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Publication numberUS3189933 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 22, 1965
Filing dateDec 3, 1963
Priority dateDec 3, 1963
Publication numberUS 3189933 A, US 3189933A, US-A-3189933, US3189933 A, US3189933A
InventorsSmith Aaron H
Original AssigneeSignal Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vacuum cleaner with rotatable nozzle
US 3189933 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. H. SMITH VACUUM CLEANER WITH ROTATABLE NOZZLE June 22, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec; :5, 1963 welfdmw I NVENTOR gM t QM ATTORN EYS June 22, 1965 A. H. sMlTH 3,189,933

VACUUM CLEANER WITH ROTATABLE NOZZLE Filed Dec. 3, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 IIIIIIIIIIII/IIA INVENTOR. 4,414 4;! JZarazz 1i J'mw'fli/ June 22,1965 A. H. SMITH 3,189,933

VACUUM CLEANER WITH ROTATABLE NOZZLE Filed Dec'. 5, 1 965 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 as Q I //4 I H] L f I50 /2 7 Wm W INVENTOR TORNEYS United States Patent M 3,189,933 VAfIUUM CLEANER Wl'lll RQTATABLE NQZZLE Aaron H. Smith, Ipswich, Mass, assignor to Signal Manufacturing Company, a corporation of Massachusetts Filed Dec. 3, 1963, Ser. No. 328,148 14- Claims. (8i. 115-344) This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application Serial No. 166,999, filed January 18, 1962, now forfeited.

This invention relates generally to vacuum cleaners, and is particularly concerned with vacuum cleaners of the push broom type.

Vacuum cleaners of such type generally comprise an upstanding dust-collecting assembly having a nozzle mounted on the lower end thereof. The nozzle comprises a housing-type structure, and moreover, the preferred forms of electric broom type vacuum cleaners have the nozzle or nozzle housing rotatably mounted with respect to the dust-collecting assembly whereby the dust-collecting assembly can be manipulated relative to the nozzle so that the nozzle can be moved under or around furniture, in corners, and the like.

The ease of manipulation and maneuverability afforded by push broom type vacuum cleaners have resulted in widespread use of the same. Still, with prior push broomtype constructions, certain problems were faced either from the efficiency standpoint in cleaning, or from the expense standpoint in manufacture.

More particularly, it is an accepted fact at the present time that the most eficient vacuum cleaning can be performed when the nozzle through which the vacuum is applied has a positively driven rotatable beater brush mounted therein. The combined action of the loosening of dirt by the brush, and the applied suction renders the cleaning operation substantially more eflicient than that which can be achieved when a vacuum alone is used, or when a vacuum with a non-driven brush is used. Notwithstanding the recognition of the increased efficiency which can be achieved with the combined driven brush vacuum operation, such a combination of features has only been used in more costly push broom-type vacuum cleaners in the past. The proposed prior solutions have involved the use of a separate motor to drive the beater brush (i.e., a motor separate from the vacuum fan motor), or the use of flexible shafting and complex gearing between the vacuum motor and the beater brush. Both of such arrangements result in bulk of equipment size, and unattractive appearance. Moreover, these prior suggestions tend to limit the very purpose for which the push broom-type vacuum cleaner was designed, namely, ease of manipulation and maneuverability.

Bearing in mind the foregoing, the primary object of the present invention is to provide a push broonrtype vacuum cleaner (a) which has a rotatable nozzle mounted on the lower end of the dust-collecting assembly thereof, (b) which has a motor and vacuum fan therein, (c) which incorporates a beater brush mounted in the rotatable nozzle, and (d) which further incorporates means for driving the beater brush from the motor in a manner and through an arrangement that does not interfere with maneuverability or cause any substantial increase in size of the overall cleaner.

More specifically, it is an object hereof to provide a push broom-type vacuum cleaner which combines a driven beater brush feature with a vacuum pick-up feature while maintaining good proportions and maneuverability, and in addition, more eflicient use and power, reduction of power loss, reduction of reactive torque, optimum brush speed, and minimum wear.

In addition to the foregoing more basic objects of the Bldhfid Patented June 22, 19565 ICC present invention, there are certain further general objects hereof, including: (a) the provision of an overall assembly conforming with the preceding objects and incorporating a closure or cover in the dust-collecting assem bly, which closure or cover is effectively sealed with the remainder of the assembly in use by means of the cooperative action between a sealing gasket and a cam type latching means reacting between a fixed assembly component and the cover; (b) the provision of such an overall assembly wherein the vacuum tube or induction tube thereof leading to the dust-collecting housing communicates with the rotatably mounted nozzle through cooperating couplings at the base of the assembly and on the nozzle housing, which couplings receive therethrough a portion of the drive means for driving the brush mounted in the nozzle; and, (c) the provision of such an assembly which utilizes gear reducing means so as to achieve with the same motor a desired rotational speed for the vacuum fan, and a desired rotational speed for the driven brush carried in the nozzle or nozzle housing.

In accordance with the preferred embodiment of the invention, there is provided a vacuum cleaner apparatus of the type having an elongated upstanding dust-collecting assembly including an inlet coupling at the lower end thereof, a motor, and a fan driven by the motor to create a partial vacuum at the inlet coupling. Such apparatus incorporates a nozzle housing having an inlet opening in the base thereof and an outlet opening in an upper portion thereof. The housing has a discharge coupling adjacent the outlet opening, and the discharge coupling cooperates with the inlet coupling of the dust-collecting assembly to provide continuous communication between the nozzle housing and the inlet coupling, and to rotatably mount the nozzle housing at the lower end of the assembly with the assembly projecting upwardly at an acute angle with respect to the base of the nozzle housing, A drive shaft driven by the motor has an end portion extending Within the nozzle housing, and a beater brush is rotatably mounted within the nozzle housing. Belt means drivingly connect the beater brush with the drive shaft. The drive shaft has its rotational axis coincident with the axis of rotation of the nozzle housing relative to the assembly and its rotational axis extending at an angle to the rotational axis of the brush.

The aforesaid preferred embodiment also preferably incorporates a dust-collecting housing constructed particularly in accordance herewith, namely, .a dust-collecting housing having a lower section forming a relatively fixed part of the assembly, and an upper section in the form of a cover cooperating with the lower section to detime an elongate dust-collecting housing. The respective sections mate at respective upper and lower edges, and a sealing gasket is provided to interact between the mating edges. Moreover, the upper section of the housing or cover preferably carries a latching cam surface thereon, and the assembly carries a cooperating latching means which reacts with the cam surface to cause the mating edges of the respective upper and lower sections of the housing to tightly engage the sealing gasket, thereby effectively providing a sealed dust-collecting housing.

The invention will be better understood, and objects other than those specifically set forth above, will become apparent when consideration is given to the following detailed description. Such description makes reference to the annexed drawings presenting preferred and illustrative embodiments of the invention.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a front elevational view of a push, broom-type vacuum cleaning apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of the apparatus shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmental transverse sectional view of the lower portion of the apparatus shown in FIGURES 1 and 2, FIGURE 3 presenting such portion as the same would normally appear when the apparatus was in use;

7 FIGURE 4 is a transverse fragmental sectional view of an upper portion of the apparatus shown in FIGURE 1, FIGURE 4 presenting the details of the upper part of a dust-collecting housing and cooperating latching means constructed in accordance herewith;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmental detailed view, partially in section, of the latching means elements shown in FIG- URE 4;

FIGURE 6 is a perspective View, on a reduced scale, of a vacuum cleaner apparatus constructed in accordance with the modification hereof;

FIGURE 7 is a sectional view, to a much larger scale, and taken medially of the lower portion of the vacuum cleaner apparatus shown in FIGURE 6;

FIGURE 8 is a diametrical sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary vertical section view of one end portion of the nozzle housing incorporated in the apparatus of FIGURES 6 and 7;

FIGURE 10 is a rear view of a cover section utilized in the assembly of FIGURES 1-5;

FIGURE 11 is a side elevational view of the lower portion of the apparatus shown in FIGURE 1, FIGURE 11 presenting the details of one part of the nozzle coupling of the apparatus;

FIGURE 12 is a fragmentary end view of the coupling portion of the nozzle housing incorporated in the apparatus of FIGURES 1 and 2;

FIGURES 13 is a sectional side elevation of the gear reducer assembly incorporated in the apparatus of FIG- URES l and 2; and

FIGURE 14 is a top plan view of the gear reducer assembly shown in FIGURE 13, but partially in section.

If reference is initially made to FIGURE 1, 2 and 3, it will be noted that the apparatus shown therein is of the type having an elongated upstanding dust-collecting assembly 2 including a motor 4 and a fan 6 driven by the motor. The fan serves to create a partial vacuum in the dust-collecting housing portion 8 of the assembly, and in turn, in the so-called induction tube 10 which leads to the inlet coupling 12 at the lower end of the assembly. The construction of the inlet coupling 12 is set forth in more detail herebelow.

A nozzle housing 14 housing an inlet opening 16 in the base thereof and an outlet opening 18 in an upper portion thereof is rotatably mounted at the lower end of the assembly, with the assembly, as best shown in FIGURE 3, projecting upwardly at an acute angle with respect to the base of the nozzle housing 14. A drive shaft 21 driven by the motor 4 in a manner explained more specifically below, has an end portion 22 extending and disposed within the nozzle housing 14. Moreover, the nozzle housing has a heater brush 26 rotatably mounted therein. A belt means 28 drivingly connects the beater brush 26 with the end portion 22 of the shaft 26 so that when the motor 4 is operated, the shaft 29 is driven, and in turn the beater brush 26 is driven.

The nozzle housing 14 is elongated in contour as shown in FIGURE 1, and preferably is formed of a pair of molded sections 6th and 62 joined together by means of screws 66 (only one shown) passing through support collars 655 (only one shown) in the lower section 62 of the nozzle housing and into receiving post members 70 (only one shown) carried in the upper portion of the nozzle housing. Actually, several screws 66, collars 68 and cooperating receiving posts 7% are incorporated to secure the lower section 62 of the nozzle housing to the upper section 6th thereof. Still further, a conventional sealing band 64 is preferably provided about the joint between the housing sections. The lower section 62 of the housing is formed with sliding ribs 80 of conventional design at the leading and lagging longitudinal edges thereof. Moreover, the cooperating nozzle housing sections 663 and 6?. are recessed as at 32 to receive a bearing for supporting projecting shaft elements 84 extending laterally from the brush 25. For further detail as to the manner in which the brush 26 is mounted rotatably in the nozzle housing, attention is directed to FIGURE 9 and the discussion below in connection therewith. Sufi'ice it to say at this point that the brush 2% is rotatably mounted in the nozzle housing 14 such that the lower peripheral edge thereof can engage a carpet or floor.

Extending laterally of the body of the nozzle housing 14 is a discharge coupling collar 86 which is preferably cylindrical in contour, and which carries an inwardly disposed projection or key 58 on the periphery thereof as shown in FIGURE 12. The coupling collar 86 and the projection or key 88 thereof cooperate and inter-fit with a coupling collar 90 formed at the lower end of the frame 39 as shown in FIGURES 3 and 11, the coupling collar 9% having a peripheral recess 92 therein and a slot 92' extending from the recess 92 outwardly to the edge of the frame, and dimensioned to slidably receive the projection or key 88 on the coupling collar 85 so that the same can be slidably engaged within recess 92. The collar 99 formed by the lower end of the frame 3% and the collar 86 projecting laterally of the nozzle housing 14 form cooperating discharge and inlet couplings respectively that provide (1) continuous communication between the nozzle housing 14'; and the inlet couplings 9t and, (2) means iotatably mounting the nozzle housing 14 at the lower end of the assembly with the assembly projecting upwardly at an acute angle with respect to the base 16 of the.

nozzle housing. The collar 86 and the key or projection 88 are preferably integrally formed with housing 14, whereby the key 38 is inserted in the slot $2 and then rotated within the recess 92.

The nozzle housing 14 further is preferably provided with an opening 1% in the upper portion thereof, which opening is closed by a sliding closure 102 having projecting legs 184 which slidably cooperate with lugs 1% of the housing 14 adjacent the opening ltlti to maintain the closure 102 in position. This closure gives access to the interior of the housing 14, thereby facilitating coupling of the belt means 23 with the drive shaft 26, without disrupting the normal arrangement of the housing 14.

In addition to the above described features, the nozzle housing 14 preferably is also provided with a wiper brush 1% supported in the rear base portion thereof as by a reciprocal block mounted in the recess 108. This feature is not essential to the invention, and moreover, the specific type of nozzle housing and the specific arrangement of component parts thereof are not essential to the invention. Instead, as indicated above, the essential factors are that a nozzle housing be provided, that the same have a brush rotatably mounted therein, and that the same carry a discharge coupling which will cooperate with coupling means on the assembly 2 to rotatably mount the nozzle housing with respect to the assembly. In like manner, the exact construction of the frame 30 is not essential, although the same should provide suificient support for the motor 4 and for a gear reducing means 110 from which the drive shaft 21) projects.

By referring to FIGURES 3, 13 and 14, it will be noted that the gear reducing means 110 includes a housing 114 supported in position by means of conventional securing devices such as screws 116-119, 121 and 123 attached to the frame it). (Here again, the particular manner in which the gear reducing means 110 is supported is not critical so long as the shaft 20 in this instance is maintained in proper coaxial position with the axis of rotation of the nozzle housing.) The gear reducing means 110, itself, further includes a pair of meshing bevelled gears and 122, the gear 129 being pressed on the shaft 20. The shaft Ztl is provided with self aligning bearings I25 and 127 held in position by means of springs such as spring 129 disposed in the housing 114 as shown in FIGURES l3 and 14. The gear 122 is pressed on the shaft 130 in a similar manner as the gear 120 is attached to shaft 2%. The shaft 130 is also provided with self aligning bearings 131, 133 again held in position by means of springs such as spring 129 disposed in the housing 114 but not shown in the drawings. With this arrangement, the motor shaft 5 drives the shaft 130 extending through the housing 114, which in turn drives the bevel gear 122. The bevel gear 122 meshes with the bevel gear 126 thereby driving the'shaft 20. The shaft 2i) extends from the housing 114 and a pulley 150 on the outer free end thereof, and this portion of the shaft 20 projects freely and extends into the nozzle housing 14.

Trained about the pulley 150 is the belt means in the form of an endless belt 152. It will be noted that the pulley 1549 has its medial axis disposed tangentially of the rear periphery of the brush drive portion 82. In other words, the pulley 150 is disposed such that the medial peripheral portion thereof engageable with the belt 152 is in line with the peripheral portion of the belt engaging section of the brush nearest the cooperating couplings 85 and 96. This particular disposition of the belt, of the pulley, and of the belt engaging section of the brush has been found to be of particular advantage since it eliminates any problems which may otherwise be experienced with the belt tending to move oif of the drive pulley during its driving of the brush 26. Having now described the driving arrangement between the motor and the brush mounted in the nozzle, there are certain important factors which are to be noted. First, it is to be noted that the axis of rotation of the shaft 20 is coincident with the axis of rotation of the nozzle housing with respect to the assembly 2. Furthermore, the rotational axis of the shaft 29 is disposed at an angle, 90 in FIGURE 3, to the rotational axis of the brush 26 so as to permit the free rotation of the nozzle housing 14 and the brush journalled therein with respect to the assembly, thereby affording complete maneuverability.

In operation of the assembly described above, the fan 6 serves to create a partial vacuum within the housing portion 8, and when a bag, such as that designated by the numeral 2% is attached to the induction tube, the vacuum is applied through the bag and through the induction tube into the nozzle housing. Thus, dust or dirt which is loosed from the rug, carpet, or the like by the brush, as well as free dust, dirt or the like, moves upwardly through the induction tube and into the bag 200. At the same time, the nozzle housing is rotatable relative to the assembly itself so that the cleaner can be easily manipulated to get under furniture, around corners, or the like.

The assembly 2, in addition to the dust-collecting housing portion 8 and the frame 30, includes a handle 32 projecting upwardly longitudinally of the assembly and from the dust-collecting housing portion 8. The motor 4 is mounted on the frame 30 in a conventional manner and the fan 6 is mounted on the shaft 34 of the motor, also in conventional manner to serve the vacuum creating function described above.

The frame 30 of the assembly is enclosed by a casing member 36 which extends downwardly from the dust-collecting housing portion 8. The dust-collecting housing portion 8, in turn, includes a lower section 3-8, forming a fixed part of the assembly 2, and an upper section 46 forming a removable part of the assembly. The lower section 38 has an upper peripheral edge portion 42 (FIG- URE 4) with a recess 44 therein. Such recess 44 opens upwardly, and a gasket or sealing ring 46 is disposed in the recess and extends thereabout. The section 38 is provided with a bracket means 39 for engaging a storable support which preferably takes the form of that disclosed in my copending application Serial No. 289,641, filed on June 21, 1963. The upper or cover section 4-0,

as also shown in FIGURE 4, has a lower peripheral edge 4% engaging the sealing ring 45. Cooperating latching means designated generally by the numerals 5t] and 52 respectively, are carried at the top of the cover section and on the handle 32 to removably secure the cover section 40 in pressing engagement with the sealing ring 46 to seal the cover section 4th of the housing with the lower section 38.

This cover section 40 like the lower section 33 has a generally rectangular contour. Preferably, the upper peripheral edge of the housing section 38 is defined by a ring member 202 which has, in addition to the recesses referred to above, a downwardly opening recess 266 that tightly receives the upper free edge of the housing section 38, as shown in FIGURE 4. The ring member 2&2 further includes an inwardly projecting support collar 206 through which the upper end of the induction tube extends, and thus the induction tube 10 is supported at its upper end so as to project freely within the upper section or cover section 40 of the dust-collecting housing.

In the event of an air flow problem in the equipment described (e.g., nozzle or induction tube blockage) the pressure within the dust-collecting housing, or specifically the upper section 40 thereof, may be decreased beyond desired limits. Accordingly, the preferred embodiment hereof incorporates a relief valve means 250 including a relief valve washer 252 fixed in position by means of a cotter pin 254 which passes through a wall of the cover section 40 of the housing. The washer 252 has a resilience which normally maintains it in engagement with the associated or adjacent wall, but when the pressure within the housing section 40 decreases to a sufficient limit, the washer 252 will flex, as indicated by the dotted line position thereof, thereby opening the passageway 256 in the wall of the housing section 40 to permit surrounding air to pass through the passageway thereby preventing overheating of the electric motor.

The cooperating latching means 50 and 52, as indicated, serve to maintain the upper or cover section 40 in sealing engagement with the sealing ring 46 or the upper peripheral edge of the lower housing section 38. The latching means 52 includes a knob member 260 having a downwardly depending hollow shaft portion 262 which is rotatably mounted on an upstanding hollow post member 264- preferably molded as an integral part of the cover section 44 A rivet-type shaft coupling 265 passing through aligned apertures in the recessed central portion 268 of the knob member 260 and the top of the hollow post 2% rotatably mounts the knob member 260 on the cover section 40. The knob member 26% carries at the base thereof a laterally extending foot or latching member 27! which has an upstanding portion 272 formed with a cam surface 274- at the upper edge thereof. The cam surface 274 engages the lower free surface 276 of the latching member 278. The latching member 278 is effectively in the form of a U-bracket secured to the handle 32 by means of a screw 280. A locking flange 279 carried at the outer end of latching member 270 engages behind surface 276 to insure the camming inter-action described.

The latching member 27 8 is fixed, as by screw 280 on the handle 32 which projects upwardly longitudinally of the assembly, and preferably adjacent, and within the longitudinal recess 41 in the dust-collecting housing. In this manner, the camming action is achieved between the respective latching means 50 and 52, with the specific camming action existing between the surfaces 274 and 276. To accommodate the rotatable knob 260, the top portion of the housing 40 is further top recessed, as at 300 so that the latching member 278 can extend within a portion of recess 41 to be engaged by the latching member 272. Specifically, as shown in FIGURE 10, the cover section 45 is longitudinally recessed throughout substantially its entire length. Further, an inwardly oifset recess 263 is provided at the upper end of the longitudinal recess 41 to receive the latching member 278.

It will be understood that the particular surface which is made a camming surface can be varied with either the surface 272 or the surface 276 providing a cam, or alternatively, both surfaces can be cam surfaces. The important point to note here is the function of latching the cover section 40 into a position with a downward pressing force whereby the same tightly engages the sealing ring 46 to effectively form a sealed dust-collecting housmg.

While the above construction constitutes the preferred embodiment of the invention, a modified embodiment hereof, as suggested above, is shown in FIGURES 6 through 9. Certain features are common to the respective embodiments, as will be apparent from the following description. Moreover, the manner in which the drive shaft extending into the nozzle housing is supported, and the manner in which the rotatable brush is journalled in the nozzle housing will become more fully apparent from the discussion of the modification.

Referring now to FIGURES 6-9, the vacuum cleaner shown therein has an induction tube 410, at one end of which there is rotatably mounted a nozzle 412 and at the other end of which there is a fan housing 416 which provides a seat for one end of a housing 414 of any suitable kind. The induction tube is part of a casting and the handle 418, integral therewith, extends from the seat, provided by the fan housing, parallel to the housing and provides a support for the opposite end of the container. The induction tube deviates between its ends and a motor M is mounted on the casting in the 7 space provided by the deviation in the induction tube,

with one end of its drive shaft 420 extending into the fan housing adjacent the housing. A fan F is fastened to the shaft and operates, by rotation, to draw air through the mouth of the nozzle 412 and the induction tube 416 into the housing 414. The opposite end of the motor shaft 420 is provided with teeth 422. A countershaft 424 is journalled in a sleeve 4255 supported in the lower end of the induction tube concentric with the axis thereof in a bearing 426 formed integral with the tube. The bearing support 425 extends inwardly of the tube and has spaced walls 426a providing an opening between them. Each wall has openings 426 through it interiorly of the tube, thus providing for air flow into the lower end of the bearing support and through the walls into the induction tube. A sleeve bushing 425 is disposed within the bearing support and centrally of the lower end of the induction tube 410. Bushing 425 is supported in such position by spaced legs 425a and opening 425.), as shown in FIGURES 7 and 8.

One end of the countershaft projects through the wall of the tube 410 into the end of the motor housing parallel to the motor shaft 420 and has fixed to it a spur gear 428 which meshes with the teeth 422 on the motor shaft. The other end of the countershaft projects into the nozzle and has on it a pulley 430.

The nozzle 4-12 has a neck 432 rotatably secured to the lower end of the induction tube 410 with its axis coinciding with the axis of the induction tube and a long, relatively narrow mouth 434 which is symmetrical with respect to the axis of the neck in a plane at an angle thereto, such that when the mouth of the nozzle has contact with the floor the apparatus inclines upwardly and rearwardly from the nozzle at a convenient angle for manipulation of the cleaner (FIGURE 6). At the opposite ends of the nozzle (FIGURE 9), there are wheel walls 436, 436 within which there are journalle'd Wheels 433, 438 which support the mouth above the floor. A beater brush 440 is journalled at its ends within the nozzle with a portion extending through the mouth for contact with the floor. Preferably the beater brush is in the form of a rigid shaft 442 which rotatably supports brush elements 444 of conventional type. Midway between the ends of the shaft 442 there is a cylindrical driving element in the form of a pulley 446 and an endless band 448 is disposed with one end about the driving pulley 44-6 and its other end entrained about the pulley 434i (FIGURE 7). As thus constructed, the nozzle 412 can be turned completely around the lower end of the induction tube 41% as many times as desired in either direction without changing the relative positions of the ends of the driving band with respect to each other and hence without imparting a greater or lesser amount of twist thereto, and without changing the angle at which power is delivered, thus maintaining a uniform and constant drive without excessive wear on the driving band and without interfering with rotation of the nozzle. The driving band, as is apparent by reference to FIGURE '7, contains only half-a-turn hence its runs never rub on each other.

In order to reduce transmission losses due to the driving band tension on the drive shaft, it is desirable to reduce the speed of the drive shaft and this is obtained by providing a four-to-one ratio between the gears 4-22 and 42%.

Reduction of the reactive torque on the motor is further reduced and optimum speed of the beater brush obtained by providing a ratio of two-to-one between the drive shaft 424 and the beater brush 440, thus providing an overall reduction of eight-to-one. By employing a motor speed of 16,000 r.p.m., which is desirable for effective pick-up, a brush speed of approximately 2,000 r.p.m. is provided which is found to be about right.

As will be seen by reference particularly to FIGURE 7, the brush is located next to the rear wall :of the nozzle so that a relatively large suction passage is provided at the forward side of the brush through which the dust can freely pass without clogging the induction tube. Moreover, the driving band and the drive shaft are situated out of the direct suction passage so that they remain reasonably clean and free of lint.

Because of the relatively simple connection between the drive shaft and the brush, the nozzle may be easily removed when required by disengaging the band from the pulley 430 and then disengaging the neck of the nozzle from the induction tube.

Although the reduction ratios referred to above with respect to the modified embodiment are generally eightto-one, with the preferred embodiment, the reduction ratios are generally three-to-one due to the differences in structure and arrangement of the two embodiments. The frame 30 of the preferred embodiment can be a casting as described in connection with the modified embodiment. Other similarities between the respective embodiments should be readily apparent.

Having now described illustrative and preferred embodiments of the invention in considerable detail, it will be appreciated that the objects set forth at the outset of the present specification have been successfully achieved. Accordingly, what is claimed is:

1. In a vacuum cleaning device, a hollow elongated nozzle having a bottom opening and a side opening, a rigid frame supported at its lower end on the nozzle for rotation about an axis inclined at a fixed angle relative to the bottom opening of the nozzle which is consistent with ease of manipulation, including a handle at its upper end parallel to said axis which provides for manipulation of the cleaner, said frame constituting an induction tube connected at the lower end to the side opening having a deviating portion intermediate its ends providing a recess for receiving a motor and a fan housing at its upper end for receiving a fan, said fan housing providing a seat for the lower end of a tank, a tank disposed parallel to the underside of the handle with one end resting on the seat in communication with the fan, and the other end connected to the handle, a fan in the fan housing, a motor in the recess, means connecting one end of the motor shaft to the fan, a counter-shaft journaled in the lower end of the induction tube and having one end portion projecting through the side opening into the nozzle on an axis coinciding with the axis of rotation of the frame relative to the nozzle, said end portion of said counter-shaft being freely disposed within said nozzle, means driveably connecting the other end of the counter-shaft to the motor, a rotary beater element journaled at its ends in the ends of the nozzle for rotation about a horizontal axis to the axis of the counter-shaft, and a twisted endless belt entrained at one end about said end portion of said countenshaft and about the rotary beater element intermediate its ends whereby the frame, handle, tank and motor are continuously rotatable as a unit about said inclined axis relative to the nozzle without disturbing the position of the nozzle on the floor or the drive between said counter-shaft and said beater element.

2. In a vacuum cleaning apparatus of the type having an elongated assembly of a frame, a dust collecting housing mounted on said frame, a handle projecting upwardly from said housing, a motor means mounted on said frame, input passageway means communicating the lower end of said assembly with said dust collecting housing, and a fan drivingly connected to said motor means and disposed to create a vacuum in said passageway means, the improvement comprising:

(a) a nozzle housing having a normally horizontally disposed elongated intake opening in the base portion thereof, and an outlet opening in an upper portion thereof;

(b) cooperating means on said nozzle housing and said assembly for rotatably mounting said nozzle housing on the lower end of said assembly,

(1) with said normally horizontally disposed intake opening disposed in a plane making an acute angle with the longitudinal axis of said assembly whereby said assembly extends upwardly from said nozzle housing at a convenient angle for handling said assembly, and

(2) with the outlet opening of said nozzle housing in continuous communication with said input passageway means,

() an elongate beater brush;

(d) means rotatably mounting said beater brush in said nozzle housing with the lower peripheral portion of said brush passing through said elongate intake opening in said nozzle housing;

(e) a coupling shaft extending from said assembly,

(1) with the rotational axis of said shaft extending at an angle to the rotational axis of said beater brush,

(2) with the rotational axis thereof coincident with the axis of rotation of said nozzle housing relative to said assembly, and

(3) with one end of said shaft extending through said output opening and being freely disposed in said nozzle housing;

(f) gear reducing means connecting a portion of said shaft spaced from said one end thereof to said motor means whereby said shaft is driven by said motor;

(g) said shaft having a belt drive portion on said one end thereof;

(h) said brush having a belt drive portion thereon;

(i) an endless belt drivingly extending between said belt drive portion on said brush and said belt drive portion on said shaft,

whereby said assembly is freely rotatable with respect to said nozzle housing without interfering with the drive between said heater brush and said coupling shaft.

3. In combination with a vacuum cleaner apparatus of the type having an elongated upstanding dust collecting assembly including an inlet coupling at the lower end thereof, a motor, and a fan driven by the motor to create a partial vacuum at said inlet coupling, the improvement comprising:

(a) a nozzle housing having an inlet opening in the base thereof and an outlet opening in an upper portion thereof;

(b) said housing having a discharge coupling adjacent said outlet opening, said discharge coupling cooperating with said inlet coupling to provide continuous communication between said nozzle housing and said inlet coupling and to rotatably mount said nozzle housing at the lower end of said assembly with said assembly projecting upwardly at an acute angle with respect to said base of said nozzle housing;

(c) a drive shaft driven by said motor;

(d) said drive shaft having an end portion extending,

and disposed freely, within said housing;

(e) a beater brush rotatably mounted within said housing; and,

(f) belt means drivingly connecting said beater brush with said end portion of said drive shaft;

(g) said drive shaft having its rotational axis coincident with the axis of rotation of said nozzle housing relative to said assembly and its rotational axis extending at an angle to the rotational axis of said brush,

whereby said assembly is freely and continuously swivelable with respect to said nozzle housing without interfering with the drive between said beater brush and said drive shaft.

4. The combination defined in claim 3 wherein:

(a) said inlet coupling comprises a first cylindrical coupling collar portion at the lower end of said assembly;

(b) said discharge coupling comprises a second cylindrical collar portion surrounding said outlet opening;

(c) said first and second collar portions are dimensioned to inter-fit with one another; and

(d) said collar portions have inter-engaging means thereon for locking said collar portions together while permitting rotary movement of said second collar portion with respect to said first collar portion.

5. The combination defined in claim 3, wherein:

(a) said drive shaft has its rotational axis extending perpendicularly to the rotational axis of said brush;

(b) said combination further includes gear reducing means disposed in said dust-collecting assembly; and

(c) said motor drives said gear reducing means and thereby said drive shaft.

6. The combination defined in claim 5 wherein said end portion of said drive shaft comprises a pulley, said heater brush has a drive portion about which said belt means is trained, and wherein the medial peripheral axis of said pulley engaged by said belt means is disposed tangentially of said drive portion of said beater brush.

7. The combination defined in claim 3 wherein said end portion of said drive shaft comprises a pulley, wherein said beater brush has a drive portion thereon, wherein said belt means is trained about said pulley and. said drive portion of said beater brush, and wherein said pulley is disposed to direct said belt means tangentially of said drive portion of said heater brush as a portion of said belt means moves between said drive portion of said beater brush and said pulley.

8. The combination defined in claim 3 wherein said inlet coupling and said discharge coupling respectively comprise first and sec-0nd collars, one of said collars having projecting flange means thereon and the other of said collars being recessed to rotatably receive said flange means to thereby rotatably engage said first and second collars.

9. The combination defined in claim 3 and further including gear reducing means disposed in said dust-collecting assembly, wherein said gear reducing means is drivingly connected between said drive shaft and said motor.

10. The combination defined in claim 9, wherein said drive shaft comprises the output shaft of said gear reducing means, wherein said gear reducing means has an input to said input shaft by a flexible coupling therebetween.

11. A vacuum cleaner apparatus comprising, in combinati-on:

'(a) an elongated dust-collecting assembly having an inlet coupling at the lower end thereof;

(b) a motor carried in said assembly in a lower portion thereof;

(c) a fan driven by said motor and disposed within said assembly to create a partial vacuum Within an upper portion of said assembly;

(d) induction tube means coupling said upper portion of said assembly with said inlet coupling to create a partial vacuum at said inlet coupling;

(e) said upper portion of said assembly comprising a relatively fixed housing section and a relatively removable housing section;

(f) said relatively fixed housing section having an upper peripheral edge portion;

(g) said removable housing member having a lower peripheral edge portion;

(h) one of said edge portions carrying sealing means thereon;

(i) said assembly including handle means extending longitudinally and upwardly thereof;

(j) cooperating latching means carried respectively by said removable housing section and said handle means for pressing said lower peripheral edge portion of said removable housing member into sealing engagement with said upper peripheral edge portion of said relatively fixed housing section to thereby form a sealed housing;

(k) a nozzle housing having an inlet opening in the base thereof and an outlet opening in an upper portion thereof;

(1) said nozzle housing having a discharge coupling adjacent said outlet opening, said discharge coupling cooperating with said inlet coupling to provide continuous communication between said nozzle vhousing and said inlet coupling and to rotatably mount said nozzle housing at the lower end of said assembly with said assembly projecting upwardly at an acute angle with respect to said base of said nozzle housing;

(in) a drive shaft driven by said motor;

(n) :said drive shaft having an end portion extending,

and disposed freely, within said nozzle housing; (0) a beater brush rotatably mounted Within said housing; and

(p) belt means drivingly connecting said heater brush with said end portion of said drive shaft;

(q) said drive shaft having its rotational axis coincident with the axis of rotation of said nozzle housing relative to, said assembly and its rotational axis, extending at an angle to the rotational axis of said brush, whereby said assembly is freely and continuously swivel-able with respect to said nozzle housing without interfering with the drive between said beater brush and said drive shaft.

12. The combinationdefined in claim 11 wherein said cooperating latching means includes a latching bracket fixed to said handle means and a movably mounted latching member carried by said removable housing section.

13. The combination defined in claim 12, wherein said cooperating latching means includes a knob rotatably mounted on said removable housing section, said movably mounted latching member being fixed to said knob for movement into and out of latching engagement with said latching bracket upon rotation of said knob.

'14. The combination defined in claim 13 wherein said removable housing section has a longitudinally recess therein, wherein said handle means includes a handle post disposed within said longitudinal recess on said removable housing section, wherein said removable housing section further has recess in the top portion thereof, and wherein said latching member isdisposed in the recess in the top portion of said removable housing section and is movable across said longitudinal recess.

WALTER A. SCHEEL, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
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US3761997 *May 26, 1971Oct 2, 1973Frazier JVacuum cleaner
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/344, 15/350, 15/421, 15/389, 15/411, 55/361, 55/467
International ClassificationA47L5/22, A47L5/26
Cooperative ClassificationA47L5/26
European ClassificationA47L5/26