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Publication numberUS3190426 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 22, 1965
Filing dateApr 3, 1961
Priority dateApr 3, 1961
Publication numberUS 3190426 A, US 3190426A, US-A-3190426, US3190426 A, US3190426A
InventorsCahill Bernard S, Schepflin Daniel J
Original AssigneeNat Rejectors Gmbh
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Money-handling devices
US 3190426 A
Images(7)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 22, 1965 B. s. CAHILL ETAL MONEY-HANDLING DEVICES 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April I5. 1961 TTORNEY June 22, 1965 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed April 3. 1961 I l I I I I I I L L mmm OHG/ TA Non., .wam

D mi Nl- RE El M D Iwhvk NIM@ June 22 1965 B. s. cAHlLL ETAL 3,190,426

MONEY-HANDLING DEVICES Filed April s. 1961 v 7 sheets-sheet 4 lgn/ 330 EHJ/ 462 Fl f5;

INV E N To RS BERNARD J'. H/LL DAN/5.1. J. scf/EPFL//v/v June 22, 1965 B.s.cAH1LL ETAL. 3,190,426

MONEY-HANDLING DEVICES Filed April 5. 1961 7 sheets-sheet s BY ATTORNEY June 22, 1965 B. s. cAHlLL ETAL.

MONEY-HANDLING DEVICES 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed April s. 1961 n -www INVENTORJ BERNARD .5. CAH/LL DAN/EL J. SCHEPFL/N wNN om# TTK June 22, 1965 B. s; cAHlLL ETAI. 3,190,426

MONEY-HANDLING DEVICES Filed April 3, 1961 '7 Sheets-Sheet 7 m L-ezlIL/ge" VIAi.

INVEN TORS BERNARD AH/LL f ter.

United States Patent Oihce QAZS Patented June 22, 1965 3,190,426 MONEY-HANDLHNG DEVICES Bernard S. Cahill, Kirkwood, and Daniel .1. Schepilin, St. Louis County, Mo., assigner-s to National Rejectors, Inc., St. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Missouri Filed Apr. 3, 1961, Ser. No. 100,272 14 Claims. (Cl. 1943-4) This invention relates to improvements in money-handling devices. More particularly, this invention relates to improvement in devices that can accept money and that can pay out change.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a device which can accept money and which can pay out change.

The money-handling device provided by the present invention can accept paper currency and can also accept coins. Further, that money-handling device can accept paper currency of different denominations and can accept coins of ditferent denominations. This is desirable because it enables that device to provide change for all patrons who carry paper currency and coins of the denominations which are customarily carried on ones person. It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a device which can accept paper currency and can also accept coins, and which can accept paper currency of diiferent denominations and can accept coins of different denominations.

One embodiment of the present invention can accept live dollar bills, can accept one dollar bills, can accept fty cent pieces, and can accept quarters. When a quarter is inserted in that embodiment of the present invention, certain coin ejectors will pay out change for that quarter. When a lifty cent piece is inserted, those certain coin ejectors will pay out change for a quarter, and a further coin ejector will pay out a quarter. When a dollar bill is inserted, those certain coin ejectors will pay out change for a quarter, the further coin ejector will pay out a quarter, and two additional coin ejectors will each pay out a quar- When a tive dollar bill is inserted, those certain coin ejectors will pay out change for a quarter, the further coin ejector will pay out a quarter, the two additional coin ejectors will each pay out a quarter, and a bill ejector will pay out four one dollar bills. It will be noted that whenever a higher denomination unit of money is inserted, the change for the lower denomination unit of money is still paid out, and that only such additional change is paid out y as is necessary to match the higher value of the higher denomination unit of money. This is desirable because it makes possible the paying out of widely different amounts of change with a minimum number of pre-set combinations or" ejectors. It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a money-handling device wherein the change for a lower denomination unit of money is paid out when a higher denomination unit of money is inserted and lonly such additional change is paid out as is necessary to match the higher value of the higher denomination unit of money.

In the event the supply of one dollar bills, that are to be paid out as change, becomes exhausted it would be desirable to have the money-handling device return to the patron any tive dollar bills that are inserted; and yet it f would be desirable to have that money-handling device continue to accept one dollar bills, fty cent pieces and quarters and to pay out the appropriate amounts of change. The present invention makes it possible for a money-handling device to effect the return of inserted iive dollar bills when the supply of one dollar bills is eX- hausted while permitting that money-handling device to continue to accept one dollar bills, fty cent pieces and quarters and to pay out appropriate amounts of change.

it is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a money-handling device which effects the return of tive dollars bills when the supply of one dollar bills is eX- hausted but which Will continue to accept one dollar bills, iifty cent pieces and quarters and to pay out appropriate amounts of change.

ln the event the supply of any of the coins, that are to be paid out as change, becomes exhausted it would be desirable to have the money-handling device effect the return of any further bills or coins that might be inserted. The present invention lprovides a money-handling device which effects the return of all coins and bills that are inserted after the supply of any of the coins that are to be paid out as change becomes exhausted. It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a moneyhandling device which effects the return of all bills and coins that are inserted after the supply of any of the coins that are to be paid out as change becomes exhausted.

The embodiment of money-handling device provided by the present invention uses one bill-transporting device to grip and move one dollar bills and to grip and move iive dollar bills, but it uses two individually different electric channels to control the accepting of thosebills. This is desirable because it means that the electric channel for the identifying and accepting of live dollar bills can be disabled, to effect the return of live dollar bills, without affecting the operation of the electric channel for the identifying and accepting of one dollar bills. As a result, the money-handling device of the present invention is fully capable of gripping all inserted bills, of moving all those bills along a predetermined testing path, and of identifying and accepting authentic one dollar bills while returning all tive dollar bills when the supply of one dollar bills, to be paid out as change, becomes exhausted. It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a money-handling device that uses one bill-transporting device to grip and move one dollar bills and to grip and move ve dollar bills but that uses two individually different electric channels to control the identifying and accepting of those bills so those channels can be individually disabled.

It would be undesirable for a money-handling device to pay out more than the required amount of change. The present invention prevents the paying out of more than the required amount of change by providing an anti-jackpot circuit for the money-handling device provided by the present invention. That anti-jackpot circuit includes contacts on a relay which must operate during each and every cycle of operation of the money-handling device; and those contacts must return to their normal positions betore the money-handling device can complete its cycle of operations. The switch that initiates a cycle of operation of the money-handling device when a tive dollar bill is inserted must re-open before the end of that cycle of operation or the contacts of the relay will not restore themselves to permit that money-handling device to complete that cycle of operation. Similarly, the contacts that initiate a cycle of operation of the money-handling device when a one dollar bill is inserted, and the contacts that initiate a cycle of operation of the money-handling device when a iifty cent piece is inserted, `and the contacts that initiate a cycle of operation of the money-handling device when a quarter is inserted, must yre-open before the end of that cycle of operation or the contacts of the relay will not restore themselves to permit that money-handling device to complete that cycle of operation. This means that if any of the switches, that initiate a cycle of operation of the money-handling device, fails to re-open before the end of that cycle of operation, the anti-jackpot circuit of that money-handling device will cause that money-handling device to come to rest, and will thereby keep that money-handling device from paying out more than the required amount of change. It is, therefore an object of the present invention to provide, an anti-jackpot circuit which includes relay c-ontacts that must operate and must restore themselves `duringeach and every cycle of operation 'of' the money-handling device,A and which -requires the switches, that initiate cycles of operation of the moneyhandling device, to restore themselves before the ends of those cycles of operation or the relay contacts will not bel able to restore themselves.

The money-handling device provided bythe present invention. has a delayed-action protective device than can open the circuit to the motor of the currency-identifying unit if one of the bill-actuated switches of that unit sticks or is held closed by a jammed bill. In addition, that protective devicel will block the insertion of further coins, will block the initiation of further cycles f operation of the currency-identifying unit, and will cause'anempty lamp to become illuminated. In this way, that protective device gives full protection to the money-handling device and to the patrons thereof.

Other and further objects and advantages of'gthe present l invention should become apparent rfrom, an examination of the drawing and accompanying description.

In theI drawing and accompanyingdescription, a preferred embodiment of the present invention isshown and described but vit is to be understood the drawing and acr 4 j f base 30 adjacent the fr-ont edge of that base. A plate 34 of 'U-shaped configuration is disposed above the plate 32, and that plate lies in the same plane as the lower plate 32. The closed end of the U-shaped plate 34 rests on the top of the plate 32, and the arms of that plate project upwardly from the plate 32. A front plate 36'overlies the front face of the plate 34, and also projects downwardly beyond the bottom of that plate to overlie thefront portion of the upper part of the plate 32. A horizontally-directed opening 38` is formed in the plate 36, and that opening is wide enough to accommodate a dollarbill when that bill is inserted lengthwise through that opening. Fasteners 40, shown in the form of machine screws, pass through openings adjacent the bottom ofthe front plate 36 and seat in threaded openingsadjacent the upper end` of the plate 32. Other fasteners 40, shown in the form of machine screws, pass through openings adjacent the top of the front plate 36 and seat in threaded openings adjacent the upper ends of the arms of the plate 34.

The numeral 42'denotes the rear plate for theembodiment of currency identification device shown by the drawing, and that. platel has a horizontally-directed flange which acts as la foot. As lindicated by the drawing, the

companying description are for the purpose of illustration y only and do not limit the inventionand that thev invention will be defined by the appended claims. Y

Y In `the drawing, FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of a portion of the circuit of the money-handling Adevice provided by the present'invention,

FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of a further' portion of the ci-rcuit of the money-handling device provided by the present invention,

FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of a still further portion of the m-oney-handling device provided by the present invention, v Y

FIG. 4 is a schematic'diagram of the rest of the circuit of the money-handling device providedA by the present invention,

lated,

FIG. 6 is device provided by the present invention, f

FIG. 7 is a schematic view ofthe bill-transporting de, vice of FIG. 6, and its shows the locations of several ofv tural in nature, -of the portion of the money-handling de- Y Vice which pays out bills.

Referring to the drawing in detail, the numeral'30 de-A notes a base forone embodiment of currencyidentifcation device that is made in accordance with the principles and teachings of the present invention. That base vis generally rectangular in plan, it has stiffening flanges thatv extend downwardly from the sides'thereof, and it has stif-l fening flanges that extend downwardly Vfrom the ends thereof. That base. has a large opening 31 therein, and

that opening begins at a point about one third of the way toward the rear of that base, and that opening extends alf.

most all the way to the rear of that base.

' The numeral 32 denotesV a vertically-directed plate FIG. 5 is a view showing how FIGS. 1-4"areiinterre5 a perspective view of one form of bill-transf, porting device which can be used in the money-handling- The rear plate 42jis parallel tothe plate 32, and it is in register with that plate.

. The base 3i), the front plate 32 and the rear plate 42 are parts of a bill-transporting device which Vcan receive an -inserted bill, which can test that bill, and which can then Y for Currency Detectors which was filed on December 1,

1960, and that bill-transporting device is shown and described in complete detail in said application.

VThe currency identification device shown by the drawing has a horizontally-directed platen which is disposed above and which is parallel to the base 30. That platen has a downwardly-extending wall portion, not shown, at the front thereof; and that wall portion has a vertical flange, not shown, at one side thereof, has a centra1lylocated rectangular opening, not shown, extending upflange 6,2 at the other side thereof.

Y edge 80.

wardly from the lower edge thereof, and has a vertical The two vertical flanges act to stiften that downwardly-extending wall p0rtion. That platen has a flange 64 which extends downwardly from one of the elongated sides thereof, and that flange is contiguous with the vertical flange 62 and extends almost all the way to the rear edge of that platen. An elongatedv opening, not shown, is formed in the platen, and that opening is parallelto but spaced inwardlyvfrom the flanger64. Af short, but wide, rectangular opening, not shown, isvprovided in the` platen near the front of that platen. kA second velongated opening,not shown, is pro vided in the platen, and that opening is vparallel to, and has the same length as, the first elongated opening. Aflange that is similar to the flange 64 is formed at the other elongated side of the platen; and theflange 64 and its ,counte1- part'reinforce and stiffen the platen. Rectangular openings, not shown, are formedin the platen, adjacent the rear of that platen; and those openings are intermediate the elongated openings and the elongated sides of that platen. The platen terminates in a downwardly-inclinedl trailing Notches, not shown, extend inwardly through ythat trailing edge; and those notchesare generally in reg- .ister with the elongated Vopenings in that platen.

A short slot is provided in the platen, and that slot is disposed between the elongated openings. The platen will preferably be punched or pressed to provide a conical rewhich has a horizontally-directed flange at the bottom thereof; and that flange servesgas afoot. As indicated by the drawing, `.the foot of the plate 32 is secured to the lief at each end of that slot. Y

A vertical plate 46, which has a foot-like flange, is secured to the lower face of the platen by that flange. Spot welds can be used to secure that foot-like Vflange to the I lower face of that platen. In` addition, a second and similar vertical plate, notr shown, will be secured to the lower face of the platen. The vertical plate 46 and its counterpart are parallel to each other, and they abut the adjacent edges of the elongated openings in the platen.

Short vertical plates, not shown, are secured to the lower face of the platen; and one of those plates is alined with the plate 46 and extends between the rear edge of that plate and the rear edge of the platen. The other of those plates is alined with the counterpart of the plate ld and extends between the rear edge of that counterpart plate and the rear edge of the platen.

A securing flange is provided at the front of the plate 46, and a similar flange is provided at the front of the counterpart of the plate 4d. Those securing flanges are 'suitably secured to the rear face of the vertical wall portion of the platen; and that wall portion is fixedly secured tov front plate 3o and to the U-shaped plate 34 by fasteners. The short vertical plates on the lower face of the platen are secured to a U-shaped bracket, not shown, on the rear plate 42; and hence that platen is rigidly secured to both the rear plate 4t2 and the front plate 32.

The numeral 9d generally denotes a horizontal platen that is substantially identical to the first platen. The platen 94 has a wall portion 96 at the front thereof; but instead of extending downwardly from the plane of that platen, that Wall portion extends upwardly from that plane. The wall portion 96 has a vertical flange 98 at one side thereof, has a centrally-located rectangular opening 101) extending downwardly from the upper edge thereof, and has a vertical flange 102 at the other side thereof. The flanges 98 and 102 act to stillen the wall portion 95 of platen 94. The platen 94 has a flange, not shown, which extends upwardly from one of the elongated sides thereof; and that flange is contiguous with the vertical flange 98. An elongated opening 1116, not shown, is formed in the platen 94; and that opening is parallel to, but is spaced inwardly from, the other elongated side of that platen. A short, but wide, rectangular opening, not shown, is provided in the platen 94 near the front of that platen; and that opening is in register with the short, but wide, rectangular opening in the first platen. A second elongated opening, not shown, is formed in the platen 94, and that opening is parallel to the said one elongated side of the platen 94. A flange 114 is formed at the said other elongated side of the platen 94, and that flange is contiguous with the vertical flange 102 on the wall portion 96, and it extends almost all the way to the rear edge of the platen 94. The flange 114 and its counterpart reinforce and stiffen the platen 94. An opening 116 is provided in the platen 94 adjacent the rear of that platen; and a similar opening, not

shown, also is provided in the platen 94 adjacent the rear of that platen. The platen 94 is provided with an upwardly-inclined trailing edge 12S; and a notch 122 and a second notch, not shown, extend inwardly through that trailing edge and into the horizontally-directed portion of the platen 94.

A short slot, not shown, is provided in the platen 94, and that slot is disposed between the opening 106 and its counterpart. The platen 94 will preferably be punched or pressed to provide a conical relief at each end of the short slot therein.

The numeral 126 denotes a vertical plate which has a foot-like flange, and that flange is secured to the upper face of the platen 94. That plate has a securing flange, not shown, that is suitably secured to the inner face of the portion 96. The numeral 13) denotes a second vertical plate which has a foot-like flange; and that flange also is secured to the upper face of the platen 94. That plate has a securing flange, not shown, that is suitably secured to the inner face of the portion 96. The vertical plates 126 and 130 are disposed in parallel to each other, and they abut the adjacent edges of the elongated opening 1136 and its counterpart.

A short vertical plate 128 has a foot formed on it; and lthat foot is secured to the platen 94 by a fastener, such as a machine screw. The plate 12S is alined with the vertical plate 126; but it is spaced a short distance rearwardly of the trailing edge of that plate. The plate 123 extends to the rear edge of the platen 94. A short vertical plate 132 has a foot formed on it; and that foot is secured to the platen 94 by a fastener, such as a machine screw. The plate 132 is alined with the vertical plate 13G; but it is spaced a short distance rearwardly of the trailing edge of' that plate. The plate 132 extends to the rear edge of the platen 9&1. The space defined by the confronting edges of the plates 126 and 128 is in register with the space defined by the confronting edges of the plates 130 and 132.

The securing flanges at the leading edges lof the vertical plates 126 and 13d are suitably secured to the rear face of the vertical wall portion 96 of the platen 94. That vertical wall portion is suitably secured to the front plate 36 and to the arms of the U-shaped plate 34 by suitable fasteners; and hence the platen 94 and the vertical plates 126 and 13% thereon are fixedly secured to the front plate 35. Fasteners 13:3 secure the short vertical plates 128 and 132 to a U-shaped bracket 134 that is `spot welded to the front face of the rear plate 42. In this way the platen 94 and the short vertical plates 128 and 132 thereon are flxedly secured to the rear plate 42.

The rear plate 42 has a generally H-shaped opening 136 therein. However, the cross bar of that opening extends outwardly beyond the vertical portions `of that opening. That cross bar is dimensioned to accommodate an inserted bill when that bill is moved through that cross bar in a direction which is parallel to the elongated axis of that bill. T he cross bar of the H-shaped opening 136 in the rear plate 42 is in direct alinement with the opening 3e in the front plate 36; and that cross bar and the opening 38 are in register with the space intermediate the upper surface of the lower platen and the lower surface of the platen 94.

A guide plate 141) is mounted intermediate the upper platen 94 and the lower platen, and that plate is narrower than that portion of the platen 94 which is intermediate the opening 1% and the flange 114. That guide plate has its inner edge spaced outwardly from the outer edge of the opening 196; and that inner edge will coact with the upper and lower platens to define an elongated recess which can accommodate one edge of an inserted bill. A similar guide plate is disposed intermediate the upper and lower platens adjacent the other elongated opening in the platen 901; and the inner edge of that guide plate will coact with the upper and lower platens to define an elongated recess which can accommodate the other edge of the inserted bill.

The numeral 143 denotes a I-shaped bracket which has a truste-triangular closed end; and the short arm of that bracket is at the widest portion of that closed end. Three similar J-shaped brackets are provided; and two of those brackets are shown and are denoted by the numerals and 152. The l' -shaped bracket 14S has its short arm secured to the plates 126 and 123 and the J-shaped bracket 151B has its short arm secured to the plates 130 and 132. The l-shaped plate 152 has its short arm secured to the plate 46 and the short plate, not shown, in register With that plate; and the fourth J-shaped plate has its short arm secured to plates that are secured to the lower platen and that are in vertical registry with the plates 130 and 132.

The long arms of the .'-shaped brackets 148 and 150 extend toward but terminate short of the platen 94, and the long arms of the J-shaped bracket 152 and of the fourth J-shaped bracket extend toward but terminate short of the lower platen. Suitable bushings are held by those long arms; and the bushings in the long arms of the J- shaped brackets 148 and 151') rotatably support a shaft162. Timing belt pulleys 164 are fixedly secured to that shaft, and those pulleys will be in register with the elongated opening 106 and with the other elongated opening in the platen 94. A spur gear 166 is fixedly secured to one end of the shaft 162; and a ratchet-faced clutch member 168 is secured to the shaft 162 intermediate the other end of v 7 that shaft and the bushing whichsupp'orts the other end of that shaft. A ratchet-faced clutch member, not shown, rotates freely on the shaft 162, and the ratchet-face of that clutch member confronts and can engage the ratchet face of the clutch member 168. A large diameter pulley 172 is mounted on and supported by the shaft 162, adjacent the said other end of that shaft; but that pulley` is free to rotaterelative to that shaft. A knurled hand wheel 174 is tix-edly secured to the said other end of the shaft 162, and that hand Wheel can be used to effect rotation of the shaft 162 whenever desired. A helical spring, not shown, i-s telescoped over the'said other'end of the shaft 162, and one endof that springis seated in a socket in the clutch member, not shown, while the other end of that spring is seated in a socket in the large diameter pulley 172. That spring is wound in such a way that it will tend to wind tightly if the large diameter pulley 172 is held stationary while the shaft 162 rotates in the clockwise direction in FIG.J6. .f

The, numeral 178 denotes a shaft which is held by the bushings that are `held by the long arms 'of J-shaped bracket 152 and of the fourth J-shaped bracket. 'That shaft is located below` the level of, and in .vertical registry with, the shaft162; and that shaft extends through the openings in-a gear housing, not shown. rThe shaft 178 has timing belt pulleys 180v xedly secured thereto, and those pulleys are in regi-ster with'the elongated openings in the .lower platen. A spur gear 182 is mountedl on one end of the shaft 17 8, and that gearl meshes with the spur gear 166 on the one end of the shaft 162.V A worm Wheel, not shown, is mounted on the shaft 178, and thaty Wheel is disposed Within the gear housing; and that worm wheel meshes with Vand is driven by a worm gear which is mounted on the shaft of a motor 188. That motor shaft is vertically directed, and it extends upwardly through an opening in the bottom of the gear housing'. The motor,V

188 is suitably secured to and depends downwardly from the gear housing. That motor is long enough to extend down into the large opening 31 in the, base 30, but it is Ishort enough so it does not extend down below the level of the lower edges of the flanges on that'base.

The motor 188 is a reversible motor; and a capacitor 190 is connected in series with the .phase winding of motor 188, and that capacitor is mounte-d on 'a bracket adjacent the motor .188. That bracket is secured to, and dei pends downward-ly from, the 'vertical plate 46 and its counterpart.

to which the various electrical componen-ts of the billtransporting device of FIG. 6 can `be connect-ed.

A bracket, not-shown, is secured to the plate 46 and Vits counterpart adjacent the front plate 32; and that bracket carries bushings which Vaccommodate .a horizontallydirected pivot 192,. That pivot has timing belt ypulleys 194 rotatably mounted thereon, a-nd those pulleys are in That bracket has an opening in the bottomV thereof which can accommodate a multi-prong connector Si also be'rotated in the clockwise direction to lower the pivot 202.

Timing belt pulleys 204 are rotatably mount-ed on the outer ends ofthe pivot 202; and those pull-cys will move up and dow-u as the bracket 206 coacts with the ,U-sh-aped Ibracket for the .piVot20-2 to raise and lower that pivot. The pulleys 204 are mounted in register with theopening 106 and its counterpart in the platen 94. The U-shaped bracket206 has an upwardly-extending arm 207, as shown by FIG. 7.

The numeral210 denotes a mounting bracket that is secured to, but is laterally spacedf-rom, the vertical plate 126; and that mounting plate projects upward-ly labove the topof the plate' .126. A horizontally-directed pivot 212 is supported by the mounting bracket 210; and a llever 224 is rotatably mounted on that pivot. A connecting rod Y 214 extends between the upwardly-extending arm 207 of v the bracket 206 and the lower end ofthe lever 224; and

pin joints:.216 and'21-8 connect that rod'with that upwardly-projecting yarrn and with that lever, respectively. Thev connecting rod 214 extends to the .left'beyond the lower end of the lever 224,; andy the left-hand end of that l rod has an opening in which one end vof a helical extenregister with the elongated openings in the lower platen.r.

A U-shaped bracket, notshow-n, is rotatably secu-red to the plates 126aud 130 adjacent the forward ends of those plates; and that bracket carries bushings which support an f elongated pivot 202. The ends of thatv pivot extend through openings in the vertical plates .126 and 130;'-and those openings are considerably lar-gerthan the diameter of the pivot 202. As a result, the U-shap-ed bracket which supports that pivot can rotate arlimited number of degrees with-out having the pivotv 202 engage the openings in the plates 126 and 130;

The bushings which are carried by the U-shaped bracket for the pivot 202 also supporta U-shaped bracket 206. The latter bracket is narrower than the U-shaped bracket for the pivot 202,; and hence the bracket 206 can be disposed between the arms of that bracket. The bracket 206 can rotate about the pivot 202, and .thus relative .to the bracket forythat pivot; and the bracket 206 can be rotated in the counter clockwise direction to raise thepivot 202 Vand that slot Iaccommod-atesa pin which is carried lby the plunger Y228 of a solenoid 2'30. That solenoid is suitably securedto and supported by the mounting bracket 210; and that solenoid can .be energized to retract theplunger 228 and thereby rotate the lever 224 in the counter clockwise direction in FIG. 6. A switch 232 is suitably secured to the mounting'bracket 210; and the actuator 234 :of that switch extends into a hole in the connecting Irod 21.4. The spring 222"norma1ly.holds the connecting rod 214, the lever 224, and the plunger 228 in the positions shown by-FIG. 6; and, in doing so, that spring normally holds the bracket 206 in the raised position shown by FIG. 7L This means that under normal conditions the spring causes the bracket 206 to hold the pivot 202 andthe U- shaped bracket therefor in their raised positions. The

Y force of the spring 222 will be overcome by the solenoid 230 whenever the latter is energized; and hence that solenoid'can cause the -b-racket206 to rotate to its lower position; and as that bracket so rotates it will permit the pivot 202 .to move down toits lower position. The energization yof the solenoid 230 will also cause the connecting rod 214 to `move Ithe actuator 234 far; enough to close the contactsof the normally-open switch 232.

The numeral 236 denotes a bracket which is secured to, and which spa-ns the space between, the vertical plates 126 and 130. That lbracket has downwardly depending legs with `slots which .accommodate projections on la mounting f-or a magnetic head 244;and those slots and projections lguidethe vertical movement of that mounting. A helical 'y compression spring, not shown, biases that mounting, and

t-hus the magnetic head 244, downwardly rela-tive to the bracket 236; and hence thatspring biases that head downwardjly relative. .to the platen 94. However, the spring 246 can yield to permit upward movement of that mounting and of the magnetic head 244./ vAn adjusting screw 248 has the shank thereof passing through a threaded opening in the bracket 236, through the compressi-on spring, and through an opening in the mounting. Ver-tical movement `of the adjusting vscrew 248 iix-es t-he normal position of the magnetic` head 244 relative to the platen 94.

The numeral V252 denotes a socket which can receive a connector that will serve to connect the magnetic head 244 into'a suitable circuit. That socket is mounted on the bracket 236, and it is connected to the magnetic head 244 by two short wires. Those wires are readily flexible so they can permit movement of the magnetic head 244 relative tothe platen 94.4

The numeral 260 generally denotes) a bracket that is L- shaped in configuration; and that bracket has a long horizontally-dir-ected arm and has a short vertically-directed :arm and both of those arms have openings therein. The horizontally-directed arm `also has leading `and trailing edges .264 that incline upwardly from the plane of that f arm. .A hardened face plate, not shown, is suitably sey.cured to the horizontally-directed arm of .the bracket 260;

and that hardened face plate is strongly resist-ant to wear. That face plate underlies part of that horizontally-directed arm land also underlies the upwardly inclined leading and trailing edges 264. That face plate also has a downwardly depending lip, not shown, and that lip will confront the innermost edge of one of the timing belts used in the billtransporting device s-hown in the drawing.

A number of L-shaped brackets 260 are provided; and the long arms of those brackets are secured to the platen 94 and to the lower platen, and the short arms of those brackets are secured to the vertical plates 126, 139 and 46 and to the counterpart of the plate 46. The brackets 260 which are secured to the platen 94 are paired and the brackets of each pair are set opposite each other; and the brackets 26d which are secured to the lower platen are paired and the brackets of each pair are set opposite each other. However, the pairs of brackets 260 which are secured to the platen 94 are displaced from the pairs of brackets 266 which are secured to the lower platen.

The numeral 27@ denotes timing belts which extend around and are supported by the timing belt pulleys 234 and 164. The numeral 272 denotes timing belts which extend around and are supported by the timing belt pulleys 194 and 18th. The timing belts 270 are mounted so the ribs thereon engage and pass under the hardened face plates of the brackets 260 which are supported by the platen 94. The timing belts 272 are mounted so the ribs thereon engage and pass over the hardened face plates of the brackets 260 which are supported by the lower platen. The hardened face plates of the brackets 26d carried by the lower platen dene a horizontally-directed plane, and the hardened face plates of the brackets 260 carried by the platen 94 define a second horizontally-defined plane; and the vertical distance between those two planes is less than twice the thickness of any of the timing belts 271i and 272. As a result, the timing belts 27@ and 272 must bow downwardly to pass under the hardened face plates of the brackets 260 secured to the platen 94 and must bow upwardly to pass over the hardened face plates of the brackets 260 secured to the lower platen. The downward and upward bowing of the timing belts will alternate and will force those belts to undulate as they move relative to the platen 94 and the lower platen. This undulation is very desirable because it recurrently `forces the confronting faces of the timing belts 27)l and 272 into intimate engagement with a bill interposed between those faces. If

esired, rollers could be used instead of the brackets 26d. However, while rollers would reduce the frctional forces applied to the timing belts 27 t) and 272, those forces have not been found to be particularly objectionable.

The timing belts 270 and 272 will be driven by the timingr belt pulleys 164 and 180 mounted on the shafts 162 and 178, respectively. The shaft 178 will be directly driven by the motor 188, and the spur gears 182 and 166 will enable that shaft to drive the shaft 162. The gears 182 and 166 are important in keeping the belts 27d and 272 moving in synchrony with each other.

The numeral 274 denotes a switch that has an arcuate actuator 276. That switch is secured to the lower platen adjacent the front of that platen, and the actuator of that switch extends upwardly into the openings, for the belts 270 and 272, which are adjacent the plate 130 and the plate below that plate. In doing so, that actuator extends into the path of movement of any bill which is inserted within the bill-transporting device shown in the drawing. The actuator 276 extends toward the front wall portions of the platen 94 and the lower platen, and, consequently, that actuator will be engaged and moved by an inserted bill almost as soon as the leading edge of that bill passes inwardly beyond those wall portions.

The numeral 278 denotes a switch that has an arcuate actuator 289. That switch is secured to the platen 94 adjacent the front of that platen; and the actuator of that switch extends downwardly into the opening 106 and its counterpart in the lower platen. In doing so, that actuator extends into the path of any bill that is inserted within the bill-transporting device shown by the drawing. The actuator 286 also extends toward the front wall portions of the platen 94 and the lower platen, and, consequently, will be engaged by an inserted -bill almost as soon as the leading edge of that bill passes inwardly beyond those wall portions. The actuator 276 of the switch 274 and the actuator 2S@ of switch 278 will be engaged by an inserted bill at about the same time where that inserted bill is intact and the corners thereof are not folded. However, if a corner of the inserted bill has been torn off or has been folded, one of those actuators will be engaged and moved before the other actuator is engaged and moved. To make certain that the presence of an inserted bill is sensed promptly, the switches 274 and 278 are connected in parallel, as shown by FIG. 3. This means that a closed circuit will be established almost as soon as the inserted bill passes inwardly beyond the front wall portions of the platen 94 and the lower platen; and that closed circuit will be established by one or the other or both of switches 274 and 278.

The numeral 282 denotes a switch that has an arcuate actua-tor 284. That -switch is secured to the lower platen about one quarter of the distance toward the rear of that platen, and the actuator 284 extends upwardly into the opening 1816 and its counterpart in the lower platen. The actuator 284 extends rearwardly; and that actuator is thus, in part at least, disposed rearwardly of the actuator 288.

'Ihe numer-al 236 denotes a switch that has an arcuate actuator 28d. That switch is secured to the lower platen at a point about one half of the distance toward the rear of that platen, and the actuator 288 extends upwardly into the openings, for the belts 270 and 272, which are adjacent the plate and the plate below that plate. The actuator 288 extends forwardly toward the fron-t plate 36; and an inserted bill will engage that actuator while that bill is still engaging and holding the actuators 276 and 230 of the switches 274 and 278.

The numeral 290 denotes a switch that has an arcuate actuator 292. That switch is secured to the lower platen at a point which is just a little closer to the front of that platen than is the point at which the switch 236 is secured to that platen. The actuator 292 extends upwardly into the opening 106 and the counterpart of that opening in the lower platen, and it extends rearwardly from that switch. That actuator is immediately adjacent the belts 270 and 272 which are disposed within the opening 106 and the counterpart of that opening in the lower platen, and those belts will give full and complete support to the leading edge of any inserted bill.

The numeral 294 denotes a switch that has an arcuate actuator 296. That switch is secured to the lower platen adjacent the rear of that platen, and the actuator of that switch extends ino the opening 166 and the counterpart of that opening in the lower platen. The actuator 296 extends rearwardly, and it extend-s between the shafts 162 and 17S. That actuator is immediately adjacent the belts 270 and 272 which are disposed within the opening 106 and the counterpart of that opening in the lower platen; and those belts will give full and complete support to the leading edge of any inserted bill.

The numeral 298 denotes :a switch that has an arcuate actuator 31M). That switch is secured to the platen 94 adjacent the rear of that platen, and the actuator of that switch extends into the openings, for the belts 270 and 272, which are adjacent the plate 130 and .the plate below that plate. The actuator 300 extends rearwardly toward 11 the rear `of the .platen`94, and it extends between the Yshafts 162 `and 178.

The actuators 296 and 300 are opposite each other,"and they will be 'engaged by the leading edge of an inserted billat aboutthe same time. fFurther, those actuators extend a-s close to the rear edges of the lower platen 'and of the plate 94 as is practicable; and hence an inserted bill willl hold those actuators in moved position until that bill has passed almost Vall the way through the opening 136 in the rear plate 42.

Stops 302 are provided for some of the switch actuators, and those stops will be secured to the vertical plate 46 and its counterpart and -to the plates 126 and 130 by machine screws or other suitable fasteners. Thosek stops will limit the extent to which those actuators project through the openings for the-belts 270 and2'i'2. Those stops arev adjustable to facilitate the making of adjustments in the normal positions of the switch actuators.

A shaft 308 is rotatably supported -abovethe platen 94 and adjacentjthe rear plate 42.` That shaft has soft-faced rollers 314 fix'edly secured to it, andthose rollers rotate withthat shaft. The soft-faced rollers are' immediately adjacent the outer faces ofthevertical plates 126 and 130; and parts of those rollers extend into the opening 136. A'small diameter pulley 316 is ixedly' secured Vto .and rotatable with the shaft 308, and that pulley is in alinement with the large diameter pulley 1-72 that is loosely mounted on and carried by the shaft 162. 'An endless belt 318 extends around and is supported by the large diameter pulley 172 and by the small diameter pulley 316. Y

The short plates, that are secured to the lower platen. Y

and that are disposed below and in register with the short plates 1.28 and 132, rotatably support a shaft which is below and 4in vertical registry with the shaft 308. That lower shaft is shorter than the shaft 308, but it has softfaced rollers mounted Lon, and ixedly secured to, it; and those rollers .engage and are drivenrby the soft-faced rollers 314 which rotate wi-th the shaft 308. The diameters of the various soft-faced rollers are so large thatthe confronting faces of those rollers always abut and slightly deform each other.

A U-shaped bracket, not shown, is disposed between and is `secured tothe plate 46 and i-ts counterpart on the lower platen; and that bracket is disposed4 adjacent the front ends of those plates. ,A pivot is supported by that bracket, and -a carrier 323 is rotatably mounted on that` pivot. That carrier is generallyA U-shaped; yand -thatcarrier rotatably holds a soft-,faced roller in register with the lower face of the magnetic head 244.

A pin joint 328 is provided at the bottom of the carrier 323, and that pin joint is connected to one vend of a connecting rod 334. The other end of that connecting rod is secured to the plunger 332 of a solenoid 330. That solenoid is xedly secured to a small plate 331 which, in turn, -is iixedly secured to the plate on'the lower Platen that is the counterpart ofthe plate 46. j

The numeral 336 denotes a horizontal platform which projects outwardly fro-m the front face 36 of the currency` identification device,.and that platform serves to support a bill which is -to be tested by that device. 338 of attractive appearance surrounds and 'helps .-support the platform 336; and the upper edges of that bracket project upwardly beyond the upper face of that platform. Those edges help a patron aline a bill with the-opening 38vin the front plate 36, and they also make certain that the patron will move the leading edge of that bill far enough through that opening to be intermediate the leading edges of the belts 270 and 27,2.

The numeral 370 denotes a gate which is generally flat but which has a horizontally-directed ear l372 adjacent the top thereof. That gate is thinner than the U-shaped plate 34, and that gate is narrower than the horizontal distance between the upstanding arms of that plate. As a result, that gate'can fitV within the space dened by the A bracketY arms land the `closed `end of the vU-shaped plate 34. The wall portion 96 .of the .platen 94 overlies partA of the rear face of'that gate but does not obstruct movement of'that gate; and the frontplate 36foverlie's substantially all of the front face of that gate ,but does not obstruct movement ofthat gate. As a result, the gate 370 is held in a vertical position by,.but'is free to move vertically relative to, thefront plate 36 and the wallV portion 96 of the platen 94.

' The gate 370 has anopeningf374 therein, and that opening is made wide enough to accommodate a bill when that bill has its long axis perpendicular tothe plane of that gate. That opening will normally be set in register with the opening 38 in the front plate 36; but that opening can be moved downwardly out of register with the opening 38. A switch 362 is mounted on the platen 94 ad.

jacent the front ofv that platen, and the actuator 364 of that switch extends to, and is hooked through, an openingr in the ear 372 on the gate 370. Whenever lthe gate 370 is in the raised position shown by FIG. 7, the movable contact of thatswitch will engage` the fixed contact of that switch, as shown by FIG. 4; but whenever that gate is in its lowered position that movable contact will bey Vspaced away from tha-t xed contact.

kA solenoid 344 is supported on and carried by the mounting bracket 210; and that solenoid is at one face of that bracket while .the switch 232 is at the other face of that bracket. The vplunger 346 of the solenoid 344 is disposed adjacent the upper end of a rocker -arm 350 which is rotatably supported by a pivot 348 that is carried by theY mounting bracket 210. The upper end of that rockerV arm is rotatably secured to the plunger 346 by a pin joint 349; and the lower end of that r-ocker arm is secured t-o one end of a connecting rod 352 by a pin joint, not shown.

The other end of that connecting rodis connected to Y an ear on a bracket 354 by means of a pin joint 355.

That bracketv is rotatably mounted on a pivot held by the vertical plates 126 and 130; and that bracket has an extension 353 which underlies the ear 372 on the gate 370.

; A helical extension. spring, not shown, urges the rocker arm 350 for rotation in the clockwise direction and also urges the connecting rod 352 for movement to the right in FIG. 7. Such movement of that connecting rod will rotate the U-shaped bracketl 354 to the raised position shown by IFIG; .7; but that spring can yield to permit that bracket to move to a lowered position. When the bracket 354 is inits raised position it will hold vthe ear 372 of thergate 370 up against [the adjust-able stop 360, yshown in the'form of. a'machine screw. Thatstop is suitably held by a bracket 361 which is secured to and supported by the vertical plate 130. When the bracket V354 =is in its'lowered position, the gate 370.will be freeto move downwardly and sense for thetpresence `or absence of a thread, tape or other meinberattached to the inserted bill.

Referring particularly to FIGS. 1-4, the numeral 1586 denotes a unit whichincludes the similarly-numbered unit, incop-endingSmith et al. application Serial No. 849,066 for Currency Detectors which was filed on October 27, 1959, now'abandoned, plus Ythe triodes, resistors, capacil tors, inductors, and thyratrons which are shown connected to the output of that unit. Poweris supplied to the unit 1586 by a conductor 452 which is connected to the prong 412 of a male plug 410V and by a conductor 490 which is connected to the prongl 414 of thatl plug. The magnetic head 244 of thebill-transporting'device has the coils there of connected to the input ofthe unit 1586.

' 'A coil 428 of a relay is connected intermediate one of the output terminals of the unit 1586 and the conductor 490; Contacts 438, 439 and 440,A which are shown in FIG; 4, are mounted adjacent the coil 428; and the contacts 438 and 440'will preferably be stationary contacts while the kcontact 439 will preferably be a contactthat is selectively movable into engagement with the stationary contact 438 or thestationary contact ,440. As indicated by FIG. 4, the contacts 438 and 439 are normally in engagement and the contacts 439 and 440 are normally spaced apart. The numeral 446 denotes the coil of a relay that has normally-open contacts 442 and 444; and that coil and those contacts are shown in FIG. 4. The numeral 462 denotes the coil of a relay that has contacts 454, 456, 458and 460; and that coil and those contacts are shown in FIG. 4. The contacts 454 and 45S will preferably be stationary contacts while the contact 456 Will preferably be a contact that is selectively movable into engagement with the stationary contact 454 or the stationary contact 458. The contacts 460 are normally open. The numeral 476 denotes the coil of a relay that has normally-open contactsy 470, 472 and 474; and the contacts 470 and 472 are shown in FIG. 1, while the contacts 474 and the coil 476 are shown in FIG. 4. Those four relays are part of a relay chain which is similar to the relay chain, in the said copending Smith et al. application, that has similarlynumbered coils and contacts.

The numeral 520 denotes the coil of a relay that has contacts 522, 524 and 526. That coil is shown in FIG. 1, the normally-closed contacts 522 are shown in FIG. 3, the normally-closed contacts 524 are shown in FIG. 2, and the normally-open contacts 526 are shown in FIG. 4. The numeral 52S denotes the coil of a relay that has contacts 530, 532, 534 and 535. The coil 528 is shown in FIG. 2 andthe contacts 530, 532, 534 and 535 are shown inkFIG. 3. The contacts 530 and 534 will preferably be stationary contacts while the contact 532 will preferably be a contact that is selectively movable into engagement with the stationary contact 530 or the stationary Contact 534. The contacts 535 normally open.

One terminal of the coil 52S is connected to the conductor 490 and the other terminal of that coil is connected to one of the fixed contacts of a pushbutton 340 -by a resistor '53S and a rectifier '540. A capacitor 536 is connected in parallel with the serially-connected resistor 538 and coil 528 by junctions 541 and 542, as shown by FIG.y 2. The other stationary contact of the pushbutton 340 is connected to the upper stationary contact of the switch 290 by a conductor 436.

The numeral 544 denotes the coil of a relay; and the numerals 550, 552, 554, 556, 558, 560, 562, 564 and 566 denote the contacts of that relay. The coil 544 and the contacts 550, 552, 554, 556, 558, 560, 562 and 564 are shown in FIG. 3, and the contacts 564 and 566 are shown in FIG. 4. The contacts 550 and 554 will preferably be stationary contacts while the contact 552 will preferably be a contact that is selectively movable into engagement with the stationary contact 550 or the stationary contact 554. The contacts 556 and 560 will preferably be stationary contacts while the contact 558 will preferably be a contact that is selectively movable into engagement with the stationary contact 556 or the stationary contact 560. The contacts 562 and 566 will preferably be stationary contacts while the contact 564 will preferably be a contact that is selectively movable into engagement with the stationary contact 562 or the stationary contact 566.

The numeral 57S denotes the coil of a relay that has normally-open contacts 584, 587 and 583. The coil 578 and the contacts 587 are shown in FIG. 4, and the contacts 584 and 588 are shown in FIG. 1.

The numeral 624 denotes the motor of a time delay relay which has a pair of normally-closed contacts 605, a pair of normally-closed contacts 606, and a pair of normally-open contacts 607. The motor 624 and the contacts 606 are shown in FIG. 3, and the contacts 605 and 607 are shown in FIG. 2. The motor 624 is a stall-type motor; and an actuator on the output shaft of that motor will respond to rotation of that output shaft to cause the contacts 605 and 606 to open and to cause the contacts 607 to close. As that actuator opens the contacts 605 and 606 and closes the contacts 607, the motor 624 will stall and will hold the contacts 605 and 606 open and will hold the contacts 607 closed until the circuit to that motor is interrupted. Once that circuit is interrupted the output shaft of that motor and the actuator mounted thereon will be restored to normal position by a returning spring; and thereupon the contacts 605 and 606 will re-close and the contacts 607 will re-open. In one preferred embodiment of the present invention, the motor 624 will run about thirty seconds before the actuator on the output shaft thereof opens the contacts 605 and 606 and closes the contacts 607. Such a length of time is many times longer than the normal time cycle of the bill-transporting device; and yet it is short enough to prevent undue running of the motor 188 of that bill-transporting device. One commercially-available time delay relay that can be used is made by the Struthers Dunn Company. v

Referring to FIG. 7, the numeral 420 denotes a feeler that has ears at the upper end thereof which confront the inner-faces of the vertical plates 126 and 130 of the billtransporting device. Suitable pivots 418 secure those ears to those vertical plates and maintain that feeler in assembled relation with those vertical plates while permitting ready oscillation of that feeler relative to those plates. The feeler 420 has a narrow, elongated, bill-receiving portion 422; and that bill-receiving portion normally extends downwardly through the short slot in the upper platen 94 and through the short slot in the lower platen. As a result, that bill-receiving portion is normally in the position shown by FIG. 7; and in that position that feeler will be engaged by any bill that is gripped and moved by the belts 270 and 272.

Whenever the feeler 420 is in the position shown by FIG. 7, it will permit the actuator of a switch 630, that is held by a bracket on the plate 130, to move to a position where the movable contact of that switch is in the raised position shown by FIG. 4. However, whenever a bill raises the feeler 420 far enough to enable that bill to pass under the bill-receiving portion 422 of that feeler, that feeler will cause the actuator of the switch 630 to move the movable contact thereof down into engagement with the lower fixed contact of that switch.

The bill-receiving portion 422 of the feeler 420 has a bend 424 adjacent the bottom thereof, and that bend forms a smoothly-rounded surface that will not snag a bill as that bill passes under the bill-receiving portion 422 of that feeler. In its normal position, the feeler 420 inclines dowardly from upper right to lower left, and hence it inclines in the direction in which a bill must move as that bill moves toward the rear plate 42. This is desirable because it facilitates the raising of that feeler by the leading edge of an inserted bill.

The feeler 420 will be held up in its raised position until after an inserted bill has moved completely beyond the bend 424 in the bill-receiving portion 422 of that feeler; and this means that the movable contact of the switch 630 will be held in engagement with the lower xed contact of that switch until after the inserted bill has moved completely beyond the bend 424. After the trailing edge of that bill has moved beyond the bend 424, the feeler 420 will fall back to its normal position and the movable contact of the switch 630 will yre-engage the upper xed contact of that switch. At such time, the billreceiving portion 422 of the feeler 420 will be inclined away from the direction in which a bill would have to move if a patron were to withdraw that bill from the billtransporting device. This means that if a patron attached a thread, tape or other member to a bill and tried to withdraw that bill after that bill had passed beyond the feeler 420, any `such attempted withdrawal would cause that bill to jam the feeler even more solidly into bill-obstructing position.

Referring to FIG. 1, the numeral 1428 denotes a relay coil which is connected between another output terminal of the unit 1586 and the conductor 490. That relay, of which that coil is a part, includes contacts 1438, 1439 `and 1440. Those contacts are shown in FIG. 3; and the contacts 1438 and 1440 will preferably be stationary contacts while the contact 1439 will preferably be-a=contact1 that is selectively movable into engagement with the stationary contact 1438 orthe stationary contact 1440.Y

The numeral 1446 denotes the coil of a relay which has normally-open contacts 1442 and 1444. That coil and those contacts are shown in FIG'. 3. The numeral 1462l Y.

The coil 1476 and the contacts 1474 are shown in FIG. V3,Y

while the contacts 1470 and 1472 are shown in FIG. l. The coil 1428 is similar to the coil 428, the coil 1446 is similar to the coil 446, the'coil 1462 is vsimilar to the coil 462, and the coil 1476 is similar. to the coil 476. However, the coils 1428, 1446, 21462 and'1476 are energized during the identification and acceptanceY of an. authentic ve dollar bill `whereas thecoils 428, 446, 462 and 476 are energized` during theY identification and ac ceptance of an authentic one dollar bill.

Referring to FIG. 1, the numeral 700 denotes a switchv which is mounted adjacent a passageway, notshown, in the money-handling device provided by thepresent invention. The'actuator of that switch extends into that passageway andwill be struck by any quarters which patrons introduce into the money-handling device. The'stationary contact of the switch 700 is connected to one terminalof the coil 702 of a relaywhich has contacts 704, 706 and 708. The Vcoil 702 and the normally-open contacts 704 yand 706 are `shown by FIG. 1,?while the normallyclosed contacts 708 are shown in FIG. 2.

.The numeral 710 denotes a switch' which is mounted adjacent Ia second passageway, not shown, in the moneyhandling device provdedby the present invention. VThe actuator of that switch extends into that passageway and will be struck lby any fty' centpieces which patrons -introduce into the'money-handling device. The stationary contact of the-switch 710 is connected toone terminal of the coil 712 of a rel-ay which has normally-open contacts 714, ,716 and 718. The coil 712 and the contacts 714 and 718 are shown in FIG. 1, while the contacts 716 are shown in FIG. 2.

The numeral 720 denotes the coil of a 'relay which has normally-open contacts 722, 724 and 726.V The coil 720 andthe contacts 722 .and 724, are shown in FIG. 1, while the contacts 726 are shown in FIG. 2.

The numeral 728 denotes theS coil of a relay which has normally-open contacts 730, 732 and 734. The coil 728 and the contacts 730 and 732 are shown in FIG. l, while the contacts 734 are shown in FIG. 2.

The numeral 738 denotes a motor which'ha's a shaft' 870 on whichv a number of cams anda crankl are mounted. That motor and two of those cams are shown cams are shown as rotating in the clockwise direction.

The crank 872 is shown as a Idisc, and is shown as rotating in the clockwise direction.

Y The numeral .750 denotes the coil of Aa counting mechanism; and that counting mechanism is intended to record each ,and every cycle of operation of the Vmoney-handling device. That counter can be of'standard and usual construction; and the coil 750 thereof is shown'in FIG. 2.2

Y The numeral 752 denotes an electromagnet which has an armature 754, all as shownr in FIG. 8. That armature is normally disposed in the path. of an ear 758 on a coin-ejecting slide 756 which is mounted adjacent, a coin .storage tube 762. nickels, to be p-aidout as change; and they slide 756 has an opening 757 therein which is normally held in register with the upper end ofgthetube 762. Anear 760 isprovided on the rright-hand end of the slide 756, and a spring 763 urges that earagainst the cam882.1 Whenever the electromagnet 752 is energized, the armature 754 will be Vraised up Yout of the path of theear 758; and at such time that armature will free the slide 756.` t

The numeral 764 denotesy an electromagnet which has an armature that is normally disposed in the path of an ear 765 on a'coin-ejecting-slide 766, all'as shown by FIG. 8. That slide is mounted adjacent a coinv storage tube 768, and lit Vhas Van ear 767 on the right-hand end thereof. That tube can hold va supply ofdimes, to be paid out as change; and the slide 766 has a coin-receiving opening therein which is normally held in register with the upper end of the tube 768.` A spring 763 urges the Y ear 767 against'they cam 884.

lpaid out as change; and the slide 774 has a coin-receiving opening therein which is normally heldin register with the upper end ofthe tube 778.= A spring763 urges the ear Y7.76 against the cam 886.v v Y The numeral 780 denotes anl electromagnet which has an armature that is normally disposed in the path of an ear 782 on a coin-ejecting slide 7 84, all as shown by FIG. 8. That slide is mounted adjacenta coin storage tube 788, and it has an ear 786 on the right-hand end thereof. That tube can hold a supply` of quarters to be paid yout as change; and the slide 784 has a coin-receiving opening therein which isnormally held in' register with the upper end of the tube 788.. A spring 763 urges the ear .786 against Vthe cam 888. f

The'numeral 790 denotes an electromagnet which yhas an armature that is normally disposed in the path of an .ear 792 on a coin-ejecting slide 794,\all as shown by FIG. 8. That slide is mounted adjacent a-.coin storage tube .798, and it has anV ear 796 on the right-hand end thereof. That tube can hold a supply of` quarters, lto be in FIG. 1, and those cams are denoted by the numerals 740 and 742. The other cams are shown in FIG. 8,Y and; they are denoted by the numerals 882, 884, 886, 888, 890 and 892.- T-he crank is shown in FIG. 9, and it isdenoted by the numeral 872.

The cam.740 is a single lobe cam, andthe cam 742 is Va single notch cam. A camoperated switch 744 and a paid out as change; and the slide 794 has a coin-receiving openingtherein which isnormally held in register with the upper end of the tube 798. A spring 763 urgesthe ear 796 against the-cam 890. n

. The rnumeral 800 denotes an electromagnet which has an armaturethat is normally disposed in the path of an ear 802 on'a coin-ejecting slide.804,all as shown by FIG. 8. That slide is mounted adjacente coin'storage tube V808, and it hasan ear806 onv the right-handend thereof. That tube can hold a.supply of' quarters,'to

e be paid out as change; and the, slide 804 has a coinreceiving opening therein which is normally held in'register with the -upper end vof the tube 808.vr A spring 763 urges" the ear 806 -'against 4the cam 892.

Each of the coin storage tubes 762, 768, 778, 788, 798 and 808 has a coin-supporting platform 810 therein;l and each of those platforms has an ear 812 that projects outwardly through a vertically-directed slot 811 yinr the That tube can hold a supplyof tube in which that platform is held. A helical compression spring 8f4 underlies the coin-supporting platform 818 in each tube, and thereby biases that platform upwardly. As a result, the various coin-supporting platforms 810 hold the coins in the various coin storage tubes adjacent the upper ends of those tubes and urge those coins for movement into the coin-receiving openings in the coin-ejecting slides 756, 766, 774, 784, 784 and 884.

The numeral 8l6 denotes a shaft which is rotatably mounted adjacent the various coin storage tubes 762, 768, '778, 788, 798 and 888; and that shaft has arms 8l8, 820, 822, 824, 826 and 828 fixedly mounted thereon and rotatable therewith. The arm 818 overlies and is in register with the ear 812 on the platform 818 within the tube 888; and the arms 828, 822, 824, 826 and 828 overlie and are in register with the ears 812 on the coin-supporting platforms, respectively, in the tubes 798, 788, 778, 768 and 762.

The arm 818 has a slot in the left-hand end thereof, and that slot accommodates the actuator 831 of a switch 830. The movable contact of that switch will engage the upper lixed contact of that switch, as shown by FIG. 2, whenever the ears 812 of all of the coin-supporting platforms 818 are below the level of the arms 818, 828, 822, 824, 826 and 838. Those ears will be below the level of those arms as long as an adequate supply of coins is in the coin storage tubes 888, 798, 788, 778, 768 and 762. However, if the supply of coins in any one of those coin storage tubes becomes depleted, the ear 812 on the coin-supporting platform 8MB for that tube will engage the arm which is adjacent that tube and will rotate that arm far enough in the counter clockwise direction to cause the movable Contact of the switch 838 to move down into engagement with the lower fixed contact of that switch. That movable contact will remain in engagement with that lower fixed Contact until suflicient coins have been introduced into the tubes 888, 798, 788, 778, 768 and 762 to cause all of the ears 812 on all of the coin-supporting platforms 818 to move downwardly out of engagement with the arms 818, 828, 822, 824, 825 and 828.

The numeral 832 denotes an electromagnet which has an armature 834, and that armature is normally disposed in the path of an ear 840 on a U-shaped member 835 which is shown in FIG. 9. That U-shaped member is mounted on a pivot 838, and it can oscillate relative to that pivot. A plate 842, which has a rearwardly-directed flange 844 at the bottom thereof, is suitably mounted within the U-shaped member 836; and that plate is spaced a short distance rearwardly of the closed front portion of that U-shaped member. A U-shaped closure 846 is provided for the rearmost portion of the bottom of the U- shaped member 836; and that closure is normally spaced rearwardly of the upper end of a vertically-directed currency storage tube 848. A closure 850, which has the configuration of an inverted U, has the arms thereof secured to the storage tube 848 by pivots 852. The end of that closure is normally spaced rearwardly from the upper end of the storage tube 848, but it can be moved into position to close that upper end.

A movable platform 854 is mounted within the currency storage tube 848, and that platform has an ear 856 which projects through a slot in the currency storage tube 848. A negator spring, not shown, will be suitably connected to the platform 854 to urge that platform upwardly relative to the storage tube 848. That storage tube can accommodate cylindrical, currency dispensing tubes `858; and the space defined by the front face of the U-shaped closure 846, by the rearwardly-extending flange 844 of the plate 842, and by the closed front portion of the U-shaped member 836 can accommodate one of those currency-dispensing tubes.

The coin storage tubes 888, 798, 788, 778, 768 and 762 and the currency storage tube 848 are of the type shown in Erickson et al. application Serial No. 35,504 for Coil separators which was filed June 13, 1960. Further, the coin-ejecting slides 884, 794, 784, 774, 776 and 754 and the electromagnets 800, 790, 788, 770, 764 and 752 are of the type shown in the said Erickson et al. application. Further, the electromagnet 832, the U-shaped member 836, the currency storage tube 848 are of the type shown in the said Erickson et al. application.

The numeral 850 denotes a shaft which is mounted adjacent the currency storage tube 848; and an arm 862 is lixedly mounted on that shaft. The right-hand end of that arm overlies, and is in vertical registry with, the ear 856 on the movable platform 854. A slot is provided in the left-hand end of the arm 862, and that slot accommodates the actuator 866 of a switch 864. The movable contact of that switch will engage the lower fixed contact of that switch, as shown by FIG. 3, whenever the ear 856 is below the level of the arm 862. That ear will be below the level of that arm as long as an adequate supply of currency dispensing tubes 858 is in the currency storage tube 848. However, if the supply of currency dispensing tubes 858 becomes depleted, the ear 856 on the movable platform will engage the arm 862 and will rotate that arm far enough in the counter clockwise direction to cause the movable contact to the switch 864 to move up into engagement with the upper fixed contact of that switch. That movable contact will remain in engagement with that upper fixed contact until the supply of currency dispensing tube 858 is replenished.

As indicated by FIG. 9, the crank 872 carries a pin 874 which rotatably supports the left-hand end of a slotted connecting rod 878. A pin 876 extends through the slot in that connecting rod and is secured to one Wall of the U-shaped member 836. In the normal position of the components of the money-handling device provided by the present invention, the right-hand end of the slot in the connecting rod 878 abuts the pin 876.

In the normal position of the components of the moneyhandling device provided by the present invention, the high dwells of thecams 882, 884, 886, 888, 890 and 892, respectively engage and hold the ears 760, 767, 776, 786, 796 and 806. However, after the shaft 870 has rotated approximately one hundred and eighty degrees in the clockwise direction in FIG. 8, the high dwells of those cams will release those ears. If, at that time, any of the armatures of the electromagnets 752, 764, 770, 788, 790 and 800 have been raised, by the energization of those electromagnets, the coin-ejecting slides adjacent those raised armatures will be free to move to coin-ejecting position.

Prior to the time the shaft 870 rotates the cams 882, 884, 886, 888, 890 and 892 to the position where they can free the ears 760, 767, 776, 786, '796 and 806, that shaft Will rotates the crank 872 far enough to move the slotted connecting rod 878 to its right-handmost position. Such movement of that connecting rod will, if the armature 834 of the electromagnet 832 has previously been moved out of the path of the ear 840, enable the spring 880 to rotate the U-shaped member 836 in the counter clockwise direction until the pin 876 is stopped and held by the right-hand end of the slot in the connecting rod 878. That rotation of the U-shaped member will cause the currency dispensing tube 858, held in the space defined by the U-shaped closure 836, by the liange 844 on the plate 842 and by the closed front end of the U-shaped member 836, to move into register with, and to fall downwardly into, a chute. Subsequently, the coins which are ejected by the coin-ejecting slides 756, 766, 774, 784, 794 and 804 will be moved into register with, and will fall downwardly into that chute. The currency dispensing tube 858 and the coins will pass to a cup-like receptacle which will hold that tube and those coins available for the patron. Whenever a currency dispensing tube 858 is ejected by the U-shaped member 836, a coin'will be ejected by each of the coin-ejecting slides 756, 766, 774, 784, 794 and 804. ThisV means that six Y the pivot 202 to its upper position.

coins and the currency dispensing tube 858 lwill pass to the cup-like coin receptacle. Y K

The numeral 894 in FIG. 2 denotes a coin return electromagnet; and that electromagnet will be mounted adjacent the slug rejector used in the money-handling device. K That electromagnet will normally be energized and will thus normally hold coin-intercepting pins out of the quarter passageway and out of the fifty centpiece passageway of that slug rejector. will respond 4to the de-energization thereofy to permit those coin-intercepting pins to enter those passageways; and thereafter those pins will intercept, and effect the return of, all quarters and iifty cent pieces that are introduced by patrons until that electromagnet is again reenergized. The electromagnet 894 also will enable the coin-intercepting pins to intercept, and effect the return of, all quarters and fty cent pieces that are introduced by patrons when the plug 410 is disconnected or a fuse blows. In this way, the ,electromagnet 894 protects patrons against the loss of quarters and fifty cent pieces at times when the money-handling device isnot able to dispense change. Y

The numeral 896 in FIG. 2 denotes an electric lamp.

That lamp will be mounted so it can illuminate a sign on quarters and fifty cent pieces will be accepted. That signl will make clear to patrons why any `iivedollar bills that the patron'attempts toV insert are` beingreturned to him.

Whenever the money handling 'device is Vat rest, the spring 222 in FIG. 7 will pullthe connecting rod 214 to the left and thus cause the U-shaped bracket'206 to raise This means that whenever the money-handling deviceis at rest, the leading edges of the timing Vbelts 270 will be above, and out of engagement with, the leading edges of thetiming belts 272. This is desirable because-it facilitates the ready introduction of the leading edge of a bill between those.Y

leading edges. Y

Also at this time, the rocker arm 350 will be held in the position indicated by FIG. 7; and, as a result, the connecting rod 352 rw-ill hold the U-shaped bracket 354 in its raised .position and thereby hold'the gate 370 in its maised position. This means that a patron can easily introduce the leading edge of a bill through theopening 38 in the front plate 36, through the opening 374 in the gate 370, and into the space between the leading edges of the belts 270 and 272. Y Y

Additionally at this time, the plunger 332 of the solenoid 330 will be held in extended position, and that yplunger will act through the connecting rod 334 and the carrier 32'3 to hold the soft-faced, bill-engaging roller below, and out of engagement with, the magnetic head 244. As a result, that roller will not impede the movement of an inserted bill toward the rear plate 42.

-If a patron inserts a quarter, that quarter will be testedby the slug rejector and will bedelivered to the quarter passageway. As that quarter moves through that passage-V way, it will -close the switch 700; and that switch will complete a circuit via prong 412, conductor'452, switch 700, relay coil 702,conductor 490, and prong 414.Y The resulting energization of the relay coil V7,02 Vwill close the contacts 704 and 706 in'FIG. 1 and will open the contacts 708 in FIG. 2. The closing of theconta'cts 704will`complete. a holding circuit` forthe relay coil 702 via prong 412, con-` ductor 452, lcam-operated switch 744', contacts 704, relay coil 702, conductor 490, and prong 414. The closing ofthe cont-acts 706 will energize the motor 738' via prong 412, 4conductor 452, contacts 706, the movable andY upper ixed contacts of the cam-operated switch 748, motor That electromagnet Y 738, conductor 490,V and 'pr-ong 414. f The closing of the contacts 70'6 will alsoenergize coil 750 and electromagnets 752, 764 and r`770 v-ia prong `412, conductor 452, contacts 706, parallel-connectedy coil 750 and electromagnets-2, 764 and 770, conductor 49,0, and prong 414. The opening of the contacts 708 will disconnect the electromagnet 894A from the prong 412 and will positively isolate .the push button 340 from that prong. In this way, the energization of the coil 702 will establish a holding circuit for that coil, will start the motor 738, will enable .the electromagnet 894 to effect the return of all further inserted quarters and fifty cent pieces, and will keep the closing of the pushbutton 340 from initiating a cycle of operation of the bill-transporting device.

VAs the motor 738 rotates its shaft 870, the cams 740, 742, 882, 884, 886,888, ,890 and 892 and the crank 872 will'iot-ate with that shaft. Alm-ostimmediately, the cam 742 will force the movable contact of the switch 748 to move down into engagement with the lower iixed contact of that switch. Su'ch movement will complete a running circuit'for the motor 738 via plong 412, conductor 452, the movable and upper xedcontacts of the cam-operated switch 746, the movable and lower iixed contacts of the cam-operated switch 748, motor 738, conductor 490,- and prong 414.

After the shaft l870 hasrotated about one hundred and eighty degrees, the crankV 872 will have shifted the connecting Irod 878 to its lright-'handmos-t posi-tion, However, a currency dispensing tube 858 will'not be paid out because the armaturey 834 will be in its extended position and will intercept the ear 840 and thus keep the spring y880 from rotating r.theHU-shaped member 836 in the countercl'oclewise direction. f Y

A.The shaft 870 will notate a few more degrees in the clockwise direction, and then the cams 882, 884, 886, 8818, 890 and 892 will move out of engagement with the ears 760,767, 776, 786, ,-7196 and |806, respectively. The ears 7182, 792 and 802 of the coin-ejecting slides 784, 794 and 804 will be intercepted and held by the armatures of the electr-om-agnets 7-80, 790 and 800; and hence no quarters will be paid out. However, the armatures ofthe electromagnetsV 752, 764 and 770 will be in their raised positions and will not intercept the ears 758,765 and 772; and hence a nickel and two dimes will be paid out. l

VThe shaft 870 will continue to rotate in the clockwise direction, and as that shaft appro-aches its normal position the cams 882, 884 and 886 will re-engage the ears 760, 76-7 and 776 and force the coin-ejecting yslides 756, 766 and 774 back to their normal positions. Thereupon, a nickel will enter the coin-receiving opening 757 in the slide 756, a dime will enter the coin-receiving opening 757 in the slide 766, and a dime will enter the coin-receiving opening 757 in the slide 774. Subsequently, the cams 8-88, 890 and 892 will eng-age the ears 786, 796 and 806 and -force the coin-ejecting slides 784,794 and 804 back to their normal positions. Y i

Shortly before the shaft 870 reaches its normal position, the lobe on the cam 740 will open the switch 7-44 and will shift the movable contactV of the switch 746 down into engagement withV the lower contact of that switch. The opening Yof the switch 744 should de-energize the relay coil 7 02, and that coil shouldr permit the contacts 704 Y and 706 to re-open and should permit the contacts 708 tol re-close. -If the relay coil 702 d-oes become deenergized,

and if it does .permitV the contacts 704 and 706 to re-open,

the coil `750 andthe electromagnets 752, 764 and 770 will become de-energized. .-I-f therelay coil 702 does become` de-energized, and if it does permit the contacts `708 to reclo-se, a 4circuit will be completed via prong 412, conductor 452, contacts 708, the movable and lower xed contacts t annonce switch 74d to move back up into engagement with the upper ixed contact of that switch. The re-closing of the switch 744 will not have any eiect at this time because the cont-acts 704 reopened; and the returning of the movable contact of the switch 746 to its upper position will not stop the motor because a further running circuit will be completed via prong 412, conductor 452, the movable and upper ixed contacts of switch 746, the movable and lower fixed contacts `of switch 74%, motor 73S, conductor 490, and prong rtl4.

As the shatt 87@ reaches its normal position, thc notch in the cam 742 will per-mit the movable contact of the switch 748 to move back up to its normal position; and thereupon the motor 738 will come to rest because the contacts 7% re-opened. This completes one cycle of operation of the moneyhandling device of the present invention; and during that cycle of operation, the coil 75% caused the counter to record the fact that a cycle of operation had occurred, the electnom'agnets 752, 754 and 77) coacted with the cams S32, 3&4 and 835 to effect the paying out of one nickel and two dimes, the electromagnet 894 permitted the coin-intercepting pins to effect the return of any further quarters and fifty cent pieces, and the pushbutton 34@ was isolated trom the prong 412, At the conclusion of that cycle of operation, the elect-romagnet 894 again withdrew the coin-intercepting pins from the slug rejector to permit the acceptance of further quarter-s and fifty cent pieces, and the pushbutton 34d was again connected to the prong 412.

In the foregoing description of the cycle of operation of the money-handling device, it was assumed that the opening of the switch '744 die-energized the relay coil 792; and that is what normally happens. However, if the switch 7% were to stick closed, that relay coil would not become de-energized when the cam 74@ opened the switch 744; and this means that the contacts 766 would remain closed. Those contacts could not, however, cause the motor 73S to run indeiinitely because of the anti-jackpot circuit provided by the present invention. That circuit includes the contacts 70d, the switch 746 and the switch 743; and it would halt the operation of the motor 738 when the lobe of the cam 74S) shifted the movable contact of the switch 746 down into engagement with the lower contact of that switch, because the contacts 79S would still be open and would be isolating that lower contact from the prong 412.

As a result, the sticking ofthe coin switch 7G@ could not lead to the dispensing of more than the proper amount of change-that sticking merely leading to the de-energization of the motor 73S. That motor would remain deenergized until the switch 76@ re-opened, either spontaneously or in response to the efforts of a service man; and until that switch reopened, the still-open contacts '76S would prevent the acceptance of further coins and bills by isolating the electromagnet 394 and the pushbutton 340 from the prong 412.

If a patron inserts a fifty cent piece, that titty cent piece will be tested by the slug rejector and will be delivered to the passageway for fifty cent pieces. As that fifty cent piece moves through that passageway, it will close the switch 710; and that switch will complete a circuit via prong 412, conductord 452, switch 71), relay coil 712, conductor 499, and prong 414. The resulting energizat'ion of the relay coil 712 will close the contacts 714 and 713 in FIG. l and will close the contacts 71o in FIG. 2. The closing of the contacts 714 will complete a holding circuti for the coil 712 via prong 412, conductor 452, cam-operated switch 744, contacts 714, relay coil 712, conductor 490, and prong 414. The closing of the contact 716 will preset a circuit for the relay coil 75d, but that circuit Will not be completed at this time because the contacts 766 will be open. The closing of the contacts 718 will coact with the closing of the contacts 714 to energize the relay coil 702; and thereupon that relay coil will close the contacts 704 and 706 in FIG. 1 and will open the contacts 7e3 in FIG. 2. The closing of the contacts 7454 will not be significant at this time because the contacts 714 and 718 will provide a holding circuit for the relay coil 792; but the closing of the contacts 7% will energize the motor 733, will energize the coil of the counter, and will energize the electromagnets '752, 764, 77@ and 73h. The opening of the contacts 708 will disconnect the electromagnet S94 and the pushbutton 340 from the prong 412, as explained previously.

The motor 738 will cause its shaft to make one complete revolution, all as described previously in connection with the insertion of a quarter. However, as the cams S82, 384, i586, S88, 39? and S92 free the ears 760, 757, 776, 786, 7% and S66, the slide 734 will join the slides 756, 766 and 774 in moving to coin-ejecting position. As a result, one nickel, two dimes and one quarter will be paid out as change.

As the shaft 537i? rotates, the switches 74S, 744 and 746 will be actuated in the same sequence in which they were actuated when a quarter was inserted. Further, the antijaclrpot circuit will permit the shaft 70 to be rotated all the Way to its normal position only if the switch 710 has re-opened. Specifically, it' the switch 710 sticks closed, the relay coil 712 will hold the contacts 714 and 718 closed and thus keep the relay coil 702 energized, with consequent continued opening of the contacts 768. As a result, the anti-jackpot circuit of the present invention will halt the motor 733, and thus prevent the paying out of more than the right amount of change, if the switch 710 sticks closed.

lf a 4patron inserts the leading edge of a one dollar bill between the leading edges of the upper and lower timing belts 27d and 272 and then presses the pushbutton 340, a circuit will be completed via prong 412, conductor 452, contacts 70d, contacts 605, the movable and upper fixed contacts of switch S30, contacts 524, the movable and upper iixed contacts of switch 29), conductor 436, pushbutton 34), rectifier 540, junction 541, parallel-connected capacitor 536 and serially-connected resistor 538 and relay coil 528, junction 542, conductor 492, and prong 414. The resulting energization of the relay coil 528 will cause the movable contact 532 in FIG. 3 to move out of engagement with the contact 534 and to move into engagement with the fixed contact 530, and it will also close the contacts 535. As the movable contact 532 moves into engagement with the stationary contact 530, a circuit will be completed via prong 424, conductor 452, contacts 708, contacts 665, the movable and upper fixed contacts of switch 830, contacts 524, the movable and upper iixed contacts of switch 290, now-closed contacts S30-532, time delay relay motor 624, conductor 491i, and prong 414. Simultaneously, a circuit will be completed via prong 412, conductor 452, contacts 708, contacts 695, the movable and upper fixed contacts of switch 830, contacts 524, the movable and upper fixed contacts of switch 290, contacts S30-552, contacts 606, solenoid 236, conductor 496, and prong 414. The closing of the contacts 53m-532 will not energize the relay coil 544 because the contacts 532-534 opened as the contacts S30-S32 closed.

The energization of the time delay relay motor 624 will start that motor running; but under normal conditions of operation, the energization of that motor will not affect the operation of the money-handling device. This is due to the fact that the time cycle of that motor is many times longer than the normal time cycle of the money-handling device.

The energization of the solenoid 230 will cause the plunger 228 to move to the left in FIG. 7 and thereby rotate the lever 224 in the counter clockwise direction, with consequent shifting of the connecting rod 214 to the right. That shifting will cause the pivot 202 to move downwardly and permit the leading edges of the upper belts 27@ to engage the leading edge of the bill and to force that bill against the leading edges of the lower belts 272. Further, that shifting of the connecting rod 214 will close the switch 232. Thereupon, a circuit will contacts of switch 290, contacts S30-532, contacts 606, now-closed switch'232, and then both through the main winding of the motor 188 and through the capacitor 190 hold theirelay coil 528 energized for about one secondV after the pushbutton 340 is released. VThis means that even if a patron presses the pushbutton 340 only momentarily, the lrelay coil 5281 vwill remainy energized long enough to insure starting ofthe motor 188 and to insure running of that motor for about one second.

As the `belts 270 and 272 move the bill toward the rear plate 42, the leading edge of that bill will quickly engage the actuators 276 and 280 of the switches 274 and 278.

Thereupon @those switches will close and W-ill establish a holding circuit for the solenoid 230 and a running circuit for the motor 188; that holding circuit including prong 412, conductor 452, switches 274, and 278, contacts'6tl6', solenoid 230, conductor 490, and prong 414, and that running circuit including prong 412, conductor I452, switches 274 and 278, contacts606, switch 232, the main winding of the motor 183,V capacitor 190, contacts 558- 560, the phase winding of motor 188, contacts 554-552,r

junction 572, conductor 490 and prong 414. The motor 188 will thus vbe kepty energized and will thus cause the belts 270 and 272 Ito continue to move the bill toward the rear plate 42.

The leading edge of the bill will promptlyy engage the actuator 284 of the switch 282 and close that switch; and

thereupon a circuit Will be completed via prong 412, conthat coil lwill cause the contact 439 to engage the contact 440 in FIG. 4. Thereupon, a circuit will be completed via prong 412, conductor 452, switches v274 and 278, contacts 439-440, contacts 456-454, relay coil 446, junction 572, conductor 490, land prong 414. Theresulting energization of the coil 446 Will cause relay contacts 442 and 444 in FIG. 4 toclose. rllhe contacts 444 will establish a holding circuit for the relay coil 446 Ivia prong 412,

conductor 452, switches 274 and 278, contacts 444, relay ductor 452, switches 274 and 278, contacts 564-566,

switch 282, relay coil 330, conductor 490, and prong 414.

Theresulting energization of the solenoid 330 will retract the armature 332- and act through the connecting rod 334 to cause the carrier 323 to urge the soft-faced pressure The actuator 284 for the switch 282 is set far enough away from the front plate 36 to enable the leading edge of the bill to pass between the magnetic head 244 .and the soft-faced pressure roller before that leading edge moves the actuator 284. Als a result, the magnetic head 244 and the soft-faced pressure roller can not cause the leading edge of the bill to crumple or roll up. However, the actuator 284 is set close enough to the front plate 36 to enable the leading edge of the bill to move that actuator before the portrait background of that bill reaches the magnetic head 244. Consequently, the magnetic head 244 will engage and sense the portrait background of the bill.A

By the time the inserted bill has moved into engagement with thev actuator 284 of the switch 282, that bill will have been raised to the desiredsynchronous speed;

and the engagement of the soft-faced pressure vroller with that bill, and the engagement of that bill with the magnetic head 244, will not keep thatbill from continuing to move at synchronous f speed. The continued movement of the insertedbill past the magnetic head 244 will canse voltage variations to be generated in Vthe coils of that coil 446, junction 572,'conductor 49,0, andprong 414. Contacts 442 Will preset va circuit for the relay coil 462, but'that circuit Willnot be completed at thisA time because the contact 439 is out of engagement with the contact 438.

As the iirst validating signal passes, the relay coil 428 will become de-energized andthe contact 439 will move back into engagementwith the contact 438 in FIG. 4; and such engagementwill complete the pre-setcircuit via prong 412, conductor 452, switches 274 and 278, nowclosed contacts 439-438, now-closed vcontacts 442, relay coil 462, junction 572, conductor 490, and prong 414. The resulting energizatfion of lrelay coil 462 will close the contacts 456-458 in FIG. 4, will open the contacts 456- 454in FIG.V 4, and will close the contacts 460 in FIG. 4. The contacts 450`will Vestablish a holding circuit for the relay coil 462 vial prong 412, conductor 452, switches V274 and 278, contactsl 460,A relay coil 462, junction 572, conduct-or 49?, and prong 414. The closing of the contacts 456-458 will pre-set a circuit for the relaycoil 476, but that circuit can not rbe closed at this time because Ithe contact 439 is out of engagement with the con-tact 440.

The `movement of the contact 439V out' of engagement with the contact 440 did not de-energize the'relay coil 446, because the contacts 444'hold that coil energized. Similarly, the movement of the contact 456 out kof engagement with the contact 454 did not de-enelrgizei the relay coil 446, because the contacts 444 hold that coil energized. Y The second validating signal will again energize the relay coil 428;=and the Vresulting re-engagement of the contact 439 with the contact 440 in FIG. 4 will energize the relay coil 476 via prong 412,` conductor 452, switches 274 and 278,-contacts 439-440, contacts 456-458,relay coil 476,V junction 572, conductor 490, and prong 414. The resulting energization of the coil 476 will close the contacts 470 in FIG. 1, will close the contacts 472 inFIG. 1, and will close the contacts 474 in FIG. 4. The contacts 474 will establish a holding circuit for the relay coil 476 via prong 412, conductor 452,.switches 274 and 278, contacts 474, relay coil 476, junction 572, conductor 490 and prong 414. The closing of the contacts 470 will preset a circuit for the relay lcoil 720but that circuit Will not be completed at this Ytime because the contacts 588 are open.4 The closing of the contacts 472 v'villrcompleteV a circuitvia prong 412, conductor 452, now-closed contacts 472, relay coil 520, conductor 492, and prong 414; and the yresulting energization of the coil 520 Will open the contacts 522 in FIG. 3, will open the contacts 524 `in FIG. 2, and will close the contacts 526. in FIG. 4. The openl ing of the contacts 522 and 524 will prevent the energization of the relay coil 544. The closing of the contacts 526 will complete a circuit via prong 412,'conductor 452,

`switches 274 and 278, contacts 564-566, now-closed contacts 526, solenoid 344, junction 572, conductor 490, and prong 414. The passing of the second validating signal will again de-energize the relay coil 428 and thus cause the contact 439 to move away from the contact 440; but the relay coil476 will be kept energized by the contacts The energization of the solenoid 344 will retract the plunger 346' and thereby shift the connecting rod 352 toward the Afront plate v36. That shiftingwill rotate the bracket 354-,forwardly and downwardly; and the extension 353 .thereof will move downwardly and release gate 370. If no thread, tape or other member is attached to the bill, the gate will be able to move down far enough to permit switch 362 in FIG. 4to open. At this time, the trailing edge of the bill will have passed inwardly of the gate 378, and that gate will then move downwardly to block the opening in the front plate 36. In doing so, that gate will protect the patron from the loss of a further inserted bill. The gate 370 will remain in its lowered position, and the switch 369 will remain in its shifted position, as long as the solenoid 344 remains energized.

This bill will continue to move rearwardly of the billtransporting device and its leading edge will engage the actuator 292 of the switch 298 in FlG. 2, and thereby move the movable Contact of that switch down into engagement with the lower fixed Contact of that switch. Because the relay coil 520 was energized previously and is still energized, that downward movement of that movable contact will not produce any immediate change in the position of any other electrical component of the moneyhandling device.

As the bill continues to move toward the rear of the bill-transporting device, the leading edge thereof will engage the actuator 288 of the switch 286 in FIG. 3. The switch is connected in parallel with the switches 274 and 278; and hence the closing of that switch will merely help maintain the circuits which were being maintained by the switches 274 and 278.

As the bill moves still further toward the rear plate 42, the leading edge thereof will engage the elongated, billreceiving portion 422 of the feeler 420 and will raise that portion. As that elongated, bill-receiving portion is raised, it will move the actuator of switch 638 in FIG. 4, and thereby shift the movable contact ot that switch down into engagement with the lower iixed contact of that switch. Such shifting will not have any effect at this time because the switch 362 was previously opened.

Continued rearward movement of the bill will cause that bill to engage the actuators 296 and 380 of the switches 294 and 298. Thereupon, the switch 298 will close to provide a further path in parallel with the paths provided by the switches 274, 278 and 286. The closing of the switch 294 will not have any effect at this time because the switch 638 will be isolating the movable contact of the switch 294 from the prong 412.

The bill 400 will move through the opening 136 in the rear plate 42; and as that bill does so, its leading edge will pass between the small diameter rollers 314 and the small diameter rollers which are disposed below and in vertical registry with those small diameter rollers. Those rollers normally rotate at an angular rate which is greater than the angular rate at which the pulley i172 rotates. As long as the inserted bill is held by the timing belts 270 and 272, it will be unable to move at a speed which is equal to the normal, high peripheral speed of the rollers 314. Further, as long as the inserted bill engages the timing belts 27? and 272 as well as the small diameter rollers 814, those rollers will be held to a lower-than-normal peripheral speed. This means that the pulley 316 will not be able to rotate at its normal angular rate; and the overall result is that the helical torsion spring, not shown, will tend to wind itself tighter, and store energy within itself. As soon as the trailing edge of the inserted bill passes beyond the trailing edges of the timing belts 279 and 272, that helical torsion spring will restore itself to its normal condition. As it does so, that spring will rapidly rotate the small diameter rollers 314 in the same direction in which they had been rotating; and that rapid rotation will give an added impetus to the movement of the bill toward the cash box, not shown, which will be set adjacent the opening 136 in the rear plate 42.

As the inserted bill successively moves out of engagement with the actuators 276, 280 and 288 of the switches 274, 278 and 286, the movable contacts of those switches will return to the open positions shown by FIG. 3. However, the switch 298 will serve to maintain the circuits which were previously maintained by the switches 274, 278 and 286, because the actuator of that switch is disposed immediately adjacent the rear plate 42 of the bill- 28 transporting device, all as shown by the drawing. This means that the switch 2558 will be able to keep the solenoid 23), the solenoid 338, the solenoid 344, the motor 188, and the relay coils 446, 462 and 476 energized until the trailing edge of the bill has passed rearwardly beyond, and out of engagement wtih, the trailing edges of the timing elts 278 and 272.

As the trailing edge of the bill moves beyond the elongated bill-receiving portion 422 of the feeler 420, that teeler will return to its normal position and thus permit the movable Contact of the switch 630 to re-engage the upper fixed contact of that switch. Thereupon a circuit will be completed via prong 412, conductor 452, switch 298, contacts 686, the movable and upper fixed contacts of switch 630, now-closed switch 294, relay coil 578, junction 572, conductor 498, and prong 414. The resulting energization of the coil 578 will close the contacts l 4 in FIG. l, will close the contacts 588 in FIG. 1, and will close the contacts 587 in FIG. 4; and the contacts 587 are in parallel with the switch 298. The closing of the contacts 84 will not have any effect at this time because the contacts 1478 are open, but the closing of the contacts 588 will complete a circuit via prong 412, conductor 452, now-closed contacts 588, contacts 478, relay coil 729, conductor 4%, and prong 414. The resulting energization of the coil 728 will close the contacts 722 and 724 in FIG. 1 and will close the contacts 726 in FlG. 2. The closing of the contacts 724 will establish a holding circuit for the relay coil 72? via prong 412, conductor 452, cam-operated switch 744, now-closed contacts 724, relay coil 720, conductor 49), and prong 414. The closing of the contacts 722 will complete a circuit via prong 412, conductor `452, cam-operated switch 744, contacts 724, contacts 722, relay coil 712, conductor 498, and prong 414. The closing of the contacts 726 will preset a circuit for the electromagnets 79@ and 888, but that circuit will not close at this time because the contacts 786 are open.

The energization of the coil 712 will close the contacts 724 and 718 in FlG. l and will close the contacts 716 in FIG. 2, all as explained previously in connection with the insertion of a lifty cent piece. The relay coil 702 will then be energized and a cycle of operation of the money-handling device will be initiated. During that cycle of operation, the contacts 766 will close and energize the motor 738, the coil 758 of the counter, and the electromagnets 752, 764, 770, 788, 790 and 808; and during that cycle of operation the slides 756, 766, 774, 784, 794, and S04 will eject one nickel, two dimes, and three quarters.

As the shaft 870 rotates, the switches 748, 744 and 746 will be actuated in the same sequence in which they were actuated when a quarter or a fty cent piece was inserted. Further, the anti-jackpot circuit will permit the shaft 870 to be rotated all the way to its normal position only if the switch 294 has re-opened as the bill passed from the rear of the bill-transporting device. Specically, if the switch 294 sticks closed, the relay coil 578 will hold the contacts 588 closed and thereby keep the relay coil 728 energized; and that relay coil will act through contacts 722, relay coil 712, contacts 718 and relay coil 702 to keep the contacts 788 from re-closing. As a result, the anti-jackpot circuit of the present invention will halt the motor 738, and thus prevent the paying out of more than the right amount of change, if the switch 294 sticks closed.

As the trailing edge of the bill moved out of engagement with the actuator 296 o the switch 294 in FIG. 4, that switch broke the connection to the relay coil 578. The resultant opening of the contacts 587 in FIG. 4 and the reopening of the switch 298 in FIG. 3, as the bill moved beyond the actuator 38h, cle-energized the solenoid 238, tie-energized the motor 188, de-energized the solenoid 33t), cle-energized the solenoid 344, and de-energized the relay coils 446, 462 and 476. The de-energization of the coil 476 permitted the contacts 472 in FlG. l to reopen and thus canse the de-energization of the relay coil 52?. As a result, all of the electrical components of the money-

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Referenced by
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US3250363 *Apr 21, 1964May 10, 1966Automatic Canteen CoDispensing control apparatus
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Classifications
U.S. Classification194/201, 902/13, 194/203, 902/11, 194/206
International ClassificationG07D11/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07D11/0003
European ClassificationG07D11/00D