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Publication numberUS3193090 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 6, 1965
Filing dateApr 6, 1961
Priority dateApr 6, 1961
Publication numberUS 3193090 A, US 3193090A, US-A-3193090, US3193090 A, US3193090A
InventorsHudgeons Jr Thomas Edgar, Hudgeons Sr Thomas E
Original AssigneeHudgeons Jr Thomas Edgar, Hudgeons Sr Thomas E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin mounting
US 3193090 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 6, 1965 T. E. HUDGEONS, SR., ETAL 3,193,090

coIN MOUNTING Filed April 6, 1961 26 24 22 20 /a F lg. i ,f

Thomas E. Hudgeons, 5r.

7' mas Edgar Hudgeons, Jf.

INVENTORS United States Patent O 3,193,090 COIN MOUNTING Thomas E. Hudgeons, Sr., and Thomas Edgar Hudgeons, Jr., both of 7661 Ridgewood Drive, Parma, Ohio Filed Apr. 6, 1961, Ser. No. 101,279 Claims. (Cl. ZIM-.83)

The present invention generally relates to a mounting device or receptacle for various relatively thin objects such as coins, stamps, metals, tokens and any other such items which require prolonged protection and at the same time require that the items being protected be readily observable.

One of the major problems facing numismatists and philatelists as well as other collectors and hobbyists is the storage of the various specimens in a manner which will protect the same but yet enable ready observation thereof. This is especially true when the article involved is a coin which is subject to deterioration by tranishing, staining or the like when it comes into contact with various foreign particles and materials such as perspiration on the fingers which is transferred to the coin when handling. Therefore, it is the primary object of the present invention to provide a mounting or receptacle for coins or the like which will indefinitely protect such article in order to maintain its maximum value over a long period of time while at the same time providing a highly inexpensive storage device and display device.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a mounting or receptacle for coins, stamps or like articles which is extremely simple to use, economical, flexible in utility, highly protective and capable of being constructed in various types, sizes and shapes so that various items that need to be protected to maintain their maximum Value in a state of preservation in a collection 0r the like may be stored in the device.

Another feature of the present invention is to provide an exceptionally clear plastic Window in the mounting or receptacle of the present invention which enables a person to immediately visually inspect all surfaces of the item stored between the plastic windows. Both the obverse and reverse side and even the edges of the item stored may be viewed thus enabling one to view even the smallest and most minute defects of such an item. The device also still provides protection against moisture, scratching, rubbing tranishing, deterioration or wear. Thus, the receptacle or mounting of the present invention enables the maintenance of a high standard of' protection with the least possible amount of effort.

Another factor in the present invention is the provision of a mounting in which the individual collectors may re-adily mount their own coin or other articles thus providing a considerable satisfaction in the actual construction of the finished article that is, the assembly of the coin or other article with the mounting or receptacle.

Briefly, the present invention involves a cardboard sheet having a die cut window opening therein and having a coating of pressure sensitive adhesive which, when pressed to itself sticks on contact together with two pieces of `,crystal clear plastic which provides windows when placed over the openings and which cooperate with the article rplaced therebetween to form a receptacle inasmuch as the plastic windows have a periphery spaced from the periphery of the cardboard sheet. The cardboard sheet proyides an extremely low cost of manufacture and yet offers lCe the maximum protection afforded by much more expensive means. Also, the openings may be formed in such a manner that a single cardboard sheet will receive a complete mint or proof set of coins in that it has four pairs of openings of equal side and a single pair of larger openings capable of receiving a fifty cent piece and the four pairs capable of receiving a quarter or smaller coin. Of course, the size of the openings may be varied depending upon the particular articles being associated with the cardboard sheet.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIGURE l is a plan View of the cardboard sheet of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a partial plan View of the adhesively coated surface of the cardboard sheet illustrating the position of the clear plastic sheet thereon in overlying relationf tothe opening;

FIGURE 3 is an end elevational View of the construction of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view illustrating the positioning of a coin in 4the mounting and the manner lof folding the cardboard sheet so that the openings therein are Vin alignment and the plastic sheets overlie each other and receive the coin therebetween together with the contacts between the surfaces of the cardboard sheet having the adhesive coating thereon;

FIGURE 5 is a perspective view of the completed receptacle with the coin therein; and

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view taken substantially upon a plane passing along section line 6 6 of FIGURE 5 illustrating the structural details and relationship of Athe components of the invention.

Referring now specifically to the drawings, the numeral 1i) generally designates the coin mounting or receptacle of the present invention and for purposes of illustration, the invention has been disclosed specifically for the purposes of protectively mounting coins or the like and it is pointed out that various articles may be effectively supported in a protected manner by the device of the present invention.

The optimum manner of construction involves the use of a generally rectangular sheet of cardboard material 12 which is relatively stiff but capable of a certain degree of flexing. The cardboard rectangular sheet is provided with a longitudinally extending fold line and four trans-- Verse score lines 16 which enable optional separation of the sheet into five different segments which may beI separated along the score lines 16. The sections of the cardboard sheet 12 delineated by the score lines 16 are designated by numeral 18, 20, 22, 24 and 26 respectively.

Disposed centrally in each of the sections 18-24 is a pair of openings 28 which are equally spaced from the center fold line 14 on opposite sides thereof and equally spaced from the score lines 16 or the end edges of each section. The openings 28 are all of the same size and are of a sufiicient size to receive a quarter or any other coin of equal size or lesser size than the quarter. The size of the openings 28 is such that adequate space will be provided peripherally of a quarter or any smaller coin to enable visual inspection of the peripheral edge thereof. In the section 26 a pair of openings 30 is provided in the same orientation as the openings Z8 but the openings 30 dollar to be disposed therein. Of course, smaller coinsV may also kbe mounted between the openings 3) if desired. With this construction, the cardboard sheet 12 may be employed for housing or receiving a mint set or proof set the openings 2S will receive any size item up toa twenty- ,live cent coin size while'the other opening 3%) will lit of coins for maintaining. them Vin a highly protectedY v orientation.

This cardboard sheet also facilitates the packaging of the present invention Vin thatv a. number of the cardboard sheets may be disposed insuperimposed relation and placed in a suitable container such as a receptacle or the like and the upper end Yof the plastic receptacle or bag may be closed by using a suitable closure tab or meansY having the price, nameV and othery pertinent information concerning the items therein. Y

Also provided in the package is a plurality of completely clear plastic sheets 32 which are'preferably square in configuration. An example of such plastic sheets are square sheets of Eastman Kodapak IV. Other equivalent types of clear plastic may be employed as long as they are completely transparent androptically neutral.

The4 surface of the rectangular cardboard sheet 12 which may be termed the reverse surface is provided with a coating ofy pressure sensitive adhesive or glue 34. The glued surface is on the opposite side fromr which the scored separation lines 16 are formed and rthe'fold' line 14 is .formed so ,that the cardboard sheet` 12 may be readily folded along the foldline 14 to bring the pressure sensitive adhesive areas into contact with eachother. A

-certain procedure is followed when -mounting acoin 36 in the, mounting or receptacle of the present invention'.

The sheet' may be used either as a complete. sheet for mountinga mint orproof setor it may be separated into the Ydifferent sections. In any event, the sheetsV or Vthe individual sections are orientated with the VadhesivelyV coated surface 34 facing upwardly. A pairV Yof plasticv sheets 32 are disposed into overlying relation to the openings28 yor 30 as illustrated in FIGURE 2.` Preferably;

theY openings are generally orientated in relation to the.

plastic sheets 32 in suchra manner that the openingsV are centrally' disposed in relation tothe plastic sheet 32. By merely placinga small pressure upon the plastic sheet 32',

' pressure.

items up to a fty cent coin size. The permanent mounting of the coin eliminates the necessity of using separate closure means such as staples,'wet glue,.heat seals and the like in thatthe present invention only requires. fingertip One very important feature is that the item cannot bev tampered with or removed without destroying the receptacle completely. This is highly advantageous and has been sought after and requested by numismatists in that precious coins can now be shipped to prospective customers by marking Vthe receptacle or mounting' so that the customers may thenexamine the coins in'every detail upon arrival through ther crystal clear window formed by the plastic sheet. Yet thecoin cannot be removed, exchanged or tampered with withoutY such action being detectedy by the person sending the coins to the prospective customer. Y i

The Vdevice of the present invention may be varied as to the shape or size of the cardboard sheets or segments together with the shape or` size of the openings and plastic sheet.V Thiswillenable `almost any sizeY or variety of VX-ray negatives or any other items thatneed tor be prof tected as amatterv of necessity may be conveniently sup- 'ported and retained. in protected relation. The. plastic sheet which engages the coin` or other article protected is completely inert as far as anydeleterious chemical effect on the articlel is concerned.`

Another convenience. of the cardboard sheet vwhich Vforms. aV plurality of receptaclesis the facilitation of identiication through typing or hand lettering on the cardboard sheet. With :this arrangement, it is unncessary to handle single receptacles thus saving many hours ofv an otherwise tedious and Vannoying task. Complete and adequate identifying data maybe printed on Ithe receptacle by it may be fastened to the pressure sensitive adhesive. For example, thengernail'rmay berpressed slightly. against the surface of the plastic sheet32 and moved therealong for a short distance for securing the plastic Vsheets in place duringassembly of the invention. The coin 36 is then placed on one of theV plasticV sheets.32 in. alignment generally with theunderlying opening'. The remainder. of.

the section of the sheet 12 Yis then folded upwardly'along fold lines 14 and then into overlyingV relation to the coin 36 and pressure is then exerted preferably .around thev usinga conventional typewriter priorto assembly of the articles inithe receptacle. Without the use'of metal, an objectionable feature of most mountingsfhas been eliminateld; It hasbeen found` thatrno matter how carefully the metallstaples are used, there is always the change that the staple may, insome way, vcome intofcontact with the coins stored either-.leaning against one another or merely placed too close to the coins.,V This produces unremovableA stains or tarnish marks which'detracts seriously from thevalue and appearance of thecoin.A

" The presentl inventionA is; also very useful in the metal industry for purposes yof shipping small samples of metal,

ore or, finished piecesor specimens to. customers for in.-

' spectionv and analysis. Also, gems andother'articles of openings 28 or 30 thus bringing the pressure sensitive adhesive covered areas exteriorly of the plastic sheets. 32 into sealing and connectingrelation to each other thereby bringing the plastic sheets 32 into overlying and enclosing relation to.` the coins 36. The surface-to-surface contact of the plastic' sheet. 32 and the fact that the pressure sensitive adhesive forms a seal for the peripheral edges of the plastic sheets 32, the Vcoin 36 will be retained in a highly protected manner. Y Once the coin hask been mounted, it'is impossible to remove the coin without a similiar nature may be shipped expeditiously.

lA very novel and important aspect is the fact that the present invention. is extremelyY economical since it is con- Y structedsolelyof cardboard with adhesive; thereon and plastic .sheets which economy also provides a certain de,-

destroying the mounting.V However, theY mounting is quite inexpensive and may be easily replaced if desired.

While the size and shape of the components may vary, the device illustrated includes the carboard sheet 12 which is four inches by ten inches with a scored line 16 being disposed at two inch intervals. The eight openings 28 are provided with a oneV inch diameter VWhile the two openings 30 are one and five-sixteenths inches in diarneter. The complete unseparated sheet or board` may be used for mounting a series of items such as mint sets, proof sets or any other item which need be collected in a set so as to preserve their maximum value. segments canbe separated and used individually in that The.

gree of satisfaction by the users thereof inasmuch as they can create the iinalproduct themselves. Y

rIhe foregoing isiconsidered. as illustrative only; of the principles of the invention.'y Further, since numerous modifications andchanges will readily koccur to those Q skilled in the art, it. is not desired to limit .the invention tc the exact'confstruction and operation shown and described,

Vtand accordingly all suitable modifications and yequivalents may be resorted to, falling within .the scope of the invention as claimed.r

Whatis claimed as new is as follows:

1. VA"receptacle for .mounting` and protecting-articles comprising a panell of cardboard material foldable along a central fold line, said panel including a pair 'of openings therein, said openings being disposed on opposite sides Vof the fold line for'orien-tati-on in aligned relation when the panel is folded along the fold` line and the portions lonV opposite sides of the fold line brought int-o. overlying engagement, an adhesive coating sensitive to pressure at room temperature on one sur-face of the panel, a normally planar transparent iiexible sheet overlying each opening, said transparent sheets being held in place by the .adhesive and being larger than the openings but smaller than the panel whereby a relatively thin article of less perimetrical dimension than the opening may be disposed between the sheets within the space defined by the periphery of each of the openings when the panel is folded whereby the sheets in contact with the articles will conform partially to the shape of the article and maintain the article in protected relation and the portion of the pressure sensitive coating on the panel exteriorly of the periphery of the sheets will be sealingly engaged with each other by exerting linger pressure peripherally of the folded panel thereby retaining the article for visual observation through the openings from either side thereof and peripherally thereof by virtue of the transparent sheet enclosing the article.

2. A mounting for relatively at objects such as coins or the like comprising a generally thin rectangular cardboard sheet having a longitudinally centrally disposed fold line and a plural-ity of transversely disposed score lines for separation of the sheet in-to a plurality of individual separable sections, each of the sections of the sheet having a pair of openings therein oriented centrally of the area of each section on opposite sides of the fold line, Ia coating of pressure sensitive adhesive on one surface of the sheet, a pair of clear flexible transparent plastic sheets for each of said sections, each sheet being of less size than the .area of one of the individual sections of the sheet and greater size than the area of the opening and mounted by the pressure sensitive adhesive in overlying relation t-o each of the openings whereby a coin of less size than the opening may be d-isposed on the upper surface of one of the plastic sheets in alignment within the opening and the cardboard sheet then folded along the fold Iline to bring the other plastic sheet into overlying relation and to bring the portion of the periphery of each of said sections exteriorly of the periphery of the plastic sheets into seal-ing contact-ing relation with each other and sealing the edges of opposite plastic sheets thereby mounting the coin in sealed relation between the plastic sheets for enabling inspection of both sides and the periphery thereof.

3. A mounting for relatively at objects such as coins or the like comprising a foldable sheet having a longitudinally centrally disposed fold line and a plurality of tr-ansversely disposed score lines for separation of the sheet into a plurality of individual sections, each of the sections of the sheet having a pair of openings therein oriented central-ly of the area of each section on opposite sides of the fold line, a coating of pressure sensitive adhesive on one surface of the sheet, a normally planar and easily flexed transparent sheet of less size than the area and being mounted by the pressure sensitive adhesive in overlying relation to each opening whereby a coin of less size than the opening may be disposed on the upper surface of one of the transparent sheets in alignment with the opening and the foldable sheet then folded along the fold line to bring the other transparent sheet into overlying relation and to bring the portion of the periphery of each section exteriorly of the periphery of the transparent sheet into seal-ing contacting relation thereby mounting the coin in sealed relation between the transparent sheets with the entire periphery thereof being visible.

4. A mounting receptacle for coins and the like comprising two coextensive frame members of relatively rigid thin sheet material secured together along one edge thereof by a fold line, each frame member being formed with an opening occupying a subst-antial portion of the center thereof and having .an area greater than a coin to be placed thereon, panels of normally planar, readily flexible transparent sheet material disposed across each of the openings in the frame members and between the frame members,

said panels of sheet material having a shape conforming to the shape of the frame members and a perimetrical dimension only slightly less than the perimetrical dimen- .sion of the frame members whereby the periphery of the panels will be spaced inwardly concentrically from the periphery of the frame members, said panels having a per-imetrical dimension greater than the perimetrical dimension of the opening in the frame members whereby the periphery of the panels will be disposed intermediate the perimeter of the openings and the perimeter of `the frame member, said frame members having room temperature pressure contact adhesive throughout the facing surfaces thereof, said panels being secured in place on the frame members by said adhesive from around their periphery to said opening, said frame members being secured together beyond said panels solely by the area of pressure sensitive adhesive disposed peripherally outwardly of the panels for securing the frame members and panels in peripheral sealed relation by exerting peripheral squeezing nger pressure on the frame members when folded into loverlying rela-tion thereby sealing a coin or the like between the transparent panels within the openings in the frame members with the coin or the like having a smaller perimetrical dimension than the openings so that both sides and the periphery of the coin or the like may be visu-ally inspected.

5. A mounting receptacle for a plurality of coins or the like comprising two longitudinally elongated coextensive frame members constructed of relatively rigid sheet material of a thickness less than one half the thickness of a coin to be mounted therein and being secured together along one edge thereof by a centrally disposed longitudinal fold line, said frame members being divided into a plurality of sections by .a plurality of longitudinally spaced score lines whereby the frame members may be divided into a plurality of sections with each section having one edge thereof connected to an adjacent section by virtue of the fold line, each of said sections being formed to provide an opening occupying a substantial portion of the center thereof, one surface of the frame members having a coating of pressure sensitive adhesive thereon with the adhesive covering the entire surface area thereof, each section of each frame member being provided with a normally planar and readily ilexible transparent plastic sheet member mounted thereon by the pressure sensitive adhesive and disposed between the sections of the frame members when the frame members are folded into overlying relation or when the individual sections of the Iframe members are folded into loverlying relation, each panel of transparent material having a shape conforming to the shape of the section on which it is mounted and having a perimetrical dimension only slightly less than fthe perimetrical dimension of the section on which it is mounted whereby the periphery of each of the transparent panels will be spaced inwardly concentrically from the periphery of the sect-ion of the frame members on which it is mounted, each of said transparent panels also having a perimetrical dimens-ion greater than the perimetrical dimension of the opening in each of the sections whereby the periphery of the transparent panels will be disposed intermediate the perimeter of the opening in each of the sections tand the perimeter of the sections, said trame members and each of the individual sections being secured together solely by the area of pressure sensitive adhesive disposed peripherally outwardly of the transparent panels thereby securing the sections and panels in peripheral sealed relation by exerting peripheral squeezing finger pressure on the sections when folded into overlying relationship thereby sealing a coin or the like between the transparent panels with the coins or the like having a smaller perimetrical dimension than the opening so that both sides and the periphery of the coin may be visually inspected with the thickness of the coin serving to partially deform the transparent panels so that the mansp-arent panels will snugly embrace and engage the coin to prevent lateral displacement thereof. Y

Spitzer.

Mellin Burnhamu u r 206,-,78 Simpson 407-14578 Snyder.

i S 2,491,424 12/49 simmer. v Y 2,571,073 10/51- stroop. 20G-78 2,571,764 10/51V Rodger'. 40-158 Y 2,597,227 5/-52'0011-11011 ;---1 20G-78 5 V 2,867,927 41/59 schwayrtzr 40.4158

THERONE. CONDON, Primary Examiner.

EDWARD vV. BENHAM, EARLEYJ. DRUMMOND,

Y y Y Examiners.

Patent Citations
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US2571073 *Jun 6, 1946Oct 9, 1951Stroop David VHolder for coins and similar articles
US2571764 *Nov 15, 1946Oct 16, 1951Eastman Kodak CoLantern slide mount
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3302773 *Dec 3, 1965Feb 7, 1967Shoemaker Fred NNumismatic receptacle
US4385688 *Apr 6, 1981May 31, 1983Grant Robert FArticle display and holder apparatus
US4466534 *Sep 13, 1982Aug 21, 1984Dunn J MalcolmDisplay packages
US4691827 *May 8, 1986Sep 8, 1987Ronald GraceSupported package attached to panel in parallel slots
US5058734 *Jan 22, 1991Oct 22, 1991Wayne ScheibleStorage and display device for coin cassettes
US7100761Sep 12, 2003Sep 5, 2006Unicover CorporationRotatable coin display
US7322512 *Jun 9, 2006Jan 29, 2008Higer Adam MCoin holder
US8181377 *Jan 22, 2010May 22, 2012Ade, Inc.Display devices and methods of displaying objects
US8215479Aug 14, 2009Jul 10, 2012Unicover CorporationCoin storage and display device
WO2003071902A1 *Feb 14, 2003Sep 4, 2003Pleven Ludovic Joel GeorgesDevice for protecting, displaying and using a coin for standard ornamentation purposes
WO2004023942A1 *Sep 12, 2003Mar 25, 2004Max A DeherreraRotatable coin display
WO2010039398A1 *Sep 9, 2009Apr 8, 2010Unicover CorporationCoin storage and display device
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/.83
International ClassificationA47G1/00, A47G1/12
Cooperative ClassificationA47G1/12
European ClassificationA47G1/12