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Publication numberUS3190571 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 22, 1965
Filing dateNov 29, 1963
Priority dateNov 29, 1963
Publication numberUS 3190571 A, US 3190571A, US-A-3190571, US3190571 A, US3190571A
InventorsKimball Charles H
Original AssigneeEdgar T Cyr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rock crusher having frictional drive for crusher rolls
US 3190571 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 22, 1965 c. H. KIMBALL 3,190,571

ROCK CRUSHER HAVING FRICTIONAL DRIVE FOR CRUSHER' ROLLS Filed Nov. 29, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR.

CHARLES H. K/MBAL L ATTORNEYS C. H. KIMBALL June 22, 19 65 ROCK CRUSHER HAVING FRICTIONAL DRIVE FOR CRUSHER ROLLS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 29, 1963 INVENTOR. CHARLES h. K/HBALL ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,190,571 CRUSHER HAVING FRTQTEQNAL DRTVE 1 38K CRUSHE'R ROLLS Charles H. Kimball, Phoenix, Aria, assignor ct one-bait to Edgar T. Qyr, Tempe, Ariz. Fiied Nov. 2% 1963, Set. Ne. 326,941 in Claims. (Qt. 2di.-23ti) The present invention pertains to rock crushers, and more specifically, to a rock crusher having an improved means for transmitting torque from one roll of the crusher to the second roll of the crusher.

There are several types of rock crushers, each having specific advantages depending on the size of rock encountered and the average diameter or the crushed rock product. One of the most common forms of rock crushers is a roil crusher which utilizes a pair of opposed drums urged peripherally toward each other by heavy springs. The rock to be crushed travels between the drums or roils; in most rock crushers, to insure the proper crushing force, and to feed rock through the roii crusher, the rolls are driven at a velocity from 25 to 125 revolutions per minute depending on roll size. The rotational velocity is chosen to provide a surface speed of 400 to 680 feet per minute. It is important that both drums r0- tate at approximately the same velocity and it has therefore been customary to utilize a pair of large gear wheeis, called timing gears, to transmit torque from the driven drum to the second drum. I The timing gears are exceedingly heavy and very expensive and have several disadvantages.

Timing gears, since force transmission therethrough is based on metal-to-metal contact, are susceptible to substantial wear and cannot withstand shock loading caused by the admission of a non-yielding material to the roll crusher. Occasionally, a piece of non-yieidable material such as iron, called tramp iron, will be mixed with the rocks to be crushed in the roll crusher. When the rolls of the crusher encounter the tramp iron, a severe torsionai shock is imparted to the timing gears which frequently causes failure of the gears or severe damage thereto. Since the gears are exceedingiy heavy, their replacement or repair constitutes a time consuming and expensive undertaiiing in addition to the cost of the gears themscives.

Accordingly, it an obiect of the present invention to provide an improved rock crusher of the roil crusher type.

It is another object of the present invention a roll crusher that can absorb shock loading foreign material in the crusher.

It is another object of the present invention to provide roll crusher drive that is considerably less expensive, lighter in weight, and more reliable than the drives of the prior art.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a roll crusher drive that will not only reduce weight and permit limited slippage when a foreign material is admitted thereto, but which will also reduce wear in other related parts of the crusher by reducing the vibration heretorore imparted to the drive by the crushing operation.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art as the description thereof proceeds.

to provide caused by li aterited June 22, 1%65 "ice Briefly, inaccordance with one embodiment of the present invention, a pair of pneumatic inflatable tubes are n ounted on the shafts co-axial with the rock crusher rolls. These pneumatic tubes extend into intimate peripheral contact with each other to thereby permit one tube to drive the other through the friction of the contacting surfaces. The tubes are sufficientiy flexible to permit the axes upon which they are mounted to approach or recede from each other without shooting the driving relationship. In the event tramp iron, or other uncrusha is material, is admitted to the crusher rolls, the shock loading resulting therefrom is readily absorbed by the resilience of the pneumatic tubes and by the limited siippage permitted by the pneumatic tubes.

The present invention may more readily be described by reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of a typical rock crusher in which the teachings of the present invention may be implemented;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged portion of FIG. 1 showing the rolis of the rock crusher, the driving mechanism therefor, and the pneumatic. tubes for transmitting torque from one roll or" the crusher to the other, arranged in accordance with the teachings of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a side view of PEG. 2 showing the pneumatic tubes in elevation;

FIG. 4 is a view of FIG. 3, partly in section, taken along lines ld;

FIG. 5 is a view showing a portion of the power train for the crusher of PEG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a side view of the crusher rolls showing the manner in which the rolls are urged toward each other.

Referring to FIG. 1, the typical rock crusher shown therein inciudes a hopper it for receiving rock to be crushed. The rock falls onto a conveyor 11 and is elevated thereby to a feed box 1 2. The material in the feed box is vibrated along a plurality of decks, illustrated generally at 15, each having a screen for passing rock of a specific size and rejecting all rock of a larger size. Fine 1y divided particles, such as sand, drop immediately into a receiving pan to equipped with a worm If for depositing the material on a conveyer 1%. The conveyer 18 transports material to an appropriate storage pile. Rock that is of the appropriate size for roll crushing is carried through deck 2% and fed to the rolis 21 and 22 of the roll crusher. The rock having a size too large to be crushed in the roll crusher may be transported to a jaw crusher 25 for reduction in size to the appropriate size suitable for roll crushing. The crushed rock from the roll and jaw crusher drops onto a conveyer 23 and is transported to an elevating wheel 3%. The elevating wheel transports the material back to the conveyor 11 to be recycled through the crusher until the rock is of the appropriate size to fall through the decks of screens onto conveyor 35. Conveyer transports the material to a suitable storage facility. The crusher may conveniently be mounted on wheels as shown in FIG. 1 with the additional use of fold-down jacks to support the crusher when it is in operation.

Referring to FIG. 2, an enlarged view of the roll crushers with their driving means is shown. A sheave is driven by multiple V-belts 41 from a suitable source of power. A typical source of power is shown in FIG. 5 wherein a diesel engine 45 is coupled through a shaft 46 and coupling 47 to a V-belt pulley 48. The pulley drives a sheave 59 through a plurality of V-belts 51, thereby reducing rotational velocity and increasing torque. It is customary to mount the diesel engine forwardly of the rock crusher and to utilize a plurality of V-belt-pulley arrangements to greatly reduce the rotational velocity prior to driving the rolls of the crusher. Referring again to FIG. 2, the sheave 40 tansmits torque through the shaft to a pinion 56 keyed thereto. The pinion meshes with a gear wheel 57 mounted on and keyed to a shaft 58. The roll 59 is driven by the shaft 58 and moves in substantial synchronism with the second roll 60 through a pneumatic tube drive. A rim 61 having a suitable hub 62 keyed to the shaft 58 is secured at one axial end of the shaft 53 and includes a pneumatic tube 63 mounted thereon. The pneumatic tube 63 is in peripheral contact with the like pneumatic tube 64 which is keyed to a shaft '70 through a rim 71 and hub arrangement 72 substantially identical to the rim and hub of the first pneumatic tube. The second roll 60 is also keyed to the shaft and is driven thereby; the torque transmitted to the tube 63 via the shaft 58 is coupled, by friction, to the tube 6d and thence to the shaft 70 and the second roll 60. A hopper 75 is positioned above and adjacent the rock crushing area between the rolls 59 and 60 to guide uncrushed rock into the crushing area.

The pneumatic tubes, and their rims and hubs, may more clearly be seen by reference to FIG. 3. The embodiment shown illustrates one method of attaching the hubs to the shaft. A single threaded nut 76 and 77 may be used to secure the hub onto the respective shaft, provided the shafts are in some way keyed to the hubs. Alternatively, it may be possible to utilize a plurality of bolts to secure each rim and hub to the corresponding shaft in the same manner that the wheel and tire of an automobile are secured to their axle.

Referring to FIG. 4, the pneumatic tube 80 is shown having side walls 81 and 82 extending radially outwardly from a base 83 and terminating in a peripheral contact surface 84. The surface 84 may include a simple tread design such as that shown at 85 to improve the frictional characteristics of the tube. The tube is mounted on a rim 88 which extends from a hub 89. The shaft 90, shown in FIG. 4, terminates in a portion 91 having a square cross section so that it may be keyed to the hub 89. A pair of spacing washers 92 and 93 are provided so that the nuts 94 and 95 may be drawn up securely to hold the hub firmly against the shoulder 96 of the shaft 90. As mentioned previously, the pneumatic tubes may be mounted in the manner of an automobile tire on a supporting rim having a plurality of holes to accept bolts positioned radially distant from the axis of the wheel.

Referring to FIG. 6, the drums 59 and 6!) are shown on their respective shafts which may be supported by any suitable frame provided on the rock crusher. The shaft 70 is movable relative to the shaft 53 and is urged toward the latter through the expedience of a coil spring 100 which abuts a stop plate 101 at one end thereof and engages a movable stop 102 at the opposite end thereof. The coil spring 100 urges the roll 60 to the position shown in dotted lines and permits the roll 60 to retract as shown in solid lines to admit rock between the drums. The rock, being subjected to the compressive force of the spring, is crushed and passes outwardly beneath the drums.

The operation of the present invention may be described as follows. Rock of a suitable average size is fed to the bin 75 to be crushed between the rolls 59 and 60. The drive mechanism, operating through the expediency of V-belts and sheaves, drives the shaft 55 and the pinion secured thereto. The pinion 56 through gear 57 and shaft 58 rotates the roll 59 at the appropriate velocity.

To rotate the roll 60, the pneumatic tube 63 engages the periphery of pneumatic tube 64 transmitting torque to the shaft '70. As the rock is crushed, and the rolls separate or approach each other, the flexible pneumatic tubes compress and expand to thereby continue to transmit torque. In the event an unyieldable substance enters the space between the rolls, such as tramp iron, the sudden shock transmitted to the rolls causes the pneumatic tubes to either completely separate (thus ceasing to transmit torque), or provide a limited slip without damage to the drive mechanism. The vibration caused by the crushing operation is also absorbed by the pneumatic tubes without being transmitted back and forth between shafts 58 and 70 to cause additional shock loadings and stress on the remainder of the drive train driving the rolls. In the event the pneumatic tubes become worn or damaged, they may readily be removed without the necessity of special equipment. The pneumatic tubes are light, rugged, and inexpensive and permit effective use of a roll crusher with less down time caused by equipment failure. The specific form of the pneumatic tube, such as that shown in FIG. 4, may be modified extensively to withstand a variety of loadings caused by the coil spring 100 of FIG. 6 and to provide a variety of operational characteristics such an increased frictional co-efficient between tubes. In some instances, an inner tube may be provided having conventional construction to help support and maintain airtight the pneumatic tube. While the present invention has been described in terms of a specific embodiment, many changes may be made without departing from the concept of the invention. For example, while the description is in terms of pneumatic tubes, the tubes may be filled with a liquid, or may be sealed so that they are airtight.

It will therefore be apparent to those skilled in the art that many modifications may be made in the specific embodiment chosen for illustration without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention; accordingly, it is intended that this invention be limited only by the claims appended hereto.

I claim:

1. A rock crusher comprising:

(a) a first and a second crusher roll;

(b) means urging said rolls toward peripheral contact with each other;

(0) driving means for imparting rotation to said first roll;

(d) a first resilient tube mounted coaxially to said first roll and driven thereby;

(e) a second resilient tube mounted coaxially to said second roll for driving said second roll;

(f) said first and second tubes in driving frictional contact for imparting rotational force from said first roll to said second roll.

2. A rock crusher comprising:

(a) a first and a second crusher roll;

(b) means urging said rolls toward peripheral contact with each other;

(0) driving means for imparting rotation to said first roll;

(d) a first fluid-filled tube mounted coaxially to said first roll and driven thereby;

(e) a second fluid-filled tube mounted coaxially to said second roll for driving said second roll;

(f) said first and second fluid-filled tubes in driving frictional contact for imparting rotational force from said first roll to said second roll.

3. A rock crusher comprising:

(a) a first and a second cylindrical crusher roll;

(b) means including coil springs urging said rolls toward peripheral contact with each other;

(e) driving means for imparting rotation to said first roll;

(d) a first pneumatic tube mounted coaxially to said first roll and driven thereby;

(e) a second pneumatic tube mounted coaxially to said second roll for driving said second roll;

(f) said first and second pneumatic tubes in driving frictional contact for imparting rotational force from said first roll to said second roll.

4. A rock crusher comprising:

(a) a first and a second cylindrical crusher roll;

(b) means including coil springs urging said rolls toward peripheral contact with each other;

(e) driving means for imparting rotation to said first roll;

(d) a first inflatable pneumatic tube mounted coaxially to said first roll and driven thereby;

(e) a second inflatable pneumatic tube mounted coaxially to said second roll for driving said second roll; a

(f) said first and second inflatable pneumatic tube in driving frictional peripheral contact for imparting rotational force from said first roll to said second roll.

5. A rock crusher comprising:

(a) a first and a second crusher roll;

(b) means urging said rolls toward peripheral contact with each other;

(e) a first and a second shaft for mounting said first and second crusher rolls respectively, said shaft secured to the respective crusher rolls for rotation therewith;

(d') a gear wheel secured to said first shaft;

(e) a pinion having teeth engaging said gear Wheel;

(f) driving means for imparting rotation to said pinion;

(g) a first tube mounted on said first shaft;

(h) a second tube mounted on said second shaft;

(i) said first and second tubes in driving frictional peripheral contact;

(j) whereby said driving means imparts rotation through a drive train comprising said (1) pinion,

(2) gear wheel, (3) first shaft, (4) first tube, (5) second tube, (6) second shaft.

6. A rock crusher comprising:

(a) a first and a second cylindrical crusher roll;

(b) means including coil springs urging said rolls toward peripheral contact with each other;

(e) a first and a second shaft parallel to each other for mounting said first and second crusher rolls respectively, said shaft secured to the respective crusher roll for rotation therewith;

(d) a gear wheel secured to said first shaft;

(e) a pinion having teeth engaging said gear wheel;

(f) driving means for imparting rotation to said pinion;

(g) a first pneumatic tube mounted on said first shaft;

(h) a second pneumatic tube mounted on said second shaft;

(i) said first and second pneumatic tubes in driving frictional peripheral contact;

(3) whereby said driving means imparts rotation through a drive train comprising said (1) pinion,

(2) gear wheel,

(3) first shaft,

(4) first pneumatic tube, (5) second pneumatic tube, (6) second shaft.

7. A rock crusher comprising:

(a) a first and a second cylindrical crusher roll;

(b) means including coil springs urging said rolls toward peripheral contact with each other;

(e) a first and a second shaft parallel to each other for mounting said first and second crusher rolls respectively, said shaft secured to the respective crusher roll for rotation therewith;

(d) a gear Wheel secured to said first shaft;

QB (e) a pinion having teeth engaging said gear wheel; (f) driving means for imparting rotation to said pinion; (g) a first inflatable pneumatic tube mounted on said first shaft;

(h) a second inflatable pneumatic tube mounted on (b) means urging said rolls toward peripheral contact with each other;

(e) a first and a second shaft for mounting said first and second crusher rolls respectively, said shaft secured to the respective crusher rolls for rotation therewith;

(d) a gear wheel secured to said first shaft;

(e) a pinion having teeth engaging said gear wheel;

(f) driving means for imparting rotation to said pinion;

(g) a first tube mounted on said first shaft;

(h) a second tube mounted on said second shaft;

(i) said first and second tubes in driving frictional peripheral contact for imparting rotation through a drive train comprising said (1) pinion,

(2) gear wheel, (3) first shaft, (4) first tube, (5) second tube, (6) second shaft.

9. A rock crusher comprising:

(a) a first and a second cylindrical crusher roll;

(b) means including coil springs urging said rolls toward peripheral contact with each other;

(e) a first and a second shaft parallel to each other for mounting said first and second crusher rolls respectively, said shaft secured to the respective crusher roll for rotation therewith;

(d) a gear Wheel secured to said first shaft;

(e) a pinion having teeth engaging said gear wheel;

(f) driving means for imparting rotation to said pinion;

(g) a first pneumatic tube mounted on said first shaft;

(h) a second pneumatic tube mounted on said second shaft;

(i) said first and second pneumatic tubes in driving frictional peripheral contact for imparting rotation through a drive train comprising said (1) pinion,

(2) gear wheel,

(3) first shaft,

(4) first pneumatic tube, (5) second pneumatic tube, (6) second shaft.

10. A rock crusher comprising:

(a) a first and a second cylindrical crusher roll;

(b) means including coil springs urging said rolls toward peripheral contact with each other;

(c) a first and a second shaft parallel to each other for mounting said first and second crusher rolls respectively, said shaft secured to the respective crusher roll for rotation therewith;

(d) a gear Wheel secured to said first shaft;

(e) a pinion having teeth engaging said gear wheel;

.4 u (f) driving means for imparting rotation to said (4) first inflatable pneumatic tube,

pinion; (5) second inflatable pneumatic tube, (g) a first inflatable pneumatic tube mounted on said (6) second shaft.

first shaft; References Cited by the Examiner (h) a second inflatable pneumatic tube mounted on 5 said second haft; UNITED STATES PATENTS (i) said first and second inflatable pneumatic tubes in 1,950,501 3/34 MacKay 241-101 X driving frictional peripheral contact for imparting 2,964,249 12/60 Knight 241--230 rotation through a drive train comprising said FOREIGN PATENTS (1) pinion, 10

1,192,014 4/59 France.

(2) gear Wheel, 7 (3) first shaft, J. SPENCER OVERHOLSER, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1950501 *May 16, 1931Mar 13, 1934Diamond Iron Works IncRock crushing plant
US2964249 *Oct 6, 1959Dec 13, 1960Jeffrey Mfg CoMaterial reducing apparatus
FR1192014A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3394894 *Mar 31, 1966Jul 30, 1968Diversified Products Mfg CoComminutor with volumetric proportioned feed
US5460332 *Dec 17, 1992Oct 24, 1995Frick; DietmarMobile crusher
US5694709 *Jan 19, 1995Dec 9, 1997Cronk, Jr.; Thomas J.Pipeline padding machine with crusher
US6029378 *Oct 31, 1997Feb 29, 2000Cronk, Jr.; Thomas J.Apparatus for padding underground conduits
US6055749 *Mar 5, 1998May 2, 2000Cronk, Jr.; Thomas J.Apparatus for padding underground conduits
Classifications
U.S. Classification241/230, 241/223, 241/101.76, 241/222
International ClassificationB02C4/00, B02C4/42
Cooperative ClassificationB02C4/42
European ClassificationB02C4/42