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Publication numberUS3196079 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 20, 1965
Filing dateOct 5, 1959
Priority dateOct 5, 1959
Publication numberUS 3196079 A, US 3196079A, US-A-3196079, US3196079 A, US3196079A
InventorsMilton Blaustein
Original AssigneePhillips Petroleum Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cosmetic powder compositions containing polyethylene
US 3196079 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,1%,tl7 C'GSMETKQ EQWBER Ctlil/llllSl'llfiNS CQNTAHNENG LGLYETHYZENE Milton Eiausteiu, Eartlesviile, Gide assignor to Phillips Petroleum ompany, a corporation of Delaware No Drawing. Filed Oct. 5, E59, fier. No. 844,212 Claims. (Cl. 167-92) This invention relates to novel cosmetic or dusting powders, and relates more particularly to cosmetic pow der preparations, such as compact powders, cream powders, cake make-up, cosmetic stockings, powder rouge, compact powder rouge, bath powders, baby powders, deodorizer powders, and the like, containing as one oi the principal ingredients thereof a finely divided polyolefin. In accordance with one aspect, this invention relates to novel cosmetic powder preparations having improved and desirable properties comprising, as one of the principal ingredients thereof, a finely divided or pulverulent high density, highly crystalline polyeth lene.

Cosmetic powder preparations such as womens face powder, compact powders, bath powders, and the like, and methods of their preparation, is an age-old art. Various cosmetic preparations have either been proposed or tried, but many of these preparations have certain undesirable properties or shortcomings. For example, many cosmedc powders contain materials that irritate sensitive skins. Other preparations are not dye receptive, exhibit poor adhesion, distribute poorly when applied to the shin, do not have good covering power, or some other poor quality. Therefore, there is an ever present need for cosmetic powder preparations that do not have the above-noted undesirable qualities. In accordance with the present invention, a novel cosmetic powder preparation is provided having very desirable cosmetic properties imparted thereto which comprises adding a finely divided polyolefin as a substitute for talc in said preparations.

Accordingly, an object of this invention is to provide a novel cosmetic powder having novel and desirable cosmetic properties.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel cosmetic powder having desirable properties containing a finely divided polyoleiin.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel cosmetic powder preparation containing a finely divided polyolefin, such as polyethylene, that is compatible with and nonirritating toward livin animal tissue, especially human tissue.

Another obglect of this invention is to provide a method for imparting the desired color to cosmetic powder preparations.

Other aspects, objects, as well as the several advantag-2s of the invention are apparent from a study of the disclosure a d the appended claims.

In accordance with the present invention, novel cosmetic powder preparations such as face powders, cream powders, cake makeup, hath powders, deodorizer powders, baby p wders, and the like, havin very desirable cosmetic properties or qualities are provided comprising as one of the principal ingredients thereof a finely divided or pulverized high density, highly crystalline polyolefin, such as polyethylene, as a substitute for talc norma ly employed in said preparations.

More specifically, in accordance with the present invention, I have found that cosmetic powders containing, as the base or principal ingredient thereof, a finely divided or pulverulent high density, highly crystalline polyolefin, such as polyethylene, as a substitute for talc in the preparations, exhibit very desirable cosmetic properties, especially with regard to color characteristics, lack of irritation to even sensitive human skins, good adhesion, good covering, good absorbency and distribution qualities, and the like, as well as being quite readily prepared. The polyethylene is preferably free of waterleachable irritant impurities such as antioxidants and catalyst residues in order to prevent irritation of human skin.

Poly-olefins, especially polyethylene, that can be employed in the practice of the present invention are the high density, highly crystalline polymers prepared by any of the methods presently known in the art. One method of preparing these polymers is described and claimed in Hogan et al. US. Patent No. 2,825,721. This particular method employs a chromium oxide catalyst, preferably containing hexavalent chromium associated with a material selected from the group consisting of silica, alumina, zirconia, and thoria, and composites thereof. The polyolefins, especially polyethylcnes, prepared by the Hogan et a1. method are characterized by havin an unsaturation which is principally either trans-internal or terminahvinyl, depending on the particular process conditions employed. The polyethylene prepared by this method is also characterized by its high density and high percentage of crystallinity at normal atmospheric temperatures.

in addition to the foregoing Hogan et al. method, the invention also includes within its scope the use of polyethylenes prepared by the conventional high pressure methods and other methods which are well known in the art.

While the invention is applicable generally to polyethylene prepared by any of the known methods, it finds particular application in the use of high density, highly crystalline polyethylenes, namely, polyethylene having a density of at least 6.940, preferably 0.950 to (3.980, a crystallinity of at least 78 percent, preferably 86 to 95 percent, a molecular wei ht in the range 35,000 to 108,069, a melting point or" approximately 250265 F. and a softening point of about 265 F. or higher, prepared by the method and utilizing the catalyst set forth in Hogan et al.

Density is determined as follows: a thick slab is compression molded by heating the polymer between suitable press platens, maintained at a temperature of 325 F. for 5 minutes, and then pressing the polymer at 29300 psi. Cooling water is then circulated through the platens so as to provide a cooling rate of from -50" F. per minute. A small pea-size specimen is cut from the prepared slab. The density is determined by the height at which the sample floats in an ethyl alcoholwater gradient column whose density at all levels is known. The density is reported as the value corrected to 23 C.

The crystallinity values are based upon measurements of nuclear magnetic resonance at approximately 75 F. The procedure which is followed to prepare the sample for test and to insure a close approach to equilibrium, is to (1) heat tie polymer to a temperature about 50 C. above the crystalline melting point; (2) maintain the polymer at that temperature for approximately one hour, and (3) cool the polymer to room temperature at a rate characterized by a fall of 1.50 C. per minute at 135 C. This entire procedure is carried out in an environment essentially free of oxygen, e.g., nitrogen.

The amount of polyethylene added to the cosmetic powder preparation generally is in the range of between about 20 and about 90 weight percent of the final composition. However, amounts of polyethylene in finely divided form outside the above noted ranges can be employed, depending upon the particular cosrnetic preparation being prepared. For example, face powders will contain from about to about 80 weight percent, compact powders less than weight percent,

n, 9 cream powders about 20 weight percent, powder rouge about 80 weight percent, and bath powders 90, or more, weight percent. The polyethylene prior to incorporation into the cosmetic powder preparation should be subdivided to a particle size of about 300-mesh and preferably about 325-mesh. The mesh size can be determined in accordance with US. Standard Sieve sizes.

The polyethylene can be pulverized by any suitable method known in the art. For example, micro-pulverizers, refrigerated pulverizers, such as CO pulverizers, and the like, can be employed to obtain the desired particle size of polyethylene. The polyethylene to be pulverized is preferably colored with a dye prior to pulverizing since incorporation of a dye with the polymer in a molten state results in a better distribution of the coloring dye than can be obtained by mixing the dye with the dry powdery materials.

As noted before, in accordance with the present invention, finely divided polyethylene has been found to be an excellent and even improved substitute for talc in cosmetic powder preparations. Therefore, wherever talc is normally employed in cosmetic powder preparations, the utilization of finely divided polyethylene in the same proportions is contemplated within the scope of the present invention.

After the solid polyethylene has been pulverized to obtain the desired sized particles in finely divided form, the finely divided polyethylene, which is preferably colored with a dye prior to pulverization, is mixed with the other ingredients of the cosmetic preparation and thoroughly agitated to obtain a uniform mixture. Various inorganic materials such as titanium dioxide, colloidal clay, zinc oxide, magnesium oxide, metallic soaps, precipitated chalk, purified kaolin, and the like, together with other materials needed to obtain the desired formulation are intimately mixed with the finely divided polyethylene in the usual manner. Perfume is generally added to the final cosmetic mixture to give the desired scent before the mixture is packaged. Following this, the perfumed mixture is then packaged and ready for market.

The following are three typical cosmetic face powder formulations employing finely divided polyethylene as a substitute for talc.

TABLE Typical Recipe, Percent by Wt. in Ingredient Light Medium Heavy Chalk (precipitated) 8 10 8 8 35 6 6 Kaolin 20 6 4 80 Magnesium carbonate 6 2 Magnesium stearate 7 4 Polyethylene 75 80 70 30 Titanium dioxide- 3 4 Zinc oxide 7 5 2 25 20 Zinc stcarate 7 5 6 5 5 8 Color and perfume omitted in table. The following example illustrates a satisfactory method of carrying out the present invention.

Example l polyethylene and this admixture is then cooled to solidify the colored polymer. The solid colored polyethylene is then ground in a micro-pulverizer until polyethylene particles that will pass through about a 300-mesh sieve are obtained.

The finely divided colored polyethylene particles are then thoroughly mixed with precipitated chalk, kaolin, titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, and zinc stearate to produce a medium grade face powder having approximately the following Weight percent of each of the ingredients:

TABLE Ingredient: Weight percent Chalk 8 Kaolin 6 Polyethylene 72 Titanium dioxide 6 Zinc oxide 2 Zinc stearate 6 Total 100 After the above mixture is thoroughly agitated, a small amount of perfume to give the desired scent is added, and then the face powder is packaged and ready for shipment.

The above face powder can be applied even to the most sensitive skin, since the polyethylene in the powder is not allergenic or abrasive. Also, the above powder distributes very easily when applied to the skin and also exhibits good adhesion and absorbency. Further, the coloring of the final preparation is excellent since a better blend of coloring is obtainable by mixing the dye with the molten polymer than can be obtained when adding a dye to a dry mix.

Reasonable variation and modification are possible within the scope of the foregoing disclosure and the appended claims to the invention, the essense of which is that high density, highly crystalline polyethylenes in finely divided or pulverulent form have been found to be an excellent substitute for talc in cosmetic powder compositions or preparations.

I claim:

1. A face powder composition consisting essentially of about 30 to about weight percent of a finely divided cosmetically acceptable polyethylene of about 300 mesh size particles having a density ranging from 0.950 to 0.980 and a crystallinity ranging from 80 to 95 percent and minor amounts of chalk, kaolin, titanium dioxide, Zinc oxide, zinc stearate, and perfume.

2. The composition according to claim 1 wherein said polyethylene particles are colored with a dye prior to incorporation into said composition.

3. A cosmetic powder composition consisting essentially of about 20 to about weight percent of a finely divided cosmetically acceptable polyethylene of about 300 mesh size particles having a density ranging from 0.950 to 0.980 and a crystaliinity ranging from 80 to 90 percent and minor amounts of chalk, kaolin, titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, zinc stearate, and perfume.

4. A method of improving the appearance of human epidermis which comprises applying to said human epidermis a powder composition comprising about 20 to about 90 weight percent of a finely divided cosmetically acceptable polyethylene of about 300 mesh size particles having a density ranging from 0.950 to 0.980 and a crystallinity ranging from 80 to percent and minor amounts of chalk, kaolin, titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, and zinc stearate, and perfume.

5. The method of claim 4 wherein said polyethylene particles are colored with a dye prior to incorporation into said powder composition.

(References on following page) 5 6 Refei'ences Citefl by the Examiner OTHER REFERENCES UNITED STATES PATENTS De Navarre, Chem. and Manuf. of 008., D. Van 2,628,187 2/53 Frohmader et a1. 167-82 liosrrand, 1941, pp. 334, 2,718,473 9/55 Powers t 1 117 49 r Renfrew, Polyethylene, Ilifle and Sons Ltd., London, 2,801,225 7/57 Harding 26041 1957, pp. 51-65, 427428, 4-32, 438. 2,858,299 10/53 GuZZfitta Schimmel Briefs, Schimmel & Co., N.Y., No. 293,

FOREIGN PATENTS Aug 1959, 1 P 967,860 12/57 Germany. 7 n 150010 5 1 5 Ge many 10 JULIAN S. LEVI'IT, P1 mmly Exammvr. 1,010,535 3/52 Fra MORRIS 0. WOLK, WILLIAM B. KNIGHT, LEWIS 1,121,394 4/56 France. GOTTS, Examiners.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3383320 *Aug 10, 1965May 14, 1968Avisun CorpDetergent bar
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Classifications
U.S. Classification424/63, 424/69, 524/586
International ClassificationA61K8/81, A61K8/72, A61Q1/12
Cooperative ClassificationA61Q1/12, A61K8/8111
European ClassificationA61K8/81C2, A61Q1/12