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Publication numberUS3190648 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 22, 1965
Filing dateMay 21, 1962
Priority dateMay 21, 1962
Publication numberUS 3190648 A, US 3190648A, US-A-3190648, US3190648 A, US3190648A
InventorsThomas Kallenbach
Original AssigneeThomas Kallenbach
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Torque lock exercise apparatus
US 3190648 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

TORQUE LOCK EXERCISE APPARATUS Filed May 21, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet l I INVENTOR. THOMAS KALLENBACH ATTORNEY June 22, 1965 T. KALLENBACH TORQUE LOCK EXERCISE APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 21, 1962 June 22, 1965 -r. KALLENBACH 3,190,648

TORQUE LOCK EXERCISE APPARATUS Filed May 21, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet s lH- 44 /,P l as 41 l g A W m 36/ I i I 38 37 INVENTOR. THOMAS J ALLENBACH BY g f r AT TORNEY United States Patent 3,190,648 TQRQUE LUQK EXERElSE APPARATUS; Thor ias Kallenhach, Elmhurst, NX. (Box Th- East iietaulrct, FLY.) Filed May 21, 1962, Ser. No. 196,417 1 (Ilahn. (til. 272-79) This invention relates to gymnastic or exercise apparatus. It enables the user to obtain without danger of harm or strain to his person the various benefits obtainable by means of conventional barbells, as well as other benefits that are not obtainable by the use or" the latter.

Conventional barbell apparatus comprises an elongated bar and various weights which may be detachably mounted upon the ends of the bar. The user manually lifts the weighted bar from the floor to various levels. As the users strength increases, he mounts heavier weights to the bar. This known apparatus has various disadvantages. The amount of weights that the user may lift at any time is curtailed by the particular weights that he has on hand. There is always present the danger of the inexperienced as well as the experienced user in over estimating his strength and attempting to lift a weighted bar heavier than he can safely handle. The result may prove to be harmful to the user. Often the weights are carelessly mounted upon the bar, so that they loosen and escape or slide along the bar. This also may also cause injury to the user.

The disadvantages commonly associated with conventional 'barbells are not :present in the use of the apparatus of this invention.

in accordance with the present invention there is provided an exercise apparatus comprising a pair of rigid vertical supports :or posts from which laterally extend a pair of torque lock bars having limited angular movement in a vertical plane relative to the posts and carrying an elongated pressure bar transversely of the free ends thereof. Initial pressure exerted by the user upon the pressure bar tilts the torque bars to a locked angular position relative to the posts. Further subsequent pressure exerted by the user upon the pressure bar, and regardless of the extent of such pressure, is transmitted through the torque bars to the posts.

A feature of the apparatus lies in the capacity of the torque bars to be slidably adjusted along the posts to any desired level.

A further feature of the apparatus lies in the particular arrangement of the pressure bar with respect to the torque bars whereby the user may readily adjust the elevated position of the torque bars along the posts by manipulating the pressure bar.

A particular advantage lies in the fact that by exerting manual pressure upon the pressure bar the user may obtain the advantages that one obtains by lifting or lowering weighted barbells; and these advantages are obtainable Without adding any weights to the pressure bar.

Another advantage of the present invention is that the user is enabled to exert a lifting or pressing force to the extent of his strength upon the pressure bar without lifting any weights. The danger of strain or physical harm occurring from lifting excessive weights, as in the care of barbells, is accordingly not present.

Further, if the user of the present apparatus wishes to add weights to the pressure bar, he may add the weights individually to the pressure bar at an adjusted level of the latter. Accordingly, the user is not as in the case of barbells required to lift -a Weighted bar from the floor and then lower it. He may lift the weighted pressure bar through the limited angular distance permitted by the torque bars, and may lower it through the same distance. Or, if the user wishes, he does not have to lift the weigh-ted pressure bar at all; he may exert a force against it in counter direction to and equal to or less than the weighted bar.

A further advantage of the apparatus of the present in- I vention is obtainable by adjusting the level of the torque bars to a desirable height, so that chinning exercises, not possible with bellbars, may be performed,

The invention further lies in the particular construction and general arrangement of its component parts as Well as in their cooperative association with one another to eifect the benefits intended herein.

The foregoing as well as other advantages of the invention will appear more fully hereinafter from a consideration of the detailed description which follows, taken together with the accompanying drawings wherein an embodiment of the invention is illustrated. it is to be expressly understood that the drawings are for purpose of illustration and description and they are not to be construed as defining the limits of the invention.

in the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a torque lock exercise apparatus embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary side elevational view of FIG. 1 showing a longitudinal section through one of the torque lock bars;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of a torque lock bar;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the forward end of a torque lock bar;

FIGS. 5, 6, and 7 show a modified form which the torque bars may take; and they illustrate one of the torque bars of this modified form in association with the pressure bar;

FIG. 5 is a top plan view;

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of FIG. 5 with portions cut away for added clarity; and

FIG. 7 is a front end view of FIG. 5 with the front end of the torque bar in section.

'As the description of the invention proceds in further detail, reference is made to various elements in the drawings by reference numerals so as to provide a clear understanding of the invention by any person skilled in the art to which it pertains.

The exercise apparatus disclosed in the drawings includes an elongated pressure bar 1 which is supported transversely of the forward ends of a pair of torque lock bars 2. The latter extend forwardly from, and are slidably mounted by means of holes 3 in their rear areas upon a pair of vertical stationary posts 4. These posts are anchored fast so that, regardless of the degree of individual human pressure exerted upon the pressure bar 1. and transmitted through the torque bars 2 to the posts, the latter will not be caused to shift in any direction from their vertical position.

The holes 3 of the torque bars are a little greater in diameter than the diameter of the posts 4, the latter being cylindrical. Because of the slight clearance 5 provided by the larger size of the holes, the torque bars may be slid along the posts to any desired level or position, and they may be also tilted in a vertical plane relative to the posts. The extent to which they may be tilted is dependent upon the size of the clearance or play provided by the size of the holes. If the torque bars are manually held in a horizontal plane, at right angles to the posts, they may be readily slidably moved along the posts. If pressure is exerted upon the forward ends of the torque bars, either upwardly or downwardly so as to tilt the torque bars relative to the posts through the angle permitted by the slight clearance 5, the torque bars will lock in the angularly moved position relative to the posts. And regardless of the degree of individual human manual pressure applied to the torque bars in their tilted direction, they will not move along the posts from their locked sue e re b in position. They may be released from their locked position by manually restoring them angularly to a horizontal level, and then manually sliding them along the posts to any selected new position. The broken line U shown in FIG.2 indicates an upwardly tilted position in which the torque bars may be locked; and the broken line D indicates a downwardly tilted locked position of the torque bars. Under the influence of the weight of the pressure bar 1 at the forward ends of the torque bars, the latter will normally be locked to the posts in a downwardly tilted direction as indicated by the broken line D in FIG. 2. It is preferable that the angle at which the torque bars lock relative to the posts be slight. The locking action is effected when the torque bar is tilted downward by engagement of the upper rear edge 6 and the lower forward edge 7 of the hole 3 with the post; and by the opposite edges of the hole, when the torque bar is tilted upward.

The posts 4 are held rigidly in parallel spaced vertical position by various anchoring elements. The posts are anchored fast to the floor surface 8 by means of fioor plates 9 at their lower ends bolted to the floor. A pair of brackets 10, one of which is shown in FIG. 2 serves as anchoring means for the upper ends of the posts. Each bracket is bolted, as at 11, by means of a flanged plate 12 to a wall surface 13. At the opposite end, a bolt 14 passed through the forward end of the bracket and threadedly engaged in a nut member 15 welded atop the post, secures the forward end of the bracket to the post. A forwardly extending portion 16 of the wall bracket serves to space the related post a desired distance from the wall. Lateral reinforcement straps 17 and 18 serve to strengthen the brackets and to maintain the posts in lateral spaced relation.

The torque bars 2 are illustrated as being of channel form, having a flat central or bridge plate 19 and depending side walls 20. This form is desired because of its great strength and capacity to stand up without bending despite the strong physical pressures that may be applied to it during use of the apparatus. The forward and rear ends 21 and 22 of the torque bars are rounded to avoid sharp corners that might come into harmful contact with the user of the apparatus. The rear end of each torque bar is reinforced by a thick block 23 welded between its side walls 20. The hole 3 extends through this block. The block 23 provides several other advantages. It provides a broad bearing surface about the hole 3, facilitating sliding movement of the torque bar along the post. It further serves to limit the extent to which the torque bar may tilt relative to its post.

The pressure bar 1 which extends transversely of the forward ends of the torque bars is solid. It is supported to the torque bars by means of a pair of U-bolts 24, one associated with each torque bar. The bridge portions 25 of the U-bolts pass around the pressure bar 1. The free ends 26 of the U-bolts extend through complementary holes in the torque bars, and are tightened to the latter by means of nuts 27 threaded upon the ends of the U-bolts tightly against opposite faces of the bridge plates 19. The U-bolts are not drawn tight against the pressure bar, so that the latter is free to turn in the U-bolts.

The capacity of the pressure bar to turn relative to the U-bolts, together With the aid of a pair of sleeve cam members 28, enables the user of the apparatus to manipulate the pressure bar so as to selectively position the torque bars at any desired level along the posts. A sleeve 28 is associated with each torque bar. Each sleeve is disposed on the pressure bar beneath one of the torque lbars. Each sleeve has an inner end which bears against a side face of the corresponding U-bolt. The opposite end of each sleeve is stepped to provide a radial shoulder 30 which bears against the inner face of a side wall 20 of the related torque bar, and also provides a flat longitudinal shoulder 31 which is disposed with a slight clearance 32 below the related side wall 20. The sleeves are locked fast to the pressure bar against relative movement by means of lock screws 33. The locked condition of the sleeves to the pressure bar prevents endwise movement of the pressure bar relative to the torque bars, and also enables the sleeves to turn as a unit with the pressure bar relative to the U-bolts 24. By means of the sleeves the torque bars are maintained in parallel level relation to each other. The sleeves enable the user of the apparatus to selectively control the elevated relation of the torque bars to the posts by manipulating the pressure bar.

In its normal position the pressure bar 1 lies in a horizontal plane. In this normal position the torque bars are inclined downwardly under the weight of the pressure bar at their forward ends, and they are jammed or locked in this condition by the pressed engagement of the walls of the holes 3 with the posts.

In using the apparatus for exercise purposes, the user faces the pressure bar 1 grasping it manually at its mid-area. While the torque bars are locked in an angular downward position, the user may exert to the extent of his physical ability downward pressure upon the pressure bar in the performance of any exercise. Regardless of the extent of such pressure, the torque bars will not move from their locked position. If desired, the user may tilt the torque bars upwardly and upon their becoming jammed or locked in this upwardly tilted position, the user may without causing the torque bars to move from their locked position exert to the extent of his strength upward pressure upon the bar.

If the user wishes to slide the torque bars upward to a new level relative to the post so as to enable him to perform an exercise requiring a higher level position of the torque bars, the user proceeds as follows. He manually turns the pressure bar clockwise (FIGS. 2 and 4-) to cause the rear portions of the shoulders 31 to abut and cam the torque bars with an upward force. And while exerting this clockwise torque upon the pressure bar, the user draws the torque bars to a horizontal level and then slides them upwardly along the posts to the desired level. To lower the torque bars to a new level along the posts, the user manually exerts a counter clockwise torque upon the pressure bar to cause the front portions of the shoulders 31 of the sleeves to abut and cam the torque bars with a downward torque force. The user then draws or brings the torque bars to a horizontal level and then slides them downward along the posts to the desired level. In the sliding movement of the torque bars downwardly, the weight of the block 23 at the rear of the torque bars aids in sliding the torque bars downward.

It is clear that without adding any weights to the pressure bar, the user may exert to whatever extent he is capable of pressures upon the pressure bar in either an upward or downward direction as well as in a forward or rearward direction. These various pressures are the equivalent of lifting, pressing, pulling, or pushing weights.

If the user so desires, he may add weights to the ends of the pressure bar, as indicated by the broken lines 34 in FIG. 1. The weights on the pressure bar will hold the torque bars locked in a downward tilted position relative to the posts. While the weights are thus supported, the operator may exert to the extent of his strength an upward force on the pressure bar to raise the weights. If he should be able to raise the weights only slightly, he may hold them so raised until he relaxes the upward force on the pressure bar. Following the latter action the pressure bar will restore with the weights to the downward tilted position of the torque bars. By using the apparatus in this manner the operator is not required to lift the weights from the floor and to return them to the floor, as he would be required in the use of conventional barbells. Accordingly, the operator avoids the danger of straining himself.

FIGS. 5, 6 and 7 show a modified form which the torque bars may take; and they illustrate one of the torque bars of this modified form in association with the pressure bar.

FIG. is a top plan view;

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of FIG. 5 with portions cut away for added clarity; and

FIG. 7 is a front end view of FIG. 5 with the front end of the torque bar in section.

The modified form of the torque bar shown in FIG. 5 comprises a solid upper member 35 to the underside of which is welded at the rear a solid block portion 36. A sleeve 37 is seated in a complementary arcuate cavity 38 formed in the underside of the curved forward end of the torque bar. An ear 39 integral with the sleeve projects freely upward through a slot 41 of the torque bar. A heavy dowel pin 42 fitted in a hole of the ear 39 above the torque bar holds the sleeve and the associated pressure bar 1 to the torque bar. The pressure bar is releasably retained in the sleeve by means of a lock screw 43, The torque bar also includes a hole 3 at its rear in which the post 4 is received with a slight clearance.

To raise or lower the torque bar relative to the post 4, the pressure bar is manually rotated relative to the torque bar so as to carry the ear 39 of the sleeve to the broken line position P into abutment with the inclined shoulder 44 of the slot 41. The torque bar is then brought to a horizontal position and raised or lowered as desired as the operator accordingly raises or lowers the pressure bar.

While an embodiment of the invention has been illustrated and described in detail, it is to be expressly understood that the invention is not limited thereto. Various changes can be made in the design and arrangement of the parts without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention; and it is my intent, therefore, to claim the invention not only as shown and described, but also in all such forms and modifications as may be reasonably construed to be within the spirit of the invention and the scope of the appended claim.

What I claim is:

Torque lock exercise apparatus comprising a pair of stationary vertical cylindrical posts disposed in parallel laterally spaced relationship, a pair of torque lock bars each having a hole in its rear area presenting a cylindrical wall surface in surrounding relation to a separate one of the posts, there being slight play of equal degree between each post and the opposed wallarea of the related hole whereby each torque lock bar is capable of being tilted in a vertical plane relative to its post to an extent as determined by the degree of such existing play, and a horizontally disposed pressure bar mounted transversely of the forward ends of such torque bars wherein the pressure bar has limited turning movement in its mounting relative to the torque bars, a pair of sleeves is removably fixed upon the pressure bar, each sleeve presenting in the same plane a flat shoulder in close spaced relation to the underside of a separate one of the torque bars whereby slight turning of the pressure bar in either direction abuts the shoulder of each sleeve against the related torque bar to transmit a component of force angularly upon the torque bars.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,086,280 7/37 Matter 27270.1 X 2,470,815 5/49 Harvey 272-62 X 2,817,522 12/57 Margulies 272-62 X 2,892,604 6/59 Keen et a1 248- DELBERT B. LOWE, Primary Examiner,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2086280 *Dec 14, 1934Jul 6, 1937Crane Packing CoSupport
US2470815 *Mar 10, 1948May 24, 1949Roosevelt W W HarveyAthletic apparatus
US2817522 *Jul 26, 1954Dec 24, 1957Philip MarguliesPortable gymnastic device
US2892604 *Jul 15, 1954Jun 30, 1959Keen Mfg CorpSupporting stand for feeder troughs and the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3346256 *Feb 16, 1965Oct 10, 1967White James RGuidedly mounted lift bar having adjustable weight means
US3351311 *Jan 25, 1966Nov 7, 1967Melfi Samuel TSupport of guard rails
US3424005 *Jan 6, 1966Jan 28, 1969George M BrownIsometric exercising device with indicator
US3642278 *Jul 20, 1970Feb 15, 1972Hinckley John DAdjustable floor and ceiling supported chinning bar
US4385760 *Aug 30, 1979May 31, 1983Newmark Industries, Inc.Isokinetic exerciser
US4563004 *Oct 18, 1982Jan 7, 1986Mattox Ernest MFriction type isokinetic exercise mechanism
US4564194 *Apr 8, 1985Jan 14, 1986Fred DawsonExercise apparatus
US4632393 *Jan 4, 1985Dec 30, 1986Noord Andrew J VanMulti-purpose exercising apparatus
US4699376 *Dec 18, 1985Oct 13, 1987Portable Isokinetics, Inc.Hip and knee joint exercising apparatus
US5184992 *May 27, 1992Feb 9, 1993Banks Gary SMulti-station physical exercise apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification482/91, 248/246, 482/106, 248/125.1
International ClassificationA63B21/002, A63B1/00, A63B21/06, A63B21/078
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2021/0783, A63B1/00, A63B21/0023, A63B2021/0614, A63B21/078
European ClassificationA63B21/078, A63B1/00, A63B21/002B