Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3188704 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 15, 1965
Filing dateSep 11, 1961
Priority dateSep 11, 1961
Publication numberUS 3188704 A, US 3188704A, US-A-3188704, US3188704 A, US3188704A
InventorsSukava Armas J
Original AssigneeSukava Armas J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic mold casting machine control apparatus
US 3188704 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 15, 1965 A, J, SUKAVA 3,188,704

AUTOMATIC MOLD CASTING MACHINE CONTROL APPARATUS /N VEN T0@ ARMAS J. SUKAVA armen/ry;

June 15, 1965 A. .1. sUKAvA 3,188,704

AUTOMATIC MOLD CASTING MACHINE CONTROL APPARATUS Filed sept. 11. 1961 2 sheets-Sheet 2 6l To Low VOLTAGE souRcE 59 To ELECTRIC POWER SOURCE INVENTOR ARMAS J. SUKAVA BY MM .1l-.

HTTORNEYI 3,188,704 AUTOMATIC M0111) CASTING MACHNE CGNTRL APPARATUS Armas I. ulrava, 111 Edgar Drive, London, ntario, Canada Fiied Sept. 11, 1961, Ser. No. 137,205 6 Caixns. @L 22--79) ,the pouring position beneath it, and closing the valve when the required amount of material is in the mold and the latter is moving out of the pouring position. The machine ralso has a contact linger mounted to extend into each mold when it is positioned beneath the valve, said finger being swung out of the mold path by each mold as the latter leaves the pouring position. When the contact finger is touched by a mold or by the molten material therein, after said material reaches a predetermined depth, the flow valve is instantly closed.

The original mold casting machine operates satisfactorily as long as it functions continuously till the supply of molten material is used up. However, if the moldmoving mechanism stops through failure or is stopped, there is always the possibility of the contact finger freezing into an ingot if the machine stopped while the finger was in contact with molten material.

An object of the present invention is the provision of control apparatus for swinging the contact finger out of a mold whenever the mold-moving mechanism stops.

4Means is provided for rendering the control apparatus inoperative as long as the molds are moving, but if the latter stop, the control apparatus moves the finger out of the mold if it is extending into one, and it also causes the 'fiow valve to be closed.

'manipulation of a control switch. Fully automatic operation of the casting machine by an ingot-handling machine may be envisaged, such that the casting machine is automatically started and stopped in response to ingot demand.

This further development is accomplished in a very 'simple but effective manner. A secondary switch is l5- cated in a circuit in parallel with a main switch which is opened and closed to stop and start the mold-moving mechanism. The contact finger is provided with means that keeps the secondary switch closed when the finger extends into a mold. If the main switch is opened at this time, the mold-moving mechanism continues to operate until the contact finger is swung out of the mold, at which time the secondary switch opens and the molds stop moving.

Examples of this invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of a simple form of casting machine incorporating this invention, showing a mold in the pouring position beneath the ow valve;

3,l38,?4 Patented .lune l5, 1965 FIGURE 2 is a plan view of the apparatus shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a cross section taken on the line 3-3 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 diagrammatically illustrates the control apparatus illustrated in FIGURES 1 to 3, and including a wiring diagram associated therewith;

FIGURE 5 diagrammatically illustrates this control apparatus with the latter in a different setting from that shown in FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 6 is a diagram illustrating an electrical set-up for this control apparatus;

FIGURE 7 diagrammatically illustrates an alternative form of control apparatus in one setting;

FIGURE 8 diagrammatically illustrates the control apparatus of FIGURE 7 in another setting; and

FIGURE 9 diagrammatically illustrates still another form of control apparatus.

Referring to FIGURES 1 to 6 of the drawings, 10 is one form of automatic mold casting machine with which the present control apparatus is used. Molten material, usually molten metal, is contained in a pot 12 which may have a heating jacket 13 therearound. The pot has an outlet at the bottom thereof controlled by a flow valve 15 having a control arm 16 extending outwardly from the pot.

Control means is provided for opening and closing valve 15 as a mold moves into and out of the pouring position beneath valve discharge spout 17. This control means includes a solenoid 2t) connected at 21 to a standard 22 projecting outwardly from a base'23. The solenoid has a movable core 26 projecting therefrom which is connected by a link or bar 2,3 to the outer end of arm 16. When solenoid 2d is energized, core 26 is drawn into it to swing arm 16 to open valve 15. Suitable spring means is provided for normally retaining the valve closed. In this example, a pair of springs 34 are connected at 35 to link 28, and at their opposite ends .36 to a standard 37 projecting upwardly from base 23. These springs normally swing arm 16 to close valve 15.

A plurality of molds 40 are moved beneath the spout of flow valve 15 in any convenient manner. In this example, the molds are mounted on spaced endless chains 42 which extend around spaced sprockets 43 and 44, either of which may be driven by a suitable source of power. It is preferable to use an electric motor 46 as a source of power. The molds are moved along a path or track 48 extending beneath iioW valve 15.

The opening and closing of the flow valve is `controlled by switch means 52 mounted above the path of movement of molds 40 and adjacent valve 15. This switch means includes an insulated bloclfL 53 supported immediately above the mold path by a support 54. A contact finger 55 projects downwardly from the switch block into the mold path. This finger is swingable relative to its mounting block, and it may be formed of flexible material for this purpose, or it may be formed of rigid material, in which case, a hinge is provided at its upper end. The contact finger is engaged by each mold `as it is moved beneath the flow valve, and when the mold is in the proper pouring position, the finger projects downwardly thereinto, See FIGURES 3 and 4.

Contact finger 55 is electrically connected to solenoid 2f) in such a manner that when the finger is in engagement With a mold or touched by the molten metal in a mold, the solenoid is de-energized to allow spring 34- to close the valve. An example of such an electrical connection is i1- lustrated in FiGURE 4. A relay switch 5S is located in the circuit 59 of solenoid 2t?. The solenoid of switch 58 is connected by a wire titl to contact 55, and when the latter engages a mold liti, or the molten metal in the mold, the

. 3 Y switch solenoid is grounded. Another the solenoid to a low voltage source of electrical power, said source also being grounded. i

The `operation of the known casting machine de-y scribed so far is as follows. Springs 3:4;normally Vretain iiow valve in its closed position. beneath the valve, contact finger 55 engages the mold to keep solenoid dre-energized,` since the solenoid of switch 58 is grounded so .thatthe latterswitch is open at this time. As soon as the finger clears theV edge of the mold vand swings into the latter, Yrelay switch 58 closes, energizing solenoid 20, ywhich action draws core 26 thereinto. This moves valve arm 116 against the ten; sion springs 34 to open the valveand all-ow the'rnolten metal to -ow into the mold therebeneath. Vhenethe level ofthe molten metal reaches the contact finger, or

wire 61 connects As a mold moves the conveyor and moldsstop moving, thus causing the solenoid to de-energize.

.to' swing army 70 into engagement .with finger 55. This shifts or swingsthe finger upwardly out of the mold 4t) therebeneath, as shown in FIGURE 5,"and arm 70 grounds .Y the finger so that solenoid 20 is also de-energized, allowing valve 15 to'befclosed by springs 34. Thus,the flow the back end of the mold engages saidiinger, relay switch 58 opens vto de-energize solenoid 20, thereby allowing Fsprings 34 to close valve 1'5. The contact finger is a little ahead of the owvalve with reference to theV di- .rection of movement of the mold. Wit-h this arrangement, the contact finger is bound to engage the backend of themold `beforesaid mold moves yfrom beneath the valve so that there ais no danger ofmolten metal flowing without a mold being positioned to receive it. Furthermore, the V'finger isf made long enough to remain in con,-

tact with the front end ofthe mold untilsuiiicient of -thelatter is under the valve to rece-ive the moltenmetal when valve 15 is opened andtheV metal starts to pour.

If the electrical power' failsV so that motor y46 stops,

the Vsolenoid is also de-energized and. springs 34 close the valve. :Each of these springs is'strong enough to,`

close'the .valve on its own should the other spring break. lIf the mold-moving. mechanism stops through mechanical failure,'or Ythrough adefect in motor 46,themetal will continue to pour only untilit' reaches contact tingerSS, -at which .time solenoid 20 is de-energized, allowing the springs Ato close the valve. Ilf the contact finger is in engagement with amold at the time of stoppage, it will remain there sothat the flow v-a-lve will not open.

`.Themolds are placed so close together that finger'SS -rapidly snaps from the trailing edge of one to the leading .edge of the next following mold sothat the flow valve has not time to open during this action.

Casting machine 10 and its operation belong to the yprior art. Y

Control apparatus 68 isprovidedin accordancenwith,

.the present invention in order to`lift contact'finger 55 out of a' mold should the moldsstop moving for any reason whatsoever. If this is not done, the :finger may freezeinto the molten metal yin a mold shouldthe moldv be stopped longv enough to permit the metal to solidify. Control, apparatus 68 includesshifting means in the form of a horizontal arm 70,V pivotally mounted at one end 7.1 on a vertical support 72 carried by base 23. The opposite end 74 of this arm is. located near but is normally spaced from contactiinger 55 when the latter is lin a vertical position. Arm 70 is connected by a link of molten metal is stopped, and the contact finger is swung upV out of the mold so that it will not freeze in the metal in the mold should said meta-l solidify.

FIGURES 7 and 8 illustrate control apparatus 68a which is the same as apparatus 68, but includes. means for manually or automatically stopping the movement of the molds Vwhile ensuring that the movement and the pouring of the'molten'met-al do not cease until a mold being filled has-'received a predetermined amount of metal and has moved from the ypouring position; In FIGURES 7 and 8, V95 isafm-ain switch in the circuit 960i' motor 46.. Switch 95'may be manually or automatically closed and opened to start and stop the motor and, therefore, themovement of the molds. A secondary -switch`99 is provided in circuit 95 in parallel with switch 95. Switch 99is spring loaded into its open position.

Contact finger 55 is provided with anfex'tension 102 v projecting upwardly therefrom above the pivot point there- V of, said extension'having an insulating block 103 which n invention of FIGURES 7 and 8.

76 to a movable core 77 of a solenoid, 78 mounted on l fa support 79 carried by the base .of Vthe casting machine.

A spring 81 has one end Yconnected torarm 70` and its oppositerend connected tosupport54. .T his springtends to swing the armV towards finger 55, Ywhile solenoid 78,

when energized, keeps they arm .clear of the finger, which is its normal position when the machine is in operation.V

FIGURE 6 diagrammatically illustrates the electrical set-up of cont-rol apparatusot.V Arm .70 isfgrounded at 85, and a governor-controlled yswitch 87 is connected in series withv solenoid 78 in the electricaly circuit'ofthe latter.V The governor-controlled switch-.is operated 4by -a part of the mechanism for moving molds 40. ,In this example, the switch has a sprocket 88.over which one of the chains 42 of the mold movingV conveyor runs.

VWhen the conveyor is in operation, switch 87 is closed 'to' keep solenoid 78 energized, but this switchropenswhen is adapted to close switch 99 when the contact finger hangs downwardly in a mold 40. A spring 104 draws extension 102 into the switchfclosing position at this time. When main switch 'is closed, casting machine 10 4operates in'the manner described above, and switch 99 has 'norinfluence on the operation. Should the power vfail orthe molds stop moving as a result of a mechanical failure, armk 70 Willswing contact finger 55 upwardly 4as described above. However, if'switch 95 is opened during the normal courseof operation of the casting machine, the `molds will continue to move .because of the fact that secondary .switch `99 is closed as long as finger 55 is hanging Vdown into a mold. However, as soon as the back end' of the mold swings the contact finger upwarclly'f,` as shown in FIGURE 8,;block 103 is moved away-from switch 99 so that the latter opens, breaking the circuit: of ymotor 46' and stopping .the movement of the molds. Finger 55 is grounded 'by' the mold and/or .arm'70at this time'sothat the pouring stops also.,

FIGURE 9 illustrates a'variation of the form of the Control apparatus 68b :is similar to apparatus 68a. Finger 55 has the extension 102 which loperates aV Vsecondary switch 108 which is in parallel with main switch 95 in the circuit 96 of motor -46. Switch'108 includes a Vcontact 1.1.0 mounted on an 'insulating block 1v1-learned by the upper Vend' of finger extension 102. lThisv Contact Vis in sliding engagement with arstationary contact 1.14V havingpan insulating 4block 1,15 at an end thereof. Contact 1'10 is connected to one side and contact 114 is connected to the other side of 'circuit 96.

,'When contact finger 55 is hanging downwardly in a mold 40, Contact is in'engagement withcontact 1.14 "so that switch 108 is closed. VWhen finger 55 is swung upwardly, contact 110 slides over insulating block 11S to Iopen switch 10:8, at which time the motor circuit 96 is openif main switch 95 also is open.v

If theV mold conveyor Vstops :movingVv as a result 'of a power failure or mechanical failure; solenoid 78 is derenergized so that arm 70 will* swing contact finger 5,5 upwardly out of themold,k and switch 108 of control apparatus 68b is yopenedY at Vthis time. Asr arm 70grounds fingerfSS, solenoidZt) isalso de-energized to .allow springs 34 t-o close flow valve 15. This is not necessary if the movement of the molds stops because of electrical failure, but it is necessary if the stoppage is the result of mechanical failure. IIn addition to the above, if switch 95 is man- -ually or automatically opened, the mold conveyor will continue to move until linger S5 is swung upwardly by a mold, at which time switch 16S is also opened to break the motor circuit.

i What I claim as my invention is:

1. In Ian automatic mold casting machine having means for directing molten material `to a flow valve and electrical power means for moving molds in succession along a path beneath the valve; control apparatus comprising electrical actuating means connected to the valve operable when electricalfcurrent is supplied thereto to open said valve, closing means connected to the valve for closing the latter when the actuating means is inoperative, a contact finger mounted adjacent the ow valve and normally hanging in the path of the molds and extending into each mold when it is beneath the valve as the latter mold passes beneath ythe finger, said finger being spaced from the bottom of the mold and normally being engaged by an endl of each mold as said mold moves from beneath the finger to slide over said end and int-o the next succeeding mold, electrical means Iin circuit with the finger for cutting off the flow of current to the actuating means for rendering said actuating means inoperative when the finger engages v a mold or the molten material in the mold reaches said finger thereby allowing the closing means to close the valve, shifting means removably engaging the finger when the molds are not moving and keeping it out of the path of .the molds, electrical means connected to the shifting means operable when the molds are moving to disengage said shifting means from the finger to allow said finger to extend into the mold path, said electrical means being inoperative when the molds stop moving, a control switch in circuit with the power means to be opened and closed to open and close said circuit :and thereby stop and start the molds, a secondary switch in said circuit in parallel with the control switch, and means on the finger for closing the secondary switch when said finger is extending into a mold, whereby the opening of the control switch when the finger is extending into a mold does not stop the molds, said finger moving the last-mentioned means to open the secondary switch when the fin-ger is moving out of the mold path.

2. In an automatic mold casting machine having means for directing molten material to a flow valve and electrical power means for moving molds in succession along a path beneath the valve; a solenoid having a movable core therein connected to the valve, spring means connected to the valve and opposed to the solenoid for closing the valve, electr-ical means connected to the solenoid for energizing the latter, said solenoid when energized retaining the valve open against the spring means, a contact finger mounted adjacent the flow valve and norm-ally hanging in the path :of the molds and extending into each mold when y it is beneath the valve as the latter mold p-asses beneath the finger, said finger being spaced from the bottom of the mold and normally being engaged by an end of each mold yas said mold moves from beneath the finger to slide over said end and into the next succeeding mold, electrical means connecting the finger to the solenoid for de-energizing said solenoid While the valve is open andthe molten material in the mold reaches the nger or said finger engages a mold thereby allowing the spring means to close the valve, shifting means removably engaging the finger when the molds are not moving .and keeping it out of the path of the molds, electrical means connected to the shifting means operable when the molds are moving to disengage said shifting .means from the finger to allow said finger to extend into the mold path, said electrical means being inoperative when the molds stop moving, a control switch in circuit with the power means to be opened and closed to open and close said circuit and thereby stop and start the molds, a secondary switch in said circuit in parallel with the control switch, and means on the finger for closing the secondary switch when said linger is extending into a mold, whereby the opening of the control switch when the finger is extending into a mold does not stop the molds, said finger moving the last-mentioned means to open the secondary switch when the finger is moving out of the mold path.

3. In an automatic mold cas-ting machine having means for directing molten material to a liow valve and means for moving molds in succession along la path beneath the valve; control apparatus comprising electrical actuating means connected to the valve operable when electrical current is supplied thereto to open said valve, closing means connected to the valve for closing the latter when the actuating means is inoperative, a contact finger mounted adjacent the flow valve and normally hanging in the path of the molds and extending into each mold when it is beneath the valve as the latter mold passes beneath the finger, said finger being spaced from the bottom of the mold and normally being engaged by an end of each mold as said mold moves from beneath the finger to slide over said end and into the next succeeding mold, electrical means in circuit with the finger for cutting off the flow of current to the actuating means for rendering -said actuating means inoperative when the finger engages a mold or the molten material in the mold reaches said finger thereby allowing the closing means t-o close the valve, a bar engaging the finger when the molds are not moving and keeping it out of the path of the molds, said electrical means rendering the actuating means inoperative when the finger is engaged by the bar, and electrical means connected to the bar operable when the molds are moving to disengage the bar from the finger to allow said finger to extend into the mold path, said electrical means being inoperative when the molds stop moving.

d. In an automatic mold casting machine having means for directing molten material to a flow valve and means for moving molds in succession along a path beneath the valve; control apparatus comprising electrical actuating means connected to the valve operable when electrical current is supplied thereto to open said valve, closing means connected to the valve for closing the latter when the actuating means is inoperative, a contact finger mounted adjacent the iiow valve and norm-ally hanging in the path of the molds and extending into each mold when it is beneath the valve as the latter mold passes beneath the finger, said finger being spaced from the bottom of the mold and normally. being engaged by an end of each mold las said mold moves from beneath the finger to slide over said end and into the next succeeding mold, electrical means in circuit with the finger for cutting off the flow of current to the actuating means for rendering said actuating means inoperative when the finger engages a mold or the molten material in the mold reaches said finger thereby allowing the closing means to close the valve, a bar normally engaging the finger and keeping it out Aof the path of the molds, said finger and the electrical means cutting ofi the flow of current to the actuating means when the finger is engaged by the bar, a solenoid having a movable core therein connected to the bar and when energized disengaging said bar from the finger to allow the latter to extend into the mold path, switch means in circuit with said solenoid and de-energizing the latter when operated, and means normally operated by the mold moving means connected to operate said switch means when the mold moving means stops moving to de-energize said solenoid to allow the bar to engage the finger to keep said finger out ofthe mold path.

5. In an automatic mold casting machine having means for directing molten material to a fiow Valve and means for moving molds in succession along a path beneath the valve; a first solenoid having a movable core therein connected -to the valve, spring means connected to the valve and opposed to the solenoid for closing the valve, first electrical means connected tothe solenoid forenergizing the latter, saidsolenoid-Vwhen energized retaining the VVvalve open against the spring means, a .cont-act linger mounted Y adjacent the ow valve and normally hanging'in lthe-path f the molds and extending into eachl mold when it is beneath the molds and extending into each mold when itis beneath the valve as thellatte'r moldpasses'beneath the nger, said finger being spaced from the bottom of the mold and l Vnorm-ally being engaged byan end 'of each mold as said the valve yas the latter mold passes beneath the finger, said, I

linger being `spaced from the bottombf the mold and normally being engaged by an end of each mold as said mold moves from beneath the iinger to slide over said end and into the next succeeding mold', second electrical means in circuit with the finger for dev-energizing said solenoid and thereby allowing the spring means kto close the valve when the molten material in the mold reaches the linger or'VV said linger engages a mold, a bar engaging the nger When'the molds' are not moving 4and keeping it out of the path of the molds, said second electrical means de-energzingV the solenoid when thefinge-r is engaged by mold moves from' beneath thenger toslidefover said end and' intorthe neXtsucceeding mo1d,`second electrical 'means in circuit with the linger fonde-energizing said Y Vsolenoid and thereby allowing the springmeans to close thev bar, and third electrical means connected to the bar Y operable by the mold moving means when the molds vare .moving to disengage they bar from the finger to a-llowrsaid ngerto extendinto themold path,v said electrical means Y Ibeing inoperative'when the molds stop moving'thereby v the val-ve when the molten material inthe mold reaches the linger or said finger engages a mold,l a bar engaging the Aiingerwhenthe'rnolds are not moving land keeping it out of the path :of the molds, said second electrical means de -ener'gizing'the solenoid'when the finger` is engaged by the bar,V a second solenoid having a movable core therein connected t-oy the bar and when energized disengaging said lbar .from the finger to a'llow lthe latter to extend into the n`1old`path,` switch means in circuitfwith saidsecond solenoid and de-energizing 'the latter fwhen operated, and means normally operated by the mold moving means connected yto operate said switch means-When the mold moving means stops moving to yde-energirre said second sole- I noid t-o allow thevfbarV to engagey the fingerto keep said finger out ofthe mold path.

fReferencesCted bythe Examiner UNIIEDSTATES PATENTS 9/56 -sukav'a i 922-79 2,891,292 6/59 VS'ulnava I. 22-79 WILLIAM J'. sTErHENsoN Primary Examiner. MARCUS U. LYONS,V MICHAEL y', BRINDISI, Examiners.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2763904 *Oct 29, 1952Sep 25, 1956John Sukava ArmasAutomatic casting machine
US2891292 *Nov 12, 1957Jun 23, 1959Sukava Armas JAutomatic mold casting machine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3353586 *Apr 14, 1965Nov 21, 1967Amsted Ind IncHeight control for molten metal in mold riser
US3512575 *Dec 27, 1965May 19, 1970Bradley Metal Co TheApparatus for making metal bodies
US3659644 *May 5, 1969May 2, 1972Metallurgie HobokenApparatus for the casting of metal anodes
US3810726 *May 5, 1972May 14, 1974G BjorhaagPlant for manufacturing reinforced concrete elements, preferably in the shape of a case
US3943992 *Feb 6, 1975Mar 16, 1976Maschinenfabrik & Eisebgiesserei Ed. Mezger AgControlled-pouring apparatus for metal casting
US4509578 *Feb 12, 1982Apr 9, 1985General Motors CorporationStationary continuous automatic pouring apparatus
US4576217 *Jul 2, 1984Mar 18, 1986General Motors CorporationStationary continuous automatic pouring process
US5875832 *Feb 21, 1996Mar 2, 1999Dale L. HabernyMethod and apparatus for continuous casting using a rotating cylinder
EP0333621A1 *Mar 2, 1989Sep 20, 1989Remetal, S.A.Improvements in height measuring devices for billet filling
Classifications
U.S. Classification164/156.1, 164/329, 425/136, 425/145, 164/337
International ClassificationB22D25/02, B22D5/04, B22D5/00, B22D25/00
Cooperative ClassificationB22D5/04, B22D25/023
European ClassificationB22D5/04, B22D25/02C