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Publication numberUS3194427 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 13, 1965
Filing dateMay 31, 1963
Priority dateMay 31, 1963
Also published asDE1450276A1, DE1450276B2
Publication numberUS 3194427 A, US 3194427A, US-A-3194427, US3194427 A, US3194427A
InventorsBooker Robert J, Mullett Howard G
Original AssigneeBradley Waschfontaenen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Closure
US 3194427 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1965 H. ca. MULLETT ETAL 3,194,427

CLOSURE I Filed May 51, 1963 r 7 HOWARD e. MULLETT /,f"||- I;; ROBERT J. BOOKER 4 1." H

evam,

ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,194,427 CLOSURE Howard G. Mullett and Robert J. Booker, Milwaukee,

Wis, assignors to Bradley Washfountain (30., Milwaukee, Win, a corporation of Wisconsin Filed May 31, 1963, Ser. No. 284,624 8 Claims. (Cl. 220-45) This invention relates to closures for the filling opening of a soap dispenser for a washfountain, or for other applications where is it necessary to close off an opening through a wall member; and it resides more particularly in the combination with a wall having an aperture therethrough of a rotatable cap disposed on one side of the wall and engageable therewith; a locking bar disposed on the other side of the wall; means to hold the bar and cap against relative rotation while allowing them to move toward and away from one another; ramp means cammingly engageable with the bar to move the bar away from the cap as the cap is rotated; bias means to urge the cap and bar together; and lock means to move the cap and bar toward one another.

Closures formed accordingly to this invention are particularly useful in connection with soap dispensers for group washfountains such as those commonly provided in schools and industrial plants. Such washfountains usually comprise a large basin and a central, 360 sprayhead for simultaneous use by a number of persons. A soap dispenser is often mounted above the sprayhead and usually comprises a reservoir for powdered or liquid soap and any suitable number of individual valves or other dispensing means, It is of course necessary to refill the reservoir at frequent intervals, and to this end the cover of the reservoir is usually provided with a filling opening with a suitable removable closure.

Presently available closures have not proven entirely satisfactory for soap dispensers, and they are usually either to difiicult to operate or too easily tampered with. Since refilling of a soap dispenser is a frequent occurrence and is often done by unskilled persons, a dispenser closure must be easy to operate. On the other hand, pranks and vandalism are common in washrooms and dispensers closures are usually fully exposed, so that a closure which may be easily removed by unauthorized persons is wholly unsuitable. The closure must also provide an effective seal to prevent the wetting of powdered soap or the introduction of foreign matter which might ultimately clog the dispensing valve, contaminate the soap, or cause other damage.

It is the general object of this invention to provide an improved closure which provides an effective seal and which can be operated easily by authorized persons and which can easily be locked in place to prevent tampering. Although these attributes make the closure of this invention particularly suitable for soap dispensers, such a closure will be useful in a wide variety of applications.

The invention is not, therefore, intended to be limited to any particular use.

It is an object of this invention to provide a closure which may be manually operated and which may easily be locked in a closed position.

it is another object of this invention to provide a closure in which a visible cap is provided with a beveled edg to make it easy to grasp.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a closure in which a locking bar is mounted on a cap so that it is movable toward and away from the cap but is held against rotation relative to the cap so that the two rotate as a unit in a closing action and so that the bar may be moved toward the cap in a locking action.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a closure in which a ramp means which cammingly engages BJMAZ? Fatented July 13, 1965 a locking bar is provided with a reverse incline near one end to insure a positive holding and locking action.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide a closure in which stops are provided to limit the movement of a locking bar and cap beyond closed position and to prevent their rotation in the wrong direction.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a closure having an easily accessible tool operable lock means.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide a closure having a threaded lock means provided with a stop member to prevent itfrom being removed from the locking bar.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a closure having the foregoing advantages which is relatively simple and inexpensive to manufacture.

Further objects and advantages will appear from the description to follow. In the description, reference is made to the accompanying drawing, forming a parthereof, in which there is shown by illustration and not of limitation a particular embodiment of the invention.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary top plan view of the top wall of a soap dispenser showing a closure, formed according to this invention, in place,

FIG. 2 is a bottom plan view of the closure of FIG. 1,'

FIG. 3 is a bottom plan view of the closure of FIG. 1 that is similar to FIG. 2, but shows the cap and locking bar in a closed position,

FIG. 4 is a view in cross section taken along the plane 4l4 shown in FIG. 1,

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary View in cross section taken along the plane 55 shown in FIG. 3, and

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary view in cross section taken along the plane 5-6 shown in FIG. 2.

In the drawing, the reference numeral 1 refers to the plastic top wall or cover of a soap dispenser or similar receptacle (not shown). Again, it should be remembered that the closure of this invention is useful in a wide variety of applications. For this reason, and since the structure and operation of the closure can be understood without reference to any particular receptacle or other structure, the soap dispenser has not been shown ordescribed herein. For one illustration of a soap dispenser in which a closure formed according to this invention may be used, reference may be had to US. Patent No. 2,376,551 issued May 22, 1945 to H. G. Mullett et al.

The wall 1 has a substantially circular aperture therethrough which is provided with a pair of substantially diametrically opposite, generally rectangular cutout portions or recesses 3 which serve as lateral extensions of the aperture 2. The underside of the wall 1, that surface seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, is provided with an integral upstanding rim 4, which extends about substantially the entire circumference of the aperture 2 except for those portions occupied by the recesses 3.

As can be seen most clearly in FIGS. 2, 3 and 5, the underside of the wall 1 is also provided with a pair of integral ramp means 5 which extend outwardly from the rim 4. The ramp means 5 begin near opposite sides of the recesses 3, with each ramp 5 extending from a point near its associated recess 3 and thence about the circumference of the aperture 2 to terminate approximately on a line perpendicular to a line drawn between the recesses 3. Each ramp 5 beings at the level of the rim 4. and inclines outwardly from the wall 1 to an apex 6 intermediate its ends. From the apex 6, each ramp 5 is provided with a reverse incline toward the wall 1 which continues until the ramp 5 terminates at an upstanding stop projection 7. The two ramps 5 are substantially diametrically opposite; that is, they have their corresponding points substantially on opposite sides of the center of recesses 3. The rims 4 and 9 serve to strengthen the wall 1. In those cases where a closure formed according to the-invention is to be used with a curved wall member, rims such as the rims'4 and'9, are also useful in providing flat operating and sealing surfaces about the aperture 2. It can beseen from FIG. 4,'that the aperture 2 tapers outwardly slightlyxfrom the bottom of the wall 1, which is actually the top of the rim 4!, to the top of the rim 9.

A generally circular, plate-like plastic cap 10 engages the upper surface of'the wall 1, the surface seen in FIG. 1, with. the outer edge of its inner side in sealing contact with the rim h, the cap 10 thus serving to close off the aperture 2; As can be seen from FIG. 4, the edge of the cap 10 is beveledor tapered inwardly from top to bottom for ease in handling as will be described.

The'cap 510 is provided on its bottom or inner side with a pair'of integral downwardly extending, substantially diametrically opposite projections 11 each provided with a downwardly opening, fiat bottomed notch 12. At about the center of the cap 10, intermediate the projections 11, there is a downwardly extending integral block 13 having a smooth, vertical stepped bore 14 extending therethrough. A lock meansin the form of a threaded screw 15, having an operating head 16, is slidably and rotatably received through the bore 14 with the head 16 being received in the relatively larger upper portion of the bore 14, as can be seen in FIG. 4.

A compression spring 17 is seated in'theintermediate portion of the bore 14 and acts between the floor of the intermediate portion of the bore 14 and the head 16 to urge the screw in an-upward direction as seenin FIG. 4.

' A generally rectangular metal locking bar 18 is threadedly mounted on the downwardly projecting end of the screw 15, the-bar-18thus being mounted on or connected to the cap 10." The lower end of the screw 15 is provided with a groove which receives a lock washer 19 which prevents the screw-15 from being removed from'the bar 18.

As can be seen clearly in FIGS. 2, 3 and 6, the bar 18 is provided with narrowed end portions 20 which are received in the notches 12 of the projections 11. Because the-ends 20 are disposed in the notches 12, the bar 18-is held against rotational movement relative to the cap 10 but is allowed to move toward and away from the cap'10. The projections 11 and the block 13 serve to limit movement of the bar '18 toward the cap 10.

The bar 18 is normally in the position shown in FIG. 4;

that is, it is held against the projections 11 and block 13 by the spring 17. The screw 15 and bar 18 are adjusted so thatin this normal'position there is, as can be seen in FIG. 4,'a clearance between the head 16 and its seat in the bore 14. This clearance allows the bar 18 to be moved downwardly in a closing action as will be described. The projections 11 and block 13 are of sufficient height so that when the bar 18 is in the normal position shown in FIG. 4 the distance between the bar 18 and the a cap 10 is slightly greater than the thickness of the wall 1,

which at the aperture 2 is the distance between the tops of the rims 4 and 9. 7

As can be seen clearly in FIG. 2, the bar 18 is longer than the diameter of the aperture 2, but is shorter than the distance between theremote ends of the recesses 3 so that it can pass through the aperture 2 only when the narrowed ends 20 are in alignment with the recesses 3.

The operation of the closure can be understood with particular reference to FIGS. 2, 3 and 5. In a closing action, the 'cap 10 andbar 18 are placed inthe position shown in FIG. 2 wherein the ends 20 of the bar 18 are in alignment with the recesses 3. The bar 18 may then be inserted through the aperture 2 and the upper surface of the bar 18 will then be slightly below the top of the rim 4. The cap 19 is then rotated in a counterclockwise direction as seen in FIGS. 2 an d-3, with the engagement between the ends 29 and notches 12 causing the bar 18. llObfl rotated with theicap 10 as a unit. The stops 8 prevent the cap 10 and bar-181mm being rotated in a clockwise direct-ion as seen in FIGS.' 2 and 3.

As the cap 19 is rotated, the ends2ii of the bar 18 come into contact with the ends of the ramps 5, and as rotation continues they ride up the ramps 5 in a camming action, thus moving thebar 18 against the spring 17 and away from the cap 10. Rotation can continue only until the ends 24) come into contact with the stops 7. By the time this occurs, the ends2tl have passed the apices of the ramps 5 and are in the position shown in FIG'. 5. From FIG. 5, it can be seen that at the conclusion of a closing action an edge, the upper left hand edge as'seen in FIG. 5, of each end 29 bears against the reverse incline below the apex 6, this engagement serving as a positive stop to retard return movement of the bar 13.

When the closure is in closed position, the position shown in FIGS. 3 and 5, the spring 17 urges the cap 10 and bar 18 together against the wall .1, and the engagement oftne ends 20 on the reverse inclines of the ramps 5 serves as a positive stop to hold the closure against opening. When it is desired to remove the closure, the cap 16 is rotated in a clockwise direction as seen in FIG. 3 with suflicient force so that the camming action between the ends 20 and reverse inclines causes the bar 18 to be moved against the spring 17 and away from the cap 10 so that the ends 20 can ride over the apices 6. Continued rotation then brings the closure to the position of FIG. 2 where the ends20 are in alignment with the recesses 3 and the cap 10 and bar 18 may then be lifted from the aperture 2.

As can be seen from the drawing,the cap 10 is relatively thin and is set quite close to the wall 1, being raised only by theheight of the rim 9. This substantially flush mounting would ordinarily make the cap 10 quite difficult to grasp for opening and closing. The inwardly beveled edges of the cap 10, however, make it quite easy tograsp the cap 10 and rotate it for closing and opening. Thus, the cap 10 can have a substantially flush appearance, which also reduces the possibility of catching dirt or foreign matter, while still being easy to handle.

Ordinarily, the force of the spring 17 will be enough to hold the cap 10 in place. When, because'of the possibility of vandalism or otherwise, it is desired to lock the cap 10in place, however, the screw 15 may be used to draw the bar 18 tightly against the underside of the wall 1, the screw 15 thus serving as a screw lock means. As can be seen in FIG. 1, the head 16 of the screw 15 is provided with a hexagonal socket 21. The head 16 is substantially flushwith or below the top of the cap 10, so that, although rotation of the screw 15 can be accomplished readily by inserting a'suitable tool into the socket 21, manual rotation by unauthorized persons is practically impossible. It will bereadily appreciattd that the force exerted by the screw 15 in combination withthe engagement between the ends 20;and the-reverse inclines of the ramps 5 will make it virtually impossible-to remove the cap 10 manually once the screw 15 has been tightened. The engagement of the ends 20 and the notches 12 prevents rotation of the bar 18 while the screw 15 is being tightened. For unlocking, it is necessary only to loosen the screwv 15 and the closure can then be removed in the manner described above. The lock washer 19 preventssaccidentially removing the screw 15 from the bar 18 during an unlocking action.

One of the important features of the invention is the provision of the projections 11 and notches 12 which serve to allow movement of the bar 18 toward. and away from the cap 10 to allow a camming action by the ramps 5.

The bar 18 is, however prevented from rotation with respect to the cap it} so that the two rotate together as a unit. The notches 12 also prevent rotation of the bar 18 during tightening of the screw 15.

Although a preferred embodiment of the invention has een shown and described herein, a number of variations might be made without departure from the invention. For example, although a ramp with a reverse incline is particularly suitable in that it provides a positive stop or lock, a straight ramp may be used and tightening of the screw will still make the closure extremely difficult to open manually. The invention is not, therefore, intended to be limited except insofar as such limitations appear in the following claims.

We claim:

1. In a closure, the combination with a wall having an aperture therethrough of a rotatable cap disposed on one side of the wall and engageable therewith; a locking bar connected to the cap and disposed on the opposite side of the wall; means to hold the bar and cap against relative rotation and to allow the bar and cap to move toward and away from one another; bias means to urge the bar and cap together; ramp means interposed between opposite side of the wall and the bar and adapted to cause a camming engagement therebetween which moves the bar away from the cap as the cap is rotated; and lock means separate from the ramp means to move the bar and cap toward one another.

2. In a closure, the combination with a wall having an aperture therethrough of a rotatable cap disposed on one side of the wall and having an inner side engageable therewith to close off the aperture; a locking bar connected to the cap and disposed on the opposite side of the wall; projecting means on said cap adapted to be inserted through the aperture, said bar being received in said projecting means to be held against rotation relative to the cap while being capable of movement toward and away from the cap; bias means to urge the bar toward the cap; ramp means on and extending outwardly from said opposite side of the wall, said ramp means being inclined outwardly from said opposite side of the wall and being cammingly engageable with the bar to move the bar away from the cap as the cap is rotated; and loci; means separate from the ramp means to move the bar 7 toward the cap.

3. In a closure, the combination with a wall having a substantially circular aperture therethrough with a pair of substantially diametrically opposite recesses, of a rotatable cap disposed on one side of the wall and having an inner side engageable therewith to close off the aperture and recesses; an elongated locking bar disposed on the opposite side of the wall that is longer than the diameter of the aperture and shorter than the distance between the remote ends of the recesses; a screw lock means having an operating head at the outer side of the cap and an inner end threadedly engaged with the bar, whereby operation of the screw will cause the bar to be moved toward the cap; a pair of oppositely disposed projecting means on the inner side of the cap, each having an outwardly opening notch receiving an end portion of the bar, whereby the bar is held against rotation relative to the cap while being capable of movement toward and away from the cap; bias means acting between the cap and the operating head of the screw lock means to urge the bar toward the cap; and a pair of ramp means on said opposite side of the wall beginning near opposite sides of the recesses, each ramp means being inclined outwardly from said opposite side of the wall to an apex and being provided with a reverse incline leading from the apex and having an upwardly extending stop projection at the end of the reverse incline, said ramps being cammingly engageable with end portions of the bar.

4. A closure according to claim 3 wherein a block extending toward the bar is mounted on the inner surface of the cap, said block having a smooth, stepped bore therethrough through which the screw lock means is slidably and rotatably received, said bore including a relatively smallest portion nearest the bar, an intermediate portion, and a relatively largest portion at the outer side of the cap within which the operating head of the screw lock means is received, and wherein the bias means is a compression spring disposed about the shaft of the screw lock means and received in the intermediate portion of the bore.

5. A closure according to claim 3 wherein there is a second pair of stop projections on said opposite side of the wall, one located immediately adjacent the side of each recess opposite the side near which an associated ramp means begins.

6. A closure according to claim 3 wherein the cap is plate-like with its edge tapered inwardly from its outer side to its inner side.

7. In a closure for an aperture through a wall, the combination comprising: a rotatable cap having inner and outer sides and adapted to close off the aperture; an elongated locking bar; a screw lock means extending through the cap with an operating head at the other side of the cap and an inner end threadedly engaged with the bar, whereby operation of the screw will cause the bar to be moved toward the cap; a pair of oppositely disposed projecting means on the inner side of the cap that are adapted to pass through the aperture, each having a notch opening axially away from the inner side of the cap and receiving an end portion of the bar, whereby the bar is held against rotation relative to the cap while being capable of movement toward and away from the cap; and bias means acting between the cap and the operating head of the screw lock means to urge the bar toward the cap.

8. In a closure, the combination with a wall having an aperture therethrough of a rotatable cap disposed on one side of the wall and having an inner side engageable therewith to close off the aperture; a locking bar connected to the cap and disposed on the opposite side of the wall; projecting means on said cap having an outwardly opening notch, said bar being received in said notch to be held against rotation relative to the cap while being capable of movement toward and away from the cap; bias means to urge the bar toward the cap; ramp means on said opposite side of the wall, said ramp means includirn away from said opposite side of the wall to an apex and thence having a reverse incline toward said opposite side, there being a projecting stop means at the end of the reverse incline, said ramp means being cammingi'y engageabie with the 'bar to move the bar away from the cap as the cap is rotated; and lock means to move the bar toward the cap.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS THERQN E. CONDON, Primary Examiner.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,194,427 July 13, 1965 Howard G. Mullett et al.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 1, line 11, for "is it" read it is line 23, for "accordingly" read according line 38, for "to", each occurrence, read too lines 42 and 43, for "dispensers" r aad dispenser column 2, line 12, for "the" read a c lumn 4, line 61, for "appreciattd" read appreciated line 70, for "accidentially" read accidentally column 5, line 23, after "between" insert said column 6, line 30, for "other" read outer line 53, for "including" read inclining A 2 SEAL) Signed and sealed this 1st day of December 1965 Lttest:

ERNEST W. SWIDER EDWARD J. BRENNER Lttesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2448838 *Jan 23, 1946Sep 7, 1948Granville M BowmanClosure for containers
US2844274 *Apr 28, 1954Jul 22, 1958Universal Metal Products IncFiller cap
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3375612 *Jan 24, 1966Apr 2, 1968Joseph M. BusuttilDeck plate and locking mechanism
US3902625 *May 8, 1974Sep 2, 1975Schmidhuber AntonKnock-out filler for electrical box
US5433333 *Feb 16, 1993Jul 18, 1995Shakespeare CompanyStrength enhancing closure hatch assembly for access ports in highway utility poles
US5516885 *May 19, 1992May 14, 1996Akzo Nobel N.V.Epihalohydrin-based resins having a reduced halogen content
US6376578Nov 6, 1995Apr 23, 2002Akzo Nobel NvEpihalohydrin-based resins having a reduced halogen content
US6976868 *Jun 15, 2004Dec 20, 2005Tatung Co., Ltd.Ornamental plate mounting structure
US7363751Nov 2, 2006Apr 29, 2008Shakespeare Composite Structures, LlcWound-in tenon/wound-in tenon collar for attachment of luminaire
US7490964Jun 26, 2006Feb 17, 2009Genlyte Thomas Group LlcModular pole system for a light fixture
US8061666Nov 22, 2011Philips Electronics LtdAdapter assembly for pole luminaire
US20050186836 *Jun 15, 2004Aug 25, 2005Tatung Co., Ltd.Ornamental plate mounting structure
US20070058363 *Nov 2, 2006Mar 15, 2007Copeland S DWound-In Tenon/Wound-In Tenon Collar for Attachment of Luminaire
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/246, 220/251
International ClassificationF16J13/00, A47K5/00, F16J13/12
Cooperative ClassificationF16J13/12, A47K5/00
European ClassificationA47K5/00, F16J13/12