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Publication numberUS3189251 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 15, 1965
Filing dateApr 25, 1961
Priority dateApr 25, 1961
Publication numberUS 3189251 A, US 3189251A, US-A-3189251, US3189251 A, US3189251A
InventorsWilliam W Mcfarland
Original AssigneeInt Paper Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container
US 3189251 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 15, 1965 w. w. MGFARLAND 3,189,251

CONTAINER Filed April 25, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 IN VEN TDR.

WILLIAM McFARLAND ATTORNEY United States Patent Oiiice y liZSl Patented Jurre i5, 1965 3,189,251 CNTAHNER William W. McFarland, Wooster, hio, assigner' to linternational Paper Company, New York, NSY., a corporation of New York Filed Apr. 25, 1961, Ser. No. 105,407 1l Claims. (Cl. 229-51) This invention relates to containers and more particularly to a container that has reinforced side walls and is formed from a one-piece blank of foldable sheet material.

The one-piece blank or the partly formed and collapsed container can be shipped to the user in flat condition. This greatly reduces shipping costs. The one-piece construction also increases the ease with which the containers can be formed from the blanks. It is, therefore, an object of this invention to provide a one-piece blank or partly formed container that can be shipped flat and then readily and simply formed, by the user, into the cornpleted container.

lt is commonplace to stack packed containers one on the other during shipment or in storage. lt is, therefore, important that the walls of the containers have adequate strength to withstand the considerable loads to which they may be subjected in use. This problem has been solved in the past in a number of ways, primarily by aflixing to the walls, a reinforcing member of wood or a like material. This, of course, involves additional parts and furthercomplicates shipping and assembling. it is therefore, a further object of this invention to incorporate in the blank per se means to form a container having reinforced side walls.

The blanks of this invention are cut from a suitable sheet material, preferably corrugated board, and scored to provide fold lines. lt is a relatively easy matter to fold a single thickness blank of corrugated board, which o has been properly scored, into container form. However, if the folding required to form the container invoives two or more thicknesses or plys of corrugated board, as it does in the present invention, in the formation of the reinforced walls, it is quite difficult, in fact often impossible, to obtain accurate and symmetrical corners without placing stress on one or more of the plys, particularly the outer ply, at the corner fold. This stress, in time, can cause a rupture along the corner fold, thereby weakening the box to such an extent as to destroy its utility. It is, therefore, another object of this invention to provide a blank having incorporated therein means to fold two or more thicknesses of corrugated board to form a container having accurate and symmetrical corners.

A standard container, called a regular slotted container, is the one most generally used by the shipping industry, because it is the most economical to manufacture and uses less material than any other providing the same rength and volume of shipping space. As a result, the greatest number of available automatic machines for seting up and closing containers are those designed to service the regular slotted container. It is, therefore, another object to provide a blank that is foldable to form a regular slotted container having triple ply side walls that can be set up on and closed by standard machines.

Further objects and advantages will appear from the following detailed description.

In the drawings:

FIG. l is a plan view of a blank, in accordance with the invention, from which a container is made;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary section taken along line 2-2 of FlG. l;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged section taken along line 3-3 of FIG. l showing the initial stages of folding;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged section showing the completion of the initial stages of folding;

FlG. 5 is a perspective View showing further stages of folding; p

FlG. 6 is a fragmentary section taken along line 6 6 of FG. 5; and

FlG. 7 is a perspective view of the box showing stages of folding the top iaps. i

The container i3 shown in FTG. 7 is formed from a one-piece blank itl (PEG. l) cut from suitable sheet material, preferably corrugated board, which consists of a first liner i3 and a second liner l5 adhesive-ly secured to a corrugated medium 26,. as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3.

The blank ld has longitudinal scores 22, 33 and 35 transverse scores 2d which provide fold lines for erecting the container. The fold lines each of which is of substantially uniform width throughout its length, generally deline and hingedly connect bottom closure liaps 34, top closure liaps 3d, outer walls 4i?, intermediate walls 432, inner walls 44 and a stitch or glue flap 46.

Scores Sii and 35 can be impressed on both sides of blank itl, so as to provide two parallel lines of indentation, one in the plane of iirst liner 13. and one in the plane of second liner l5, per score and such impressions afford even greater folding facility. But the greatest folding facility is achieved when slit score constructions 3 and 5' are substituted for or are used `supplementary to the single or double line of indentations of which scores 33 and are constituted so that, in a preferred embodiment, tape hinging means are supplied to blank l0 in the following manner; slit score 3 along the lower edge of 'ritermediate walls d2 is made up of a first slit 23 cut through first liner i3 and corrugated medium Ztl', but not through second liner l5, and a parallel line of indentation 53 on second liner l5 and slit score 5 along the upper edge of intermediate walls d2 is made up of a second slit 25 cut through second liner l5 and corrugated medium Ztl, but not iirst liner i3, and a parallel line of` indentation 35 on iirst liner As shown, slit scores 3 and 5 extend from one transverse edge of the blank to the other.

Slits 29 extend inwardly in a converging relation from the free edge of the fiap to a fold line 24, thereby defining a tear tab 3d.

The outer walls ttl have means to sever them along a tear line for the purpose further to be described, including the tear tab 3h and a tear tape 32 which is adhesively secured to an inner surface 3i of the outer walls and extends under the tear tab from a transverse edge of the outer walls to a transverse edge of the flap. i

The elements of the blank have been described With reference to the positions which they occupy when the blank has been folded into container form. lt will be understood that the blank elements and fold lines are appropriately formed and disposed to permit folding of the blank to produce the container in the manner to be described.

To form the container, the inner and outer walls itl and are folded7 as shown in Fi'G. 3, along the longitudinal `fold lines 33 and 35 at the opposite edges of the intermediate walls dit, and into abutting contact with the opposed surfaces of the intermediate walls where they are secured in place by glue applied to prior to or during formation of the container. in this position, as shown in FIG. 4, the outer walls are in abutting Contact with an outer surface i3 of the intermediate walls and the inner walls are in abutting contact with an inner surface of the intermediate walls.

The glued and superimposed inner, intermediate and outer walls which are of substantially equal height, and the flap are then folded along the transverse fold lines and are secured together by an appropriate means, such as staples 5d which pass through the four layers thus 1novided, thereby forininfr a manufacturers joint.

es Thus folded, the inner, intermediate stitute triple ply side walls that are generally de 52, as seen in FIG. 6. The reinforced walls 52 exceptional strength which enables them to s 'f loads without risk of collapse and injury to the contents of the box when the loaded containers are placed in stacks of considerable height. it should be further noted that in this condition the partly formed container is a regular slotted contain-er. lt can be folded and shi;` flat to the user and as such set up and closed on standard. machines.

When the container is to be filled, it is erected into a rectangular condition and the bottom closure flaps 3f@ are folded, along the fold lines defining the bottom flaps, perpendicular to the inner walls are connected and are surface glued or otherwise to form the bottom closure. After the container with its contents, the top closure flaps are folder., the fold lines deining the top ilaps, per Outer walls d@ to which they are connecwu, where they are secured in the same manner as the bottom llaps to form the top closure.

The intermediate walls are separated from each other by means defining a plurality of transverse slots f are disposed between their lower and upper edge connect the intersections of the longitudinal and verse fold lines. When the inner, intermediate and o ter walls are superimposed, these slots are pl the respective fold lines that denne the inner and outer walls. in other words, as shown, ior example in "EQ2 6, the fold line defining inner wall the slot 23 deining intermediate wall di?, which in turn directly overlies the fold line defining the outer wall The slots constitute a means to fold the triple ply walls 52 perpendicular to each other without undue stress being placed On the corners and particularly on the outer ply at the perpendicular corner fold.

VJithout the presence of the slots there would be tnree thicknesses of corrugated board at the corner folds. lt is extremely dillicult to mold three thicknesses of corrugated board, particularly to obtain accurate and symmetrical corners and even if acceptable corners are obtained, the stress placed on the outer ply is often great as to cause rupture because in forming the corner, the outer ply must be stretched disproportionately to th intermediate and inner plys.

Vt/ith the slots 2&5, there are only two t corrugated board at the corner folds and wform a corner the slots accommodate the convex corners of the inner walls thereby relieving the stress on the corners of the outer walls. ly so doing, accw. and strong corners are obtained without placing undue stress on the outer walls at the corner folds.

Preferably, the glue for securing inner, intermediate and outer walls together is applied to the entire inner surface d5 of the intermediate walls and to the inner surface 3l of the outer walls in a zone bounded by their lower edges and the lower edge of tane 32; and is omitted in a zone bounded by thei edges and the upper edge of the tear tape, for the rosso to be further described.

To open the container i3, the tab El@ may be grasped and pulled outwardly, as shown in phantom in FlG. 6, thereby severing the outer walls along tear line. As the outer walls are torn, the tear is guided and reinforced by the tear tape 32 so that a continuous tear strip is removed from one transverse edge ot the outer walls to the other.

This divides the outer walls into two parts. The lower part is secured to the intermediate walls by the glue an plied to the outer walls below the tear line, as has been explained. However, since glue has been omitted from the outer walls above the tear line, the upper t free to move with respect to the intermediate walls in place only by the staples 5d tha" secure the fr bein held

and the triple ply side walls together, above the tear line.

The container may now be opened by exerting a slight upward pull on the Outer walls in the immediate area of the staples, thereby pulling them free of the staples. lu so doing, the outer walls are completely separated from the intermediate walls. It is important to note that the upper part of the outer walls and the top ilaps forming the top closure constitute a cover that can now be removed and re-set at will, the outer walls telescoping over the intermediate walls when it is replaced.

it is, of course, possible to open the container without completely removing the cover. This may be done by exerting an upward pull on the outer walls at the corner directly opposite the staples. ln so doing the cover is pivoted upwardly in an arc about the portion of the outer walls secured by the staples to the intermediate walls above the tear line. This portion constitutes, as such, a cover hinge means by which the cover is secured to the intermediate walls and which functions as a pivot about winch the cover is swung to open the container.

ln the preferred embodiment ot this invention, the liap is secured to the triple ply side walls by staples that pass through the llap and all three layers or the side walls. However, if it is desired the ap may be secured by staples or glue to the outer walls only. When this is done, of course, once the tear strip is removed there is nothing securing the cover to the intermediate walls and it may readily be removed and replaced at will.

While the container is preferably formed of corrugated board, it is also contemplated that a container constructed in accordance with this invention may be made of other material such as a heavy sheet of paperboard.

What is claimed is:

l. A one-piece blank of sheet material foldable to form a container, said blank including intermediate walls having opposed surfaces, inner and outer walls connected to said intermediate walls at opposite edges thereof, said inner, intermediate and outer walls being of substantially equal height and tape hinging means along said opposite edges of said intermediate walls whereby said inner and outer walls are foldable into abutting contact with said opposed surfaces of said intermediate walls.

2. A one-piece blank or sheet material oldable to form a container, said blank including intermediate walls having inner and outer surfaces, inner and outer walls connected to said intermediate walls at opposite edges thercots said inner, intermediate and outer walls being of substantially equal height and tape hinging means along said opposite edges of said intermediate walls whereby said outer Walls are foldable into abutting contact with said outer surface of said intermediate walls and said inner walls are foldable into abutting contact with said inner surface of said intermediate walls, said tape hinging means being in the form of slit scores.

3. A one-piece blank of sheet material oldable to form a container, said blank having inner, intermediate and outer walls of substantially equal height, said blank having intersecting longitudinal and transverse fold lines generally defining said walls and hingedly connecting them to each other, each of said fold lines being of substantially uniform width throughout its lengt said intermediate walls having means defining a plurality of transverse slots, said slots extending between opposite edges of said intermediate walls and connecting the intersections of said longitudinal and transverse fold lines.

A one-piece blank of sheet material foldable to form a container, said blank having inner, intermediate and outer walls of substantially equal height, and a flap, said blank having intersecting longitudinal and transverse fold lines generally defining said walls and said ap and hingedly connecting them to each other, and severing means including a tear tab formed at one of said transverse fold lines and tear means allixed to said outer walls and extending from said tear tab longitudinally to a transverse edge of said outer walls.

5. The blank of claim 4 in Which said flap is connected to said outer walls and in which said tear tab is formed in said flap.

6. A container having reinforced side Walls comprising intermediate Walls having opposed surfaces and opposite edges, tape hinging means along said opposite edges of said intermediate walls, inner and outer walls connected to said intermediate walls by said tape hinging means, said inner, intermediate and outer walls being of substantially equal height, said inner Walls being folded along one of said tape hinging means and into abutting contact with one of said surfaces of said intermediate Walls and said outer walls being folded along the other of said tape hinging means and into abutting contact with the other of said surfaces of said intermediate Walls.

7. The container of claim 6 in which said tape hinging means along said opposite edges of said intermediate walls are in the form of slit scores.

8. A container having reinforced side Walls comprising inner, intermediate and outer Walls of substantially equal height, said container having intersecting longitudinal and transverse fold lines generally deiining said Walls and hingedly connecting them to each other, each of said fold lines being of substantially uniform width throughout its length and said intermediate Walls having means defining a plurality of transverse slots, said slots extending between opposite edges of said intermediate walls and connecting the intersections of said longitudinal and transverse fold lines.

9. A container having reinforced side Walls comprising inner, intermediate and outer Walls of substantially equal height, said container having intersecting longitudinal and horizontal fold lines generally defining said Walls and hingedly connecting them to each other, severing means including a tear tab formed at one of said transverse fold lines and tear means aiixed to said outer Walls and extending from said tear tab longitudinally to a transverse edge of said outer walls, said inner and outer |Walls being folded into abutting contact With opposed surfaces of said intermediate walls and secured thereto by zones of glue and at least one of said zones of glue being disposed so as to leave an area of abutting surd faces of said intermediate and said outer walls free of glue above said severing means.

10. In the conta-incr of claim 9, a flap connected to said outer Walls by one of said transverse fold lines and means securing said iiap to said inner, intermediate and outer Walls.

1.1. A paperboard shipping container comprising four side Wall panels foldably connected together into a tubular coniiguration, top closure flaps folda'bly connected to the upper edges of said side Wall panels and arranged to close the upper end of said tubular configuration, first panels foldably connected to the lower free edges of each of said side Wall panels, second panels foldably secured to the outer free edges of said iirst panels, said first and second panels having a height substantially equal to said side wall panels, said iirst and sec-ond panels folded into parallel relation with said side Wall panels, said side wall panels, first panels, and second panels being adhesively secured together at their respective interfaces, and bottom closure iiaps foildably secured 'to Ithe free edges of said second panels, said bot-tom closure flaps arranged to close the lower end of said tubular configuration.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,158,130 10/15 Hawkins. 2,344,999 3/44 Newson 229-37 X 2,401,765 6/46 Kuhlrnan 229-14 2,474,523 v6/49 Guyer 229-37 2,752,032 6/56 Fish 229-37 X 2,798,596 7/ 57 Emmons. 2,883,042 4/59 Richer 229-22 X 2,909,312 10/ 5 9 Conerty 229-5 l 3,013,712 12/61 Wollaeger 2129-51 FOREIGN PATENTS 471,136 8/ 37 Great Britain.

JOSEPH R. LECLAR, Primary Examiner. EARLE I. DRUMMOND, Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US2344999 *Jan 26, 1938Mar 28, 1944Newsom Kitchener KBox construction
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3281050 *Aug 13, 1964Oct 25, 1966Menasha CorpCollapsible tote boxes
US4784271 *Nov 20, 1987Nov 15, 1988The Procter & Gamble CompanyTear strip openable shipping/display container with butt joint
US4871345 *Aug 1, 1988Oct 3, 1989The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of making tear strip openable shipping/display container and blanks therefor
US5209394 *Dec 9, 1991May 11, 1993Lever Brothers CompanyCarton for detergent
US5320279 *Feb 16, 1993Jun 14, 1994Lever Brothers Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Carton for concentrated detergent
US8196805 *May 18, 2007Jun 12, 2012Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Cartons with liquid-tight receptacles
US8226794Aug 21, 2009Jul 24, 2012Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Reinforced carton and methods of making carton blanks
US8727204Nov 16, 2010May 20, 2014Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Expandable carton
US9113648Apr 10, 2014Aug 25, 2015Graphic Packaging International, Inc.Expandable carton
US20060071060 *Oct 4, 2005Apr 6, 2006Mike NaefCarton for sheet items having a closable integral lid
US20070267466 *May 18, 2007Nov 22, 2007Kirsten Laura BrandCartons With Liquid-Tight Receptacles
EP1535849A2 *Nov 11, 2004Jun 1, 2005Smurfit UK LimitedBox comprising a display tray and detachable cover
EP1535849A3 *Nov 11, 2004Oct 29, 2008Smurfit Kappa UK Ltd.Box comprising a display tray and detachable cover
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/235, 229/926
International ClassificationB65D5/54
Cooperative ClassificationY10S229/926, B65D5/5445
European ClassificationB65D5/54C