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Publication numberUS3195270 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 20, 1965
Filing dateMar 1, 1963
Priority dateMar 1, 1963
Publication numberUS 3195270 A, US 3195270A, US-A-3195270, US3195270 A, US3195270A
InventorsGlass Marvin I, Leonid Kripak
Original AssigneeMarvin Glass & Associates
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Animated toy figure
US 3195270 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 20, 1965 M. l. GLASS ETAL 3,

ANIMATED TOY FIGURE 7 Filed March 1, 1963 '7 Sheets-Sheet 1 July 20, 1965 M. GLASS ETAL ANIMATED TOY FIGURE 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 1, 1963 211277222 5 Nfl/cV/A/ z 4445: LEON/0 /f /P/ 1019K Q6 July 20, 1965 M. I. GLASS ETAL ANIMATED TOY FIGURE 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 1, 1965 1. mWN v J y 1965 M. GLASS ETAL 3, ,27

ANIMATED TOY FIGURE Filed March 1, 1963 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 $1.4? {MA $555M als) 5 July 20, 1965 M. i. GLASS ETAL ANIMATED TOY FIGURE 5 5 K a mmm W5 m m m w M w 5 h 11% 8 1 z 0 w l w l: fmwm rmm @RT Q mm. M A

Filed March 1, 1963 July 20, 1965 M. I. GLASS ETAL ANIMATED TOY FIGURE 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed March 1, 1963 July 20, 1965 M. I. GLASS ETAL 3,

ANIMATED TOY FIGURE Filed March 1, 1963 I 7 SheetsSheet 7 United States Patent l 3,195,270 ANIMATED TOY FIGURE Marvin I. Glass, Chicago, and Leonid Kripalr, Villa Park, Ill.., assignors to Marvin Glass & Associates, Chicago, Ill., a partnership Filed Mar. 1, 1963, Ser. No. 262,069 8 Claims. (Cl. 46-232) This invention relates to toys and, more particularly, to toy figures w ich can be caused to perform certain animal movements.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide an improved toy figure of the class described.

A more particular object of the invention is to provide an improved toy figure which is adapted to move itself into a sitting position when a portion of its body is engaged in a predetermined manner.

An additional object of the invention is to provide an improved toy figure which can be caused to realistically simulate ambulatory movements.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved toy figure which is adapted to move itself into a sitting position when a portion of its body is engaged in a predetermined manner, and which will automatically return itself to a standing position and commence simulated ambulatory movements.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved toy figure adapted to simulate ambulatory movements, to cease such movements and move to a sitting position when a portion of its body is engaged in a predetermined manner, and to automatically return itself to a standing position and resume the simulated ambulatory movements.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent with reference to the following description and the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIGURES l and 2 are front and side elevational views respectively of a toy showing various of the features of the invention;

FIGURES 3 and 4 are perspective side views of the toy of FIGS. 1 and 2, illustrating a manner in which the figure can be caused to perform various animal movements;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary partially broken-away perspective view of the toy of FIGS. 1 through 4, showing various portions of the operating mechanism of the toy;

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional elevational view taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 1;

FIGURE 7 is a plan view, partially in section, of the toy shown in FIG. 6;

FIGURE 8 is an elevational view of a foreleg of the toy as seen in FIG. 6, another position of the foreleg being shown in dotted outline;

FIGURE 9 is a schematic view of the electrical system of the toy; I

FIGURE 10 is a fragmentary elevational view, partially in section, of an alternate embodiment of the toy;

FIGURE 11 is an enlarged fragmentary view of a portion of the mechanism of the embodiment of the toy shown in FIG. 10;

FIGURE 12 is a plan view of the figure shown in FIG. 10; and

FIGURES 13 through 15 are enlarged fragmentary partially broken-away views of the embodiment of the toy shown in FIG. 10.

Very generally, the principal embodiment of the toy figure shown in the drawings is in the form of a fourlegged animal having a body 21 including a head portion 23 on which a lower jaw member 25 is pivotally mounted. A set of forelegs 2'7 are reciprocally mounted on the body adjacent the forward end thereof and are effective, when 3,1952% Patented July 20, l9fi5 moved, to cause the figure to simulate ambulatory traveling movement on a supporting surface. Operating means 29 Within the body cause reciprocal movement of the forelegs such as will produce a forward or rearward ambulatory traveling movement of the figure, and sound-producing means 31 are provided for causing the figure to produce a characteristic sound as its forelegs are moved.

The figure of the principal embodiment also includes a set of hind legs 33 mounted on the body adjacent the rearward end thereof for movement between a first or generally vertical position, as when the figure is standing or walking, hereinafter referred to as an ambulatory disposition of the figure, and a second or generally horizontal position in which the figure appears to be seated on its haunches but with its forelegs remaining generally upright and in engagement with the supporting surface.

Movement of the hind leg members is effected by actuating means 35 which interconnect the lower jaw and hind leg members 33. When the lower jaw is pivoted upwardly, the actuating means cause the figure to cease its forward ambulatory traveling movement and cause the hind legs to move from the first position to the second position, thereby causing the figure to assume a seated position. When in the seated position, the figure can be caused by prodding, i.e., application of a rearward and slightly upward force on its forward portion, to rock rearwardly into a more erect seated position in which its reciprocating forelegs 27 are elevated above the supporting surface. The actuating means are also effective to automatically cause the figure to return to its first position and to commence ambulatory movement.

In an alternate embodiment of the toy figure, counterbalancing means 37 are provided which automatically cause the figure to move from a seated to a more erect position without further prodding.

More specifically, the toy of the illustrated embodiment has the appearance of a lion, an animal frequently trained to perform certain tricks or movements which the present toy is adapted to simulate. The figure could, of course, be caused to resemble various other animals or figures, real or imaginary, as desired.

The main body portion 21 of the figure includes the head 23 and an elongated horizontally disposed trunk 39, both the head and trunk being of hollow construction to enable them to contain various of the mechanisms of the toy. The side walls 41 of the trunk are essentially fiat and parallel adjacent the forward portion of the figure to provide an area of attachment for the forelegs 27, and taper inwardly toward the rearward end of the figure to provide a trim appearance. The rearward end of the trunk is provided with an upwardly extending tail 43 of sufficiently sturdy construction to enable it to support the fig- .ure when the figure is in the more erect seated position.

The head portion of the body is integral with the trunk and is formed to define an upper jaw 45, and an opening 4'7 immediately below the upper jaw within which the lower jaw 25 is pivotally mounted. The upper jaw therefore overhangs the opening 47 and includes a wall 49 defining the roof of the mouth of the figure. Simulated teeth 51 project downwardly from the wall 49 to add to the realism of the toy.

The lower jaw 25 is in the form of a shell having a top wall 53, with side walls 55 and end walls 57 extending downwardly therefrom. The top wall 53 defines the bottom of the mouth of the figure and is provided with a simulated tongue and teeth 59 for realism. A hole 61 is provided in each side wall 53 to receive a rod 63 about which the jaw pivots, the hole being located rearwardly of the transverse centerline of the jaw so that the jaw .will be balanced slightly toward an open position and will normally occupy such a position. Movement of the jaw to the closed position is effective to actuate the toy, as Y will become more apparent shortly. The side walls 55 of the lower jaw member 25 each include a depending jowl portion 65 which moves within a slot 67 in the lower portion of the head and thereby guides the pivotal move-' ment of the jaW.

As previously mentioned, pivotal movement of the lower jaw 25 is effective to actuate the toy and, in this regard, the rearward portion of the lower jaw member 'is provided with a hole 69. which receives a rivet 71 which, in turn, connectsthe jaw member to one end of an operating link 73, referred to in greater detail shortly. The opposite end of the operating link is connected to the actuating means 35, later described, upward pivotal movement of the lower jaw being effective to cause such movementof theoperating link as will render the actuating means operative.

The lower jaw is pivotally mounted within the body on a pair of supporting plates 75 (FIG. which extend upwardly from the lower forward portion of the trunk 39 into the lower portion of the head 23. Each supporting plate 75 is provided at its upper end with an enlarged portion 77 having a hole 79 therein to receive and support the rod 63 about which the lower jaw 25 pivots. The enlarged portions 77 also serve to guide'the movement of the lower jaw by virtue of their disposition immediately adjacent the side walls 55of the jaw.

Referring now to the forelegs 27 of the figure, each comprises an upper portion 81, and an articulated paw portion 83 pivotally attached to the lower end of the upper portion within an opening 84 provided therein. The upper portion 81 includes an open-sided outer shell 85 having generally the configuration of the outer portion including the shoulder of the foreleg of an animal, and

a flat backing plate 87 secured to the inner open sidei of the shell.

T he backing plate 87 of each of the upper foreleg portions (FIG. 8) includes a generally circular segment 89, from which depends a somewhat triangular segment 91 defining the lower foreleg. The generally circular segment 89 is relieved to provide an inner cross-shaped portion 93 centered within the circular segment and including upper, lower and transverse arms 95, 97 and 99 respectively. The upper arm 95 is provided with elongate-d slot' 101 which extends approximately the length thereof and, as hereinafter described, receives a stationary pin 103. The opposite or lower arm 97 is provided with a circular hole 105 disposed approximately midway of the arm and receives a movable pin 107, as will later be described.

The paw portions 83 of the forelegs are of a generally hollow construction and include a lower wall 109 on which a plurality of downwardly projecting teeth or pegs 1-11 are provided, the pegs serving to insure an intimate and a non-slipping engagement between the paw and the surface supporting the figure. The upper portion of the paw is of restricted size so as to enable it to fit within the opening 84 of the lower end of the upper portion, and is maintained therein by a pin 113 passing through the paw and the lower end of the upper portion, thereby affording pivotal movement of the paw. As the foreleg is raised and lowered, as hereinafter described, the paw pivots somewhat relative to the upper leg portion to provide a realistic articulated effect. Such pivotal movement is limited, however, by a stop pin 115 which extends through the upper leg portion adjacent thelower end thereof and is engaged by the upper edge of the narrowed upper portion of the paw.

The forelegs 27 are driven in such a manner by the operating means 29 that they reciprocate in a slightly rocking and lifting movement so as to stimulate the ambula-tion of an animal. More specifically, each of the forelegs is suspended from the trunk portion 39 of the body by means of the stationary pin 103 which projects outwardly from the side wall 41 of the trunk and occupies the slot 191 in the upper arm of the cross-shaped portion 93 of the circular segment 89. The pin 103. may have a lock washer secured adjacent its outer end and adjacent the outermost surface of the backing plate 87 to prevent the foreleg from becoming detached from the trunk.

The foreleg is also engaged by the pin 107 which projects from one face of a rotatable disk 117 carried on the end of a rotatably driven rod 119 and disposed within the circular hole of the lower arm 97 of the cross-shaped portion 93. A lock washer is also preferably secured adjacent the outer end of the pin 107 to maintain the leg in position adjacent the body of the figure. The pin 107 is eccentrically mounted on the disk 117 so that as the rod and disk are rotated, the pin causes the foreleg to be raised andlowered as well as to be move-d forwardly and rearwardly. This movement'of the forelegs can best be seen in FIG. 8, wherein it will be noted that the forelegs move from a forwardly extended and raised position, as shown in the solid line of FIG. 8, to a lowered floorengaging rearwardly withdrawn position as shown in the dotted line of FIG. 6, thence upwardly and forwardly to the forwardly extended raised position. This motion, therefore, simulates the actual ambulatory movement of an. animal, and is rendered even more realistic by the articulated movement of the paw 83.

As previously mentioned, the disks 117 are each secured to, and rotated by, the driving rod 119. The disks are preferably so arranged relative to one another, however, that their pins 107 are not disposed in alignment, but are rather 180 out of alignment such that they will occupy exactly opposite positions relative to one another at all times. Accordingly, the paws 83 of the forelegs will also occupy opposite positions, and as the paw of one foreleg moves into engagement with the supporting surafce, the paw of the opposite foreleg moves out of engagement with the supporting surface. Hence, the figure is driven alternately by each foreleg,

The driving rod of the forefeet of the toy is rotatably driven by the operating means 29 which comprises in the principal embodiment a direct current electric motor 123, a gear box driven by the motor, and a continuous ball chain 127 interconnecting the gear box 125 and the driving rod 119.

More specifically, the motor 123 is supported within the trunk 39 adjacent the. rearward end thereof by means of a U-shaped bracket 129 suitably secured to the gear box 125.. A shaft (not shown) extends from the armature (not shown) of the motor into the gear box and has a small pinion gear 131 secured thereto.

The gear box 125 includes a housing 133 (FIGS. 6 and 7) within which three intermeshed compound gears 135, 137 and 139 are mounted on shafts parallel to one another and to the shaft of the motor 123. The shaft 141 of the gear 139 extends outwardly beyond the wall of the housing 133 and has mounted thereon a sprocket wheel 143 which receives the ball chain 127. The chain 127, in turn, extends forwardly of the trunk 39 and encircles a similar sprocket wheel 145 keyed to the driving rod 119. Accordingly, rotation of the armature of the motor 123 is transmitted through the gear box 125 and ball chain 127 to the driving rod 119 of the forelegs 27 so as to produce reciprocal movement of the forelegs.

The motor 123 forms part of an electrical-system 147 which includes, in addition to the motor 123, storage battery means 149, an on-off switch 151 electrically connected between the battery and motor for interrupting the flow of current thereb-etween, and directional switch means 153 for controlling the'direction of flow of current to the motor.

More specifically, the storage battery means 149 is in the form of a pair of dry cells slung withina recess 155 provided adjacent the lower surface of the trunk 39. Resilient clips 157 are provided within the recess to clamp the dry cells in place, and suitable contacts 159 are provided at each end of the recess to permit electrical connection to the motor 123. Preferably, the entry to the recessv centerline thereof (FIG. 7).

I. Q 155 is closed by means of a hinged door 161 or the like so that the dry cells do not detract from the appearance of the toy.

The battery means 149 is electrically connected to the motor 123 through the on-off switch 151 comprising an L-shaped lever 163 pivotally mounted on a platform 165 adjacent the motor 123 by means of a pin 167, with one of its arms 169 disposed so as to be engageable with a contact 171 electrically connected to one terminal of the battery means, and with its opposite arm 173 projecting through an opening 175 in the rearward end of the trunk. The pin 167 is itself electrical-1y connected to the opposite treminal of the battery means 149 so that, when the arm 169 of the lever engages the contact 171, a circuit is completed and current flows to the motor 123.

Rotation of the motor armature in one direction, e.g., the clockwise direction as seen in FIG. 6, causes a rotation of the driving rod 119 such as will cause the forelegs 27 to produce a forward traveling movement of the figure. Reversal of the direction of rotation of the motor armature and, hence, reversal in the direction of rotation of the driving rod 119, causes the figure to tend to travel in a rearward direction. This latter movement is helpful in moving the figure into the seated position. Restoration of the motor to its initial direction of rotation, on the other hand, is helpful in causing the figure to return to the ambulatory position. Accordingly, the switch 153 for reversing the direction of rotation of the motor is provided.

The switch 153 comprises generally a supporting board 177 extending upwardly from the bottom wall of the trunk 39 in offset relation to one side of the longitudinal Pivotally mounted on the board 177 by means of a pin 179 is an irregularly-shaped plate 181 (FIG. 9) which includes a generally circular central portion 183 having a nub 185 projecting radially adjacent each of its upper and lower edges. Each nub 185 has an electrically conductive post 187 and 189 respectively projecting outwardly from its face and connected respectively to opposite terminals of the motor 123.

One face of the plate 181 has secured thereto a flat block 191 disposed in encircling relation to the pin 179 by means of which the plate 181 is pivotally mounted. The block 191 is provided with a pair of spaced slots 193 extending generally parallel to one another and to a line passing through the posts 187 and 189 supported on the nubs 185, each slot 193 having disposed therein a flat resilient conductive blade 195 and 197 respectively. The blade 195 is connected to the positive terminal of the battery means 149, and the blade 197 is connected to the negative terminal.

The direction of flow of current in the blades 195 and 197 into contact with one of the posts 187 and 189 of the plate 181, which posts are electrically connected to opposite terminals of the motor 123. This is accomplished by pivotal rotation of the plate 181 such as will bring an opposite end of each blade 195 and 197 into contact with an insulated peg 199 projecting from the supporting board 177 adjacent each of the posts 187 and 189. Engagement of the blade with a peg prevents the end of the blade from engaging the adjacent post while permitting engagement of the post by'the end of the opposite blade. One end of each blade is always in engagement with a peg 199 while its opposite end engages a post.

More specifically, when the plate 181 is rotated in a counter-clockwise direction (FIG. 9), the lower end of the blade 195 engages the lower peg 199, flexing the blade and preventing the lower end thereof from engaging the post 189. However, the lower end of the blade 197, not engaged by a peg, engages the post 189, thus placing a negative potential on the corresponding terminal of the motor. At the same time, the upper end of the blade 197 engages the upper peg 199, causing the blade to be flexed so as to prevent its upper end from engaging the post 187, which is however engaged by the upper end of blade 195, thereby placing a positive potential on the corresponding terminal of the motor. When the plate 181 is rotated in a counter-clockwise direction, the blade 195 engages the post 189 and the blade 197 engages the post 187, thus effecting a reversal in the direction of current fiow to the motor.

One lateral edge of the central portion 183 of the plate 181 extends radially outwardly therefrom and is provided with a notch 2111 which receives one end of an over-center U-shaped spring 293. The opposite end of the spring 203 is received in a notch 285 of a block 287 secured to the supporting board 177 The over-center spring 203 is effective to rapidly rotate the plate 181 between two positions, each of which causes contact of the posts 187 and 189 with a blade 195 or 197.

To facilitate pivotal movement of the plate 181, as well as to limit the extent of such movement, the lateral edge of the plate opposite the notch 2111 projects outwardly to form an appendage 289, the side edges of which are adapted to engage a pair of vertically spaced stop blocks 211 secured to the supporting board 177. When the appendage 299 engages the lower stop block (FIG. 9), the direction of current flow is such as to cause the figure to move forwardly, but when the plate 181 is rotated in a clockwise direction (FIG. 9) so as to bring the appendage 289 into engagement with the upper stop block, the direction of current fiow is such as to cause the figure to tend to move rearwardly.

Rotation of the switch plate 181 is effected by an operating lever 213 (FIG. 6) which is pivotally mounted on the supporting board 181 by means of a pin 2.15. The lever 213 includes a pair of arms 217 and 219, one of which (217) engages one of a pair of ears 221 which project from the appendage 289 when the lever is rotated so as to cause a sufficient movement of the plate 181 to render the over-center spring 293 effective in rapidly rotating the plate into either of its two positions. The lever 213 is rotated by engagement of the arm 219 by the operating link 73, referred to in greater detail shortly, and is biased in each of two directions by an over-center spring 214 extending from the lever to a ring 216 keyed to a rod 2511, hereinafter described.

It will be noted that those portions of the operating mechanism of the toy representing a large percentage of the weight thereof, namely, the motor 123, the gear box 125, and the battery means 149 are located adjacent the rearward end of the trunk 39, thus locating the center of gravity of the figure adjacent the rearward end thereof. As will become more apparent shortly, this feature greatly facilitates the movement of the figure to the more erect seated position, as hereinafter described.

Rotation of the driving rod 119 of the forelegs 27 also is elfective in causing the sound-producing means 31 to operate, thereby providing sounds whenever the forelegs are moving, as when the figure is traveling or when it assumes the more erect seated position and its forelegs are elevated out of engagement with the supporting surface, as described in greater detail shortly. The sound producing means 31 comprise generally means defining a resonating chamber 223 disposed within the trunk 59 in suspended relation above the driving rod 119. The

chamber 223 is defined by a generally conical side 226 extending upwardly into the head 39. The upper end of the chamber 223 is open, while the lower end is closed by means of a diaphragm 227.

The conical side wall 226 is hingedly supported adjacent its forward edge on a rod 229, with the rearward edge of the side wall being supported in resting engagement on a second rod 230. The side Wall 226 is biased for hinged movement in a clockwise direction (FIG. 6) by a coil spring 232 which extends from the lower rearward edge of the side wall to a pin 234 projecting from form an enclosed structure.

7 the inner wall of the trunk 39. The means defiriingthe resonating chamber 223 are therefore not rigidly supported within the toy and the side wall 226 as well as the diaphragm 227 is adapted to vibrate. Also, the side wall and diaphragm are capable of hinged movement for reasons which will become apparent shortly.

The side wall 226 and diaphragm 227 is caused to vibrate by a leaf spring .231 which is secured to the outer surface of the diaphragm and projects downwardly into engagement with a wheel 233 keyed to the driving rod 119 and rotatable therewith. The Wheel 233 includes a plurality of teeth236 on a portion of its periphery, approximately one-half of the periphery being so provided in the illustrated embodiment. is engaged by the teeth 234, it is caused to vibrate, which vibration, in turn, causes the diaphragm 227 to vibrate and produce sounds. The absence of teeth on a portion of the periphery of the wheel 233 causes sounds to be produced intermittently, thereby adding to the fascination provided by the toy.

As previously mentioned, the rod 1-19 which drives the forelegs 27 is caused to rotate at various portions of the operation of the figure in both a clockwise and a counter-clockwise direction, thus causing the wheel 233 keyed thereto to be rotated in both directions as well. When the direction of rotation of the wheel 233 is reversed, the end of the leaf spring 231 connected to the diaphragm 227 is impinged in a root separating the teeth 236 of the wheel and, as the wheel rotates, is moved upwardly, thereby causing a counter-clockwise hinging movement of the side wall 226 and diaphragm 227 of the resonating chamber 223 about the rod 229. This hinged movement continues until the leaf spring 231- is again disposed essentially tangent to the wheel 233, whereupon the coil spring 232 returns the sidewall to its initial posigenerally an open-sided shell 241 formed to resemble the outer configuration of the hind leg of an animal, and an inner plate 243 secured to the open side of the shell to The lower surface of each hind leg member is provided with a hole 245 (FIGS. 3 and 4) within which a wheel 247, preferably including peripheral teeth 249, is rotatably mounted. The hind leg members 33 do not reciprocate in the manner of the forelegs 27 as the animal ambulates forwardly or rearwardly, but rather remain stationary relative to the body as the front feet propel the figure. Accordingly, the wheels 247 facilitate movement of the hind leg members along a supporting surface. The wheels 247 also facilitate pivotal movement of the hind leg members between a first and second position, as will hereinafter be apparent.

The hind leg members are mounted on the. trunk of the body by means of a square rod 251 whichpasses through the rearward end of the trunk just rearwardly of the center of gravity of the figure, the rod being rotatable within the trunk and relative thereto. Each end of the rod passes through a square hole in the flat inner plate 243 of one of the pair of hind leg members, thus keying the hind leg members to the rod and insuring their rotation with the rod. Means such as a lock washer (not shown), encircle the rod adjacent each end thereof to prevent the hind legs from becoming detached from the rod.

In the operation of the toy insofar as pivotal movement of the hind leg members is concerned, reversal of the direction of rotation of the armature of the motor .123 causes the forelegs to cease imparting forward traveling movement to the figure and to commence imparting a rearward traveling movement thereto. Substantially simultaneously, the rod 251 is rotated in a clockwise direction (FIG. 6) so as to cause the hind leg members to rotate relative to the trunk until the figure assumes the When the leaf spring 231 simulated seated position seen in FIG; 3 of the drawing. The rearward movement of the figure, as well as the presence of the wheels 247 on the lower surface of each of the hind legs, facilitates the movement of the figure into such a position.

When in the seated position, the figure can be caused to move into the more erect seated position of FIG. 4 by prodding, as will hereinafter be explained. After the figure has arrived in the seated position, the direction of rotation of the motor is automatically reversed, thus causing the forelegs 27 to again impart a forward traveling movement to the figure and causing .the square rod 251 to rotate in the opposite or counterclockwise direction so as to return the hind legs to their initial position. The forward movement of; the figure provides assistance in enabling the, hind legs toregain their original upright position.

More particularly, rotation of the square rod 251 is accomplished by means of a sector 253 which is semicircular in shape and is keyed tothe rectangular rod 251 near one end thereof. A portion of the curved edge of the sector is provided with a plurality of teeth 255. Rotation of the sector and, hence, rotation of the square rod 251 is accomplished by rotating the sector slightly in a clockwise direction (FIG. 6) so as to bring the teeth thereof into meshing engagement with the teeth of a driving pinion gear 257 mounted on a shaft 259 extending into the housing 133 of the gear box 125and driven by the engagement ofa larger gear 261, keyed to the shaft 259, with the compound gear 139.' v

The slight counter-clockwise drag (FIG. 6) exerted on the hind leg members due to the forward movement of the figure is sufiicient to maintain the sector out of engagement with the. gear 257; When the gear 257 is caused to rotate in a counterclockwise direction (FIG. 6) and, the sector is rotated slightly in a clockwise direction so as to bring its teeth into engagement with the teeth of the gear, the sector will be driven by the gear in a clockwise direction so as to move the hind leg members to a position in which the figure assumes a simulated seated disposition.

Movement of the sector 253 into engagement with the gear 257 is accomplished by reversingthe direction of rotation of the motor so as to cause the figure to tend to move rearwardly, thus relieving the drag on the hind leg members, and by the operating link 73 which is connected to the lower jaw 25. and is effective, when the lower jaw is pivoted upwardly, to both effect a reversal in the direction of flow of current to thernotor and to rotate the sector slightly in a clockwise direction.

The operating link 73 is of an irregular shape so as to be accommodated to the .contours of the body of the figure. The upper forward end of the link is connected to the lower portion of the lower jaw of the figure as previously mentioned, and the lower rearward end of the link is disposed adjacent to that portion of the sector immediately adjacent. the gear 257. A pin 263 projects outwardly from a face of the sector and is engaged by the end of the link when the link moves downwardly andrearwardly. Such movement of the link is accomplished by an upper pivotal movement of the lower jaw 25 of the figure, as hereinafter described.

The link 73 is guided adjacentits midportion by a bifurcated bracket 265 secured to the supporting board 177 of the switch 153 and disposed with its prongs directed downwardly in straddling relation to the link; The lower 'edgeof the portion of the bracket intermediate the prongs serves as a camming surface engageable with a nub 2-67 on the upper edge of the link. Interengagement of the nub 267 with the ca'rnming surface of the bracket 265 iseffective to cause the link to be moved downwardly and rearwardly when the lower jaw 25 is pivoted upwardly.

The operating link 73 also includes a depending lug 269 intermediate its rearward end and the nub 267, the

lug 269 being effective, when the link 73 is moved downwardly and rearwardly, to engage the arm 21% of the operating lever 213, thus rotating the lever a sufficient degree in a clockwise direction as will enable the over-center spring 203 to rotate the plate M31 and effect a reversal in the direction of flow of current to the motor and, hence, a reversal in the direction of rotation of the motor.

Thus far it has been shown that when the figure is moving in a forwardly direction and the lower jaw 25 is pivoted upwardly, the operating link 73 is moved downwardly and rearwardly, this movement being effective to bring the lug 269 of the link into engagement with the arm 219 of the operating lever 213, thereby effecting a reversal of the motor and causing the figure to commence to move rearwardly. Downward and rearward movement of the link 73 also causes the end of the link to engage the pin 263 on the sector so as to move the sector.

into engagement with the gear 257 which, due to a reversal in the direction of rotation of the motor, is rotating in a direction effective to rotate the sector in a clockwise direction and cause pivotal movement of the hind legs 33.

When the figure is in the seated position, the longitudinal axis of the trunk is inclined relative to the horizontal, with its rearward end disposed at a lower position than its forward end. The center of gravity is thus shifted slightly rearwardly and the figure can be caused by gentle prodding, as with a stick or the like, to rock into a more erect sitting position (FIG. 4) in which its reciprocating forelegs are elevated above the supporting surface. This position of the figure creates the realistic impression that the figure has reared back and is attempting to strike its aggravator with its paws. When in the more erect seated position, the figure is balanced somewhat by the tail 43.

As previously mentioned, the direction of rotation of the motor armature is reversed automatically so as to cause the forelegs to again cause the figure to travel in a forward direction and cause the sector and, hence, the square rod to be rotated in the opposite direction, thus returning the figure to its ambulatory position. This is accomplished by means of a pin 271 which projects from a face of the sector adjacent its lower end and is adapted to engage the arm 219 of the operating lever 213 after the sector has been rotated a given degree so as to retum the lever and, hence, the plate 131 of the switch 153 to its original position, thus causing a reversal in the direction of current flow to the motor.

An alternate embodiment of the toy is shown in FIGS. 10 through and differs principally from the principal embodiment in the fact that means are provided for automatically causing the figure to move to the more erect sitting position without the aid of a prodding. The alternate embodiment comprises generally a main body portion 210 including a head 23a and an elongated horizontally disposed trunk 39a of a construction similar to the body, head and trunk of the principal embodiment. The rearward end of the trunk 39a is provided with an upwardly extending tail 43a which supports the figure when in the more erect seated position.

The head portion of the alternate embodiment is formed to define an upper jaw 45a, and an opening 47a immediately below the upper jaw within which a lower jaw 25a is pivotally mounted. The lower jaw 25a is in the form of a shell similar to that of the principal embodiment, and a hole 61a is provided therein to receive a rod 63a about which the jaw pivots, the rod 63a being carried on a pair of supporting plates 75a. The rearward portion of the jaw member 25a is provided with a hole 6% which receives a rivet 71a which, in turn, connects the jaw member to one end of an operating linkage 273, the alternate embodiment dilfering from the principal embodiment in this respect in that a single link 73 svas utilized in the principal embodiment.

The forelegs 27a of the alternate embodiment of the figure each comprises an upper portion 91a, and an articulated paw portion 83a pivotally attached thereto. The upper portion 81a includes an open-sided outer shell 85a and a fiat backing plate 37a secured to the inner open side of the shell. The backing plate 87a (FIG. 10) includes a generally circular segment 89a and is relieved to provide an inner cross-shaped portion 93a centered within the circular segment and including upper, lower and transverse arms 95a, 97a and 99a respectively. The upper arm 95a is provided with elongated slot ltila which extends approximately the length therof and, as hereinafter described, receives a stationary pin 103a. The opposite or lower arm 97a is provided with a circular hole ldSa disposed approximately midway of the arm and receives a movable pin 107a, as will later be described.

The upper port-ion of the paw 83a is of restricted size so as to enable it to fit within an opening 84a of the lower end of the upper portion, and is maintained therein by a pin 113a passing through the paw and the lower end of the upper portion, thereby affording pivotal movement of the paw. As the foreleg is raised and lowered, as hereinafter described,-the paw pivots in the manner of the paw S3 of the principal embodiment, which pivotal movement is limited by a stop pin 115a which extends through the upper leg portion adjacent the lower end thereof and is engaged by the upper edge of the narrowed upper portion of the paw.

Each of the forelegs is suspended from the trunk portion 3% of the body by means of the stationary pin 103a which projects outwardly from the side of the trunk and occupies the slot ltlla in the upper arm of the crossshaped portion 93:: of the circular segment 8%. Each foreleg 27a is also engaged by the pin 107a which projects from one face of a rotatable disk 117a carried on the end of a rotatably driven rod 119a and disposed within the circular hole 1435a of the lower arm 97a of the cross-shaped portion 93a. The pin 10711 is eccentrically mounted on the disk 117a so that as the rod and disk are rotated, the pin causes the foreleg to be raised and lowered as well as to be moved forwardly and rearwardly.

As previously mentioned, the disks 117a are each secured to, and rotated by, the driving rod 119a which is rotatably driven by the operating means 29 comprising a direct current electric motor 123a, a gear box 125a driven by the motor, and a continuous ball chain 127a interconnecting the gear box 125a and the driving rod 11%. The motor 123a i supported within the trunk 39a adjacent the rearward end thereof by means of a U-shaped bracket 129a suitably secured to the gear box 125a. A shaft (not shown) extends from the armature (not shown) of the motor into the gear box and has a small pinion gear 131a secured thereto.

The gear box 125a includes a housing 133a (FIGS. 6 and 7) within which three inter-meshed compound gears 135a, 137a and 13% are mounted. The shaft 141a of the gear 139a extends outwardly beyond the wall of the housing 133a and has mounted theron a sprocket wheel 143a which receives the ball chain 127a. The chain 127a, in turn, extends forwardly of the trunk 39a and encircles a similar sprocket wheel 145a keyed to the driving rod 11%. Accordingly, rotation of the armature of the motor 123a is transmitted through the gear box 125a and ball chain 127a to the driving rod 119a of the forelegs 27a so as to produce reciprocal movement of the forelegs.

The motor 123a forms part of an electrical system 147a which includes as well storage battery means 149a, an on-otf switch 151a and directional switch means 153a. The storage battery means 14% is in the form of a pair of dry cells connected to the motor through the on-otf switch 151a and slung within a recess 155a provided adjacent the lower surface of the trunk 39a. The entry to the recess 1550 is closed by means of a hinged door 161a.

The switch 153a comprises generally a supporting board 177a extending upwardly from the bottom' wall of the trunk 39a, and'an irregularly shaped plate 181a pivotally mounted thereon. The plate 181a includes a nub 185a projecting radially adjacent each of its upper and lower edges, each nub having an electrically conductive post 187a and 18% respectively projecting outwardly from its face and connected respectively to opposite terminals of the motor 123a. One face of the plate 18111 has secured thereto a fiat block (not shown), the block being provided with a pair of spaced slots having disposed therein a flat resilient conductive blade 195a and 193a respectively. The blade 195a is connected to the positive terminal of the battery means 149a, and the blade 197a is connected to the negative terminal. The switch means 153a is effective to reverse the direction of flow of current in a manner similar to the switch 153 of the principal embodiment.

One lateral edge of the central portion 183a of the plate 181a is provided with a notch 201 which receives one end of an over-center U-shaped spring 203a effective to rapidly rotate the plate lsla between two positions, each i of which causes contact of the posts 187a and 189a with a blade 195a or 197a. The lateral edge of the plate opposite the notch 201a projects outwardly to form an appendage 209a, the side edges of which are adapted to engage a pair of vertically spaced stop blocks 211a secured to the supporting board 177a.

Rotation of the switch plate 181a is effected by anopcrating lever 213a (FIG. 6) which includes a pair of arms 217a and 219a, one of which (217a) engages one of a pair of ears 221a which project from the appendage 209a when the lever is rotatedso as to cause a suificient movement of the plate 181a to render the over-center spring Zilfra effective in rapidly rotating the plate into either of its two positions. The lever 213a is rotated by engagement of the arm 219a by a portion of the operating linkage 273, referred to in greater detail shortly.

It will be noted that those portions of the operating mechanism of the toy representing a large percentage of the weight thereof and disposed adjacent the rearward end of the trunk 39 in the principal embodiment are I cated adjacent the rearward end of the trunk 3911 of the alternate embodiment, thus also locating the center of gravity of the alternate embodiment of the figure adjacent the rearward end thereof. This distribution of the weight of weight of the figure and thelocation of the center of gravity greatly facilitates the automatic movement of the figure into the more erect sitting position.

Sound producing means 31a are also provided and comprise generally means defining a resonating chamber 225a disposed adjacent the lower wall of the trunk beneath the driving rod 119a and defined by a portion of the lower wall of the trunk 3%, by side walls 235a. extending upwardly therefrom, and by a diaphragm 237a. The diaphragm of the chamber 225a iscaused to vibrate by a resilient leaf spring 239a, the free end of which extends upwardly into engagement with the lower portion of the periphery of a toothed wheel 233a. The hind legs 33a of the figure of the alternate embodiment also includes no articulated paw portion and each comprises generally an open-sided shell 241a, and an inner plate 243a secured to the open side of the shell to form an enclosed structure. The lower surface of each hind leg member is provided with a hole (FIGS. 3 and 4) within which a wheel 247a, preferably including periph-- eral teeth 24901, is rotatably mounted.

The hind leg members are mounted on the trunk of the body by means of a square rod 251a which passes through the rearward end of the trunk just rearwardly of the center of gravity of the figure, the rod being rotatable Each end of the means of a sector 253a which is semi-circular in shape and is keyed to the rectangular r0d251a near one end thereof. A portion of the curved edge of the sector is provided with a plurality of teeth 255a disposed adjacent the teeth of a driving pinion gear 257a mounted on a shaft 259a extending into the housing 133a of the gear box a and driven by the engagement of a larger gear 261a, keyed to the shaft 259a, with the compound gear 139a. When the gear 257a is caused to rotate in a counter-clockwise direction (FIG. 6) and the sector is rotated slightly in a clockwise direction (FIG. 6) so as to bring its teeth into engagement with the teeth of the gear, the sector will be driven by the gear in a clockwise direction so as to move the hindleg members to a position in which the figure assumes a simulated seated disposition.

Movement of the sector 253a into, engagement with the gear 257a is accomplished by reversing the direction of rotation of the motor so as to cause the figure to tend to move rearwardly,.and by the operating linkage 273 which is connected to the lower jaw 25a and is effective, when the lower jaw is pivoted upwardly, to both effect a reversal in the direction of flow ofcurrent to the motor and to rotate the sector slightly in a clockwise direction.

' The. operating linkage 273 comprises a first link 275 connected at its upper end to the jaw 25a by means of a rivet 71a, and connected at its lower end by means of a rivet 277 to one arm 279 of a bell crank 281 rotatably carried on the driving rod 11 951 with the arms of the bell crank disposed inupwardly extending position. The other arm 28.3 of the bell crank 281 is provided with a pin 285 which is slidably received within a slot 287 provided in an elongated connecting link 1289 having a somewhat arcuate shape and pivotally mounted adjacent its midpoint to the upper portionof the supporting, board 177a of the switch means 153a by a pin 291.

It will be noted therefore that, unlike the operating link 73 of the principal embodiment, the elongated connecting link 289 does not slide rearwardly of the trunk 39a of the figure, but rather pivots about the pin 291 by means of which it is mounted on the board 177a. The rearward end of the link 289, moves in an arcuate path, and is provided with an inclined edge (FIGJ 11) which is engageable with a pin 263a projecting from a faceof the sector 253a so as to urge the sector into engagement with the driving pinion gear 257a. Furthermore, as in the principal embodiment, the link 289 engages arm 21% of lever 213a to rotate'the latter so that the over-center spring 214ais effective to rotate switch plate 181a and effect areversal in the current flow to the motor to thereby cause the figure to move to a seated position.

It will be appreciated that while the structure of the two embodiments. differs somewhat, their operation as thus far described is essentially the same. More particularly, in .eachembodiment when the lower jaw of the figure is raised, the hind legs of the figure are moved to a position in which the figure appears to be seated.

In the alternate embodiment, however, once the figure has been caused to resume the sitting position, it is automatically rocked backwardly into a .more erect position, i;e., a position in which it appears to be sitting back on its haunches with its forefeet suspended above the supporting surface. The alternate embodiment thus differs from the principal embodiment, in which the figure manually was rocked to the more erect position by prodding.

In the alternate embodiment, the rocking is accomplished automatically by means of a weight293 (FIGS. 13 through 15) whioh'is slidably carried on a rod 295 'supportedwithin the body. When the figure moves to the seated position, .the weight is moved rearwardly along the rod (PEG. 14), thus shifting the center of gravity of p the figure to a point rearwardly of the axis of the rod 251a causing the figure to rock in a clockwise direction (FIG.

4). The figure is caused to rock forwardly to its normal seated position (FIG. 3) when the weight is caused to shift forwardly (FIG. 15).

More particularly, the weight 293 (FIGS. 13 through 15) includes a generally cylindrical body portion 297 and a forw-ardly projecting head portion 299, the body portion being provided with a hole 301 to receive the rod 295. A hump 393 is provided on the upper surface of the body portion to facilitate rearward sliding movement of the weight, and an arm 365 projects downwardly from the body to facilitate forward sliding movement of the weight, as hereinafter described.

The rod 295 is supported at its opposite ends by a bracket 30?, the rod being carried by the bracket in generally parallel relation to the longitudinal axis of the trunk 39a. A sleeve 3% encircles the rod adjacent its forward end and limits forward sliding movement of the weight on the rod.

Movement of the weight rearwardly along the rod 295 so as to shift the center of gravity of the figure reaiwardly and thereby cause it to rock about the square rod 251a is accomplished by means of a pair of arms 31;} keyed to the rod 251a at their lower ends and extending upwardly in flanking relation to opposite sides of the rod. A coil spring 313 extends between the upper ends of the arms 311 in overlying relation to the upper surface of the weight so as to engage the forward edge of the hump 3 When the sector and, hence, the square rod 251a rotate in a clockwise direction (FIG. 13), the arms 311 will be pivoted in a. clockwise direction (FIG. 13) and, because of the engagement of the spring 313 with the hump 3%, the weight will be moved rearwardly along the rod, thus shifting the center of gravity of the figure to a point rearwardly of the axis of the rod 251a as, for example, from {Q t 2 (FIG. 14), thereby causing the igure to rock into a more upright position. As the arm members continue to move, however, the spring 313, moving in an arc and, hence, upwardly as well as rearwardly, is freed from engagement with the hump, thus releasing the weight for forward movement.

The weight is caused to move forwardly on the rod after being released from the spring 313 by a second spring 315 extending forwardly from the arm 305 to the bracket 307. This movement of the weight is sufficient to cause the figure to rock forwardly to its normal'sitting position (FIG. 3), at approximately which time the pin 263a of the sector 253a has tripped the operating lever 213a and reversed the flow of current to the motor, thus causing the direction of rotation of the sector and rod 251a to be reversed and causing the figure to return to the ambulatory position.

Accordingly, it will be seen that in the alternate embodiment of the invention, closing of the jaw of the figure causes the figure to move from an ambulatory position to a sitting position in which its rear hind legs are generally horizontal, then to a more erect sitting position with its forefeet suspended, then to a sitting position, and, finally, to return to an ambulatory position and cornmence ambulatory forward movement.

A toy figure has thus been shown and described, the figure being adapted to perform certain animal movements in a realistic and facinating manner.

While various of the structural features of two specific embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, it should be apparent that various modifications may be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A toy figure comprising a hollow body, a pair of forelegs extending from said body to a supporting surface and mounted on said body for reciprocal movement so as to alternately engage the supporting surface and cause traveling movement of said figure in a given direction on the supportingsurface, power means for causing said reciprocal movement of said forelegs, hind legs members pivotally mounted on said body for movement between a first position relative to said body wherein said figure assumes a simulated standing disposition and a second position relative to said body wherein said figure assumes a simulated seated disposition, selectively operable means connected to said hind leg members and to movable into driven engagement with said power means and effective when actuated to alter the said reciprocal movement of said forelegs so as to alter the movement imparted to the figure, actuation of said selectively operable means being also effective to cause pivotal movement of said hind leg members between said first and second positions, and means mounted on the said body of the figure and connected to said selectively operable means so that it is elfective when engaged in a predetermined manner to actuate said selectively operable means and cause the latter to be drivenly engaged by said power means.

2. A toy figure comprising a hollow body, a pair of forelegs adapted to engage a supporting surface and mounted on said body for reciprocal movement effective to cause forward traveling movement of said figure on the supporting surface, power means for causing said reciprocal movement of said forelegs, hind leg members pivotally mounted on said body for movement between a first position relative to said body wherein said figure assumes a simulated standing disposition and a second position relative to said body wherein said figure assumes a simulated seated disposition, selectively operable means connected to said hind leg members and movable into engagement with said power means and effective when actuated to reverse the said reciprocal movement of said forelegs, thereby causing the figure to cease said foreward traveling movement and thereby causing the said body of the figure to move rearwardly, actuation of said selectively operable means being also effective to cause pivotal movement of said hind leg members between said first and second position, and means mounted on the said body of the figure and connected to said selectively operable means so that it is effective when engaged in a predetermined manner to actuate said selectively operable means and place the latter in driven relation with said power means.

3. A toy figure comprising a hollow body, a pair of forelegs adapted to engage a supporting surface and mounted on said body for reciprocal movement effective to cause forward traveling movement of said figure on the supporting surface, a motor mounted within said body, gear means connected with said motor and said forelegs and operative to cause said reciprocal movement of said forelegs and effective to cause said forward traveling movement of said figure when rotated in a given direction, hind leg members pivotally mounted on said body for movement between a first position relative to said body wherein said figure assumes a simulated standing disposition and a second position relative to said body wherein said figure assumes a simulated seated disposition, selectively operable means connected to said hind leg member and movable into engagement with said gear means so as to be effective when actuated to cause a reversal in the direction of rotation of said gear means so as to reverse the said reciprocal movement of said forelegs and thereby cause rearward movement of the figure, actuation of said selectively operable means being also effective to cause pivotal movement of said hind leg members between said first and second position, and means mounted on the said body of the figure and connected to said selectively operable means so as to be effective when engaged in a predetermined manner to actuate said selectively operable means and place the latter in drive relation with said motor operated gear means.

4. A toy figure comprising a hollow body, a pair of forelegs adapted to engage a supporting surface and mounted on said body for reciprocal movement effective to cause traveling movement of said figure in a given direction on the supporting surface, power operated means for causing said reciprocal movement of said forelegs, sound producing means within said body and connected to said forelegs so as to be operable upon movement of said forelegs, hind leg members pivotally mounted on said body for movement between a first position relative to said body wherein said figure assumes a simulated standing disposition and a second position relative to said body wherein said figure assumes a simulated seated disposition, selectively operable means connected to said hind leg members and movable into engagement with said power operatedmeans and eifective when thus actuated to alter the said reciprocal movement of said forelegs so as to change the direction of movement imparted thereby while causing pivotal movement of said hind leg members between said first and second position, and means mounted on the said body of the figure and connected to said selectively operable'means soas to be effective when engaged in a predetermined manner to actuate said selectively operable means and place the latter in driven relation with said power operated means.

5. A toy figure comprising a hollow body, a pair of forelegs extendingtfrom said body to a supporting surface and mounted on said body for reciprocal movement so as to alternately engage the supporting surface and cause traveling movement of said figure in a given direction on the supporting surface, power means connected with said forelegs for causing said reciprocal movement of said forelegs,-hind leg members pivotally mounted on said body for movement betweena first position relative to said body wherein said figure assumes a simulated standing disposition and a second position relative to said body wherein said figure assumes a simulated seated disposition, the lower surface of each of said hind leg members being provided with surface engaging members adapted to rotate as said figure is caused to travel by reciprocal movement of said forelegs, selectively operable means connected to said hind leg members and actuablefor movement into driven engagement with said power means and effective when actuated to alter the said reciprocal movement of said forelegs so as to alter the movement imparted to the figure, actuation of said selectively operable means being also effective to cause pivotal movement of said hind leg members between said first and second positions, and means mounted on the said body of the figure and connected to said selectively operable means and effective when engaged in a predetermined manner to actuate said selectively operable means and place the latter in driven engagement with said power means.

6. A toy figure comprising a hollow body, a pair of elongated forelegs extending downwardly from said body to a supporting surface, the upper portion of each of said forelegs being provided with an, elongated longitudinally disposed slot and a hole spaced below the said slot, means mounting each of said forelegs on said body for reciprocal movement whereby their lower ends alternately engage the supporting surface and causetraveling movement of said figure in a given direction on the supporting surface, said means comprising a pin projecting from said body and adapted to occupy said slot, and a disk rotatably mounted on said body and provided with an eccentric pin projecting from one of its faces and adapted to occupy said hole, power operated means con nected with said disk forwcausing rotationtof said disk,

hind leg members pivotally mounted on said body for movement between a first position relative to saidbody wherein said figure assumes a simulated standing disposition and a second position relative to said body wherein said figure assumes a simulated seated disposition, selectively operable means connected to said hind leg members and movable into engagementwith said power means and effective when thus moved to alter the said reciprocal movement ofsaid forelegs so as to alter the movement imparted to the figure, actuation of said selectively operable means being also effective to cause pivotal movement of said hind leg members between said first and second position, and means mounted on the said body of the figure and connected to said selectively operable means effective when engaged in a predetermined manner to actuate said selectively operable means.

'7. A toy figure comprising a hollow body, a pair of elongated forelegs extending downwardly from said body to a supporting surface, the upper portion of each of said forelegs being provided with an elongated longitudinally disposed slot and a hole spaced below the said slot, each of said forelegs including an articulated paw pivotally secured adjacent its lower end for limited pivotal movement, means mounting each of said forelegs on said body for reciprocal movement whereby their lower ends alternately engage the supporting surface and cause traveling movement of said figure in a given direction on the supporting surface, said means comprising a pin projecting from said body and adapted to occupy said slot, and a disk rotatably mounted on said body and provided with an eccentric pin projecting from one of its faces and adapted to occupy said hole, power means connected with said disk for causing rotation of said disk, hind leg members pivotally mounted on said body for movement between a first position relative to said body wherein said figure assumes a simulated standing disposition and a second position relative to saidbody wherein said figure assumes a simulated seated disposition, electively operable means connected to said hind leg members and positionable for engagement with said power means and effective when thus positioned to alter the said reciprocal movement of said forelegs so as to alter the movement imparted to the figure, actuation of said selectively operable means being also effective to cause, pivotal movement of said hind leg members between said first and second position, and means mounted on the said body of the figure and connected to said selectively operable means effective when engaged in a predetermined manner to actuate said selectively operable means and place the latter in driven relation with said power means. v

8. A toy figure comprising a hollow body, a pair of forelegs adapted to engage a supporting surface and mounted on said body for reciprocal movement in both of two directions efiective to cause traveling movement of said figure in both a forward or rearward direction on the supporting surface, power means connected with said forelegs and operable to cause said reciprocal movement of said forelegs, means hingedly mounted Within said body defining a resonating chamber including a diaphragm, means engageable by said power means for inducing vibration of said diaphragm when said forelegs are recip- -'rocated in each of said two directions, hind leg members and means mounted on the said body of the figure and connected to said selectively operable means effective when engaged in a predetermined manner to actuate said selectively operable means and place the latter in driven relation with said power means.

References ited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 131,849 10/72 Clay 46-l50 2,147,215 2/39 Price 46l50 RICHARD C. PINKHAM, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US131849 *Oct 1, 1872 Improvement in mechanical toys
US2147215 *Jul 18, 1936Feb 14, 1939Rachel Price PearlFigured toy
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3411236 *Mar 30, 1966Nov 19, 1968Marx & Co LouisMotor sound unit
US3909276 *Nov 6, 1974Sep 30, 1975Wolf TobinRemote control toy
US4245515 *Jan 9, 1979Jan 20, 1981Hirokatsu IwayaDevice for switching power of active toy
US4266367 *Feb 1, 1979May 12, 1981Marvin Glass & AssociatesSitting doll
US20070123142 *Oct 25, 2006May 31, 2007Maddocks Richard JRealistic coordinating of specific body part movements in mechanical toys
EP1790403A1 *Nov 20, 2006May 30, 2007Hasbro, Inc.Realistic coordinating of specific body part movements in mechanical toys
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/270
International ClassificationA63H13/00, A63H13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63H13/02
European ClassificationA63H13/02