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Publication numberUS3195779 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 20, 1965
Filing dateApr 29, 1963
Priority dateApr 29, 1963
Publication numberUS 3195779 A, US 3195779A, US-A-3195779, US3195779 A, US3195779A
InventorsStanley Nicko
Original AssigneeFlake Ice Machines Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Beverage dispenser
US 3195779 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 20, 1965 s. NICKQ 3,195,779

( BEVERAGE DISPENSER Filed April 29, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet l r I i I 92 90 I L 98M i! 25 1 Q f 3U 1 I i I Y INVEN'IIOR. I G Stanley fZzc/ea Maw d/MXM W7 azz 'L s July 20, 1965 s. NICKO 3,195,779

BEVERAGE DISPENSER FIG, 3

INVENTOR.

Stanley Nicko QMZMWMM dag 5 July 20, 1965 s. NICKO 3,195,779

BEVERAGE DISPENSER Filed April 29, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR.

Stanley i'lz'cko United States Patent 9,195,779 BEVERAGE DiSlENSER Stanley Niche, Qhicago, Ill, assignor to Finite Ice Machines, 1110., Chicago, Ill., a corporation or Illinois Filed Apr. 2d, 1963, Ser. No. 276,515 11 Claims. ((31. 222-$2) This invention relates to a beverage dispenser which is particularly useful for dispensing beer and other carbonated beverages.

One object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved device for dispensing carbonated beverages from cans or similar containers of relatively small capacity, such as one gallon, for example.

Another object is to provide a new and improved beverage dispenser in which the beverage is supplied in cans having openings which are sealed initially with closure plugs made of rubber or rubberlike material.

A further object is to provide a beverage dispenser in which the beverage to be dispensed is withdrawn from the cans by means of tapping pipes which are adapted to penetrate the rubber plugs mounted in the openings in the cans.

A further object is to provide a beverage dispenser in which each can is provided with two openings closed with rubber plugs, one plug being adapted to receive a tapping pipe for withdrawing the beverage while the other plug is adapted to receive a tapping pipe through which carbon dioxide (CO under pressure is introduced into the can to provide pressure for dispensing the beverage.

Another object is to provide new and improved beverage cans having rubber closure plugs, each of which is formed with an imperforate diaphragm, together with means forming a recess for receiving theremnant of the diaphragm after the diaphragm has been punctured by a tapping pipe. It is a further object to provide a new and improved rubber or rubberlike closure plug of the foregoing character which is constructed and arranged to prevent any leakage between the tapping pipe and the plug, and also to prevent the tapping pipe from being pushed outwardly through the plug by the force produced by the CO pressure in the can.

A further object is to provide such a new and improved rubber plug which is formed with a lower sleeve portion having a bore therein which is initially of a substantially smaller diameter than the tapping pipe, so that the sleeve portion will be stretched substantially by the insertion of the tapping pipe, the sleeve portion being adapted to grip the tapping pipe tightly, due to the stretching of the sleeve and also due to the pressure of the CO on the sleeve.

Another object is to provide a new and improved beverage dispenser adapted to dispense carboncd beverages from sealed can of small size so that the dispensed beverage will always be fresh and will be prevented from going hat or stale.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will appear from the following description, taken with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a beverage dispenser to be described as an illustrative embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 1 but with the front cover or door swung open to show the interior of the compartment which holds the beverage cans.

FIG. 3 is a central elevational section of the beverage dispenser, taken generally along the line 33 in FIG. 4.

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the beverage dispenser with the covers removed to show the interior construction.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged vertical section, taken through one of the beverage cans.

3,l95,77 Patented July 20, 1965 FIG. 6 is an enlarged vertical section, taken through one of the rubber plugs, generally along the line 6-6 in FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a vertical section, showing the closure plug in its original imperforate condition.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the rubber closure plug.

FIG. 9 is a diagrammatic elevational view, showing the dispensing system employed in the beverage dispenser.

It will be seen that FIGS. 1-4 illustrate the general construction of a beverage dispenser 10 which is useful for dispensing beverages generally, but is particularly well adapted for dispensing beer and other carbonated beverages. The illustrated dispenser 10 is housed in a cabinet 12. One or more faucets 14 may be provided at the front of the cabinet 12 for dispensing the beverage. Each faucet 14 is equipped with a swingable handle 16 which may be operated to control the flow of the beverage from the faucet. The illustrated dispenser It) is provided with two of the faucets 14.

The illustrated cabinet 12 is provided with three main compartments 2t 22 and 24, as shown to best advantage in FIG. 3. The compartment 20 is located in the front portion of the cabinet 12 and is adapted to hold cans 26 or other similar containers of the beer or other beverage to be dispensed. The compartment 22 is located in the upper rear portion of the cabinet 12 and is adapted to hold a bottle or cylinder 28 containing C0 The compartrnent 24 is in the lower rear portion of the cabinet 12 and is adapted to hold a compressor, condenser, an expansion valve and other equipment (not shown) for refrigerating the main compartment 29. Louver openings 29 may be formed in the sides of the cabinet 12 to provide for ventilation for the refrigeration compartment 24.

As shown, the front compartment 2% has a door or lid 38 which is adapted to be swung upwardly on hinges 32 to provide easy access to the compartment 24 The door 30 is shown closed in FIG. 1 and open in FIG. 2. It will be seen that the door 30 comprises a horizontal top panel or Wall 34, an inclined front panel or wall 36, and a vertical front panel 33. The walls or panels 34, 3-6 and 38 are preferably provided with insulation MB to reduce the entry of heat into the refrigerated compartment 24 Gaskets 42 may be provided around the edges of the door 30 to prevent the movement of air into and out of the compartment 29 when the door is closed.

The front compartment 2i) has a stationary front wall 44, a bottom wall 46, and a rear wall 4%. insulation 50 may also be provided in the walls 44 46 and 43. As shown to advantage in FIG. 3, cooling coils 52 for the circulation of refrigerant are provided in the rear wall 50 of the compartment 20. Cooling coils may also be provided in the front and bottom walls 44- and 46, if desired. The rear wall 43 forms a partition between the front compartment 2i) and the rear compartments 22 and 24.

The cabinet 12 has a rear wall 56 which closes the rear sides of the compartments 22 and 24. A horizontal partition 5% is provided between the upper and lower rear compartments 22 and 24. It will be seen that the upper rear compartment 22 is closed at the top by a lid or door 60 which is swingable upwardly on hinges 62 to provide easy access to the CO cylinder or tank 28 so that the cylinder may be changed when the CO is exhausted. Cradles or pillow blocks 64 are mounted on the partition 53 to support the CO cylinder 28.

The illustrated cabinet 12 is provided with feet 68 for elevating the cabinet above the supporting surface 70 on which the cabinet is placed. A drip pan '72 projects for wardly from the lower front portion of the cabinet and is removably mounted on the cabinet for catching any quantity of the beverage which may drip or spill from the faucets 14. The upper side of the pan 72 is closed by a removable screen 74 which may be made of per- The pan '72 may be from the shutoff valve 78 to a pressure reducing and regulating valve 82. The initial CO pressure in the cylinder 28 is higher than necessary or desirable for pressurizing the beverage cans 25. By means of the pressure regulating valve 82, the pressure is reduced and maintained The pressure regulatconstant at a suitable low value. ing valve 82 may be provided with a rotatable adjusting shaft or knob 84 for changing the pressure setting of the valve. A low pressure outlet tube or pipe 86 leads from the pressure regulating valve 82. As illustrated, a pressure gauge 88 is connected to the outlet pipe 86 to indicate the CO pressure at the outlet or" the regulating valve 82. The gauge 88 facilitates the adjustment of the pressure regulating valve 82 and gives assure that the regulating valve is operating properly. gauge 88 gives an indication when the CO in the cylinder 23 is nearly exhausted. Thus, when the pressure shown by the gauge 88 starts to drop below the normal value, it is an indication that the CO cylinder 28 is nearly empty and will soon have to be replaced.

The CO from the regulating valve 82 'is supplied to the beverage cans 26 by flexible hoses or tubes 99 which may be made. of various plastics or other suitable materials. A shutoif valve 92 is connected between the outlet pipe 86 and each hose 90. The valve 9?; may be closed to prevent loss of CO when the corresponding can 26 is being replaced.

A tapping'pipe 94 may be employed to introduce the CO into each can 26, as will be described in greater detail shortly. In this case, a check valve 96 is connected between each tapping pipe 94 and the corresponding hose 9%) to prevent reverse flow of fluids out of the tapping pipe 94 and into the hose 9!). The check valve 96 is constructed and'arranged to offer no substantial resistance to the flow of CO from the hose 9i) and through the pipe 94 into the can 26. However, the check valve 96 preventsthe flow of CO .or the beverage from the can 26 and through the pipe 94- into the hose 9%. In the ab- Moreover, the

generally are flat and circular in shape. Conventional or suitable crimped or soldered joints 112 may be employed between the side wall 1% and the end walls 1% and 110. 7 Q i To provide for the insertion of the tapping pipes 94 and 98, the top wall 183 'of each of the illustrated cans 26 is formed with two openings 114 and 116, preferably circular in shape. in this case, one of the openings 114 is located centrally in the top wall 1% While the other opening 116 is located close to the side wall 196. As shown, the tapping pipe 94 for the CO extends through the central opening 114, while the tapping pipe 98 for the beverage extends through the opening 116.

The tapping pipe 94 for introducing the C0 into the 7 can 26 is preferably relatively shortso as to extend downwardly into the can only a short distance below the top wall 1%. This arrangement prevents the CO from bubbling through the beverage, which might tend to cause excessive foaming of the beverage. The other tapping pipe 98 for withdrawing the beverage preferably is considerably longer so as to extend to a point adjacent the bottom wall lltlof the can 26. t In this way, virtually all of the beverage may be removed from the can. i

As shown to advantage in FIGS; 5-8, each of the openings 11% and 11a is closed and sealed initially by a closure plug 126 which may be made of rubber, synthetic rubber, or other rubber-like materials, such as various soft resilient plastics. .Each plug 129 may be molded in one piece.

' As shown, each plug 121) is generallyin the form of a circular disk or body 122 having an annular peripheral groove 124 for receiving the top wall 198 of the can 26 around the corresponding opening 114 or 116. Annular flanges 126 and 123 project outwardly from the body 122 above and below the groove 124 for retaining the plug 129 in the opening 114 or 116. At its bottom or inner extremity, the groove 124 preferably has an out side diameter which is substantially greater than the diameter of the openings 114 and 116 so that the plug 120 will be compressed to a substantial extent when it is inserted into one of the openings, Moreover, the width of the grove 124 at it bottom is preferably substantially less sence of the check valve 96, such reverse flow may tend to occur when the CO pressure from the cylinder 28 drops to a low value or is lost entirely, as when the cylinder is exhausted or nearly so. V

Each can 26 is provided with a second tapping pipe 98 through which the beverage is conducted out of the can. A flexible hose 100 leads from the tapping pipe 98 to a pipe 102 which extends through the front panel 36 to the corresponding faucet or valve lld. Each hose 1% may be made of various plastics or other suitable materials. The hoses 100 are made long enough to permit the swingable lid 36 to be raised fully, as shown in lFlG. 2. p

As shown to best advantage in FIG. 5, each of the illustrated cans 26 is of the usual type, made of thin sheet metal or equivalent material. Each of the illustrated cans 26 has a capacity of one imperial gallon,'although cans It is preferred to possibility that the beverage will become stale before,

being consumed. Thus, the dispenser is particularly well adapted for use in small taverns, soda fountains, and

homes. 1

Each of the illustrated cans 26 has a substantially cylindrical side wall 1% which is closed at its opposite ends by upper and lower end walls 1% and 11%. The end walls 108 and 11% may be corrugated to some extent but than the thickness of the top wall 193. Just above the groove 124, the outwardly projecting flange 126 has an outwardly and upwardly flaring frustoconical wall or surface 136 adapted to be compressedagaint the top wall 108 so that the plug 129 will form a tight seal with the corresponding opening.

To facilitate the insertion of. the plugs 12% into the openings 114 and'116, the lower flangelzta of each plug is formed with a beveled frustoconical downwardly tapering surface or wall 132. When the plug 12% is to be inserted into one of the openings 114 and 116, the lower portion of the beveled surface 132 is inserted into the opening. Downward pressure is then applied to the plug 129 to force the flange 128 through the opening. It will be understood that the flange 128 is compressed to a considerable extent as it passes through the opening. The

'- flange 123 springs outwardly to its original shape after it has been pressed below the lower wall 168.

Each of the illustrated plugs 120 has an imperforate axial diaphragm 134 adapted to be penetrated by one of the tapping pipes 94 and 93. Thus, the plug 120 initially seals the corresponding opening 114 or 116st) as to prevent the beverage or the carbonation from escaping from the can. The plugs 12% are inserted immediatelyafterthe can 26 is filled and are effective to seal the can while the can is being shipped from the filling plant to the ultimate consumer, and until the beverage in the can-istobe consumed.

As shown, the diaphragm 134is formed integrally with the body 122 and is interposed between an upper axial boreor'opening 136 and a lower axial bore or opening 133. The upper bore 136; extends downwardlyinto the plug 12% and is closed at its lower end by the diaphragm 134. The lower bore 138 extends upwardly into the lower end of the plug 129 and is closed at its upper end by the diaphragm 134.

The upper bore 136 corresponds generally in diameter to the tapping pipes 94 and 93 and is adapted to guide one of the tapping pipes when it is inserted through the diaphragm 134. As shown, each of the tapping pipes 94 and 98 is cut off at its lower end along a diagonal or inclined surface 140 so as to provide a sharp edge or point 142 at the extreme lower end of the pipe. The sharp edge 142 is adapted to puncture one side portion of the diaphragm 134.

Just below the diaphragm 134, the lower bore 133 is formed with an enlarged annular recess or portion 144 which is adapted to receive the remnant of the diaphragm 134 after it has been punctured by the tapering pipe. As shown to best advantage in FIG. 6, the punctured diaphragm becomes a flap which is flexed downwardly and becomes lodged in the annular recess 144 when the tapping pipe is pushed through the plug 120. The provision of the recess 144 prevents the diaphragm 13 5 from being severed entirely from the plug 120. If the diaphragm is severed entirely, it sometimes tends to clog the tapping pipe. Moreover, it is undesirable to permit the diaphram to drop into the beverage because there may be a possibility that the diaphragm, or a fragment thereof, may be dispensed through the faucet 14- with the beverage.

Each of the illustrated plugs 120 has a reduced sleeve or nipple portion 148 which projects downwardly from the lower end of the body portion 122. The lower bore 138 extends axially through the sieve portion 148. It is preferred that the diameter of the lower bore 138 be considerably less than the diameter of the tapping pipes 94 and 98 so that the sleeve portion 14-3 will be stretched to a considerable extent when the tapping pipe is inserted through the bore 138. In this way, the sleeve portion 148 tightly grips the tapping pipe so as to prevent the pipe from being pushed outwardly through the plug 120 by the CO pressure in the can. The grip maintained by the sleeve portion 148 on the corresponding tapping pipe is due partly to the stretching of the sleeve portion and partly to the pressure of the CO on the outside of the sleeve portion. The pressure between the sleeve portion 148 and the tapping pipe also insures that a tight seal will be maintained along the bore 138 between the t-apping pipe and the plug 12%). A seal is flso provided at the point where the diaphragm 134 was punctured by the tapping pipe. Thus, any leakage of the CO or the beverage around either of the tapping pipes is pre vented.

As shown to best advantage in FIGS. 5 and 6, a stop washer or other member 152 is preferably secured to the outside of each of the tapping pipes 94 and 93. The stop member 152 is adapted to engage the upper side of the plug 120 so as to limit the extent to which the tapping pipe may be inserted into the can 26. Thus, the tapping pipes may be inserted into the can simply by pushing each pipe through the corresponding plug 120 until the stop member or collar 152 engages the plug.

The beverage dispenser is efiective to maintain a constant CO pressure in each of the cans at all times. The CO pressure prevents any loss of the original carbonation so that the beverage will not go flat or stale. The CO also provides for the dispensing of the beverage under pressure from the faucets 14.

When either of the cans 26 is empty, the front door 30 is opened, the corresponding shutoff valve 92 is closed, and the tapping pipes 94 and 98 are removed from the empty can. The empty can is then replaced with a fresh can which is tapped by forcing the tapping pipes 94 and 98 through the diaphragms 134 in the corresponding plugs 120. The shutoff valve 92 is again opened and the door 30 is closed to restore the dispenser to its operating condition. v

The refrigerating coils 52 keep the main compartment 24 cool so that the beverage will be dispensed from the cans 26 at the desired low temperature. It is preferred to pre-cool the fresh beverage cans in an ordinary refrigerator so that the beverage will be at the desired low temperature when the cans are first mounted in the dispenser.

The arrangement whereby the cans are tapped through the rubber sealing plugs substantially obviates any possibility of contamination of the beverage or spilling or loss of carbonation. The beverage is always dispensed in a fresh fully carbonated condition.

Various other modifications, alternative constructions and equivalents may be employed without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention, as exemplified in the foregoing description and defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a beverage dispenser,

the combination comprising a bottle for holding carbon dioxide under pressure,

a pressure reducing and regulating valve connected to said bottle,

a metal beverage can having a cylindrical side wall,

a bottom Wall and a substantially fiat top wall,

a faucet adapted to discharge the beverage,

said can having first and second substantially circular openings in said top wall,

first and second generally circular rubber plugs mounted in said openings,

each of said plugs having an annular peripheral groove for receiving the edge of said top Wall around the corresponding opening,

each of said plugs having flanges above and below said top wall for retaining said plug in the corresponding opening,

each plug having upper and lower axial bores extending into the upper and lower ends of said plug,

each plug in its initial state having an imperforate diaphragm formed integrally therewith between said upper and lower bores,

a first tapping pipe for penetrating the diaphragm of said first plug and extending through said upper and lower bores thereof to admit carbon dioxide to said can,

the lower end of said first pipe extending only a short distance below said first plug into said can,

a first flexible hose connected between said regulating valve and said first pipe for conducting carbon dioxide thereto,

a check valve connected into said first hose for preventing any reverse flow of the beverage from said can into said regulating valve,

a second tapping pipe for penetrating the diaphragm of said second plug and extending downwardly into said can to a point adjacent the bottom thereof,

and a second flexible hose connected between said second pipe and said faucet for carrying the beverage from said can to said faucet,

each of said pipes being tightly received in said lower bore of the corresponding plug to form a seal with said plug,

each plug having a reduced nipple portion extending downwardly at its lower end and adapted to be pressed against the corresponding pipe by the pressure of the carbon dioxide,

the second bore of each plug having an enlarged portion a short distance below said diaphragm for receiving the remnant of the diaphragm after the diaphragm is punctured by the corresponding tapping pipe.

2. A beverage container comprising a metal can having a generally cylindrical side wall,

a bottom wall connected to the lower end of said side wall,

a generally fiat top wall connected to the upper end of said side wall,

said top wall having first and second generally circular openings therein,

and first and second rubberlike plugs mounted in said first and second openings and sealing said openings,

each plug having an annular peripheral groove therein receiving the top wall around the corresponding opening,

each plug having flanges about and below said top wall for retaining the plug in the corresponding opening,

each plug having upper and lower bores extending axially into the upper and lower ends thereof,

each plug having an imperforate diaphragm interposed between said upper and lower bores, a reduced sleeve portion on each plug projecting downwardly therefrom around said lower bore, 7 said lower bore having an enlarged portion immediately below said diaphragm for receiving the remains of the diaphragm when punctured in tapping s-aid container.

3. A closure plug for a can,

said'plug comprising a plug member formed in one piece from soft resilient rubberlike material,

said member being generally circular in cross section and having an annular peripheral groove therein,

annular flanges on said plug member above and below said groove, e

upper and lower generally cylindrical openings extending axially into the upper and lower ends of said member,

said member having an imperforate diaphragm interposed between said upper and lower openings,

a reduced sleeve portion'projecting downwardly from said member around said lower opening,

and an enlarged annular recess in said lower opening immediately below said diaphragm for receiving the remains of the diaphragm when punctured by a tapping pipe or the like.

4. A can having a wall with an opening therein,

a soft resilientrubberlike plug received in said opening for initially sealing said can,

means on said plug for retaining said plug in said openan axial bore extending upwardly partway through said plug from the lower end thereof,

said plug having an imperforate diaphragm closing the upper end of said bore,

a reduced sleeve portion extending downwardly from said plug around said bore,

a tapping pipe extending downwardly into said can through said diaphragm andsaid bore,

the initial diameter of said bore within said sleeve portion being substantially smaller than the diameter of said pipe whereby said sleeve portion is stretched substantially around said pipe when said pipe is inserted through said bore,

said sleeve portion thereby tightly gripping said pipe,

said bore having an enlarged portion adjacent the upper end thereof and immediately below said diaphragm for receiving the partially severed remnant of the diaphragm when punctured by said pipe.

5. Aclosure plug for a can,

said plug comprising a plug member of soft resilient rubberlike material,

said member being generally circular in cross section,

upper and lower generally cylindrical openings extending axially into the upper and lower ends of said member, p

said member having an imperforate diaphragm interposed between said upper and lower openings,

and an enlarged annular recess in said lower opening immediately below said diaphragm for receiving the a remains of the diaphragm when punctured by a tapping pipe or the like.

" a generally cylindrical opening extending axially into the lower end of said member, said member having an imperforate diaphragm closing the upper end of said opening,

' and an enlarged annular recess in said opening immediately below said diaphragm for receiving the remains of the diaphragm when punctured by a tapping pipe or the like.

7. A closure plug for a can,

said plug comprising 'a plug member formed from soft resilient rubberlike material, said member being generally circular in cross section, a generally cylindrical opening extending axially into the lower end of said member, said member having an imperforate diaphragmclosing the upper end of said opening, a reduced sleeve portion projecting downwardly from said member around said opening, and an enlarged annular recess in said opening immediately below said diaphragm for receiving the remains of the diaphragm when punctured by a tapping pipe or the like. 8. A can having a wall with an opening therein, a soft resilient rubberlike plug received in said opening for initially sealing said can, means on said plug for retaining said plug in said opens, an axial bore extending upwardly part way through said plug from the lower end thereof, I said plug having an imperforate diaphragm closing the upper end of said bore,

and'a tapping pipe extending downwardly into'said can through said diaphragm and said bore,

said bore having an enlarged portion adjacent the upper end thereof and immediately below said diaphragm for receiving the partially severed remnant of the diaphragm when punctured by said pipe.

9. In a beverage dispenser, V

the combination comprising a tank for holding carbon dioxide under pressure,

a pressure reducing and regulating valve connected to said tank, V

a metal beverage can having a cylindrical side wall with a botom wall and a top wall secured thereto,

a faucet adapted to discharge the beverage,

said can having firstand second substantially circular openings in said top wall,

first and second generally circular rubberlike plugs mounted in said openings, each plug in its initial state'having an imperforate diaphragm portion,

a first tapping pipe penetrating the diaphragmof said first plug and extending into said can to admit carbon dioxide to said can,

the lower end of said first pipe extending only a short distance below said first plug into said can,

a first flexible hose connected between said regulating valve and said first pipe for conducting carbon dioxide thereto,

a check valve connected into said first hose for preventing any reverse flow of the. beverage from said can into said regulating valve,

a second tapping pipe penetrating the diaphragm of said second plug and extending downwardly into said can to a. point adjacent the'bottom thereof,

and a second flexible hose connected between said second pipe and said faucet for carrying the beverage from said can to said faucet.

10. In a beverage dispenser,

the combination comprising a tank for holding carbon dioxide under pressure,

a pressure reducing and regulating valve connected to said tank,

a metal beverage can having a cylindrical side wall with a bottom wall and a top wall secured thereto,

a faucet adapted to discharge the beverage,

first and second tapping pipes extending into said beverage can through said top wall,

tapping plug means for sealing said tapping pipes into said top Wall,

the lower end of said first tapping pipe extending only a short distance below said top wall and into said can,

said second tapping pipe extending downwardly into said can to a point adjacent the bottom wall thereof,

a first flexible hose connected between said regulating valve and said first tapping pipe for conducting carbon dioxide thereto,

a check valve connected into said first hose for preventing any reverse fiow of the beverage from said can into said regulating valve,

and a second flexible hose connected between said second faucet for carrying the beverage from said can to said faucet.

11. In a beverage dispenser,

the combination comprising a tank for holding carbon dioxide under pressure,

a pressure reducing and regulating valve connected to said tank,

a metal beverage can having a cylindrical side wall with a bottom wall and a top wall secured thereto,

a faucet adapted to discharge the beverage,

first and second tapping pipes extending into said beverage can through said top wall,

means for removably sealing said tapping pipes into said top wall,

the lower end of said first tapping pipe extending only a short distance below said top wall and into said can,

said second tapping pipe extending downwardly into said can to a point adjacent the bottom wall thereof,

a first flexible hose connected between said regulating valve and said first tapping pipe for conducting carbon dioxide thereto,

a check valve connected into said first hose for pre venting any reverse flow of the beverage from said can into said regulating valve,

and a second flexible hose connected between said second faucet for carrying the beverage from said can to said faucet.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,400,955 5/46 Samel 222131 X 2,630,259 3/53 Stein et al. 222-131 X 2,773,722 12/56 Abplanalp 22282 2,834,190 5/58 Andrews et al. 222l29.1 X 2,851,201 9/58 Poitras et al. 222541 X 2,956,418 10/60 McCann.

3,004,687 10/61 Gerfen 222-82 RAPHAEL M. LUPO, Primary Examiner.

LOUIS J, DEMBO, Examiner.

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WO2000056657A1 *Mar 13, 2000Sep 28, 2000Michel DelcourtSelf-contained mobile or fixed cool drink dispenser
WO2003045818A1 *Nov 21, 2002Jun 5, 2003Vin Valet Inc'wine or champagne preservation and dispensing apparatus'
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/82, 222/541.2, 222/146.6, 222/146.1, 222/129.1, 62/390, 222/131
International ClassificationB67D1/00, B67D1/04, F25D23/12
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/04, F25D23/126
European ClassificationF25D23/12B, B67D1/04