 and 42, is effectively divided into two chambers (FIG;

a dust bag chamber, and alower chamber 44, defining a motor and fan chamber. =The'cover 41 effectively is a cover for the dust bag chamber and is intended to be readily removable by thehousewife to remove and replace dust bags as desired, while the cover 42 is-etfectively a cover to aiford access to the motor and fan :and to support'the same, as will become apparent from the ensuing description.

To provide the desired strength and rigidity, the elon-" gated. sidewalls 40a of container '40 of the upper housing 24 are preferably of a double wall construction (best shown in FIG. 3) with a plurality of connecting ribs 401: between these'walls, the space. between the ribs provid-- 46 (FIG. 2) extends across one end of the open side of the container 40 and is secured to'the. side walls, by suitable screws or fastening means'nothown in the drawings. Sufiicient rigidity f or thelowerend of'conta'iner 40 is provided by v the cove r 42, which is described in greater detail hereinafter, .and .which is secured thereto as by suitable fastening means 48 (FIG. 3 extending.

through openings..48a (FIG. 12) in cover 42. b

Preferably the lower endwall 40dof. container 40 is provided at the center thereof with .an' opening for accommodating a suitable lens 50. (FIGS. l, 2,4 andgS), which lens i 'adapted to permit..light rays from a suitable directed to light the area adjacent theiront of Wheelmounted unit 21. The edges ofthe-opening in container 40 are designed .to support lens 50 which may be secured thereto in any suitablemanner.

5 'of container 40, which defines the front of upper housing 2), an upper chamber, genera-11y designated at 43, defining To furtheuinctease thelight bulb 51 mounted within the motor .chamber 44 to be.

If desired,.the bottom 7 relationship referred to above.

24, may be provided with a slightly recessed area for receiving a decorative plate 52 (FIGS. 1 and 2).

The dust bag chamber cover 41, preferably molded from a suitable plastic, has the latch plate 38 secured to the upper end and a cord clip 53 (FIGS. 2 and 4) secured to the lower end spaced from the cord clip portion of element 36. The lower end of cover 41 is provided with a lip 41]) (FIG. 4) which is inserted beneath the adjacent end of cover 42 and, hence holds this lower end in position while the latch portion 36b removably holds the upper end of cover 41 in position.

The lower or motor chamber cover 42 is also preferably molded from a suitable plastic and is adapted to have a motor and fan unit or suction producing means, generally designated as 54, secured thereto as by screws or fastening means 56 (FIG. 3) passing through suitable openings 56a (FIG. 12), so that when cover 42 is secured to container 4i) by fastening means 43 extending through openings 43a, the motor and fan unit will be properly supported in chamber 4-4 in upper housing 24. To permit fan exhaust air to escape from the motor chamber 44-, the cover 42 is provider. on either side with a plurality of notches 57 defining exhaust openings (FTGS. l, 2 and 12). The lower central section of cover i2 is raised as indicated at 42a and thi section is provided on the inside thereof with a plurality of grooves, such as 58 and 59 (FIGS. 4, 5, 11 and 12), to receive portions of fan housing means described hereinafter defining a scroll-like fan inlet chamber 62 and a belt or drive chamber 63 (FIGS. 3, 4 and the cover 42 effectively defining a cover for said chambers. A crescent shaped opening 64 (FIGS. 12 and 13), to permit the use of attachments as described hereinafter, is defined in cover 42 to alford access to the correspondingly shaped end of fan inlet or suction passageway 62. A removable cover 65 for this opening is provided. The lower end of raised portion 42a of cover 42 terminates in a lateral flange or lip 42!), best shown in FIGS. 4, 5, 6 and 12 of the drawings.

The wheel-mounted unit 21 includes a shallow boxlike housing 70 of generally rectangular construction, although slightly narrower at the rear than at the front. This housing 70 is preferably a unitary casting of light weight metal or the like open at the bottom with the side walls defined by a depending peripheral flange "itia extending around the entire periphery except for a short discontinuity at the center of the rear wall defining a notch or opening '72 (FIGS. 3 and 7) for receiving therein a projection from the upper housing to provide the pivotal Actually, the notch '72, partially extends into the top wall of housing 71 as is shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings. The housing 74) includes a plurality of depending integral wall portions or partitions 70b, 7% and 70d (FIG. 3), the bottoms of which are all level with the bottom of flange 79a thereby dividing the interior of housing 79 into a plurality of downwardly opening chambers 74, 75, 76, 77 and 73. The chambers '74 and 75 are wheel chambers defined by the partitions or wall portions 7% and 76c and the peripheral wall portion 70a, the partitions 7% and 700 being somewhat L-shaped.

To support housing 76, the wheels 22 and 23 are disposed in the wheel chambers 74 and '75 and are rotatably supported on suitable shafts mounted in these chamhers. Specifically, one front wheel 22 and one rear wheel 23 are rotatably mounted on shafts 79 and 5%, respectively, supported by means including the walls defining the wheel chamber 74. In a similar manner, the other wheel 22 and the other wheel 23 are rotatably mounted in wheel chamber 75 on suitable shafts 81 and 82, respectively, suitably supported by means including the walls defining this chamber or by suitable brackets integrally formed with the chamber walls.

The chambers 76 and 77 merge at the front of housing 70 into a brush and heater chamber 83 (FIGS. 4, 5 and 9) extending across the front of housing "it? which contains a suitable brush and heater device, generally designated a 84, described in detail hereinafter and best shown in FTGS. 3, 4, 5, 9 and 10 of the drawings. This device 84 includes a pulley or other drive means designated as S5. The chamber 76 might be designated as a drive chamber closed at the rear for housing drive means such as the belt 86 drivingly connected to pulley 85. The chamber '77 might be designated as the suction passageway for dirt and the like sucked into the brush and heater chamber 83 which i directed toward the open notch 72 at the rear of housing 7!). The chamber 78 might be designated as the swivel and counterbalance chamber, the rear of which is defined by the boundaries of notch 72. The wall portion d is of somewhat V- shape, as clearly shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings, and it defines chamber 78 and part of chambers '76 and 77. By virtue of the shape of wall portion 7nd, the air or suction passageway 77 is quite wide a it approaches the brush chamber 83 where it merges with drive chamber 76 and is quite narrow as it approaches the notch 72 but to one side thereof.

In order pivotally to relate the wheeled unit 21 and the upper housing 24 while at the same time providing mounting means for a drive pulley for the belt 86 on the pivotal axis between unit 21 and housing 24 and further providing a relatively sealed air or suction connection between suction passageway 77 and suction producing means 54, the ends of the V-shaped wall section Hid adjacent the notch 72 are cut away to define bearing receiving notches for supporting a pair of spaced aligned end bearings $3 and 89. These end bearings each have a side elevational view, as shown for the end hearing 83 in FIG. 5 of the drawings, including lateral extensions 38a and 89a, respectively. The edges of the wall portion 7%. defining the bearing receiving notches are grooved as is also the edge of notch 72 defined by wall 7th! to receive a tongue on the cooperating portions of end bearings 83 and 89. These tongues are designated as 33b and 892), respectively, and the grooves as 91. With this arrangement, end bearings 88 and 89 can he slipped into the bearing receiving notches and the tongue and groove arrangement will securely position them except for means described hereinafter to hold them in such notches. Each of end bearings 88 and 89 includes a portion projecting into swivel and counterbalance chamber 78 defining a pair of spaced aligned cylindrical bearing surfaces designated as She and we, respectively, best shown in FIG. 7 of the drawings. Preferably, the end bearings 83 and 89 are formed of a die cast material, such as zinc or the like, and the spaced aligned cylindrical bearing surfaces 88c and 890 of these end bearings are fairly accurately defined as by machining or the like.

The end bearing 38 has a large opening 93 therethrough defining a suction passageway connecting passageway 77 with the space between end bearings 88 and 89. The end bearing 89, on the other hand, is essentially a closed end bearing since no air passageway is defined therethrough. However, it is a jack shaft supporting hearing and, in accordance with the present invention, is provided with a central opening 94 for supporting a bearing 95 for a jack shaft 96. One end of this jack shaft extends into the belt or drive chamber 76 while the other end is disposed in the space between the end bearings 88 and 89. Suitable pulleys 97 and 98 are secured to the ends of the jack shaft 96. The pulley 97 is adapted to drive the belt 35 which is also reeved on pulley 85. In the drawings, the belt 86 is illustrated as what is commonly referred to as a poly-V belt and, consequently, poly-V pulleys and 97 are illustrated although ob viously they might comprise pulleys for accommodating the well-known timing belt. Actually, the pulley 98 is illustrated as a pulley for accommodating a timing belt 1%. Obviously it might be similar to pulley 97 and belt 1% might be similar to belt 86. Timing belt 10% is reeved about a pulley 101 drivingly connected to the motor and fan unit 54 supported in upper housing 24 through clutch means described hereinafter.-

From the above description itwill be evident that since the axis of jack shaft 96 is coincident with the axis of the cylindrical surfaces 880 and89c defining the pivotal axes between unit 21: and housing 24, relative pivotal movement vof unit 21 and housing 24- about this axis will in no way effect the drive connection between pulleys 98 and 101 or between pulleys 85 and 97.

It will be appreciated that the upper housing 24 and associated handle 25 containing the suction-producing unit 54 therein 'is pivoted to the wheel-mounted unit21r The weight of the upper housing portion and, particularly, the weight or the suction producing unit 54.without suitable additional means would require the housewife to carry .a relatively. heavy weight andwould tendto cause the upper housing unit 24 and handle portion 25 to move from the position shown in FIGS.'].. and 2 .to the position shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. For the purpose of reducing or effectively eliminating the weight of the upper.

housing unit, the suction producing unit 54 is, of course, placed .very close to the pivotal axis, pivotally relating the housing 24- and the wheel-mounted unit 2-1. In addition to that, there is provided what might be termed an effective counterbalancing unit, generally designatedtat 104, and best shown in FIGS.3, 6 and 8 of the drawings. This effective counterbalancing unit 104 comprises a cylinder or drum 105 formed of two cup-shaped members 105a and 105bhaving their closed ends disposed in faceto-face engagement, as best shown in FIG. 8 of the drawings, which cup-shaped portionsare welded or otherwisesecured to each other and to ashaft 106, the weldments being designated as 107 in FIG. 8 of the drawings. Thus, the drum 105 is rigidly mounted to the shaft 106, which shaft is journalled in the extensions 88a and 89a of .end bearings 88 and 89, respectively, so' as. to be dis posed in chamber 78. Housed within the cup-shaped member 105b..of cylinder or drum 105 is a coiled torsion spring .108, the ends of which spring include lateral projections, such as108a and 108b, indicated in FIG. 8 of the drawings. 'One of these projections 108a extends through suitable aligned openings in the adjacent end walls .of cup-shaped members 105a and 105b, which are preferably welded to each other and to the shaft 106. For. the purpose of torsionally relating the spring 108 tothe rotatable drum 105 and some stationary object, there is provided a coil spring retainer 110, preferably in the form of a cylindrical die casting having an outer diameter slightly less than the diameter of the torsion spring 108 and a closed end portion 110a, having an opening therein for receiving the lateral projection 108b at the end of coil spring 108 remote from projection 108a. 'As illustrated, this projection 108k extends completely through the end 110a of coil retainer 110 so as to engage a pro jection 70:: from the wall portion 70d. In this way/the coil spring retainer 110 is held stationary and, consequently, so is the end 108b of spring'108. Thus, rotation of the drum 105 will torsionally stress the torsion spring 108. In a device built in accordance -with the present'invention, the torsion spring 108 was capable of producing .a tangential force in excess of sixteen pounds with a three hundred sixty degree rotation of the drum 105 relative to coil spring retainer 110. I V I In order to relate the counterbalancing unit 104 positioned in chamber 78 in unit 21 to the upper housing 24, there is provided a ribbon spring -112 having on end thereof connected to the exteriorof drum 105 so as effectively 1050 (FIGS. 3, 6 and 8),.which projections engage suitable openings 113 (FIG. 3) defined in one end of the ribbon tension spring 112. Preferably this spring passes over a' cylindrical swivel portion 115a'of 'a fan housing'portion- 115, described in detail hereinafter; The cylindrical swivel portion 115a,.as best shown in FIGS. 6 and 7 of the drawings, is a cylindrical member the interior of which is divided into two sections by apartition 11512. The swivel 1-15a is received within the notch 72 and is provided at either end with counterbores 116, which counterbores pivo-tally engage the cylindrical bearing surfaces 88c and 890, as clearly shown in FIG. 7 of the drawings, thereby pivotally supportingthe swivel 115a about the axis of jack shaft 96. a

Swivel 115a, asmentioned above, is divided by partition 1151) into two chamberspa suction chamber 117 and a pulley chamber 118. The pulley chamber 118 receives the end of jackv shaft 96, supporting pulley 98 and the belt 100, while the. chamber 117 is connected to the suction passageway 77 through the opening 93 in end bearing 88. The cylindrical exterior of swivel-115a provides a bearing surface for the ribbon spring 112 which is secured to the fan housing portion 115, as indicated at 119, thus tending to bias the upper housing to the position shown in FIGS. land 2 and effectively,.counterbalancing thd weight ofthe suction producing means 54 and the upper housing 24.

As was mentioned above, the brush and heater device 84 driven from the jack shaft 96.through the belt 86 extends across the front of the housing 70 within brush and heater charnber83 forwardly of the L-shaped wall sections 70b and 70c. As is best shown in FIGS. 3, 4, 5, 9 and 10, the brush and beater device 84 comprises a shaft 120 for supporting three separate brush and beater sections 121, 122 and 123, as well as the pulley 85, the pulley 85 being disposed between brush and beater sections 122 and 123. The three brush and beater sections,

7 121, 122 and123 ofthe brush and beaterunit 84 are all essentially the same except for some variations in length and the fact that these sections are .an'gularly displaced relative to each adjacent section by approximately one 'thereof a brush element 128 having a backing strip of suitable material supporting a plurality of tufts 129. The

. brush supporting tubes 126 also include a; depressed portion 130 generally opposite the T-shaped slot 127, providing a space for. a heater bar 131, described hereinafter.

The brush tubes 126 are preferably formed of an extruded aluminum alloy. v

. For the purpose of supporting the three tubes 126 which i may have slightly different lengths from the shaft'120,

there are provided a pair of brush end members 133 which are substantially identical, one of which is shown in section in FIG. 9 of the drawings, a divider member 134 (shown only in. FIG. 3 of the drawings), and the brush pulley heretofore described. The end members 133, the pulley 85 and the divider member 134 are preferably all formed as .light weight castings .of a zinc-based alloy or the like and the end members 133 are each provided with a cooperating projection of the configuration of the tubes 126, while'the pulley 85 anduthe divider member 134 are provided with two projections, oneat either side, so that these projections may be received in theends of the tubes 126, as clearly shown in FIG. '9 of the drawings insofar as the brush-end member 133 and the pulley 85 is concerned. It should be understood that the pulley 85 and the divider 134 have the projections received in tubes 126 displaced in such a manner that'the adjacent tubes 7 are angularly displaced by one. hundred twenty degrees,

ormore specifically that the adjacent brush sections 128 o are displaced from each other by one hundred twenty degrees.

Preferably the brush ends 133 are provided with an end opening central recess 133, which is connected to a relatively large circular recess 139 at the outer end of each of the brush ends 133. A circular nut 14% threadedly mounted on the shaft 12% disposed within the recess 138 permits clamping the assembled brush sections heretofore described including the ends 133 to the shaft 121i. A similar nut may be employed at the other end, or, if desired, a suitable washer and retaining ring may be sub stituted for the clamping nut 1% since it is only necessary to have a clamping nut at on end. The ends of the shaft 7.2% are preferably supported in suitable bearings 142, which in turn are supported in a combined dust cap and bearing support member 141, clearly shown in FIG. 9 of the drawings. The combined dust cap and bearing support includes a tubular projection 141a receivable in the recess 138 for supporting the bearing 142. Preferably a sp erical thrust member 144 is disposed within the shaft receiving recess of element 141, as clearly shown in FIG. 9 of the drawings, to take up the end thrust of the shaft 126. The combined bearing retainer and dust cap 141 includes an enlarged disk-shaped portion 1 11b receivable within the larger recess 139, thus preventing threads and the like from entering the bearing. Furthermore, each combined bearing support and dust cap 141 includes a rectangular extension 1410 receivable within a downwardly directed recess 147 defined in the wall portion 7411a of housing 71') at each end of brush and heater chamber 33. Suitable clamping means not shown may be provided to retain portion 1410 of the combined bearing support and dust cap 1-41 in the recesses 147', which recesses are also rectangularly shaped so that the elements 141 are rigidly held therein.

In accordance with the present invention, the beater bars 131 are preferably formed of an extruded plastic having the cross-sectional shape clearly shown in FIG. of the drawings. The boaters may be provided at either end thereof with suitable pivotal supports designated as 149 in FIGS. 9 and 10 of the drawings. These pivotal supports may comprise pins extending entirely through the extruded beater bars, pins inserted at either end thereof, or preferably, as illustrated in MG. 9 of the drawings, may comprise projections of the end members supporting the heaters bars, such as the end members 133, the pulley 85 and the divider 134. It will be appreciated that the beater bars 131 are pivotally mounted one in each of the sections 121, 122, and 123, and like the brush elements 123, are displaced in adjacent sections by an angle of one hundred twenty degrees. It will be apparent from FIG. 10 that each beater bar 131 has on the active side thereof an end protrusion 131a and a center protrusion 1131b. When the beater and brush unit 84 is rotated, centrifugal force will cause pivotal motion of the beater elements 131. With the described arrangement, the beater bars 131 present the relatively large single area of protrusion 131 into contact with a soft nap rug and also allow the two separate areas of protrusions 131a and 13112 to engage a heavy nap rug when beater bar 131 is only partially extended due to the thick nap. Furthermore, with the arragnement described, a very simple beater bar is provided which can be manufactured at a very low cost. In applying the beater bars 131 to the brush and beater unit 84, the plastic construction thereof will permit them to be deformed sufficiently to permit the pin portions, such as 1 59, to be received therein, as is clearly evident in F IG. 9 of the drawings.

For the purpose of defining a primary or suction nozzle in the unit 21, for holding the end bearing members 33 and $9 and the means supported thereby in the bearing receiving notches, and for completing the suction passageway 77, there is provided what might be termed a dust pan 1%, best shown in FIGS. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 of the drawings. This dust pan has a somewhat T-shaped area and the stem of the T completely encloses the chambers '77 and '78 while the head of the T overlies the beater and brush chamber 83 defining the suction nozzle 151 in the form of elongated openings 151a and 151b. These openings 151a and 151b are separated by a narrow section 1513a of dust pan 150, which in effect is a guard preventing one from coming into contact with the drive belt 86 and brush pulley disposed in chamber 76. The wheel chambers 74 and 75 are not covered by dust pan 150. To provide the desired dust seal, a suitable gasket is interposed between dust pan and the lower edges of the wall portions 7%, We, 719d and part of the wall portion 70a defining the beater and brush chamber 83. This gasket is not shown in the drawings, but is preferably formed of cork or other suitable material to provide the desired seal.

In order to secure the dust pan 150 to the housing 70, the front of the dust pan 158 is preferably provided with a hook shaped portion 151)!) for engagement, as clearly shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 of the drawings, with a lateral projection from the wall portion 7th; at the front of housing 7h thereby securely locking the front of the dust pan to the housing in. The remainder of the dust pan is preferably secured by suitable fastening means 154. and 155 to tapped openings defined in wall portions of housing 70. In order to accommodate the swivel 113a, the dust pan 1511 is preferably provided with a depression 151%, best shown in FIG. 4 of the drawings.

For the purpose of preventing the unit 21 of the vacuum cleaner Zn from damaging furniture or walls when moved into engagement therewith, there preferably is provided a bumper guard 156, formed of a rubber or a molded plastic, such as a vinyl material or the like, which is suitably secured to the ouside of the wall portion 70a. As is best shown in FIGS. 4, 5 and 9, this bumper guard has a relatively hollow construction so that it may readily deform when engaged by furniture, walls or the like.

Considering now the fan and motor unit 54 in more detail, the fan housing in addition to the portion 115 described above includes a housing portion 157 generally in the form of a relatively flat plate bolted or secured by fastening means 153 to the fan housing portion 115. As best shown in the drawings, the housing portion 115 includes on the upper side thereof, as viewed in FIGS. 4 and 5 of the drawings, means defining a generally circular fan chamber 15?. This fan chamber terminates in a tangential exhaust passageway 16!) in the form of a tubular member 161 defined by cooperating extensions 115s and 157a of fan housing portions 115 and 157, respectively. Moreover, tubular member 161 is provided near its open end with an exterior peripheral groove 163 for accommodating a garter spring dust bag clamping member 164 which might be an endless coiled spring, a rubberband or the like, the purpose of which will become apparent from the ensuing description. The fan housing portion 115 on the side opposite the fan chamber 159 is provided with elongated wall portions defining the scroll-like fan inlet chamber 62 and the belt or drive chamber 63 (FIGS. 3 and 7). As illustrated in FIG. 3, one side of the fan inlet chamber 62 and one side of the drive chamber 63 are defined by a U or hairpin-shaped wall portion 11511, the legs of the U or hairpin terminating in the cylindrical swivel 115a. An additional wall portion 1152, as clearly shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings defines the common wall between the suction and drive chambers 62 and 63, and includes a circular section surrounding the pulley 101 and defining with a similar circular section of wall portion 115d the scroll-like portion of passageway 62.

As is best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 of the drawings, the fan chamber 159 is provided with an axial inlet opening which connects the fan chamber 159 with the scroll-like suction passageway 62. The open side of the scroll-like suction passageway 62 is closed by the cover 42 and, as best shown in FIG. '11 of the drawings, the.

wall'portion 115d extends into groove 58 and the wall portion 115a extends into groove 59- defined in the cover 42. Preferably a suitable scroll gasket, not shown in the drawings, is interposed between the edges of wall portions 115a and 115a and the cover 42 to provide a sealed suction chamber. Also a gasket 176 (FIGS. 4 and 6) is interposed at the junction between the swivel 115a and lateral flange or lip 42b of cover 42. It will be understood that the suction passageway 62 enters the interior of swive1 115a to one side of partition 115b asclearly indicated in FIG. 7 of the drawings, and a relatively large unimpeded passageway is provided fromthe brush chamber 83 to the tubular fan' outlet passageway 160. Similarly, the drive passageway 63 enters the swivel 115a on the other side of'partition 115b. Preferably the fan housing portions 115 and 157 are die castings of a light Weight metal,

The fan and motor unit 54 includes an electric motor 178 having the conventional'motor shaft 179 to which a fan 130 including the conventional fan blades 189a and the pulley 101 are secured. This fan 180 is disposed in fan chamber 159 and draws air through the axial inlet 175 and discharges it through the tangential exhaust passageway 160. The particular construction of the electric' motor 178 forms no part of the present invention, but it preferably is a compact, relatively flat motor so as to' minimizewthe space required therefor in upper housing 24. As illustrated in the drawings, the electric motor 178 is preferabbly secured by fastening means 184 to a plurality of projections 15'7b integrally formed with the fan housing portion 157. Suitable motor and fan bearings areprovided and supported by fan housing portion 157. Electric energy is supplied'to motor 178 and lamp 51 from power cord 28 and is controlled. by the switch 32. It -will be understood that when the switch 32 closes the circuit to electric motor 178 and lamp 51, that the fan 180will be rotated at high speed to produce the desired suction and pulley 131 attached to motor shaft 179 through a clutch to be described hereinafter will drive the jack shaft 96, which in turn will rotate the brush and beater unit 84. a

In accordance with the present invention, there is' mounted within the dust bag chamber 43 of upper housing 24, a dust bag 186, 'best shown in FIGS. 2 and 4 of'the drawings. This dust bag is preferably made 'of paper and includes a dirt storing portion 186a and a tubular inlet 18Gb adapted to he slipped over theend of tubular mem-' ber 161, defining theexhaust of fan chamber'159. The

garter spring 164 then clamps the tubular portion 1861:

through and, at the same time, retain therein the dust and dirt collected. The replacement of a filter bag is a very simple matter sinceall the housewife does is to remove the dust bag cover 41, affording ready access to the disposable bag -186. The dust bag clamping member or garter-spring 164 is then removed, which permits ready removal of the filled dust bag and insertion of a new dust bag. A very large capacity bag can be employed in the space provided by dust bag chamber 43.

'It will be appreciated that if for any reason the dis posable dust bag 186 should be torn or otherwise empties its contents into the chamber 43, these contents of dirt and the like wouldfallintothe motor chamber 44 and i into the electric motor 178,'which is very undesirable.

To prevent this, there is provided a secondary filter-190- (FIGS. 2 and 4) preferably formed of-a flocked wire cloth, which will prevent dust and dirt from passing therethrough, "but which will. permit'the air produced by the fan 180 and discharged through the dust bag 1&6 to pass' therethrough and out of the openings 57 defined in upper housing 24. So that there will be provided the desired ings).

arenas-1 exhaust air passageway permitting this air 'to flow over motor178 to cool the same, there are provided a pair of spacer members 192 (FIGS. 1 and 2) which may be glued or otherwise secured to what defines the bottom of container 46 thereby defining an air space between this bottom and the secondary filter 190. Furthermore, this space will also accommodate the power cord coming from handle portion 25 and connected to motor 178 and lamp 51. r r

In order to seal the secondary filter around the tubular exhaust member 161 of the motor and fan unit, the filter is recessed or notched and a suitable gasket 193 (FIG. 4) provides the. desired seal. Preferably, also cover member 42 1's provided with a depending projection 42c which is shaped to conform to the other side of tubular exhaust'passageway 161. It will be apparent that secondary filter 199 effectively divides the upper housing 24 into the dust bag chamber 43 and the fan and motor chamber 44. Y

In order that it may be possible to permit the fan to operate when'attachments are to. be applied to the vacuum cleaner zit of the present invention without driving the rotatable brush and heater; unit 34, the pulley 191 is connected to the motor shaft 179 through a clutch, generally designated as 194 (best shown in FIG. 11 of the draw- As there illustrated, the motor shaft 17 9 projecting beyond the fan 1% and extending into the drive chamber 63 includes an axial recess 195 for receiving a clutch actuating push pin 19%. The motor shaft 179 also ineludes an elongated slot 197 therethrough which intersects the recess 195. A pin 198 is disposed within the elongated transverse recess 197 and extends through an" opening in push pin 1%. A suitable compression spring 199 interposed between awasher 2 4W seated in a groove in shaft 179 and the pin 19% biases the clutch actuating push rodj196 to the position shown in FIG. 11 of the drawings. The pulley 191 includes a bearing 2%2 concentric with theypulley, which bearing and'pulley are rotatably mounted on the end of motor shaft 179. The pulley 101 further includes slots2tl3 at the end thereof adjacent pin 198, into which the push rod pin 198 may move. When pin' 198 is in slots 203, the pulley 161 is drivingly connected to the shaft 1'79. When the push rod 196 is depressed, so as to move push rod pin 198 out of the slots 203, the drive between the shaft 262 and pulley101 is broken and shaft 179 is free to rotate in the bearing 202inthe pulley 101. A suitable protective sleeve 204 surrounds the portion of pulley 101 containing slots2i3 and rotates therewith to protect the compression spring and the other parts housed therein. It will be apparent that depression of the push rod 196 will interrupt the drivebetween the pulley 191 and the motor shaft 179 and, hence, will interrupt the drive to the rotatable brush and heater arrangement 84.

- As best illustrated in FIG. 13 of the drawings, when it is desired to apply an attachment to the vacuum cleaner 20 for cleaning upholstery and the like, the cover 65 is removed thereby exposing the end. of push rod 196 through an opening 205 provided in cover..42, as clearly shown in FIG. 11 ofthe drawings. An attachment, generally designated as 266, is provided with a projection 206a, which, when the attachment isinserted into the crescent-shaped opening 64, engages the push rod 196 and disables the driving connection between the motor and fan unit 54 and the jack shaft 96. At the same time, the extension 206 includes a portion 26612 which is inserted in the scro'll like suction passageway 62 and closes ofi this suction passageway to the primary suction nozzle 151 with the result that the mere insertion of the attachment 2116 into the crescent-shaped opening 64 not only terminates the suction of the primary nozzle and causes all suction to be applied to'the attachment 2&6, but at the same time disables the driving connection between the motor and the brush arid beater arrangement 84. If

A 21 and passes through the pores in the disposable bag 186, leaving dust and dirt particles inside the bag. The air then passes through the secondary filter 1% surrounding the motor unit, which filters out any remaining dust particles which would damage the motor. Air then passes over the motor and exhausts through the passageways 157, this air cooling the motor unit. By virtue of the coun tenbalancing arrangement described above, the person using the cleaner is not aware of the weight of the 7 upper housing or the weight of the motor and fan unit contained therein. Since the upper housing is pivoted to the lower housing on the axis of the jack shalfit a driving connection between the brush and beater arrangement 84 and the motor unit 54 is accomplished which can be interrupted by actuating the clutch 1% described above.

While there has been shown and descnibed a panticular embodiment of the present invention, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes and modi fications may be made without departing from the invention in its broader aspects, and it is, therefore, contem plated in the appended claims to cover all such changes and modifications that fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A suction cleaner comprising, an upper housing, a handle member connected to said upper housing, a lower housing defining a section nozzle therein, pivot means pivotally relating said lower and upper housings at the portion of said upper housing remote from said handle member, suction producing means mounted in said upper housing, suction passageway means in said housings interconnecting said suction producing means and said suc tion nozzle, countenbalancing means including a torsion spring coiled about an axis displaced from the pivotal axis of said housings and having one end thereof fixed relative to one of said housings, and a ribbon spring effectively relating the other end of said torsion spring with the other of said housings to counterbalance the weight of the suction producing means in said upper housing.

2. A suction cleaner as set forth in claim 1 above wherein said suction producing means includes an electric motor, a rotatable brush mounted in said lower housing adjacent said suction nozzle, and drive means interconnecting said electric motor and said brush throughout the angular relationship of said pivotally related housings.

3. A suction cleaner as set forth in claim 2 wherein said pivot means includes a pair of spaced end bearings provided in said lower housing with coaxially aligned cylindrical bearing surfaces, and a cylindrical swivel portion formed in said upper housing pivotally supported from said cylindrical bearing surfaces, wherein said suction passageway means includes an opening provided in one of said end bearings, and wherein said drive means includes a jack shaft mounted in the other one of said end hearings on an axis coincident with the pivotal axis of said upper housing.

4. A vacuum cleaner comprising, a lower housing defining a suction nozzle therein, a pair of spaced end bearings provided with coaxially aligned cylindrical bearing surfaces, an upper housing provided with a cylindrical swivel portion pnvotally supported from said cylindric al bearing surfaces, suction producing means including .an electric motor mounted in said upper housing, suction passage-Way means in said housings interconnecting said suction producing means and said nozzle, a rotatable brush mounted in said lower housing adjacent said suction nozzle, drive means interconecting said electric motor and said brush throughout the angular relationship of said pivot'ally related housings, counterbalan'cing means including a countenbal-ancing drum journaled for rotation relative to said lower housing about an axis displaced from the pivotal axis of said pivotally related housings, a coiled torsion spring housed within said drum and having one end stationary relative to said lower housing and having its other end fixed relative to said drum so that rotation of said drum will torsionally stress the torsion spring, and a ribbon spring interrelating the counterbalancing means and the upper housing and having one end thereof connected to the exterior of said drum so as etfectively to be capable of being wound on said drum with rotation thereof and passing over the cylindrical swivel portion of said upper housing.

5. A vacuum cleaner as set forth in claim 4 wherein the suction producing unit is mounted close to the pivotal axis of said housings.

6. in a vacuum cleaner of the type adapted to receive a vacuum attachment having .a crescent-shaped suction passageway portion and a projection adjacent said portion, a housing defining a suction nozzle therein, suctionproducing means carried by said housing and including a fan and an electric motor having a motor shaft, said fan being provided with a scroll-like fan suction inlet chamber having a crescent-shaped suction passageway, a rotatable brush mounted in said housing, a second suction passageway means interconnecting the first-mentioned suction passageway and said suction nozzle, said second suction passageway being provided with a crescent-shaped opening aligned with said crescentshaped suction passageway, means drivin-gly interrelating said motor and said rotatable brush and including a normally engaged clutch, said crescent-shaped suction passageway surroundin said clutch, said clutch including a drive pulley concentrically positioned on said motor shaft rotata b-ly mounted thereon and including slots in one hub thereof, said motor shaft being provided with an axial recess, a clutch actuating push pin positioned in said axial recess, a drive pin disposed in an elongated transverse slot in said motor shaft and extending through an opening in said push pin, a compression spring biasing said drive pin into driving engagement with said slots in said hub of said pulley whereby depression of said push pin is effective to disable said clutch, said housing being provided with an opening aligned with said push pin, and a removable cover normally closing said crescent-shaped opening and the last-mentioned opening.

7. in combination, the vacuum cleaner as set forth in claim 6 and an attachment of the type having a crescentsha-ped passageway portion extending through said crescent-shaped opening and provided with a projection extending through the last-mentioned opening wherein the removal of said cover and mere insertion of the attachment into the crescent-shaped opening terminates the suction to the suction nozzle and connects the suction from the suctionaproducing means to the attachment, and at the same time the projection on the attachment extends through the last-mentioned opening to engage the push pin and disable the driving connection between the motor and the brush means.

8. In a vacuum cleaner of the type adapted to receive an attachment having a suction passageway portion and a projection adjacent said portion, a housing defining a suction nozzle therein, suction-producing means carried by said housing and including a fan and an electric motor having a motor shaft, a rotatable brush mounted in said housing, suction passageway means interconnecting said suction-producing means and said suction nozzle and provided with an attachment opening, means drivingly interrelating said motor and said rotatable brush and including a normally engaged clutch disposed at one end of said n'rotor shaft, said clutch inciuding a drive recess at said one end, a clutch actuating push pin posir tioned in' said axial recess, said housing being provided with an opening aligned with said push pin, said lastmentioned opening being adjacent said one end of saidmotor shaft, a drive pin disposed in an elongated trans-V verse slot in said motor shaft and extending throughan opening in said push pin, a compression spring biasing said drive pin into driving engagement with said slots in said .pu lley whereby depression of said push pin is, efiective to disable said clutch, and a removable cover' ing normally closing said attachment opening and the housing opening wherein the removal of said cover and mere insertion-of the attachment into the vacuum opening is effective at the same time to engage the push, pin

with the projection of the attachment therebyto disable the driving connection between the motor and the brush means. I

9. The vacuum cleanero'f claim 8 wherein said attachwith a scrol-l-like suction inlet chamber in said upper housing having a crescent-shaped passageway, a rotatable brush mounted in said'lower housing, suction passageway mean-s interconnecting said passageway and' said suction nozzle, said suction passageway means being pro vided with a crescent-shaped opening in said upper housing aligned with said crescent-shaped suction passage- Way, means d-rivingly interrelating said motor and said rotatable brush and including a normally engaged clutch,

said crescent-shaped suction passageway surrounding said clutch, said-clutch including a drive pulley concentricaliy positioned on'saiid motor shaft rotatabiy mounted thereonand inc'luding sl ots in one hub thereof, said motor shaft being provided With'an axial recess, a clutch actuating push pin positioned in said axia-l recess, said upper housingbeing provided with an opening aligned with said push pin, a drive rpin disposed in an-eiongated transverse slot in said motor shafit and extending through and opening inns/aid push pin, a compression spring'biasing said drive pin into drivingengag'ement with said slots in said pulley whereby depression of said push pin is effective to disable said clutch, and a removable cover normally closing said'crescent-shaiped opening and the housing opening.

I 7 References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,596,446 8/26 Nelson 15-390 1,858,370 5/32 Lucke 15-386 2,140,143 12/38 Sellers et a1. 15-332 2,175,004 10/39. Snyder 15-332 2,242,678 5/41 Rie'bel 15-386 2,311,121 2/43 Nette et al I '15-250.2 X 2,337,936 12/43 Sellers 15-410 X 2,525,801 10/50 Howard 15-391 X 2,548,632 4/51 "Stent' 15-332 2,633,596 4/53. Turner et a1 15-350 X 2,671,924 3/54 Seges-rnan 15-410 X WALTER A. SCHBEL, Primary Examiner. CHARLES A. WILLMUTH, Examiner.

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Referenced by
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US3321794 *Apr 11, 1966May 30, 1967Sunbeam CorpVacuum cleaner
US3966444 *Apr 4, 1975Jun 29, 1976The Singer CompanyVacuum cleaner filter assembly
US4028074 *Oct 14, 1975Jun 7, 1977Air Filters, Inc.Vacuum cleaner filter bag
US4380846 *Feb 28, 1981Apr 26, 1983The Hoover CompanyIdler pulley belt drive arrangement for suction cleaner
US4384385 *May 18, 1981May 24, 1983The Hoover CompanyCleaner with side cleanout
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US5477586 *Jul 19, 1994Dec 26, 1995White Consolidated Industries, Inc.Vacuum cleaner with accessory shutoff
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US7310855Jul 9, 2004Dec 25, 2007Tacony CorporationVacuum cleaner counter-balance mechanism
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/337, 15/390, 15/351, 55/473, 15/366, 15/410, 362/91, 55/376, 55/381, 15/391, 15/324
International ClassificationA47L5/30, A47L5/22
Cooperative ClassificationA47L5/30
European ClassificationA47L5/30