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Publication numberUS3192008 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 29, 1965
Filing dateDec 10, 1962
Priority dateDec 10, 1962
Publication numberUS 3192008 A, US 3192008A, US-A-3192008, US3192008 A, US3192008A
InventorsDwyer Maurice J
Original AssigneeDwyer Maurice J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Deodorizer fan for roller towel cabinet
US 3192008 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 29, '1965 M, J. DwYER nEonomzEn nu Fon ROLLER lTowm. CABINET yFiled Deo. 10, 1962 mvENTon Mawr/c5 J .Dwmi

H1: ArrORNI-'YJ United States Patent() 3,192,0il3 DEGDRlZ-ER FAN FR ROLLER TWEL CABHNBT Maurice Si. Dwyer, 530 Patton Ave., San .lose 28, Calif. Filed Dec. lit, 1962, Ser. No. 243,290 3 Claims. (Cl. 2177) The present invention relates to deodorizer equipment, and pertains more particularly to a deodorizing vapor dispensing mechanism for mounting on a roller towel cabinet.

It is common practice to provide some sort of deodorizing equipment in public washrooms, such as those found in filling stations, hotels, restaurants and other establishments open to the public. Such equipment usually incorporates a mechanism for vaporizing deodorant material and for disseminating the vapors therefrom into the ambient air.

The present invention provides a deodorizer accessory for mounting on a roller ltowel cabinet, and for operative connection thereto, so that upon each withdrawal of a length of toweling from a roll thereof in the cabinet, an air circulating fan is energized, causing a circulation of air through the vaporizing accessory and over a vapor disseminating member therein, thereby to discharge vapor laden air into the washroom.

Another object of the invention is to provide a vaporizer accessory for a roller towel cabinet, said accessory having means for containing a quantity of vaporizable, deodorant material, air current producing mechanism in the accessory being adapted to be operatively connected to towel dispensing mechanism in the cabinet, whereby, upon each withdrawal of a length of toweling from the cabinet, a portion of the energy expended in withdrawing the toweling is employed to energize the air current producing mechanism.

A further object of the invention is to provide animproved, air circulating, vaporizing accessory for a roller towel cabinet.

A still further object of the invention is to provideV a power driven deodorizer for washrooms and other places which are not provided with a source of electricity.

These, and other objects and advantages of the invention, will be apparent from the following description and the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. l is a perspective view of a roller towel cabinet as it appears when mounted on a wall, ready for operation, and with a deodorant vaporizing mechanism embodying the present invention mounted thereon, a portion of the housing of the vaporizi-ng mechanism being broken away.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, vertical section through the vaporizing mechanism shown in 1EIG. l, a fragment of the towel cabinet being included.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary, sectional view of the cam and roller clutch for driving the fan shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary side elevational View showing a modied form of fan drive mechanism.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along line 5-5 `of FIG. 4.

Briefly, the form of the invention shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 comprises a vaporizi-ng mechanism A mounted on an end of a conventional roller towel cabinet B. The mechanism A comprises a housing having a stored energy drive mechanism 11 mounted therein for keyed, driven connection `co-axially to an end of a roller shaft 12 of the towel cabinet B. The roller shaft 12 is rotatively driven in a well known manner by each withdrawal from the cabinet B of a length 13 of conventional toweling material, either paper or cloth, from a roll 14 in the cabinet B. Upon each rotative movement of the shaft 12, an overrunning clutch 16 embodied in the drive mechanism 11 rotatively drives a large bevel gear 15, which, in turn,

ice.,

drives a small bevel pinion 17 at a substantially greater speed.

A conventional, axial ow air fan 13 is mounted coaxially on the shaft 19 of the pinion 17 and rotates therewith. The overrunning clutch 16 allows the inertia of the fan 18 and its associated parts to continue to rotate after the shaft 12 ceases to rotate.

A suitable supply of vaporizable material is provided in the housing 10 As illustrated, a perforated deodorant container 20, having a conventional cake 21 of vaporizable, deodorant material therein, is mounted in the lower end of the housing 10. Rotation of the fan 18 creates a current of air which carries the deodorizing vapors from the cake 21 upwardly through the housing 10 and discharges them into the surrounding air through louvers 22 provided in the top of the housing 10.

Referring to the drawings in greater detail, the towel cabinet B may be one of a number of well known types employed in public washrooms. The illustrative cabinet B is arranged for upward discharge of the vapor laden air, but the direction of such discharge is not material to the invention. The cabinet B is provided with the roller shaft 12, which is rotatively driven in a usual manner by each withdrawal of a length 13 of toweling from the cabinet. An end of the roller shaft 12 is exposed through a hole 23 in an end of the cabinet B, and is keyed at 24 coaxially to a clutch drive shaft 25 for rotation therewith. The clutch drive shaft 25 is journaled in a bushing 27 mounted in a hole provided therefor in a sheet metal strip 28, the bent over end portion of which is secured to the legs of a horizontally mounted, U-shaped mounting bracket 28. The latter is secured as by spot welds 26 to the base plate 29 of the deodorizer housing 10.

A pair of hook shaped mounting fingers 3i) extend from the housing base plate 29 for insertion into slotted openings providedtherefor in the end wall 32 of the towel cabinet B. By inserting these lingers 30 in the slots provided therefor, and then moving the housing 10 downwardly to the position thereof shown in FIG. 2, these lingers interlockingly engage the cabinet B and attach the vaporizer housing 1t) thereto. During such downward movement of the vaporizer housing 10, the portions of the keyed shaft connection 24 must be aligned for interengagement.

A removable bottom closure member 33 is provided for the vaporizer housing 1t). This closure member 33 is made with a marginal flange 34 of a size to it over the lower end of the housing 10, and an inwardly bent latch tab 35 is formed from a portion severed from the flange 34 of this closure member. This tab 35 is positioned for insertion into slot provided therefor in the deodorizer housing 10. An extension 37 of the bottom closure member 33 extends beneath the towel cabinet B, and is secured thereto by a socketed head machine screw 38. Upon removing this screw 38, the bottom closure member 33 may be moved laterally outwardly from the cabinet to free the tab 35 from its -slot in the housing 10, thereby releasing the closure member 33 for removal. The bottom closure member 33 must be removed, and the keyed shaft connection 24 vertical, in order to free the housing 1t) for vertical movement relative to the towel cabinet B when either attaching the housing 10 to the cabinet B, or removing it.

The container 2li for the vaporizable deodorant material is of a diameter to tit snugly into a recess 39 provided therefor in the bottom closure member 33. The bottom of this recess 39 has a plurality of air holes 4t) therein, and a number of air holes 41 and 42 are also provided in the bottom 43, and removable cover 44, respectively, of the container 2!) to permit a ilow of air therethrough when the fan 18 is operated.

Returning now to the fan drive mechanism 11, the

clutch shaft 25 has a roller clutch drive member 45 of a well known type secured coaxially to its outer or left hand end as shown in FIG. 2. This clutch drive member 45, as best shown in FIG. 3, has a plurality of eccentrically curved, roller-supporting faces 47 formed on its periphery, and a plurality of rollers 4S are mounted, With close radial clearance, one between each of these curved faces 47 and the rim 49 `of a cup shaped clutch driven member 50. A retainer plate 51 on the inner or right hand side of the clutch drive member 45 extends radially outwardly sufliciently to overlie the ends of the rollers 48 to retain them against endwise displacement.

The cup shaped driven clutch member 50 has a hub portion 52, which is secured co-axially, by a through pin 53, to a driven shaft 54. The latter is journaled in axially aligned bushings 57 and 58 fitted into holes provided therefor in a standard 59, and in the upright outer portion et) of the U-shaped bracket 28, respectively. The lower end portion 61 of the standard 59 is bent at right angles to the remainder thereof, and is secured to the lower horizontal leg 62 of the bracket 2S.

When the clutch drive member 45 is rotatively driven in the direction of the curved arrow in FIG. 3, the inertia of the cam rollers 48 causes them to roll outwardly along the curved, peripheral surfaces 47 into gripping, driving relation with the rim 49 of the clutch driven member 50. When, however, the rotative movement of the clutch drive member 45 stops, the inertia of the driven clutch member 5t) and the other rotating parts operatively connected thereto moves the rollers 43 to their radially inward position shown in FIG. 3, in which condition they are spaced slightly from the rim 49 of the driven clutch member 45 so as to release the latter when it is in overrunning condition relative to the clutch drive member 45.

The large bevel gear 15 is secured by a through pin 63 co-axially onto the drive shaft 54, and is in constant mesh with the small diameter fan drive pinion 17. The latter is secured by a through pin 64 onto the lower end of the fan shaft 19, which is journaled in bushings 67 and 68 secured in axially aligned holes in a standard 69 secured to the outer bracket portion 60, and in the upper bracket leg 60a, respectively. Collars 65 and 66 retain the fan shaft 19 against axial displacement.

The fan 18 is a conventional, axial fiow air fan, with blades 70 which may be of light weight sheet metal. These blades are so directed that upon rotation of the fan caused by the withdrawal of a length 13 of toweling from the cabinet B, they create a current of air iiowing upwardly through the housing 10, drawing air from the ambient atmosphere inwardly through the holes 46 in the bottom closure member 33. Thence this air is drawn upwardly through the holes in the top and bottom of the deodorant material container 2t), carrying with it deodorant vapors released by the cake 21. Continuing, this vapor laden air moves upwardly through the housing 1t) and is discharged through the louvers 22 in the top of the housing, back into -the air of the room in which the device is located.

The inertia imparted to the rotating parts of the fan driving mechanism located beyond the clutch drive member 45 causes the fan 1S to rotate for some little time after a desired length of toweling has been withdrawn from the cabinet. In the event that it is desired to increase the amount of this inertia, and thereby prolong the overrunning time of the fan I8, an annular weight, indicated by the dot-dash line 71 in FIGS. 2 and 3 may be secured co-axially onto the rim 49 of the cup shaped driven clutch member 59. l

Other means for employing some of the energy expended in the withdrawal of a length of toweling from the cabinet B for causing a prolonged rotation of the fan 18 may comprise the use of a spring motor C (FIGS. 4 and 5) operatively mounted between the keyed end of a roller shaft 12a corresponding to the shaft 12 `of FIGS. 1 and 2, and a bevel gear shaft 54a corresponding to the i shaft 54 of the latter gures. Other parts shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 also correspond to parts shown in FIGS. l and 2, and such corresponding parts are designated in FIGS. 4 and 5 by the same reference numerals as used in FIGS. l and 2, plus the suffix 11.

The spring motor C comprises a drive shaft 25a keyed co-axially to the end of a towel actuated roller shaft 12a for rotation therewith. A ratchet wheel 73 is secured to the outer or left hand end of the drive shaft 25a, and a pawl '74 limits rotation of the ratchet wheel '73 to the direction in which the latter is urged by rotation of the roller shaft 12a upon the withdrawal of a length 13 of toweling from a cabinet upon which the motor C is mounted. The driven shaft 54a, having a large bevel gear 15a secured co-axially thereon, has its inner or right hand end journaled for free relative rotation in an axial recess provided therefor in the outer or left hand end of the driven shaft 25a. The other end of this driven shaft 54a is journaled in a bushing 58a in the vertical outer end portion 69a of the U-shapcd bracket 28a.

The radially outward end of a flat coil spring 75 which surrounds the shaft 54a is attached to a pin 77 in a side of the ratchet wheel 73. The radially inward end of this spring is secured to the bevel gear shaft 54a. Upon withdrawal of a length of toweling from a towel cabinet Ba upon which the spring motor C is mounted, rotation of the roller shaft 12a rotates the drive shaft 25a, and with it the ratchet wheel '73 secured thereto in the single direction permitted by the pawl 74. This rotation of the ratchet wheel 73 winds the coil spring 75 and stores energy therein for driving the fan shaft 19a until this stored energy has been expended.

The invention provides a simple, effective and efiicicnt dispenser `for deodorant vapors. It is inexpensive to install, requires no electrical connections, and entails no operating expenses other than the periodic replenishing of the vapor producing material. The total running time of the air stream generating mechanism varies almost directly with the amount of toweling withdrawn from a cabinet B having a dispenser embodying the invention mounted thereon. The amount of toweling used, in turn, varies with the amount of use to which a washroom in which the deodorizer is mounted is subjected. During intervals of little use vapor pressure in the confined container 20 greatly reduces 4the rate of evaporation of the deodorant material. All of these features combine to increase efiiciency without reducing effectiveness.

The invention may either be provided as a more or less integral part of a towel cabinet, or can be provided as an accessory for existing cabinets by means of a simple adaptation which is well within the capabilities of a routine worker in, or designer of, such mechanism.

While I have illustrated and described a preferred embodiment of the present invention, it will be understood, however, that various changes and modifications may be madein the details thereof without departing from the scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

Having thus described the invention, what I claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. A deodorizer mechanism for mounting on a towel cabinet of the type having a roll of toweling mounted therein, which cabinet has a shaft thereof rotatively driven by each withdrawal of a length of toweling therefrom; said deodorizing mechanism comprising (a) an auxiliary housing having air openings at opposite ends thereof,

(b) means for mounting the auxiliary housing on such towel cabinet with an end of the towel-driven shaft exposed within the housing,

(c) air propelling means mounted in the auxiliary housing and positioned to direct an air stream created thereby through the auxiliary housing and the air openings therein,

(d) drive means in the auxiliary housing operatively interconnecting the towel-driven shaft and the air propelling means for driving the latter upon each withdrawal of a length of toweling from the cabinet, and

(e) a supply of vaporizable, deodorant material in the housing and positioned in the path of the air propelled therethrough by each actuation of the air propelling means.

2. A deodorizer mechanism for mounting on a towel dispensing cabinet of the type having a roll of toweling mounted therein, and having a first shaft thereof directed toward a wall of the cabinet and perpendicular thereto, said shaft being rotatively driven by the withdrawal of a length of toweling from the cabinet, the cabinet having an opening in the wall thereof toward which said shaft is directed; -said mechanism comprising (a) an auxiliary enclosure mounted on a wall of the towel cabinet toward which said shaft is directed and having openings at opposite ends thereof,

(b) air propelling means in the enclosure,

(c) drive means including a second shaft extending through such opening in the cabinet wall and in driven connection with the tirst shaft, said drive means operatively interconnecting the towel-driven first shaft and the air propelling means for driving the latter upon each withdrawal of a length of toweling from the cabinet,

(d) container means having an opening therein in the path of air propelled by the air propelling means, and

(e) a supply of vaporizable deodorant material in the container means, a portion of the deodorant material being adjacent the opening in the container for exposure to air propelled by the air propelling means.

3. A deodorizer mechanism for a towel cabinet of the type having a roll of toweling mounted therein, and having a shaft thereof rotatively driven by the withdrawal of a lengthof toweling therefrom; said mechanism cornprising (a) a housing having air openings in lopposite ends thereof,

(b) means for mounting the housing on such towel cabinet with an end of the towel-driven shaft exposed within the housing,

(c) air propelling means mounted in the housing and positioned to direct an air stream created thereby through the housing and the air openings therein,

(d) 4overrunning drive means in the housing operatively interconnecting the end of the towel-driven shaft exposed within the housing and the air propelling means for driving the latter in one direction upon each withdrawal of a length of toweling from the cabinet, and freeing the air propelling means for continued rotation in the same direction upon the completion of each withdrawal of toweling material from the cabinet, and

(e) a supply of vaporizable, deodorant material in the housing and positioned in the path of the air propelled therethrough by each actuation of the air propeiling means.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS A598,053 1/08 Lewis 21-77 1,214,149 1/17 Fraad 239-274 X 2,074,077 3/ 37 Smith S12-39 2,175,553 10/39 Altiery 312-38 X 2,347,591 4/44 Cohn 239-274 X 2,539,059 1/51 Cohn 21-77 2,739,840 3/56 Anderson 242-55.2 X 2,746,798 5/ 56 Wardell 242-552 X DONALL H. SYLVESTER, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US598053 *Mar 1, 1897Jan 25, 1898 Disinfecting apparatus
US1214149 *Aug 11, 1916Jan 30, 1917Daniel FraadFumigating device.
US2074077 *Oct 4, 1934Mar 16, 1937John R MillarSoap and towel vending machine
US2175553 *Jan 27, 1938Oct 10, 1939Nicholas AltierySanitary toilet seat cover dispensing machine
US2347591 *Aug 26, 1943Apr 25, 1944Eugene CohnVapor diffusing device
US2539059 *Nov 5, 1945Jan 23, 1951Jack Cohn HaroldCombination dispenser and deodorizer
US2739840 *May 20, 1952Mar 27, 1956Conrad A AndersonToilet paper holder
US2746798 *May 18, 1955May 22, 1956Jr Macarthur WardellDeodorant spray toilet paper hanger
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3305938 *Dec 9, 1964Feb 28, 1967Arthur GoldsteinHand-drying apparatus
US3522935 *Jul 12, 1968Aug 4, 1970Monarch Lab IncAir treatment device
US3920394 *Jan 7, 1974Nov 18, 1975Marrapodi Ernest JohnTissue sterilizing apparatus
US4004687 *Apr 14, 1975Jan 25, 1977Philip BooneDevice for positioning a container of supplemental material adjacent to a toilet-tissue holder
US4040568 *Sep 15, 1975Aug 9, 1977Simco, Inc.Dispenser for vaporizable material accentuated by ambient air flow
US4046508 *Jun 16, 1976Sep 6, 1977Mcdonald William MSanitary handle
US4383377 *Nov 19, 1980May 17, 1983Crafton Thomas WHot air dryer room deodorizer
US6213424Nov 6, 1998Apr 10, 2001Beverly Helfer-GrandTowelette dispenser apparatus
US6883787Nov 6, 2002Apr 26, 2005Sloan Valve CompanyPaper towel dispenser with deodorizer
US8747755Dec 1, 2006Jun 10, 2014Sca Hygiene Products AbCombined electronic dispenser and air freshener
US8991647 *Mar 27, 2012Mar 31, 2015Encore Industrial Supply, LlcCombination toilet paper dispenser, disinfecting station, and deodorizing station
US20120248136 *Mar 27, 2012Oct 4, 2012Kellycraft Innovations LlcCombination Toilet Paper Dispenser, Disinfecting Station, and Deodorizing Station
CN101605490BDec 1, 2006Apr 18, 2012Sca卫生用品公司Combined electronic dispenser and air freshener
WO2008066426A1 *Dec 1, 2006Jun 5, 2008Sca Hygiene Prod AbCombined electronic dispenser and air freshener
Classifications
U.S. Classification422/124, 4/222, 239/52, 242/598.5, 239/274, 312/34.8
International ClassificationA61L9/12, A47K10/24, A47K10/32
Cooperative ClassificationA47K10/32, A47K2010/322, A61L9/122
European ClassificationA47K10/32, A61L9/12F