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Publication numberUS3195536 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 20, 1965
Filing dateSep 5, 1962
Priority dateSep 5, 1962
Publication numberUS 3195536 A, US 3195536A, US-A-3195536, US3195536 A, US3195536A
InventorsHrair P Hovnanian, Horace F Mccarthy, Frank L Rose
Original AssigneeAvco Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Illuminated appliances
US 3195536 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

{SEARCH ROOM .SUBSTI EUTE FOR MISSING XR July 20, 1955 H. P. HOVNANIAN ETAL 3,195,536

ILLUMINATED APPLIANCES Filed Sept. 5, 1962 HRAIR PHILlP HOVNANIAN HORACE FRANK MCCARTHY FRANK L.ROSE

INVENTORS BY A ATTORNEYS United rates Raters:

3,195,536 ILLUIVIINATIEI) APPLIANCES I-Irair I. I-lovnanian, Winchester, Horace F. McCarthy,

North Andover, and Frank L. Rose, Methuen, Mass,

assignors to Avco Corporation, Cincinnati, Ohio, a corporation of Delaware Filed Sept. 5, 1962, Ser. No. 221,498 5 Claims. (Cl. 128-6) This invention relates to illuminated appliances and, in particular, to illuminated appliances using fiber optic light transmitting means and light conducting applicators such as retractors, anoscopes, tongue depressors, etc.

Illuminated appliances, some of which are named above, are widely known in the art. I-leretofore, however, these were battery operated. The light source consisted of one or more batteries and a small lamp, both contained in the handle of an appliance assembly. The prior art devices sutfered from low light intensity and frequent replacement of lamps and batteries. When higher intensity lamps were used, operated from line voltages, two major shortcomings appeared: (l) excessive heat from lamp in proximity to patient and/or physician, and (2) voltages, wires and currents around the patient creating serious hazard problems.

Heretofore, illuminated appliances were primarily used for diagnostic purposes in hospitals and doctors oflices. Their low light intensity and limited battery life did not make them appealing to surgeons in operating rooms. Additionally, an ever present danger in an operating room is the possibility of an explosion caused by the ignition of ether. For this reason, all electrical equipment designed for use in an operating room below a minimum above a floor surface is constructed to be explosion proof. Methods of safeguarding electrical appliances from explosion invariably create a great deal of bulk.

Typical operating room lighting systems may produce 5,000 foot candles above the operating table. By the time the light reaches the surface of the operating site its intensity may have decreased to below 100 foot candles. This level of light is generally acceptable for operating purposes but because the lights are mounted a considerable distance above the operating table and because they are relatively difficult to maneuver and move about, they are quite often unsatisfactory for providing adequate light for probing inside a cavity such as the chest cavity and abdominal cavity. Overhead lights are particularly unsatisfactory for localized lighting and locating certain organs within the shadows of the cavity.

The need for a light which can be inserted directly in a cavity, particularly in surgical incisions, has long been felt. Besides obscuration due to instruments and medical staff, human organs are often obscured by each other and by fat and muscle; these organs have no real fixed positions and are often located in unexpected regions of the body with great variations in size. A small high intensity light via a highly mechanically flexible light pipe also has the advantage of not obstructing the surgeon in the limited interior of an incision, especially if it also substitutes for other functional instruments such as a retractor.

It is an object of the invention to provide an illuminated appliance which avoids the disadvantages and limitations of prior art devices of a similar type.

It is another object of the invention to provide an illuminated appliance for supplying a high intensity light at a remote location from a light source.

It is yet another object of the invention to provide an illuminated appliance which provides a high intensity cold light.

3,195,536 Patented July 20, 1965 It is still another object of the invention to provide an illuminated applicator assembly which includes means for easily attaching and removing a fiber optic light transmitting means.

It is still another object of the invention to provide an illuminated applicator assembly which includes means for containing a portion of a fiber optic light transmitting fiber optic light transmitting means is connected to a light transmitting applicator assembly, in light communication therewith. The light transmitting applicator assembly includes a tubular handle in which the fiber optic light transmitting means is inserted and secured. It also includes a light transmitting applicator which has a diffused light emitting portion.

Another aspect' of the invention is to provide a light source which comprises a plurality of lamps and means for energizing said lamps. The light source also includes means for supplying light to a utilization means. The plurality of lamps is mounted on a movable plate which can be moved to place one or another of the plurality of lamps in light communication with the light utilization means. An electrical control means for energizing the lamp which is in light communication with the light utilization means is operably coupled to the lamp mounting means and actuated thereby.

An additional feature of the invention comprises an illuminated applicator assembly having a tubular handle for receiving a fiber optic light transmitting means, a light conducting applicator and a latch mechanism for rotatably securing the fiber optic light transmitting means in the handle.

The novel features that are considered characteristic of the invention are set forth in the appended claims; the invention itself, however, both as to its organization and method of operation, together with additional objects and advantages thereof, will best be understood from the following description of a specific embodiment when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a partially schematic and partially sectionalreprcsentation of an illuminated appliance embodying the principles of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a section of a latching mechanism taken along lines 2-2 in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 depicts a light source with a cutaway section showing details of the.lamp mounting means; and

FIGURE 4 is a section taken along lines 44 in FIGURE 3.

Referring to FIGURE 1, there is shown an illuminated appliance generally designated 10 comprising a light source 11, a fiber optic light transmitting means 12 and an illuminated applicator assembly 13. The light source 11 is generally of conventional construction but includes a novel lamp mounting means which will be discussed in detail hereinafter.

The fiber optic light transmitting means is of conventional construction and comprises a large number of,

glass rods, the ends of which receive or emit increments of light applied thereto. The light is carried in the fiber optic light transmitting means by means of total' internal reflection. It is possible to transmit light efiictently from a light source 11 located at a remote point over a substantial length, six feet for example, to an Q operative point at which the light will be used. An excellent discussion of fiber optic light transmitting means can be found in the book entitled Concepts of Classical Optics by John Strong, published by W. H. Freeman & Company (San Francisco, 1958).

The illuminated applicator assembly comprises three major elements, a light transmitting applicator 14, a latch mechanism 16 and a handle 17. The applicator 14 is made preferably from a light transmitting material such as Lucite or Plexiglas. For purposes of illustration, it is shaped as a retractor and its includes a light emitting portion 20 at one end. The applicator 14, like the fiber optic means 12, conducts light by total internal reflection. A diffused light is emitted from areas of its surface that are roughened or frosted, such as at 20. A remaining end 18 of the applicator 14 is generally cylindrical in shape and is inserted part way into a tubular metal sleeve 19 and secured therein in any suitable manner such as by cement. The metal sleeve 19 in turn is inserted into one end 21 of the tubular handle 17 and secured therein. The metal sleeve 19 is used to protect the otherwise fragile light-transmitting material of the applicator 14 from abrasion when the applicator 14 is inserted and/or removed from the handle 17. In effect, it forms part of. the applicator 14.

As will be seen in FIGURE 1, the handle 17 broadly comprises an elongated portion 22 which includes a finger grip to facilitate manual manipulation and the end 21 mentioned previously. Spaced from the edge of the end 21 is the latch mechanism 16, the construction of which is shown in FIGURE 2.

Referring to FIGURE 2, it is seen that a pair of diametrically opposing slots 24 are provided through the wall of the end 21. A fork 26 comprising a bight 27 and a pair of parallel spaced prongs 28 is inserted in the slots 24. The width of the prongs 28 is not uniform. The spacing between prongs 28 adjacent to the bight 27 is smaller than the spacing between prongs 28 at their opposed end remote from the bight 27. A header 29 bridges the prongs 28 at the end remote from the bight 27. A recess 31 is provided on the under side of the header 29 and a complementary recess 32 is provided in the end 21. A spring 33 bridges the distance between the recesses 31 and 32. The spring 33 maintains the fork 26 in the position shown in FIGURES l and 2.

It will be seen in FIGURE 2 that the fiber optic light transmitting means 12 includes a protective cover 15. The cover 15 is made from rubber, or a suitable plastic and it is inserted in a metal ring 36. Allowing for a slight clearance, the length of the ring 36 is substantially equal to the distance between the latch mechanism 16 and the end 18 of the applicator 14 as shown in FIG- URE 1. When inserted and locked in the handle, the fiber optic light transmitting means 12 will abut against the applicator 14 forming an excellent light communication path therebetween.

. Referring to FIGURE 2, it will be noted that the diameter of the ring 36 is larger than the spacing between the prongs 28 adjacent to the bight 27. On the other hand, the spacing between the prongs remote from the bight 27 and adjacent to the header 29 is larger than diameter of the ring 36.

Thus, to insert or remove the fiber optic light transmitting means 12 it is merely necessary to depress the header and slide the fiber optic light transmitting means into or out of the handle respectively. Upon releasing the header 29, the spring 33 returns the latch mcehanism 16 to the position shown in FIGURE 2 thus preventing axial translation of the fiber optic light transmitting means 12 with respect to the applicator 14. It will be noted, however, that these 'two components are freely rotatable relative to one another.

A significant advantage of the combination described above is the versatility of the system. It enables a practitioner to interchange applicator assemblies in a simple and facile manner, to rotate the applicator assembly relative to the fiber optic light transmitting means, and to manipulate the applicator assembly independent of the light source 11. This latter benefit arises from the complete mechanical flexibility of the fiber optic light transmitting means, a typical length of which is six feet.

By means of the FIGURE 1 illuminated appliance, it has been possible to supply a light intensity of 500 foot candles at the light emitting surface 20 using a 150 watt lamp with an internal reflector in conjunction with a fiber optic light transmitting means six feet long with an outside diameter of h'alf'an inch." 'The light emitted from the surface 20 is cold and can be used within a patients body with complete safety and comfort. There are no electrical connections in the applicator assembly.

The light source need not be explosion proof since it can be mounted at a safe height.

FIGURES 3 and 4 depict details of the light source 11 and, in particular, details relating to the novel feature of providing a plurality of lamps, two shown in the drawings, which are easily interchanged to provide continuous light during a surgical procedure.

Referring to FIGURE 3, the light source 11 includes a pair of lamps 41 and 42 mounted on a slidable mounting plate 43. (See FIGURE 4.) The plate, in turn, sits on a shelf 44 and its movement is guided by means of a pair of Z-shaped channels 46.

One wall 47 of the light source 11 includes a pair of spaced openings 48 and 49. (See also FIGURE 1.) One end of the plate 43 is extendable through the opening 43 and terminated in a hinged connection with a handle 51. The handle 51 is generally L-shaped and includes two transverse portions 52 and 53. The handle 51 is shown extended in FIGURE 3 and recessed in FIGURE 1. In the recessed position shown in FIG- URE 1, the plate 43 is positioned at one extreme of its travel. (See the phantom outline in FIGURE 3.) By simply actuating the handle 51 it is possible to place either lamp 41 or lamp 42 in light communication with an opening 54, shown dotted in FIGURE 3, through which light is carried to the fiber optic light transmitting means 12 or other utilization means.

Mounted to the bottom of the plate 43 is an actuating mechanism 56 which aetuates a switch 57 when the plate 43 is in the position shown in FIGURE 3. When actuated, the microswitch 57 energizes lamp 42. Lamp 41 is energized when the microswitch 57 is not actuated, when the plate 43 is in the extreme right hand position of its travel.

handle 51 against the wall 47 in either position of its travel.

The various features and advantages of. the invention are thought to be clear from the foregoing description. Various other features and advantages not specifically enumerated will undoubtedly occur to those versed in the art, as likewise will many variations and modifications of the preferred embodiment illustrated, all of which may be achieved without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the following claims.

We claim:

1. An illuminated appliance comprising:

(a) a light source;

(b) a fiber optic light transmitting means of substantial length to transmit light from a remote point to an operative point and having an enlarged operative end;

(c) a light transmitting applicator including a light emitting portion;

(d) a tubular handle having an applicator inserted in one end and a fiber optic light-transmitting means inserted in the other end, said handle also including a pair of oppositely disposed transverse slots; and

(e) reciprocable latch means disposed in said slots including means for securing said fiber optic light transmitting means when said latch is in a raised position and means for permitting removal or insertion of said fiber optic light transmitting means when said latch is in a depressed position. 1

2. An illuminated appliance as defined in claim 1 in which said latch means comprises a fork having spaced prongs inserted in said slots, the spacing between portions of said prongs contained in said slots normally preventing the insertion and removal of said enlarged end and the spacing between portions of said prongs contained in said slots when said fork is depressed enabling the insertion and removal of said enlarged end.

3. An appliance for use with a fiber optic light supply means having a fiber optic light transmitting means terminating in an enlarged end comprising: A

'(a) a tight transmitting applicator including a light emitting portion;

(b) a tubular handle for said applicator in which said fiber optic light transmitting means is inserted said handle also including a pair of oppositely disposed transverse slots; and

(c) reciprocable latch means disposed in said slots including means for securing said fiber optic light transmitting means when said latch is in a raised position and means for permitting removal and insertion of said fiber optic light transmitting means when said latch is in a depressed position.

4. An illuminated applicator assembly as described in claim 3 in which said latch means comprises a reciprocable fork including a pair of spaced prongs and a bight, the spacing between said prongs adjacent to said bight being smaller than said enlarged diameter end and the spacing between said prongs remote from said bight being greater than said enlarged diameter end.

5. An illuminated applicator assembly comprising: (a) a handle comprising a tubular wall defining a passage having opposing openings, said handle also including a slot extending through said wall; (b) a light-conducting applicator inserted in. said pas sage through one of said openings;

(c) a fiber optic light-transmitting means inserted in said passage through said other opening in an abutting relationship with said applicator; and

(d) means comprising a first member mounted on said fiber optic light-transmitting means and a second complementary member mounted on said handle, said second member being movable through said slot into and out of engagement with said first means on said fiber optic light-transmitting means for preventing and permitting axial movement of said fiber optic light-transmitting means.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,326,300 12/19 Smit 12823 1,965,865 7/34 Thompson l2823 2,244,114 6/41 Noir a- 24037 2,412,340 12/46 Johnson 2401 2,514,892 7/50 Miller et al. 2401 2,936,753 5/60 Storz 1286 3,020,806 2/62 Castrucci 88-1 3,051,166 8/62 Hovnanian 128-4 OTHER REFERENCES Kapany article Fiber Optics Scientific American, November 1960, pages 72-80.

Article in Life Magazine, Oct. 17, 1960, pages 51-52. RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primr ry Examiner.

JORDAN FRANKLIN, Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3285242 *Jul 1, 1963Nov 15, 1966American Cystoscope Makers IncSurgical headlight and light source
US3397457 *Jan 22, 1965Aug 20, 1968Iota Cam CorpDental drill
US3638013 *Apr 2, 1969Jan 25, 1972Fiber Photics IncDental apparatus utilizing fiber optics
US4037588 *Mar 15, 1976Jul 26, 1977Richard Wolf GmbhLaryngoscopes
US4086919 *Jul 9, 1976May 2, 1978Bullard James RLaryngoscope
US4110820 *Dec 16, 1976Aug 29, 1978Olympus Optical Co., Ltd.Spare lamp holding device for a light supply device for endoscope
US4592344 *Dec 14, 1983Jun 3, 1986Scheer Peter MCombination illuminator and lip and cheek expander
US4785796 *Sep 12, 1986Nov 22, 1988Mattson Philip DOtoscope and flexible, disposable curette for use therewith
US4807599 *May 8, 1987Feb 28, 1989Med-Struments, Inc.Illuminating tongue depressor
US4898172 *Apr 18, 1986Feb 6, 1990Grable Richard JOptical light probe
US4905669 *Feb 23, 1989Mar 6, 1990James R. BullardLaryngoscope
US4947829 *May 10, 1988Aug 14, 1990Bullard James RModular blade laryngoscope
US5003963 *Mar 5, 1990Apr 2, 1991James Roger BullardLaryngoscope
US5035232 *Oct 21, 1988Jul 30, 1991Aesculap AgRetractor
US5125923 *May 30, 1991Jun 30, 1992Sorenson Laboratories, Inc.Laser surgical instrument
US5186714 *May 18, 1992Feb 16, 1993Yab Revo-Tech Inc.Multifunctional surgical instrument
US5318009 *Mar 3, 1993Jun 7, 1994Scientific Medical Programs, Inc.Illuminated tongue depressor
US5554112 *Jul 8, 1994Sep 10, 1996Birtcher Medical Systems, Inc.Minimally invasive irrigator/aspirator surgical probe and method of using same
US5643221 *Aug 9, 1994Jul 1, 1997Bullard; James RogerControlled targeting laryngoscope
US5800342 *Dec 17, 1996Sep 1, 1998Lee; Jai S.Method of endotracheal intubation
US5840013 *Dec 17, 1996Nov 24, 1998Lee; Jai S.Method of introducing a tubular member at a site in the body
US9675332Jul 10, 2014Jun 13, 2017Aesculap AgSurgical retractor
USRE33234 *Aug 8, 1988Jun 19, 1990Kim LandryTranscutaneous intravenous illuminator
WO1992021299A1 *May 13, 1992Dec 10, 1992Sorenson Laboratories, Inc.Laser surgical instrument
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/182, 600/212, 600/245, 385/902, 600/249
International ClassificationF21V33/00, A61B1/07
Cooperative ClassificationF21V33/00, A61B1/07, Y10S385/902
European ClassificationF21V33/00, A61B1/07
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 27, 1991ASAssignment
Owner name: TRACOR, INC.
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Effective date: 19911220
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