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Publication numberUS3192951 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 6, 1965
Filing dateJul 27, 1962
Priority dateJul 27, 1962
Publication numberUS 3192951 A, US 3192951A, US-A-3192951, US3192951 A, US3192951A
InventorsWeiss William
Original AssigneeRotary Hospital Equipment Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pulsator
US 3192951 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

w. wElSs July 6, 1965 PULSATRV 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 I Filed July 2'?, 1962v A INVENTOR.

WEISS UJA/D July 5 1965 w. wElss 3,192,951

PULsAToR Filed July 2?, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fla?, a

14 4Z/(gli 41 as; )2 F1694 f h 28 A A N 27 27 I 29 25 Q l II 29 28 19 26 FIG. 8 FIG. 9 25\E 24u INVENTOR WILLIAM WEISS ATTORNEY w. WEISS 3,192,951

PULsAToR 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 July 6, 1965 Filed July 27, 1962 INVENTOR. v

WILLIAM WEISS BY y hm 5 .n I e b 4 w ATTORNEY United States Patent O 3,192,953. PUSATQR- Wiliam Weiss, Euiaio, NEL, assigner to Rotary Hospital Equipment @orporatom Bualo, NH., a corporation oi New York Y Filed lniy 27, 1952, Ser. No. M2394 14 Claims. (Qi. 137-565) This invention relates to improvements in pulsators and proposes a construction which, although without limitation to use with a specic associatesd device to which the air currents are to be delivered, is particularly adapted for use with the types of self-applied facial'massaging devices exemplied in the patents of Laurence E. Corcoran Nos. 2,676,587 ci April 27, 1934, and 2,889,721 of April 7, 1959. V

One object is a novel combination of cooperating elements including an air control valve in association with an air pump for the continuous delivery of air under pressure, which valve is of extremely simple construction and operative in a novel and highly elicient manner.

A further object .is a construction embodying the foregoing combination .and in which the yair control valve has a cycle of operations which are subject to anoperating unit including an electric motor, the unit effecting the rotation or a cam element which directly acts upon the air control valve and the unit and cam element having a novel and advantageous arrangement in adjacency to the air pump and the air control valve.

A Vfurther object is a power driven .pulsator of compact and lightweight construction which may be placed by the user in any convenient position and embodies operative elements in the combinations aforesaid and an enclosing case available as a handle for positioning the pulsator upon a supporting surface or for moving it from place to place.

Other objects and advantages will appear as the description proceeds.

in the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a side eleva-tion of the pulsator with the enclosing case and the mounting features for the air valve shown in section.

FIGURE 2 is an end elevation of the pulsator as viewed from the right, FIGURE 1 being considered,V with certain electric wires and the member for the mountingof the air control valve omitted for clarity of illustration and with the case shown in section.

FIGURE 3 is a plan view showing the base of the pulsator, the member carried by the base for the mounting of the air control valve and a motor unit for elfecting the operations of the air control valve. V

FIGURE 4 is a schematic diagram indicative of the several operative positions in a single revolution of an eccentrically mounted cam element which effects the required movements of the air control valve, .the air control valve being shown in section in its fully closed and fully open positions.

FIGURE 5 is a combined longitudinal sectional and perspective view of the base which carries the operating elements of the pulsatcr, the section being in a central plane of the base.

vIFlGURE 6 is a combined longitudinal sectional and .perspective View or" the'base with a part of the base omitted for clarity of illustration and with the sectional View of the base in a central longitudinal plane and partly in a transverse plane and with the member for the support of the air control -valve partly in vertical section and partly in horizontal section, the part of the member shown in Vthis iigure being its half which is opposite to the halt shown in FGURE 5.

EEG. 7 is a perspective View of the air control valve estesa-.a .hay c, less as mounted in the member carried by the base, the air control valve being shown in closed position and the base and the mounting features for the air control valve being shown in section with the Vhead of the air control valve cut away and shown in section.

FlGURE 8 is a View similar to FiGURE 7 but showing a concentrically mounted cam element for effecting the required movements of the air control valve.

FGURE 9 is a schematic diagram indicative of the several operative .positions in a single revolution of the concentrically mounted cam element shown in FIGURE 8, the air control valve being shown in section in its fully closed and fully open positions as effected by a movement ofthe cam element through The operating parts `of the pulsator are supported by a horizontal base 1, preferably of generally oval or elliptical outline and formed with a downwardly ext-ending circumscribing ilange 2.

The base 1 directly carries an upright member 3, preferably integral with the base, and .which provides a mounting for the air control valve, later to be described, and also serves as a bracket for the attachment of a motor unit, later to be described, the member 3 being formed with a vertical air ow passage 4.

The pulsator includes -a continuously operated air pump S of known construction having the usual valve (not shown) for regulating the pressure at which the air is delivered, the adjustment of this valve being elfected by lthe usual linger piece 6. The air pump has support from the base 1 by an upright bracket 7 (FIGURE-S l and 2) which yis attached by suitable screw fastenings S to the base, .the Shanks of the screws passing through openings Sa in thebase. The bracket 7 is of springl clip character and the air pump 5 is removable at Will from the bracket '7 as occasion may require.

The air pump is provided with a discharge nipple 9 extending downward from its bottom wall vand having Y `a close lit within the upper end portion of the air how passage 4. At an intermediate point the passage e has an opening da Ifor lateral connection -to a line of discharge tubing 1i) which extends through an opening l1 in the base l and is continued for a short distance in the recess l2 located under the base and delimited by the flange 2. Within the recess -12 the tubing 1t), composed of suitable flexible material, has .a terminal connection 13 with a rigid coupling tube 14 which, passing through an opening 1S in the flange 2, projects suiiiciently to enable its ready connection to a line of exible tubing (not shown)- by which the air is carried to the massage or other device which is subject to the operation of the pulsator.

Near its lower end the member 3 is formed with a horizontal recess 16 of annular cross-section with which the air ow passage S communicates at its lower end, theV recess 16 terminating Vin a vertical end wall i7, functioning as a shoulder and located inwardly of the air tiow passage. The recess 16 accommodates the elements of the air control valve, designated generally as 1S, and shown in detail in FIGURE 7. Y

- The air control valve includes a valve head 19 of disk form fitted within Iand diametrically coextensive with the recess i6 and movable cantwise between two positions, in one of which it is closed and prevents the escape to atmosphere of air from the air passage 4 whereby the air delivered Vby the pump 5 will low through the discharge tubing 16 and in the other of which itis open and permits the ilow ot air from the air passage 4 to atmosphere whereby the air will not ilow through thertubing 10. The seat for the'valve head 19 is provided by a cy- V lindrical member 26 which has a close t within the recess 16 and is abutted for sealing purposes by a packing ring 21 of the type shown in theV Christensen Patent No.

2,180,795 of November 2l, 1939, which is colloquially known as an Oring, the ring 21 having a close fit against the wall of the recess i6 and against the inner edge face of the cylindrical member 29. The valve head 19 is urged to and held in its closed position against the ring 21 by an expansive helical spring 22 confined by the valve head and the shoulder 17. The valve head 19 is attached to (and preferably integral with) a centrally located stem 23 which extends in coaxial relation through and beyond the member 20.

The projecting part of the stem 23 is in immediate cooperation with the edge faces of a plate-like cam element 24 rotatable in a vertical transverse plane of the pulsator and which, in the form shown in FIGURE 7, is mounted eccentrically upon a horizontal shaft 25 and rotates in the direction of the arrow. The cam element 24 has straight parallel edge faces 26 and 2'7 and upper and lower curved edge faces 28 and 29, its operational phases being sufliciently indicated in the diagram of FIG- URE 4. The edge face 26 by its engagement with the stem 23 cants the valve head 19 (which has a universal movement) lagainst the pressure of the spring 22 to an open position to vent the air iiowing through the passage 4 to atmosphere and hence substantially to by-pass the discharge tubing 10. The edge face 2S may be called a dwell and by its engagement with the stem 23 holds the valve head 19 in a fully open position for a predetermined period. The edge face 27 provides for the closing movement of the valve head 19 under the pressure of the spring 22. With the cam element in the position shown in FIGURE 7 its edge face 29, which may be called a second dwell, provides for the full closure of the valve head 19 by the spring 22 for a predetermined period during which the air flowing through the passage 4 continues through the discharge tubing from which it is directed to the massage or other device which is subject to the operation of the pulsator. Thus the air control valve 13 functions as a periodic interruptor of the air flow alten nately through the discharge tubing 19 and to atmosphere with resultant periodic operation of the massage or other device to which the air currents are directed from the line of tubing 10.

The shaft is an element of a driving unit designated generally as which is provided for the operation of the cam 24 and is of well known form. The unit 30 includes an electric motor (not shown) housed in a suitable casing 31 and gearing (not shown) connecting the motor shaft and the shaft 25, the gearing having elements which are enclosed in a casing 32 provided with mounting features for the shaft 25. The casing 32 is provided with lateral ears 33, one of which is sufficiently indicated in FIGURE 1, for its attachment by means of fastening screws 34 to the member 3, the Shanks of the screws extending through openings 35 in the member 3 (FIGURES 5 and 6).

The air pressure for the distention of the massage device may be Within a range of the order of one pound -per square inch to three pounds and may be regulated at the will of the user by the finger piece 6. The speed of rotation of the cam 24 is selective as determined by the speed of the motor shaft and the ratio of the gearing which drives the shaft 25. Generally speaking the rotation of the cam 24 within a speed range of from three to five r.p.m. has been found satisfactory although a greater speed of rotation of the cam may be provided for if it should be desired to increase the number of pulsations per minute delivered to the massaging device. With the cam eccentrically mounted (the form shown in FIGURE 7) a single revolution effects a complete cycle of operations of the valve head 19. However, as will be explained later herein, the cycles of operation of the valve head 19 may be increased to two for each revolution of the cam by using a concentrically mounted cam, thereby doubling the number of pulsations per minute.

The current for the operation of the pump 5 and the motor 3@ is carried by wires 36 having a terminal plug 37 for engagement with the usual convenience outlet, the wires 36 carrying a manually operated switch 38 by means of which the current from the supply line may be delivered or cut ofi. The current for the operation of the air pump 5 and the motor is supplied by wires 39 and dil, respectively. The wires 35 pass through openings 41 and 42 in the iiange 2 and base 1, respectively, and at a point above the base l are severally connected to corresponding wires 39 and 40 by the usual connecting thimbles 43 which eliminate the necessity of splicing.

In order that the pulsator may rest upon the supporting surface without liability of marring it the base 1 carries suitable surface engaging pads 44 which are preferably composed of resilient and cushioning material such as foam rubber and are attached by 'a suitable cement to the under face of the base, the pads 44 projecting to a suitable extent below the ange 2.

The pulsator as above described is a complete article of manufacture and sale. However, its parts, including the base 1, are preferably confined within a case 45 of dome-shaped cross sectional outline in both directions, the case 45 fitting closely and in circumscribing relation upon the iiange to which it may be connected by suitable screws which extend through registering openings in the case 45 and the flange 2. The case 45 in its top wall is formed with an opening 49 to accommodate the iinger piece 6 and an end wall is formed with a recess 50 to accommodate the wires 36, its opposite end wall being formed with a similar recess 5l to accommodate the coupling tube I4. The case 45 improves the appearance of the article and from a utilitarian standpoint provides a handle which may conveniently be grasped when the pulsator is to be changed from one position to another as, for example, in moving it between a storage space and a supporting table.

FIGURES 8 and 9 show an alternative construction wherein the cam element, designated as 24a, is concentrically mounted on the shaft 25 and includes parallel edges 26a and 27a and upper and lower curved edges 28a and 29a which function as dwells for engagement with the stem 23 to hold the air control valve in its fully open position for predetermined intervals, the side edges functioning to provide for the full closure of the air control valve for predetermined intervals. Whereas in the construction shown in FIGURES 4 and 7 the cam element 24 in a single revolution effects a single full cycle of movement of the air control valve, in the alternative construction a single revolution of the cam 24a effects two full cycles of operation of the air control valve, each cycle being completed during a movement of the cam 24a through thereby to double the number of operations of the air control valve in a unit period of time as contrasted with the construction shown in FIGURES 4 and 7.

lt will be understood that words indicative or directions or of the positions of the parts such as horizontal, vertical, upper and lower are used with reference to the positions shown in the drawings.

I claim:

1. In a pulsator, in combination: a supporting base; an upright member supported by the base and having an air fiow passage; an air pump supported by and above the base and operative to deliver a continuous current of air; means of communication between the air pump and the air iiow passage; the upright member being provided with a recess with which the air flow passage communicates; a spring loaded air control valve comprising a valve head of disk form fitted in the recess and an operating stem directly connected to and projecting in normal relation from the valve head; the recess enclosing an annular seat against which the valve head may be held in closed position and the stem having a portion which projects through the recess and beyond the upright member; a line of tubing having communication with the air flow passage and through which the air delivered by the pump ows when the valve head is in its closed position, the line .of tubing being an element for the delivery of the air supplied by the pump to a device which is subject to the operation of the pulsator; and a continuously rotatable cam element engageable along its edges with the projecting portion of the stem and operative by such engagement so to displace the stem as tomove the valve head cantwise between open and closed positions, the air delivered by the pump escaping to atmosphere in the open position'of the valve head and flowing through the line of tubing inthe closed the cam element being formed to provide for the maintenance lof the valve head in its open and closed positions for predetermined periods.

2. A pulsator as set forth in claim 1 wherein the cam element is eccentrically mounted and in a single revolution effects a cycle of operation of the air control valve.

3. A pulsator as set forth in claim 1 wherein the cam element is concentrically mounted and in a single revolution effects two cycles 4of operation of the air control valve.

4. A pulsator as set forth in claim 1 wherein a driving unit including an electric motor is provided for the cam element and is positioned above the base and connected for support to the upright member, the driving unit including a shaft upon which the cam element is mounted and speed reducing gearing between the motor and the shaft.

S. A pulsa-tor as set for in claim 4 wherein the supporting base is formed with a downwardly directed circumscribing flange which delimits a recess and with an opening through which the line of tubing extends into the recess, the ange carries a coupling tube to which the line of tubing is connected and which projects beyond the flange for connection externally of the recess to other tubing, electric current supply wires extend beyond the base and carry a terminal plug for connection to a convenience outlet, the base and its circumscribing ange having openings though which the electric current supply wires are carried to positions above the base, electric wires above the base which are connected to the air pump, other electric wires above the base which are connected to the driving unit, and thimbles above the base which connect the electric current supply wires to the Wires connected to the air pump and the wires connected to the driving unit.

6. A pulsator as set forth in claim 4 wherein the supporting base is formed with a downwardly directed circumscribing flange which delimits a recess and with an lopening through which the line of tubing extends into the recess, the ange carries a coupling tube to which the line lof tubing is connected and which projects beyond the flange for connection externally of the recess to other tubing, electric current supply wires extending beyond the base and carrying a terminal plug for conection to a convenience outlet, the base and its circumscribing ange having openings through which the electric current supply wires are carried to positions above the base, and the electric current supply wires are electrically connected to the air pump and to the driving unit.

7. A pulsator as set forth in claim 6 wherein an enclosing case fits closely and in circumscribing relation upon the flange, the case being connected to the ange and providing a handle by which the pulsator may be movedV from place to place and having end walls which are formed with recesses respectively to accommodate the electric current supply wires and the coupling tube.

8. A pulsator as set forth in claim 1 wherein the recess terminates in a shoulder, the seat for the valve head includes an O-ring and the loading spring for the air control valve is mounted in the recess between the valve head ow passage extends between the recess and the upper face of the upright member and the pump is provided with a downwardly directed discharge nipple which has a close lit in the upper end portion of the air tlow passage.

10. A pulsator as set forth in claim 1 wherein an upright bracket of spring clip type is secured to the base and the air pump is supported by the bracket in removable re# lation.

11. A pulsator as set forth in claim 1 wherein the seat for the valve head is .provided by a cylindrical member having a close lit within the recess and through which the stem of the valve vhead projects and an O-ring having Va close iit against the wall of the recess and against the inner edge face of the cylindrical member, the valve head in its closed position having direct seating upon theV circumscribing flange' which delimits a recess and with an opening through which the line of tubing extends into the recess and the flange carries a coupling tube to which the line of tubing is connected and which projects beyond the flange for connection externally of the recess to'other tubing.

13. In Va pulsator, in combination: a supporting base;

an upright member supported by the base and having an air ow passage; an air pump supported by and above the base and operative to deliver a continuous current of air; means of communication between the air'pump and the air ilow passage; a line of tubing having communication with the air flow passage and being an element tor the delivery of the air supplied by the pump to a device which is subject to the operation of the pulsator; a valve movable between two positions, in one of which it provides for the flow of air through the line of tubing and in the other of which it diverts the flow of air from the f line of tubing; a driving unit including an electric motor; means of operative connection between the driving unit and the valve for effecting the movements of the valve between its two positions; the supporting base being formed with a downwardly directed circumscribing flange which delimits a recess and with an opening through which the line of tubing extends into the recess; and a coupling tube carried by the ange and to which the line of tubing is connected, the coupling tube projecting beyond the ange for connection externally of the recess to other tubing.

14. A pulsator as set forth in claim 13 wherein an enclosing case lits closely and in circumscribing relation upon the downwardly directed flange, the `casing being connected to the flange and providing the handle by which the pulsator may be moved from place to place.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS M. CARY NELSON, Primm Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1364501 *Jan 24, 1920Jan 4, 1921George E GibeaultHyperemia apparatus
US2148443 *Jun 22, 1934Feb 28, 1939Deady Meter CorpLiquid-fuel meter
US2345073 *Apr 10, 1942Mar 28, 1944Blanche B RosettApparatus for operating therapeutic devices
US2559046 *Sep 19, 1947Jul 3, 1951Damrow Brothers CompanyValve
US2606739 *Apr 30, 1948Aug 12, 1952Gardner Lawrence HFluid control valve
US2616512 *Apr 6, 1950Nov 4, 1952Coon Everett PAntibackflow valve
US2936002 *Jan 23, 1957May 10, 1960Vyzk Ustav Tvarecich StrojuDevice on jet weaving looms
US3027918 *Nov 4, 1960Apr 3, 1962Schloemann AgThrottle valves for extrusion presses
US3058461 *May 23, 1958Oct 16, 1962Jacques CourtinMassaging installation and control apparatus therefor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4197837 *Jan 15, 1979Apr 15, 1980American Hospital Supply CorporationInflatable-deflatable pad and air control system therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/565.16, 601/48, 137/624.13, 251/303
International ClassificationA61H23/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61H9/0078
European ClassificationA61H9/00P6